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  • 1.
    Eneland, David Eneland
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies, Thematic Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Laborativt arbete i grundskolans senare år: En fenomenografisk studie om lärares uppfattningar om syftena i naturorienterande ämnen.2012Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med studien är undersöka lärares uppfattningar om syftena med laborativt arbete i naturvetenskap. Frågeställningar som besvaras i arbetet är hur yrkesverksamma NO-lärare uppfattar syftena med laborativt arbete och hur lärarna uppfattar att deras elever blir involverade i laborationens syfte. Metoden som användes var av fenomenografisk karaktär där fyra lärare intervjuades. Resultatet som framkom visar bland annat att lärares uppfattningar om syftena är att ”labbvana” och koppling mellan teori är viktiga syften för laborativt arbete. Vidare framkom även en avsaknad av ”undersökande arbetssätt” som annars bör vara en central del av laborativt arbete. Enligt lärarnas uppfattningar så var det genom tydlighet från lärare som fick eleverna involverade i lärarnas syfte. I Diskussionen problematiseras resultatet och vad det kan innebära för kommande studier.

  • 2.
    Jidesjö, Anders
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies, Thematic Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    En problematisering av ungdomars intresse för naturvetenskap och teknik i skola och samhälle: Innehåll, medierna och utbildningens funktion2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Science and technology are important parts of culture. Thus today there is a need for a science education which promotes ‘science for all’ and ‘scientific literacy’ in order to prepare students for citizenship. Earlier studies indicate that many students find it hard to learn science and technology in school. They lack interest in it and have negative attitudes toward science and technology. There are also differences between the interests of girls and boys, as has been known for a long time.

    Recent research indicates that the concepts used in discussions of how to promote scientific literacy are too broad and underdeveloped. Science has mainly been taught for the purpose of preparing a few for further studies and has neglected the task of preparing all for citizenship. There has also been too little consideration of the relation of science literacy to specific science content. Historically, almost the same science content has been taught as is taught today. Science in society has been separated from science in school.

    Commonly used concepts like ‘science’, ‘school subjects’, ‘students’, ‘interest’ and ‘attitudes’ are too broad to be used in meaningful discussion. Research results show a need for a stronger connection between specific content and students’ experiences outside school. In addition, there is a need to understand societal development and the mechanisms of media and modernity.

    This thesis investigates student perspectives on science and technology within the affective domain of science education. The work has been carried out as part of Swedish participation in the worldwide Relevance of Science Education (ROSE) project. The empirical work presented in this thesis is extensive, and also takes into account teachers’ perspectives, the age of students, and a social theory of media.

    The results show that students do have an interest in science and technology, with age and sex affecting their interest in specific content. However, broad concepts like ‘science’ or ‘girls’ and ‘boys’ obscure the differences that emerge from a content level analysis. Students are different and their interest is content specific. Furthermore, the results show that student interest is not in line with what their teachers say they present for instruction. Teachers’ selection of science content and their encounters with students are discussed as important elements in science education research. In addition, the results indicate that students’ interests are more in line with the science presented in the media. Experiences outside school were shown to be related to different science content, which has an effect on choices for upper secondary education.

    These results are related to an overall purpose in which a social theory of the media is used to critically reflect on how modernity has led to mediated mechanisms affecting the content of science and technology. Mediated experiences and processes of reception are identified as important mechanisms in the way different people relate to specific content, which creates new conditions for science education.

    The results are discussed in relation to societal development and different understandings of the purpose of science education. The theoretical media approach demonstrates ways that young people’s interest in science and technology becomes involved with mediated mechanisms through popularized forms of science and through the move to what is known as ‘public understanding of science’. This situation changes an individual’s options when relating to available content and creates new conditions for science education. In this thesis, critical and reflective attention is paid to the relationship between science in school and science in society. This way of portraying the results directs the existing attention to pupil’s voice in science education in another direction. An expression of a lack of interest from an individual is interpreted as if there has been a mistake in the way science is presented.

    List of papers
    1. Science for all or science for some: What Swedish students want to learn about in secondary science and technology and their opinions on science lessons
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Science for all or science for some: What Swedish students want to learn about in secondary science and technology and their opinions on science lessons
    2009 (English)In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, Vol. 5, no 2, 213-229 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents Swedish results from ‘the Relevance of Science Education’ (ROSE) study, which is a large world wide comparative research project based at the University of Oslo. The Swedish sample consisted of 751 students, most of whom were 15 years old, from 29 schools and data were collected in spring 2003. Student opinions about science lessons are presented in relation to enrolment intentions for upper secondary school together with what they want to learn about in science and technology. The findings indicate that secondary science instruction seems to address only a minority of the students, those that have chosen science or technology in their further education. At the same time, all students have interest in science and technology and many seem most interested in some important issues in societal development. The results are discussed from the perspective of learners and contribute to the debate about establishing a scientific literacy approach in compulsory education.

    National Category
    Didactics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-51544 (URN)
    Available from: 2009-11-05 Created: 2009-11-05 Last updated: 2012-06-21Bibliographically approved
    2. Science in society or science in school: Swedish secondary school science teachers' beliefs about science and science lessons in comparison with what their students want to learn
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Science in society or science in school: Swedish secondary school science teachers' beliefs about science and science lessons in comparison with what their students want to learn
    2009 (English)In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, Vol. 5, no 1, 18-34 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents comparisons concerned with secondary school science teachers’ and their students’ beliefs about science and technology and also what science content secondary science teachers teach and what their students want to learn. Student data are part of the Relevance of Science Education (ROSE) study and the teacher data are part of an extensive study carried out only in Sweden. The results indicate that both secondary science teachers and their students are optimistic about science and technology as essential parts of societal development. When content from these knowledge fields is considered for instruction, significant disparities exist between what teachers teach and what their students want to learn. Additional results concerning the secondary science teachers’ beliefs, ‘out-of-school experiences’, ‘Science Technology and Society’ (STS) approaches and ‘inquiry-based instruction’ are pointed out as important for the development of science instruction in secondary schools. The results are discussed in the contexts of students’ voices and teachers’ beliefs.

    National Category
    Didactics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-18303 (URN)
    Available from: 2009-05-17 Created: 2009-05-17 Last updated: 2012-06-20Bibliographically approved
    3. Different content orientations in science and technology among primary and secondary boys and girls in Sweden: Implications for the transition from primary to secondary school?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different content orientations in science and technology among primary and secondary boys and girls in Sweden: Implications for the transition from primary to secondary school?
    2008 (English)In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, Vol. 4, no 2, 192-208 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents Swedish results from the Relevance of Science Education (ROSE) study, which is part of a large world-wide comparative research study based at the University of Oslo. The national sample was collected in spring 2003 and originates from 751 students from 29 schools, most of whom were 15 years old. In an additional study data from primary students were collected in spring 2005, with a smaller sample of 112. Significant differences in content orientation between the primary and secondary boys and girls were found and are discussed in the context of young people’s interest in science and technology and the public function of those knowledge fields as a part of education. Earlier studies suggest the benefit of more applicative contexts as the children move through compulsory school. This statement is challenged to some degree in this paper and a stronger need to understand how the transition from primary to secondary level and specific contents are related is discussed. This is due to indications that students’ content orientations are partially dependant on age and there are significant differences due to gender to consider. A deeper examination of those elements can assist in the understanding of the relevance of science from the learners’ perspectives.

    National Category
    Didactics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-43624 (URN)74445 (Local ID)74445 (Archive number)74445 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2012-06-20
    4. Students’ interest in science and technology as a function of science in society: Mediated experience and the public understanding of science
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students’ interest in science and technology as a function of science in society: Mediated experience and the public understanding of science
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Young people’s interest in science and technology has long been an object for research. Cultural aspects and informal learning have been identified as important factors to be considered. In this study comparative content analysis is used to compare what secondary students want to learn about in science and technology with the topics covered in international popular science television. Important similarities are identified. The results are discussed from the perspective of media theory in terms of modernity affecting young people’s experience as a result of the popularization of science by communication media. The role of public understanding of science is identified and the importance of difference between science in society and science in school is elaborated on. The work has implications for future research, for interpretation and categorization of the results of such research, and for understanding student’s encounters with school science.

    Keyword
    Students’ interest, science, media
    National Category
    Other Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-78786 (URN)
    Available from: 2012-06-20 Created: 2012-06-20 Last updated: 2012-06-21Bibliographically approved
    5. Student experience and interest in science: Connections and implication for further education
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Student experience and interest in science: Connections and implication for further education
    2016 (English)In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 12, no 1, 36-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Students’ problems with learning science in school have been documented for a long time. Differences in student interest in and attitudes towards science due to gender and age are well documented. Fewer studies have focused on the details at a content level. This paper presents a statistical analysis of student interest in specific content areas and combines this with student experience of science and science-related activities outside school. The result shows that interest and experience are significantly linked and influence student choices for upper secondary education. The results are presented on both a detailed content and experience level, and are discussed in relation to the purpose of compulsory science education and in relation to experiences outside school. The study is an important addition to the discussion about establishing a science education curriculum that can both prepare students for future science studies and meet the need for a public understanding of science.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oslo: Universitetet i Oslo, 2016
    Keyword
    Students’ interest, experience, science, PCA, cluster analysis
    National Category
    Other Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-78787 (URN)
    Available from: 2012-06-20 Created: 2012-06-20 Last updated: 2016-06-02Bibliographically approved
  • 3.
    Jidesjö, Anders
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies, Thematic Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Students’ interest in science and technology as a function of science in society: Mediated experience and the public understanding of scienceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Young people’s interest in science and technology has long been an object for research. Cultural aspects and informal learning have been identified as important factors to be considered. In this study comparative content analysis is used to compare what secondary students want to learn about in science and technology with the topics covered in international popular science television. Important similarities are identified. The results are discussed from the perspective of media theory in terms of modernity affecting young people’s experience as a result of the popularization of science by communication media. The role of public understanding of science is identified and the importance of difference between science in society and science in school is elaborated on. The work has implications for future research, for interpretation and categorization of the results of such research, and for understanding student’s encounters with school science.

  • 4.
    Jidesjö, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies, Thematic Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Danielsson, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Student experience and interest in science: Connections and implication for further education2016In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 12, no 1, 36-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students’ problems with learning science in school have been documented for a long time. Differences in student interest in and attitudes towards science due to gender and age are well documented. Fewer studies have focused on the details at a content level. This paper presents a statistical analysis of student interest in specific content areas and combines this with student experience of science and science-related activities outside school. The result shows that interest and experience are significantly linked and influence student choices for upper secondary education. The results are presented on both a detailed content and experience level, and are discussed in relation to the purpose of compulsory science education and in relation to experiences outside school. The study is an important addition to the discussion about establishing a science education curriculum that can both prepare students for future science studies and meet the need for a public understanding of science.

1 - 4 of 4
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