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  • 1.
    Ahlsén, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Eklund, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Språk, hjärnan och kognition2012In: Kognitionsvetenskap / [ed] Jens Allwood & Mikael Jensen, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, 1, 437-552 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kognitionsvetenskap är den första boken på svenska som beskriver kärnan i kognitionsvetenskap - att förstå hur människor tänker. Den spänner därmed över ett brett tvärvetenskapligt fält som inrymmer filosofi, lingvistik, psykologi, antropologi, datavetenskap och neuro­vetenskap. Författarna beskriver hur ämnet har vuxit fram och hur man kan studera kognition utifrån filosofiska, psykologiska och neurovetenskapliga aspekter. Även språkvetenskapliga och sociala aspekter på tänkande presenteras. Författarna tar dessutom upp relationen mellan mänskligt tänkande och djurs tänkande, samt utvecklingen av kognition från barndom till vuxen ålder. Avslutningsvis berörs flera aspekter av tänkande i förhållande till teknologi, både som stöd för tänkande och som simulering av tänkande.

    Boken vänder sig till studenter som läser introduktionskurs eller grundkurs i kognitionsvetenskap, men är även lämplig för beteendevetenskapliga eller språkinriktade utbildningar. Den kan även vara av intresse för alla som vill förstå mer om mänskligt tänkande.

  • 2.
    Akbarzadeh, Parisa
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. pania1359.
    Comparing music, lyrics, and singing in teaching Swedish children the phonetics of English2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout time, teachers, philosophers and scientists have recognized the valuable place of music for language learning and correct pronunciation. There are many researches over the last twenty years who has worked on different theories of language learning through different strategies. Many of the researchers find the pedagogical relations between language and music. The first part of this pilot study focuses on the factors that influence learning the second language as English by different theories. The study continues on comparing different strategies of learning the phonetics and correct pronunciation of English words by examining their learning through different ways such as hearing and reading.

  • 3.
    Amir, Alia
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Self-policing in the English as a Foreign Language classroom2013In: Novitas-ROYAL, ISSN 1307-4733, Vol. 7, no 2, 84-105 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explores how classroom participants invoke a monolingual target-language policy in an English as a foreign language (EFL) classroom, specifically focusing on one method of doing language policy through self-initiated language policing sequences, which I have called self-policing. Language policing refers to the mechanism deployed by the teacher and/or the pupils to (re-)establish the normatively prescribed medium of classroom interaction (Amir & Musk, 2013; cf. Bonacina & Gafaranga, 2011). The data comes from sequential analyses of 20 hours of video recordings in grades 8 & 9 of an international compulsory school in Sweden between the years 2007-2010. Drawing on Auer (1984) and Gafaranga’s (1999) organisational code-switching framework, this study sheds light on how teachers and pupils self-initiate a switch to English in their interactions. As will be demonstrated, both teachers and pupils, while orienting to the English-only norm, use a three-step sequence for language policing.

  • 4.
    Amir, Alia
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Doing Language Policy: A Micro-Interactional Study of Policy Practices in English as a Foreign Language Classes2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates foreign language classroom talk and micro-level language policy-in-process from an ethnomethodological conversation analytic perspective. The study is based on 20 hours of video recordings from 20 lessons in an English as a Foreign Language classroom (EFL) in grades 8 and 9 of an international compulsory school in Sweden between the years 2007 and 2010. The main purpose of the study is to shed light on some of the distinguishing features of how a target-language-only policy is materialised in situ in a foreign language classroom. The study demonstrates the relative ease with which teachers and pupils uphold a strict language policy in the classroom, but also the considerable interactional work that is done, by both teachers and pupils, in cases where upholding the policy becomes problematic. An interactional phenomenon which arises in such cases is language policing, where the teacher or pupils restore the policy-prescribed linguistic order. Such sequences are analysed in detail. The study increases our understanding of how language policy is lived out in practice, through interaction in the classroom.

    List of papers
    1. Language policing: Micro-level language policy-in-process in the foreign language classroom
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Language policing: Micro-level language policy-in-process in the foreign language classroom
    2013 (English)In: Classroom Discourse, ISSN 1946-3014, E-ISSN 1946-3022, Vol. 4, no 2, 151-167 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines what we call micro-level language policy-in-process – that is, how a target-language-only policy emerges in situ in the foreign language classroom. More precisely, we investigate the role of language policing, the mechanism deployed by the teacher and/or pupils to (re-)establish the normatively prescribed target language as the medium of classroom interaction in the English as a foreign language classroom of an international school in Sweden. Using ethnomethodological conversation analysis, we have identified a regular three-step sequence for language policing: (1) a (perceived) breach of the target-language-only rule, (2) an act of language policing and (3) an orientation to the target-language-only rule, usually in the guise of medium switching to the target language. Focusing primarily on teacher-to-pupil policing, where the teacher polices pupils’ (perceived) use of their L1 (Swedish), we identify three different categories of teacher-policing. These categories are based on particular configurations of features deployed in the three steps, such as initiator techniques (e.g.reminders, prompts, warnings and sanctions) and pupils’ responses to being policed (e.g. compliance or contestation).

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Routledge, 2013
    Keyword
    conversation analysis, classroom interaction, practiced language policy, code-switching, language policing.
    National Category
    Specific Languages Learning
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-96370 (URN)10.1080/19463014.2013.783500 (DOI)
    Available from: 2013-08-15 Created: 2013-08-15 Last updated: 2017-02-09Bibliographically approved
    2. Self-policing in the English as a Foreign Language classroom
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-policing in the English as a Foreign Language classroom
    2013 (English)In: Novitas-ROYAL, ISSN 1307-4733, Vol. 7, no 2, 84-105 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explores how classroom participants invoke a monolingual target-language policy in an English as a foreign language (EFL) classroom, specifically focusing on one method of doing language policy through self-initiated language policing sequences, which I have called self-policing. Language policing refers to the mechanism deployed by the teacher and/or the pupils to (re-)establish the normatively prescribed medium of classroom interaction (Amir & Musk, 2013; cf. Bonacina & Gafaranga, 2011). The data comes from sequential analyses of 20 hours of video recordings in grades 8 & 9 of an international compulsory school in Sweden between the years 2007-2010. Drawing on Auer (1984) and Gafaranga’s (1999) organisational code-switching framework, this study sheds light on how teachers and pupils self-initiate a switch to English in their interactions. As will be demonstrated, both teachers and pupils, while orienting to the English-only norm, use a three-step sequence for language policing.

    Keyword
    Classroom interaction, code-switching, conversation analysis, language policy, English as a Foreign Language (EFL), language in education policy (LIEP)
    National Category
    Educational Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100197 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-10-30 Created: 2013-10-30 Last updated: 2013-11-12Bibliographically approved
    3. Pupils Doing Language Policy: Micro-interactional insights from the English as a foreign language classroom
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pupils Doing Language Policy: Micro-interactional insights from the English as a foreign language classroom
    2014 (English)In: Apples - Journal of Applied Language Studies, ISSN 1457-9863, Vol. 8, no 2, 93-113 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we examine instances of the methods pupils deploy to do language policy in an English as a foreign language classroom in Sweden, where there is a locally practised English-only rule. Although we exemplify some more tacit methods of constructing a monolingual classroom (Slotte-Lüttge 2007), we focus primarily on instances where pupils police other pupils and on occasion even the teacher, when they are perceived not to be upholding the rule. This blatantly explicit method of pupils doing language policy, which we term language policing, generally serves to (re-)establish and maintain English as the medium of interaction and instruction. The data for this study consists of video-recordings of 18 EFL lessons in an International Swedish school and was collected in grade 8 and 9 classes (15-16 year olds) between the years 2007-2010. In order to reveal the interactional orientations of the participants in situ (Seedhouse, 1998:101), conversation analysis has been used to identify and analyse naturally occurring cases of pupils doing language policy. By discussing the analyses with reference to different policing trajectories, how participants employ a range of initiator techniques, and the nature and distribution of their policing methods, for example, we elucidate the empirical basis for our subcategories of pupil- initiated policing. We also relate language policing practices to the maintenance of a monolingual classroom and conclude that establishing and maintaining the English-only rule “sufficient[ly] for all practical purposes” is a routine matter (cf. Zimmerman 1971:227), since little language policing is needed to maintain it. In cases where the language rule is breached, both pupils and teacher play an active role in (re-)establishing themonolingual classroom.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Centre for Applied Language Studies, University of Jyväskylä, 2014
    Keyword
    Conversation Analysis, practiced language policy, language policing, English as a Foreign Language (EFL), codeswitching.
    National Category
    Educational Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109347 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-08-14 Created: 2014-08-14 Last updated: 2017-01-10Bibliographically approved
  • 5.
    Amir, Alia
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Language policing the purist and monolinguist beliefs in the English as a Second Language classroom2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    English is the official policy in the school (under observation) for English as a Second Language (ESL) Classroom. However, the participants here actually police each other’s and their own language choice to accomplish this language policy. Language policing here refers to the collaborative co-construction and orientation of the participants to the micro-level language policy in situ. The participants’ indigenous way of interpreting the official policy is negotiated, challenged and accomplished online. The official policy of the classroom is based on purist and monolinguist belief which entails that “English-only” is spoken in the classroom both by the teacher and the pupils. Swedish is deemed as a forbidden language. To keep “English-only” rule, however, alternate practices of policing emerge to avoid Swedish in the class. The study highlights the alternate practices displayed by the participants which emerge because of language policing.

    The empirical data of the study comprises of over 20 hours of video recordings of ESL classrooms in an International Swedish school. The data was collected between the years 2008-2010 in the grades 8 and 9. There are 17 incidences of language policing in the data. The English language teachers of this particular school follow an “English-only” policy which is enforced through a point system.

    The study aims to contribute to the research in the micro orientation of the second language (L2) classroom (Hellermann, 2008; Cekaite, 2006; Seedhouse, 2004). It is also an attempt to see how through talk and actions participants defy the policies in practice that are monolinguist and purist.

    References

    Cekaite, A. (2006) Getting started: Children’s participation and language learning in an L2 classroom. Tema Barn: Linköping Studies in Arts and Science.

    Hellermann, J. (2008) Social Actions for Classroom Language Learning. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.

    Seedhouse, P. (2004) The Interactional Architecture of the Language Classroom: A Conversation Analysis Perspective. Oxford. Blackwell.

  • 6.
    Amir, Alia
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Language Policing: a look at the micro-level policy practices of the second language classroom2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Amir, Alia
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The co-construction and negotiation of micro level language policy in an English as a second language classroom2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Amir, Alia
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture.
    Nature of repair in other-intiated language policing2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a recent interest in the practices dimension of language policy (Skilton-Sylvester, 2008; Vila I Moreno, 2008) in the field of language policy and planning (LPP).This interest has been ranging from a macro/micro contrast of language policy (Martin, 2009) to actual language practices to classroom practices with regards to school policy (Heller, 1996, 2001, 2007). A large number of studies deal with practices of language in education but to date there still is a gap in the research conducted in the language classrooms investigating the medium of classroom interaction in situ. The aim of this study is to fill the gap in foreign language teaching research with an ethnomethodological conversation analysis lens where the target language- only is the school policy. The practices of this ESL (English as a Second Language) classroom reveal the actual “medium of classroom interaction” which changes moment by moment and turn by turn. To keep the target language-only policy the participants switch the medium of talk of self and the other through language policing.

    The aim of this study is to focus on other-initiated language policing as a special repair practice. The nature of repair in this case is different from repair in general as the trouble in the talk-in-interaction in this case is the medium of talk. Preliminary results show that in each category of other-policing there are differing trajectories of repair.

    The empirical data for this study consists of 20 hours of video recordings in an international Swedish school. The data was collected in ESL classrooms in grade 8 and 9 between the years 2007-2010. A monolingual policy is followed by the English language teachers of this school in ESL classrooms, which is kept in place through a teacher versus pupils’ point system.

  • 9.
    Amir, Alia
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The language-policing practices constituting the emerging micro-level language policy-in-process in the EFL classroom: The example from a Swedish EFL classroom2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Amir, Alia
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Tracing micro-level language-policy in foreign language classrooms: a case study of English as a foreign language (EFL) in Sweden2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Amir, Alia
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Self-policing: How English-only is upheld in the foreign language classroom2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Amir, Alia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Musk, Nigel
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Modern Languages. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Language policing: Micro-level language policy-in-process in the foreign language classroom2013In: Classroom Discourse, ISSN 1946-3014, E-ISSN 1946-3022, Vol. 4, no 2, 151-167 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines what we call micro-level language policy-in-process – that is, how a target-language-only policy emerges in situ in the foreign language classroom. More precisely, we investigate the role of language policing, the mechanism deployed by the teacher and/or pupils to (re-)establish the normatively prescribed target language as the medium of classroom interaction in the English as a foreign language classroom of an international school in Sweden. Using ethnomethodological conversation analysis, we have identified a regular three-step sequence for language policing: (1) a (perceived) breach of the target-language-only rule, (2) an act of language policing and (3) an orientation to the target-language-only rule, usually in the guise of medium switching to the target language. Focusing primarily on teacher-to-pupil policing, where the teacher polices pupils’ (perceived) use of their L1 (Swedish), we identify three different categories of teacher-policing. These categories are based on particular configurations of features deployed in the three steps, such as initiator techniques (e.g.reminders, prompts, warnings and sanctions) and pupils’ responses to being policed (e.g. compliance or contestation).

  • 13.
    Amir, Alia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Musk, Nigel
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Modern Languages. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Pupils Doing Language Policy: Micro-interactional insights from the English as a foreign language classroom2014In: Apples - Journal of Applied Language Studies, ISSN 1457-9863, Vol. 8, no 2, 93-113 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we examine instances of the methods pupils deploy to do language policy in an English as a foreign language classroom in Sweden, where there is a locally practised English-only rule. Although we exemplify some more tacit methods of constructing a monolingual classroom (Slotte-Lüttge 2007), we focus primarily on instances where pupils police other pupils and on occasion even the teacher, when they are perceived not to be upholding the rule. This blatantly explicit method of pupils doing language policy, which we term language policing, generally serves to (re-)establish and maintain English as the medium of interaction and instruction. The data for this study consists of video-recordings of 18 EFL lessons in an International Swedish school and was collected in grade 8 and 9 classes (15-16 year olds) between the years 2007-2010. In order to reveal the interactional orientations of the participants in situ (Seedhouse, 1998:101), conversation analysis has been used to identify and analyse naturally occurring cases of pupils doing language policy. By discussing the analyses with reference to different policing trajectories, how participants employ a range of initiator techniques, and the nature and distribution of their policing methods, for example, we elucidate the empirical basis for our subcategories of pupil- initiated policing. We also relate language policing practices to the maintenance of a monolingual classroom and conclude that establishing and maintaining the English-only rule “sufficient[ly] for all practical purposes” is a routine matter (cf. Zimmerman 1971:227), since little language policing is needed to maintain it. In cases where the language rule is breached, both pupils and teacher play an active role in (re-)establishing themonolingual classroom.

  • 14.
    Andrén, Mats
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Sanne, Johan M.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linell, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Striking the Balance between Formality and Informality in Safety-Critical Communication: The Case of Train Traffic Control Calls2010In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, Vol. 42, no 1, 220-241 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Talk in safety-critical activities displays features that distinguish it from both ordinaryconversations as well as from other institutional talk, but it also shares some features with these.Formality and informality are both interactionally accomplished phenomena, but they are shapedthrough different sources. Safety rules and pre-printed forms constitute two sources offormalization, dictating how to carry out communicative exchanges in certain types of situations,irrespective of the more specific circumstances in individual cases. Sources of informalization arethe participants’ need to adapt to situation-specific communicative needs, but also, ironicallyenough, routinization itself.In contemporary literature, safety-critical talk tends to be treated either in terms of strictadherence to a formal code, where all informalities are seen as potential sources of accidents, orinformalization is treated as natural and inevitable, focusing on routine conditions where they areapparently harmless. In this paper, based upon detailed analysis of telephone calls between traindrivers and dispatchers on the Swedish railway network, we propose a middle ground. We suggest acontingent theory of formalization, identifying four main types of informalizations, as well asdiscussing when and why they may be harmless and when they may be detrimental.

  • 15.
    Anward, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Om Hills metod2010In: Aiolos, ISSN 1400-7770, no 38-39, 49-64 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Anward, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Interaction and constructions2014In: Constructions, ISSN 1860-2010, no 1, 1-7 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I observe how a construction emerges, through a method of turn construction whichI call recycling with différance, in an informal conversation between four peers. Basing myself on a detailed analysis of the social impact of the turns at talk through which the construction emerges, I argue that a construction never substitutes for or absorbs a series of individual turns, but is a socially negotiated interim structuring of these turns. As such, it is potentially open to new modifications and new uses, which, however, also have to be socially negotiated.

  • 17.
    Anward, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Språklig bildning: Avsnitt 32015In: Skola & Samhälle, ISSN 2001-6727Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad är egentligen språklig bildning?  I den tredje artikeln presenteras ett blygsamt förslag.

  • 18.
    Anward, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Språklig bildning: Avsnitt 12015In: Skola & Samhälle, ISSN 2001-6727Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad är egentligen språklig bildning? I den första artikeln av tre ställs ett antal frågor om dagens språkundervisning.

  • 19.
    Anward, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Språklig bildning: Avsnitt 22015In: Skola & Samhälle, ISSN 2001-6727Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad är egentligen språklig bildning? I den andra artikeln ges en historisk bakgrund.

  • 20.
    Anward, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dialogue and tradition: The open secret of language2014In: Grammar and dialogism: sequential, syntactic, and prosodic patterns between emergence and sedimentation / [ed] Susanne Günthner, Wolfgang Imo and Jörg Bücker, Berlin / Boston: Walter de Gruyter, 2014, 1, 53-76 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is argued that a language, a langue in a modified Saussurean sense, is a regular outcome of conversation. Based on an analysis of a series of five Swedish telephone conversations, it is demonstrated through a turn-by-turn analysis of the first of these phone calls that an embedded and dynamic system of linguistic resources emerges in conversation and is stabilized in a tradition of conversations, and that the very methods which participants use to structure conversation - turn-taking, sequence organization, and repair - also structure conversation like a language.

  • 21.
    Anward, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Making Units: Comments on Beatrice Szczepek Reed "Intonation phrases in natural conversation: A participants’ category?"2010In: Prosody in Interaction / [ed] Barth-Weingarten, Dagmar, Reber, Elisabeth & Selting, Margret, Amsterdam: Benjamins , 2010, 213-216 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Prosody is constitutive for spoken interaction. In more than 25 years, its study has grown into a full-fledged and very productive field with a sound catalogue of research methods and principles. This volume presents the state of the art, illustrates current research trends and uncovers potential directions for future research. It will therefore be of major interest to everyone studying spoken interaction. The collection brings together an impressive range of internationally renowned scholars from different, yet closely related and compatible research traditions which have made a significant contribution to the field. They cover issues such as the units of language, the contextualization of actions and activities, conversational modalities and genres, the display of affect and emotion, the multimodality of interaction, language acquisition and aphasia. All contributions are based on empirical, audio- and/or video-recorded data of natural talk-in-interaction, including languages such as English, German and Japanese. The methodologies employed come from Ethnomethodology, Conversation Analysis and Interactional Linguistics.

  • 22.
    Anward, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture.
    Om språkutveckling2007In: Det enkla är det sköna - en vänbok till Kjell Granström / [ed] Charlotta Einarsson, Eva Hammar Chiriac, Gunilla Jedeskog, Tobias Lindberg, Marcus Samuelsson, Linköping: Skapande vetande, Linköpings universitet , 2007, 25-38 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Anward, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture.
    Att befolka samtalsrummet. En fallstudie2007In: Interaktion och kontext. Nio studier av svenska samtal. / [ed] Elisabet Engdahl & Anne-Marie Londen, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2007, 1, 187-202 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Anward, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Doing language2015Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this book, I demonstrate how people in conversation (and other forms of communicative practices) on-line construct working, and re-usable, systems of linguistic resources, through turn-taking and a method of turn construction (recycling with différance), which together structure material at hand - syllables and intonation units - like a language.

    Moreover, I explore a number of properties of such systems, in particular their character of embedded and dynamic systems, solidly entrenched in space, time, and social relations.

  • 25.
    Anward, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On the open secret of language2011In: PERILUS 2011: Symposium on Language Acquisition and Language Evolution / [ed] Lacerda, Francisco; Bjursäter, Ulla, Stockholm: Institutionen för lingvistik, Stockholms universitet , 2011, 31-37 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Language is not inside speaking but comes forth as a consequence of dialogue and tradition.

  • 26.
    Anward, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linke, Angelika
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Familienmitglied ‚Vofflan‘. Zur sprachlichen Konzeptualisierung von Haustieren als Familienmitglieder.: Eine namenpragmatische Miniatur anhand von Daten aus der schwedischen Tages- und Wochenpresse.2015In: Beiträge zur Namenforschung, ISSN 0005-8114, Vol. 50, no 1/2, 77-96 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Swedish newspapers and journals an interview with or a feature article

    about a person is normally accompanied by an infobox, where, among other items, there

    is a headline named familj (family). Under this headline are mentioned not only partners,

    children, and other relatives, but also pets, notably dogs and cats. Our contribution poses

    the question to what extent this verbal (written) presentation of pets serves to construct

    them as ‘family members’. Based on our findings – the fact that pets are frequently mentioned

    in connection with family members, overlap between names of pets and names of

    human family members, and close textual alignment of humans and pets, among other

    things – we discuss whether these findings should be interpreted as a tendency towards

    anthropomorphism with regard to pets, or, somewhat more radically, whether we are witnessing

    a linguistic practice where cultural species boundaries are blurred.

  • 27.
    Arvola, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nordvall, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. SICS East Swedish ICT, Linköping, Sweden.
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Transmodal interaction and user experience2016In: Proceedings of the 12'th SweCog Conference / [ed] Alexander Almér, Robert Lowe, Erik Billing, Skövde: The University of Skövde , 2016, 5-5 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We are in a series of studies, ranging from news production to computer gaming, looking into the intersection of transmodal interaction and user experience. The purpose of this abstract is to outline the theoretical framework for that intersection. The first area we are studying is Transmodal Interaction, which is a concept that refer to a specific aspect of multimodal interaction. Human action is multimodal (Streeck, Goodwin, & LeBaron, 2011), and different sensory modes play an important role in action. However, little attention has been given to the intricate ways in which sensory modalities (seeing – drawing, hearing – saying, moving – touching, etc.) integrate, affect, and transform each other during the course of an activity. There are transformations of meaning in every new materialisation of an idea or a thought, partly depending on the communication potential of the sensory modality. This render what we refer to as a transmodal process where ideas and thoughts materialise action by action in an emergent sequence across relatively long and discontinuous timespans (Murphy, 2012). Over a sequence of actions, the meanings expressed in one modality, dynamically blend and shape what is expressed in other modalities. This produces, according to (Murphy, 2012) “a series of semiotic modulations in which certain core qualities persist, but others are noticeably transformed in the transition from one mode to another. (p. 1969)” We can, in intersemiotic translation (Jakobson, 1959) between modalities, address what is lost, how we introduce distortions, or even introduce perceptions of things that do not exist. A question is then how continuity of meaning and experience is preserved in modality changes. The second area we are studying is User Experience. The term refers to a person's perceptions and responses resulting from the use and/or anticipated use of a product, system or service (ISO, 2010). We employ a three level model of user experience based on Leontiev’s account of consciousness (Kaptelinin & Nardi, 2012; Leont ́ev, 1978), which also relate closely to Norman’s model of emotional design (Norman, 2005). The first level is the sensory fabric of consciousness, Norman refers to this as the visceral level. It is the largely subconscious level of how things feel. The second level is the personal meaning of things, related to what and how we do things action by action. Norman (ibid.) refers to this level as the behavioural level. The third level has to do with meaning, and what Norman refers to as a reflective level. It is the level of cultural meaning and what things mean for us in our socially and historically rooted activities. The intersection of these two areas constitutes our current focus of research. We are, in domains as different as news production and computer gaming, investigating persons’ perceptions and actions resulting from interaction with each other and with materialisations across different sensory modalities that give rise to intersemiotic translation effects. 

    References ISO. (2010). ISO 9241-210: 2010 Ergonomics of human-system interaction -- Part 210: Human-centred design. Geneva: International Standardization Organization. Jakobson, R. (1959). On linguistic aspects of translation. In R. A. Brower (Ed.), On translation (pp. 232-239). Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press. Kaptelinin, V., & Nardi, B. (2012). Activity theory in HCI: Fundamentals and Reflections. Synthesis Lectures on Human-Centered Informatics, 5(1), 1-105.  Leont´ev, A. N. (1978). Activity, Consciousness, and Personality. Englewood Cliffs, NJ.: Prentice-Hall. Murphy, K. M. (2012). Transmodality and temporality in design interactions. Journal of Pragmatics, 44(14), 1966-1981. doi:10.1016/j.pragma.2012.08.013 Norman, D. A. (2005). Emotional design: Why we love (or hate) everyday things. New York, NY.: Basic Books. Streeck, J. r., Goodwin, C., & LeBaron, C. (2011). Embodied interaction: language and body in the material

  • 28.
    Avdan, Nazlı
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cultural Identity as a Discursive Product: Multiple Voices Towards Discursive Construction of Lazi Identity2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Ethno-linguistic diversities and the rights to enjoy and maintain indigenous languages and identities has been a central issue in the socio-political agenda of Turkey since the foundation of the Republic of Turkey. The Lazi have taken their part in the discussions concerning minority rights through the discourses of a group of Lazi activists since the early 1990s.This study aims to examine the discursive construction of Lazi identity with close attention to its various actors and the context in which the process is carried out. To this end, selected texts by the social actors who are involved in the Lazi identity building process are studied in terms of various functions of language contributing to the communicative production of discourses. The content of written and oral commentaries by various social actors who are influential in the Lazi identity building process is studied using Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA).The study concludes that the construction of Lazi identity is an on-going process which is developed by influential social actors. The discourses of Lazi activists display a dilemma between the commitment to establish or re-establish a distinct Lazi identity with emphasis on a distinct language and culture rooted in ancient history and a determination to remain a component of the Republic of Turkey.

  • 29.
    Avdan, Nazlı
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    ‘Collaborative Competition’: Stance-taking and Positioning in the European Parliament2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Parliament (EP) is the scene where certain issues concerning over 500 million ‘Europeans’ are publicly debated and where politically relevant groupings are discursively coconstructed. While the Members of the Parliament (MEPs) pursue their political agendas, intergroup boundaries are drawn, reinforced, and/or transgressed. Speakers constantly take stances on behalf of groupings in relation to some presupposed other groupings and argue what differentiates ‘Self’ from ‘Others’. This study examines patterns of language use by the MEPs as they engage in the contextually and historically situated dialogical processes of intergroup positioning and stance-taking. It further focuses on the strategic and competitive activities of grouping, grounding, and alignment in order to reveal the dynamic construction of intergroup boundaries.

    The study is based on a collection of Blue-card question-answer sequences from the plenary debates held at the EP in 2011, when the Sovereign Debt Crisis had been stabilized to some degree but still evoked plenty of controversy.

    Theoretically the study builds on Stance Theory (Du Bois, 2007), Positioning Theory (Davies & Harré, 1990), and several broadly social constructivist approaches to discourse analysis (Fairclough, 1995).

    The analysis shows that intergroup positioning in the EP emerges as what I call a ‘collaborative competition’ between contradictory ideologies and political agendas. The MEPs strategically manipulate their opponents' prior or projected utterances in order to set up positions for self, a grouping he or she stands for, and thereby its adversaries. All participants engage in the maintenance and negotiation of intergroup boundaries, even though the boundaries hardly ever coincide between the different speakers. They discursively fence off some imaginary territories, leaving their adversaries with vague positions.

    When asking Blue-card questions, the MEPs use a particular turn organization, which involves routine forms of interactional units, namely addressing, question framing and question forms, each of which is shown to contribute to stance-taking. A dynamic model of stance-taking is suggested, allowing for a fluid transformation of the stance object as well as the discursively constructed stance-takers.

    While Blue-card questions are meant to serve as a structured procedure for eliciting information from a speaker, the analysis demonstrates that the MEPs accomplish various divergent actions that serve intergroup positioning. The dissertation thus contributes to the understanding of the discursive games played in the EP as the MEPs strive to construct social realities that fit their political ends.

  • 30.
    Bergström, Axel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eklund, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Differences in production of disfluencies in children with typical language development and children with mixed receptive-expressive language disorder2017In: Proceedings of DiSS 2017, the 8th Workshop on Disfluency in Spontaneous Speech / [ed] Robert Eklund and Ralph Rose, Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2017, 9-12 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are several studies about non-fluency inpeople who stutter, but comparatively few regardingchildren with language impairment. The currentresearch body regarding disfluencies in childrenwith language impairment has been using differentstudy-designs and definitions, making some resultsrather contradictory.

    The purpose of the present study is to expand theknowledge about disfluencies in children withlanguage impairment and compare the occurrenceof disfluencies between children with languageimpairment and children with typical languagedevelopment in the same age group.

    A total of ten children with language impairmentand six children with typical language developmentparticipated in this study. The subjects wererecorded when talking freely about a thematicpicture or toys and then analysed by calculatingdisfluencies per 50 words including frequency ofdifferent kinds of disfluencies according to Johnsonand Associates’ (1959) classic taxonomy.

    Our results show that children with languageimpairment do produce statistically significant moredisfluency in general, notably sound and syllablerepetition, broken words and prolongations.

  • 31.
    Betz, Simon
    et al.
    Phonetics and Phonology Workgroup, Bielefeld University, Bielefeld, Germany.
    Eklund, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wagner, Petra
    Phonetics and Phonology Workgroup, Bielefeld University, Bielefeld, Germany.
    Prolongation in German2017In: Proceedings of DiSS 2017, The 8th Workshop on Disfluency in Spontaneous Speech / [ed] Robert Eklund & Ralph Rose, Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2017, 13-16 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate segment prolongation as a means of disfluent hesitation in spontaneous German speech. We describe phonetic and structural features of disfluent prolongation and compare it to data of other languages and to non-disfluent prolongations.

  • 32.
    Bondesson, Rebecka
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    "Make a Man of Him": The Question of Upbringing in Anne Brontë's The Tenant of Wildfell Hall2014Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Behandlar synen på barnuppfostran i Anne Brontës The Tenant of Wildfell Hall. Argumentet är att huvudkaraktären, till skillnad mot de traditionella idéerna rådande i 1820-talets England, antar ett progressivt förhållningssätt till barnuppfostran. Det visas även att romanen presenterar en möjlig bakgrund till hennes långt framskridna idéer vad beträffar erfarenheterna som har influerat hennes utveckling. Ytterligare en dimension tillförs uppsatsen i och med ett didaktiskt kapitel som behandlar frågorna varför och hur man bör använda sig av The Tenant of Wildfell Hall i undervisningen av Engelska i den svenska gymnasieskolan. 

  • 33.
    Bonu, Bruno
    et al.
    Université Paul Valéry Montpellier 3, France.
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Crozat, Dominique
    Université Paul Valéry Montpellier 3, France.
    Fauré, Laurent
    Université Paul Valéry Montpellier 3, France.
    Sélimanovski, Catherine
    Université Paul Valéry Montpellier 3, France.
    Voir, montrer, dire un ”carnaval de rues” dans un centre de vidéosurveillance2013In: Dire l'événement: Langage, mémoire, société / [ed] Sophie Moirand, Sandrine Reboul-Touré, Danielle Londei, Licia Reggiani, Paris: Presses Sorbonne Nouvelle, 2013, 49-59 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Seeing through screens, hearing through speakers: Managing distant studio space in television control room interaction2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, Vol. 41, no 10, 1998-2016 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how an only partially visible and audible television studio space can be accountably understood from the perspective of a television control room. A proper grasp of the studio space is necessary for understanding, for example, who is talking to whom in the studio, and the position of camera operators relative to both one another and the people they are filming. Such an understanding is crucial for the on-line collaborative editing of the studio interaction, in a way that is intelligible for the audience of viewers. Based on video-recordings of the control room and the studio interaction during the live production of the French interview program Rideau Rouge, this study describes some of the multi-modal resources and practices that the personnel in the control room mobilize for resolving, in interaction, practical problems pertaining to the studio space, e.g. how they manage to show relevant participants, show participants from complementary angles, and direct camera operators to produce specific shots.

  • 35.
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture.
    The studio interaction as a contextual resource for TV-production2008In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, Vol. 40, no 5, 904-926 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present text focuses on the complex context of TV-production. The study shows how the dynamics of the studio interaction can be made relevant as a crucial contextual resource for the production crew filming and broadcasting the very same interaction. The mutual intelligibility of the crew’s indexical practices (e.g. talk, switches and camera movement) is shown to be grounded in a state of mutual attention to the unfolding studio interaction. Based on a number of recordings made in the control room during the live production of the French TV-show Rideau Rouge (January 20, 2004) the study describes in particular the crew’s orientations towards three dimensions of the endogenous organization of the studio interaction: turn construction, sequence organization, and activity constitution. The analysis confirms the general relevance of these orders of organization for talk-in-interaction, and shows how each can be used for the practical purposes of the production of the show. The study also reflects upon possible mediating effects when perceiving the studio interaction at a distance. In the control room, the studio interaction can only be observed through the technological system at hand, which is shown to be of some importance for the way in which it can be understood.

  • 36.
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    L´interaction du plateau comme ressource contextuelle pour la réalisation télévisuelle2008In: Verbum : revue de linguistique, ISSN 0182-5887, Vol. 28, no 2-3, 280-304 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [fr]

    Ce texte s-intéresse au contexte, très complexe, d-une émission télévisée en directe. L-étude montre comment l-interaction sur le plateau peut être rendu pertinente par l-équipe de réalisation - la filmant et la passant à l-antenne - comme une « ressource contextuelle » fondamentale. La compréhension mutuelle des pratiques indexicales de l-équipe (par exemple paroles, commutations et manipulations de caméras) est décrite comme reposant en grande partie sur une attention conjointe vers l-interaction émergeante sur le plateau. A partir d-enregistrements vidéo effectués en régie lors de la réalisation en directe de l-émission Rideau Rouge du 20 janvier 2004, l-étude décrit plus particulièrement une orientation de l-équipe vers trois dimensions de l-organisation locale et endogène de l-interaction sur le plateau : la construction des tours de parole, la séquantialisation et la construction d-activités. L-analyse confirme la pertinence tout à fait générale de ces ordres d-organisation pour la parole-en-interaction, montrant comment, dans ce contexte particulier, chacune d-elles peut être exploitée aux fins pratiques de l-équipe de réalisation. L-étude réfléchit également sur les effets de la médiation lors de la perception distante de l-interaction sur le plateau. En régie, cette interaction peut seulement être surveillée par le biais du dispositif technologique utilisé, ce qui peut avoir des conséquences pour la façon dont elle peut être comprise.  

  • 37.
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The "Listening Shot" as a Collaborative Practice for Categorizing Studio Participants in a Live TV-Production2008In: Ethnographic studies, ISSN 1366-4964, Vol. 10, 69-88 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      Analyzing a videorecording produced in a TV-control room during the live broadcast of a multi-party discussion on the Road Map for peace in the Middle East, the ways in which the TV-crew exploits close-up shots of the listener, "listening shots", are described as a resource for visually categorizing participants in the studio. After establishing the listening shot as a members- phenomenon, he shows how such shots are oriented to as accountable in the emergent sequence of broadcast shots. At the level of the broadcast programme, listening shots are exploited to produce both confrontation and balance between the Israeli and the Palestinians present in the studio.

  • 38.
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Theatre Performance as Interaction between Actors and Their Audience2011In: Nottingham French Studies, ISSN 0029-4586, Vol. 50, no 2, 113-133 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on video-recorded perfor­man­ces of rela­tive­ly naturalis­tic, modern French dramas, the study examines the behaviour of the theatre audience in relation to unfolding stage events. Such behaviour is described through close inspec­tion of the sounds the audience pro­duces, mainly coughing, throat-clearings, and laughter. CA (Conversation Analysis) methodology is used to analyse not only an audi­ence’s overt reactions to stage events, but also the actions occurring outside these relatively short-lived phenomena in the context of a theatre performance. It is demonstrated that members of the audience refrain from making ‘vocal noise’ during the verbal inter­action of actors, and some of the resources used to achieve this end are described. Furthermore, the audience’s laughter is described. It is shown how members of the audience negotiate collective moments of laughter not only with each other, but also with actors on stage, to insert a laughing turn in the unfolding sequence of dramatic actions.

  • 39.
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Pans, Tilts, and Zooms Conventional Camera Gestures in TV Production2014In: Studies of video practices: video at work, Routledge, 2014, Vol. 64, 63-96 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 40.
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sur l'analyse quantitative des actions sociales : le cas de 'prévenir'2006In: Construction, acquisition et communication: Études linguistiques de discours contemporains / [ed] Engwall, Gunnel, Stockholm: Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis , 2006, 273-291 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [fr]

    Le présent volume constitue un temoignage des fructueuses relations internationales établies à l'Université de Stockholm. Il contient quatorze articles écrits par des specialistes venant de Belgique, de France, de Norvège et de Suède. Ces articles portent sur une grande variété de paroles contemporaines et couvrent trois domaines des sciences du langage: ceux de la syntaxe et de la sémantique (1), de l'acquisition des langues (2) et de l'analyse du discours (3). Ainsi les articles réunis dans ce volume représentent-ils un vaste champ de recherches et soulèvent de nombreuses questions interessantes. La plupart se basent sur des matériaux écrits : des textes litteraires, scientifiques, joumalistiques et publicitaires, mais aussi sur quelques échantillons de la langue parlee: des enregistrements d'émissions télévisées, des interviews et des récits oraux. Grâce à ces matériaux, de langue française pour la plupart, et relevant aussi bien de la langue soutenue que de la langue informelle, les auteurs peuvent tirer des conclusions sur les caractéristiques linguistiques de différents genres textuels. Les auteurs mènent également d'importantes discussions théoriques et terminologiques et présentent des analyses de phénomènes langagiers observables à différents niveaux d'emploi de la langue écrite et de la langue parlée

  • 41.
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    La réalisation des images télévisées comme accomplissement social2004In: Genres et rhétoriques des discours médiatiques / [ed] Jeanne Strunck, Inger Lasse, Torben Vestergaard, Aalborg: Aalborg University Press , 2004, 1,1, 107-123 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [fr]

    Le présent volume contient des articles qui présentent une variété d approches en analyse du discours et révèlent de nouvelles réflexions encourageant la compréhension de la construction d images publiques et d idéologies impliquées dans les textes médiatiques. Les discours de la presse imprimée, de la radio, de la télé-vision et de l Internet composent le point de départ des analyses présentées.Même si les contributions se différencient au premier abord, donnant la prépondérance aux notions telles que la polyphonie, la rhétorique, l argumentation, l intertextualité et la métaphore, les autours se réunissent d un aspect qui se montre central pour les analyses du discours des textes médiatiques: les études de genre tant dans les discours oraux que dans le discours écrits.Dans son introduction Professeur Kerbrat-Orecchioni souligne la diversité méthodologique du champ de l analyse du discours, et en ce qui concerne plus précisement les discours médiatiques, elle envisage la problématique des genres dans une perspective à la fois classique, et "révisitée" à la lumière des théories récentes en analyse des discours et des interactions verbales.

  • 42.
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    La Pertinence des formes d’adresse pour la construction interactive d’une interview télévisée2006In: Dialogic Language Use: Dimensions du dialogisme = Dialogischer Sprachgebrauch / [ed] Taavitsainen, I., Härmä, J., Korhonen, J. & Ursin, M., Helsingfors: Société Néophilologique , 2006, 275-294 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dialogic language use can be defined as textual interaction between text participants in constructing and negotiating meaning in discourse. The articles in this multilingual volume show a rich variety of approaches and ask various pragmatic, text linguistic or sociolinguistic questions about synchronic and / or diachronic literary and nonliterary materials.

  • 43.
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    La production du "plan d'écoute" comme pratique collective catégorisante dans une émission télévisée en direct2008In: Médias, guerres et identités: Les pratiques communicationnelles de l'appartenance politique, ethnique et religieuse, Paris: Éditions des Archives Contemporaines , 2008, 226-247 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [fr]

    Le neuvième chapitre, rédigé par Mathias Broth, traite de la manière dont une équipe de réalisation d'une émission télévisée en direct travaille pour présenter l'interaction qui a lieu sur le plateau et qu'elle est en train de filmer. A partir de la réalisation d'une émission qui porte sur le conflit au Proche-Orient entre Palestiniens et Isréliens, ce chapitre analyse comment ces deux catégories nationales sont rendues pertinentes par l'équipe et comment elles sont ensuite montrées à l'audience des téléspectateurs.

  • 44.
    Broth, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Att koppla ihop ansikten och namn: Om gemensamt memorerande inom ett TV-team2011In: Lärande och minnande: som social praktik / [ed] Roger Säljö, Stockholm: Norstedts Förlag, 2011, 253-283 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Minnesfunktioner är något som det forskas intensivt om. Flera traditioner existerar parallellt. När det gäller minne i kombination med lärande är idag det socialpsykologiska perspektivet på frammarsch. Det går i korthet ut på att inget lärande sker som något isolerat utan alltid i samspel med andra människor och det sker också i samspel med allehanda hjälpmedel eller artefakter. Hur går lärande och minnande till? Vad är det egentligen? Det är detta denna bok försöker besvara. För att förstå det har en tvärvetenskaplig grupp samlats under Roger Säljös ledning för att utforska lärande och minnande. Varför är det viktigt att veta? Den nya kunskap som presenteras i denna bok får konsekvenser för framtida undervisning, för utformande av kommunikation av varierande slag och av artefakter. Vad är "minnande"? Det är en aktiv form av att minnas, minnande är något man lär sig, alltså ingen statisk förmåga. Det sker i samspel med andra människor och artefakter. Minnande är en del av lärandet och vice versa. Man kan inte lära något om man inte samtidigt minns. När man lär något sker ett minnande. Dessa tankar om minnande och lärande grundar sig alla medverkande författare på när de berättar om sina respektive forskningsprojekt. Deras berättelser spänner över många mänskliga områden, från hur tolvåringar arbetar med naturvetenskapliga experiment via dataspelande till polisförhör och från specialpedagogik via kontroverser till minnande och lärande i arkitektur

  • 45.
    Broth, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Levin, Lena
    Starting out as a driver: Progression in instructed pedal work2017In: Memory practices and learning: Interactional, institutional and sociocultural perspectives / [ed] Åsa Mäkitalo, Per Linell & Roger Säljö, Charlotte, N.C.: Information Age Publishing, 2017, 115-152 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Broth, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Forsberg Lundell, Fanny
    Stockholms universitet.
    Napouléon’s sequential heritage. Using a student error as a resource for learning and teaching pronunciation in the French foreign language classroom2013In: Classroom discourse, ISSN 1946-3014, Vol. 4, no 1, 89-109 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we consider a student error produced in a French foreign language small group seminar, involving four Swedish L1 first term university students of French and a native French teacher. The error in question consists of a mispronunciation of the second vowel of the name Napoléon in the midst of a student presentation on the history of Corsica. Taking a conversation analytic approach to situated language use, the study considers the ways in which the erroneous pronunciation is turned into a resource, whereby both teaching and learning opportunities are accomplished in teacher-student interaction. By tracking subsequent references to the initial error in a corpus of video-recorded small group seminars, we explore some of the things that can be achieved by such referencing in later local contexts. The study demonstrates how not only students, but also the teacher, may learn in pedagogical interaction.

  • 47.
    Broth, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Getting Ready to Move as a Couple: Accomplishing Mobile Formations in a Dance Class2014In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 17, no 2, 107-121 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article focuses on how students in a Lindy Hop dance class move into a complex mobile formation as a sequentially relevant response to a directive embedded in the teachers verbal and embodied instructions of the next task for practice. This sequence of actions accomplishes a transition from a stationary constellation of observing students to a mobile circle of practicing dance couples. The article describes in detail how instruction is turned into practice in an emergent way, in and through the simultaneous accountable production and reception of qualitative instruction, practice proposals, structuring instructions, and count-ins. The analysis shows how student behavior is oriented to the couple as a relevant mobile formation and how couples gradually become more synchronized with each other.

  • 48.
    Broth, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Laurier, EricUniversity of Edinburgh.Mondada, LorenzaUniversity of Basel.
    Studies of Video Practices: Video at Work2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The last two decades have seen a rapid increase in the production and consumption of video by both professionals and amateurs. The near ubiquity of devices with video cameras and the rise of sites like YouTube have lead to the growth and transformation of the practices of producing, circulating, and viewing video, whether it be in households, workplaces, or research laboratories.

    This volume builds a foundation for studies of activities based in and around video production and consumption. It contributes to the interdisciplinary field of visual methodology, investigating how video functions as a resource for a variety of actors and professions.

  • 49.
    Broth, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Laurier, Eric
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
    Mondada, Lorenza
    University of Basel, Switzerland .
    Introducing Video at Work2014In: Studies of video practices: video at work, Routledge, 2014, Vol. 64, 1-29 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Broth, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lundström, Fredrik
    Örebro universitet.
    A walk on the pier: Establishing relevant places in mobile instruction2013In: Interaction and mobility: language and the body in motion / [ed] Haddington, Pentti, Mondada, Lorenza, Nevile, Maurice, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2013, 91-122 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How do people use language, gestures and the materialenvironment around themfor interacting in mobile situations? Interaction and Mobility brings together international scholars who use video-recordings from real-life everyday settings to study how people interact in diverse mobile situations as part of activities such as walking, driving, flying, dancing and gaming. This book isvaluablefor anyone interested in multimodal interaction and mobility.

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