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  • 1.
    Abadpour, Shadab
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Tyrberg, Bjorn
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Schive, Simen W.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Wennberg Huldt, Charlotte
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Gennemark, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Ryberg, Erik
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Ryden-Bergsten, Tina
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Smith, David M.
    AstraZeneca, Sweden; AstraZeneca, England.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Skrtic, Stanko
    AstraZeneca, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Scholz, Hanne
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Winzell, Maria Sorhede
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Inhibition of the prostaglandin D-2-GPR44/DP2 axis improves human islet survival and function2020In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 63, no 7, p. 1355-1367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis Inflammatory signals and increased prostaglandin synthesis play a role during the development of diabetes. The prostaglandin D-2 (PGD(2)) receptor, GPR44/DP2, is highly expressed in human islets and activation of the pathway results in impaired insulin secretion. The role of GPR44 activation on islet function and survival rate during chronic hyperglycaemic conditions is not known. In this study, we investigate GPR44 inhibition by using a selective GPR44 antagonist (AZ8154) in human islets both in vitro and in vivo in diabetic mice transplanted with human islets. Methods Human islets were exposed to PGD(2) or proinflammatory cytokines in vitro to investigate the effect of GPR44 inhibition on islet survival rate. In addition, the molecular mechanisms of GPR44 inhibition were investigated in human islets exposed to high concentrations of glucose (HG) and to IL-1 beta. For the in vivo part of the study, human islets were transplanted under the kidney capsule of immunodeficient diabetic mice and treated with 6, 60 or 100 mg/kg per day of a GPR44 antagonist starting from the transplantation day until day 4 (short-term study) or day 17 (long-term study) post transplantation. IVGTT was performed on mice at day 10 and day 15 post transplantation. After termination of the study, metabolic variables, circulating human proinflammatory cytokines, and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) were analysed in the grafted human islets. Results PGD(2) or proinflammatory cytokines induced apoptosis in human islets whereas GPR44 inhibition reversed this effect. GPR44 inhibition antagonised the reduction in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion induced by HG and IL-1 beta in human islets. This was accompanied by activation of the Akt-glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta signalling pathway together with phosphorylation and inactivation of forkhead box O-1and upregulation of pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 and HGF. Administration of the GPR44 antagonist for up to 17 days to diabetic mice transplanted with a marginal number of human islets resulted in reduced fasting blood glucose and lower glucose excursions during IVGTT. Improved glucose regulation was supported by increased human C-peptide levels compared with the vehicle group at day 4 and throughout the treatment period. GPR44 inhibition reduced plasma levels of TNF-alpha and growth-regulated oncogene-alpha/chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 and increased the levels of HGF in human islets. Conclusions/interpretation Inhibition of GPR44 in human islets has the potential to improve islet function and survival rate under inflammatory and hyperglycaemic stress. This may have implications for better survival rate of islets following transplantation.

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  • 2.
    Abbott, Rebecca
    et al.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60611 USA.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    West, Janne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Elliott, James M.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60611 USA; Univ Queensland, Australia; Zurich Univ Appl Sci, Switzerland.
    Åslund, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    The qualitative grading of muscle fat infiltration in whiplash using fat and water magnetic resonance imaging2018In: The spine journal, ISSN 1529-9430, E-ISSN 1878-1632, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 717-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: The development of muscle fat infiltration (MFI) in the neck muscles is associated with poor functional recovery following whiplash injury. Custom software and time-consuming manual segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is required for quantitative analysis and presents as a barrier for clinical translation. PURPOSE: The purpose of this work was to establish a qualitative MRI measure for MFI and evaluate its ability to differentiate between individuals with severe whiplash-associated disorder (WAD), mild or moderate WAD, and healthy controls. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: This is a cross-sectional study. PATIENT SAMPLE: Thirty-one subjects with WAD and 31 age-and sex-matched controls were recruited from an ongoing randomized controlled trial. OUTCOME MEASURES: The cervical multifidus was visually identified and segmented into eighths in the axial fat/water images (C4-C7). Muscle fat infiltration was assessed on a visual scale: 0 for no or marginal MFI, 1 for light MFI, and 2 for distinct MFI. The participants with WAD were divided in two groups: mild or moderate and severe based on Neck Disability Index % scores. METHODS: The mean regional MFI was compared between the healthy controls and each of the WAD groups using the Mann-Whitney U test. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analyses were carried out to evaluate the validity of the qualitative method. RESULTS: Twenty (65%) patients had mild or moderate disability and 11 (35%) were considered severe. Inter- and intra-rater reliability was excellent when grading was averaged by level or when frequency of grade II was considered. Statistically significant differences (pamp;lt;.05) in regional MFI were particularly notable between the severe WAD group and healthy controls. The ROC curve, based on detection of distinct MFI, showed an area-under-the curve of 0.768 (95% confidence interval 0.59-0.94) for discrimination of WAD participants. CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary results suggest a qualitative MRI measure for MFI is reliable and valid, and may prove useful toward the classification of WAD in radiology practice. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rzepecka, Anna
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lundberg, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Dense breast tissue in postmenopausal women is associated with a pro-inflammatory microenvironment in vivo2016In: Oncoimmunology, ISSN 2162-4011, E-ISSN 2162-402X, Vol. 5, no 10, article id e1229723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammation is one of the hallmarks of carcinogenesis. High mammographic density has been associated with increased risk of breast cancer but the mechanisms behind are poorly understood. We evaluated whether breasts with different mammographic densities exhibited differences in the inflammatory microenvironment.Postmenopausal women attending the mammography-screening program were assessed having extreme dense, n = 20, or entirely fatty breasts (nondense), n = 19, on their regular mammograms. Thereafter, the women were invited for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), microdialysis for the collection of extracellular molecules in situ and a core tissue biopsy for research purposes. On the MRI, lean tissue fraction (LTF) was calculated for a continuous measurement of breast density. LTF confirmed the selection from the mammograms and gave a continuous measurement of breast density. Microdialysis revealed significantly increased extracellular in vivo levels of IL-6, IL-8, vascular endothelial growth factor, and CCL5 in dense breast tissue as compared with nondense breasts. Moreover, the ratio IL-1Ra/IL-1 was decreased in dense breasts. No differences were found in levels of IL-1, IL-1Ra, CCL2, leptin, adiponectin, or leptin:adiponectin ratio between the two breast tissue types. Significant positive correlations between LTF and the pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as between the cytokines were detected. Stainings of the core biopsies exhibited increased levels of immune cells in dense breast tissue.Our data show that dense breast tissue in postmenopausal women is associated with a pro-inflammatory microenvironment and, if confirmed in a larger cohort, suggests novel targets for prevention therapies for women with dense breast tissue.

  • 4. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Abramian, David
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Modern multimodal methods in brain MRI2023Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the pillars of modern medical imaging, providing a non-invasive means to generate 3D images of the body with high soft-tissue contrast. Furthermore, the possibilities afforded by the design of MRI sequences enable the signal to be sensitized to a multitude of physiological tissue properties, resulting in a wide variety of distinct MRI modalities for clinical and research use. 

    This thesis presents a number of advanced brain MRI applications, which fulfill, to differing extents, two complementary aims. On the one hand, they explore the benefits of a multimodal approach to MRI, combining structural, functional and diffusion MRI, in a variety of contexts. On the other, they emphasize the use of advanced mathematical and computational tools in the analysis of MRI data, such as deep learning, Bayesian statistics, and graph signal processing. 

    Paper I introduces an anatomically-adapted extension to previous work in Bayesian spatial priors for functional MRI data, where anatomical information is introduced from a T1-weighted image to compensate for the low anatomical contrast of functional MRI data. 

    It has been observed that the spatial correlation structure of the BOLD signal in brain white matter follows the orientation of the underlying axonal fibers. Paper II argues about the implications of this fact on the ideal shape of spatial filters for the analysis of white matter functional MRI data. By using axonal orientation information extracted from diffusion MRI, and leveraging the possibilities afforded by graph signal processing, a graph-based description of the white matter structure is introduced, which, in turn, enables the definition of spatial filters whose shape is adapted to the underlying axonal structure, and demonstrates the increased detection power resulting from their use. 

    One of the main clinical applications of functional MRI is functional localization of the eloquent areas of the brain prior to brain surgery. This practice is widespread for various invasive surgeries, but is less common for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), a non-invasive surgical procedure wherein tissue is ablated by concentrating several beams of high-energy radiation. Paper III describes an analysis and processing pipeline for functional MRI data that enables its use for functional localization and delineation of organs-at-risk for Elekta GammaKnife SRS procedures. 

    Paper IV presents a deep learning model for super-resolution of diffusion MRI fiber ODFs, which outperforms standard interpolation methods in estimating local axonal fiber orientations in white matter. Finally, Paper V demonstrates that some popular methods for anonymizing facial data in structural MRI volumes can be partially reversed by applying generative deep learning models, highlighting one way in which the enormous power of deep learning models can potentially be put to use for harmful purposes. 

    List of papers
    1. Anatomically Informed Bayesian Spatial Priors for FMRI Analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anatomically Informed Bayesian Spatial Priors for FMRI Analysis
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    2020 (English)In: ISBI 2020: IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging / [ed] IEEE, IEEE, 2020Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Existing Bayesian spatial priors for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data correspond to stationary isotropic smoothing filters that may oversmooth at anatomical boundaries. We propose two anatomically informed Bayesian spatial models for fMRI data with local smoothing in each voxel based on a tensor field estimated from a T1-weighted anatomical image. We show that our anatomically informed Bayesian spatial models results in posterior probability maps that follow the anatomical structure.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    IEEE, 2020
    Series
    IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging, ISSN 1945-7928, E-ISSN 1945-8452
    Keywords
    Bayesian statistics, functional MRI, activation mapping, adaptive smoothing
    National Category
    Medical Image Processing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-165856 (URN)10.1109/ISBI45749.2020.9098342 (DOI)000578080300208 ()978-1-5386-9330-8 (ISBN)
    Conference
    IEEE 17th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI), Iowa City, IA, USA, 3-7 April 2020
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2017- 04889
    Note

    Funding agencies:  Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council [201704889]; Center for Industrial Information Technology (CENIIT) at Linkoping University

    Available from: 2020-05-29 Created: 2020-05-29 Last updated: 2023-03-31Bibliographically approved
    2. Diffusion-Informed Spatial Smoothing of fMRI Data in White Matter Using Spectral Graph Filters
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diffusion-Informed Spatial Smoothing of fMRI Data in White Matter Using Spectral Graph Filters
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    2021 (English)In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 237, article id 118095Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Brain activation mapping using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been extensively studied in brain gray matter (GM), whereas in large disregarded for probing white matter (WM). This unbalanced treatment has been in part due to controversies in relation to the nature of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast in WM and its detachability. However, an accumulating body of studies has provided solid evidence of the functional significance of the BOLD signal in WM and has revealed that it exhibits anisotropic spatio-temporal correlations and structure-specific fluctuations concomitant with those of the cortical BOLD signal. In this work, we present an anisotropic spatial filtering scheme for smoothing fMRI data in WM that accounts for known spatial constraints on the BOLD signal in WM. In particular, the spatial correlation structure of the BOLD signal in WM is highly anisotropic and closely linked to local axonal structure in terms of shape and orientation, suggesting that isotropic Gaussian filters conventionally used for smoothing fMRI data are inadequate for denoising the BOLD signal in WM. The fundamental element in the proposed method is a graph-based description of WM that encodes the underlying anisotropy observed across WM, derived from diffusion-weighted MRI data. Based on this representation, and leveraging graph signal processing principles, we design subject-specific spatial filters that adapt to a subject’s unique WM structure at each position in the WM that they are applied at. We use the proposed filters to spatially smooth fMRI data in WM, as an alternative to the conventional practice of using isotropic Gaussian filters. We test the proposed filtering approach on two sets of simulated phantoms, showcasing its greater sensitivity and specificity for the detection of slender anisotropic activations, compared to that achieved with isotropic Gaussian filters. We also present WM activation mapping results on the Human Connectome Project’s 100-unrelated subject dataset, across seven functional tasks, showing that the proposed method enables the detection of streamline-like activations within axonal bundles.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2021
    Keywords
    functional MRI, diffusion MRI, white matter, graph signal processing, anisotropy
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Medical Image Processing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-175762 (URN)10.1016/j.neuroimage.2021.118095 (DOI)000671134200006 ()34000402 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2018-06689Swedish Research Council, 2017- 04889Vinnova, 2018-02230NIH (National Institute of Health), K01DK101631NIH (National Institute of Health), R56AG068261
    Note

    Funding: McDonnell Center for Systems Neuroscience at Washington University; Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research CouncilEuropean Commission [2017-04889, 2018-06689]; Royal Physiographic Society of Lund; Thorsten and Elsa Segerfalk Foundation; Hans Werthen Foundation; ITEA3/VINNOVA; Center for Industrial Information Technology (CENIIT) at Linkoping University; BrightFocus FoundationBrightFocus Foundation [A2016172S]; NIHUnited States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA; National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney DiseasesUnited States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USANIH National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) [K01DK101631]; National Institute on AgingUnited States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USANIH National Institute on Aging (NIA) [R56AG068261];  [1U54MH091657]

    Available from: 2021-05-19 Created: 2021-05-19 Last updated: 2023-03-31
    3. REFACING: RECONSTRUCTING ANONYMIZED FACIAL FEATURES USING GANS
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>REFACING: RECONSTRUCTING ANONYMIZED FACIAL FEATURES USING GANS
    2019 (English)In: 2019 IEEE 16TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON BIOMEDICAL IMAGING (ISBI 2019), IEEE , 2019, p. 1104-1108Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anonymization of medical images is necessary for protecting the identity of the test subjects, and is therefore an essential step in data sharing. However, recent developments in deep learning may raise the bar on the amount of distortion that needs to be applied to guarantee anonymity. To test such possibilities, we have applied the novel CycleGAN unsupervised image-to-image translation framework on sagittal slices of T1 MR images, in order to reconstruct, facial features from anonymized data. We applied the CycleGAN framework on both face-blurred and face-removed images. Our results show that face blurring may not provide adequate protection against malicious attempts at identifying the subjects, while face removal provides more robust anonymization, but is still partially reversible.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    IEEE, 2019
    Series
    IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging, ISSN 1945-7928, E-ISSN 1945-8452
    Keywords
    MRI; anonymization; GANs; image-to-image translation
    National Category
    Computer Vision and Robotics (Autonomous Systems)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160633 (URN)10.1109/ISBI.2019.8759515 (DOI)000485040000234 ()978-1-5386-3641-1 (ISBN)
    Conference
    16th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish research councilSwedish Research Council [201704889]; Center for Industrial Information Technology (CENIIT) at Linkoping University; Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundationKnut & Alice Wallenberg Foundation

    Available from: 2019-10-10 Created: 2019-10-10 Last updated: 2023-03-31
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  • 5.
    Abramian, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Blystad, Ida
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine.
    Eklund, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, The Division of Statistics and Machine Learning. Division of Medical Informatics, Department of Biomedical Engineering Linköping University Linköping Sweden;Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV) Linköping University Linköping Sweden;Division of Statistics & Machine Learning, Department of Computer and Information Science Linköping University Linköping Sweden.
    Evaluation of inverse treatment planning for gamma knife radiosurgery using fMRI brain activation maps as organs at risk2023In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 50, no 9, p. 5297-5311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) can be an effective primary or adjuvant treatment option for intracranial tumors. However, it carries risks of various radiation toxicities, which can lead to functional deficits for the patients. Current inverse planning algorithms for SRS provide an efficient way for sparing organs at risk (OARs) by setting maximum radiation dose constraints in the treatment planning process.Purpose: We propose using activation maps from functional MRI (fMRI) to map the eloquent regions of the brain and define functional OARs (fOARs) for Gamma Knife SRS treatment planning.Methods: We implemented a pipeline for analyzing patient fMRI data, generating fOARs from the resulting activation maps, and loading them onto the GammaPlan treatment planning software. We used the Lightning inverse planner to generate multiple treatment plans from open MRI data of five subjects, and evaluated the effects of incorporating the proposed fOARs.Results: The Lightning optimizer designs treatment plans with high conformity to the specified parameters. Setting maximum dose constraints on fOARs successfully limits the radiation dose incident on them, but can have a negative impact on treatment plan quality metrics. By masking out fOAR voxels surrounding the tumor target it is possible to achieve high quality treatment plans while controlling the radiation dose on fOARs.Conclusions: The proposed method can effectively reduce the radiation dose incident on the eloquent brain areas during Gamma Knife SRS of brain tumors.

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  • 6.
    Abramian, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, The Division of Statistics and Machine Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    REFACING: RECONSTRUCTING ANONYMIZED FACIAL FEATURES USING GANS2019In: 2019 IEEE 16TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON BIOMEDICAL IMAGING (ISBI 2019), IEEE , 2019, p. 1104-1108Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anonymization of medical images is necessary for protecting the identity of the test subjects, and is therefore an essential step in data sharing. However, recent developments in deep learning may raise the bar on the amount of distortion that needs to be applied to guarantee anonymity. To test such possibilities, we have applied the novel CycleGAN unsupervised image-to-image translation framework on sagittal slices of T1 MR images, in order to reconstruct, facial features from anonymized data. We applied the CycleGAN framework on both face-blurred and face-removed images. Our results show that face blurring may not provide adequate protection against malicious attempts at identifying the subjects, while face removal provides more robust anonymization, but is still partially reversible.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Abramian, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Larsson, Martin
    Centre of Mathematical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, The Division of Statistics and Machine Learning.
    Aganj, Iman
    Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA; Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA.
    Westin, Carl-Fredrik
    Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.
    Behjat, Hamid
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA; Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.
    Diffusion-Informed Spatial Smoothing of fMRI Data in White Matter Using Spectral Graph Filters2021In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 237, article id 118095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brain activation mapping using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been extensively studied in brain gray matter (GM), whereas in large disregarded for probing white matter (WM). This unbalanced treatment has been in part due to controversies in relation to the nature of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast in WM and its detachability. However, an accumulating body of studies has provided solid evidence of the functional significance of the BOLD signal in WM and has revealed that it exhibits anisotropic spatio-temporal correlations and structure-specific fluctuations concomitant with those of the cortical BOLD signal. In this work, we present an anisotropic spatial filtering scheme for smoothing fMRI data in WM that accounts for known spatial constraints on the BOLD signal in WM. In particular, the spatial correlation structure of the BOLD signal in WM is highly anisotropic and closely linked to local axonal structure in terms of shape and orientation, suggesting that isotropic Gaussian filters conventionally used for smoothing fMRI data are inadequate for denoising the BOLD signal in WM. The fundamental element in the proposed method is a graph-based description of WM that encodes the underlying anisotropy observed across WM, derived from diffusion-weighted MRI data. Based on this representation, and leveraging graph signal processing principles, we design subject-specific spatial filters that adapt to a subject’s unique WM structure at each position in the WM that they are applied at. We use the proposed filters to spatially smooth fMRI data in WM, as an alternative to the conventional practice of using isotropic Gaussian filters. We test the proposed filtering approach on two sets of simulated phantoms, showcasing its greater sensitivity and specificity for the detection of slender anisotropic activations, compared to that achieved with isotropic Gaussian filters. We also present WM activation mapping results on the Human Connectome Project’s 100-unrelated subject dataset, across seven functional tasks, showing that the proposed method enables the detection of streamline-like activations within axonal bundles.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Abramian, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering.
    Larsson, Martin
    Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Eklund, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, The Division of Statistics and Machine Learning.
    Behjat, Hamid
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Lund University, Sweden.
    Improved Functional MRI Activation Mapping in White Matter Through Diffusion-Adapted Spatial Filtering2020In: ISBI 2020: IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging, IEEE, 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brain activation mapping using functional MRI (fMRI) based on blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast has been conventionally focused on probing gray matter, the BOLD contrast in white matter having been generally disregarded. Recent results have provided evidence of the functional significance of the white matter BOLD signal, showing at the same time that its correlation structure is highly anisotropic, and related to the diffusion tensor in shape and orientation. This evidence suggests that conventional isotropic Gaussian filters are inadequate for denoising white matter fMRI data, since they are incapable of adapting to the complex anisotropic domain of white matter axonal connections. In this paper we explore a graph-based description of the white matter developed from diffusion MRI data, which is capable of encoding the anisotropy of the domain. Based on this representation we design localized spatial filters that adapt to white matter structure by leveraging graph signal processing principles. The performance of the proposed filtering technique is evaluated on semi-synthetic data, where it shows potential for greater sensitivity and specificity in white matter activation mapping, compared to isotropic filtering.

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  • 9.
    Abramian, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering.
    Sidén, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, The Division of Statistics and Machine Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Villani, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, The Division of Statistics and Machine Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Department of Statistics, Stockholm University.
    Eklund, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, The Division of Statistics and Machine Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Anatomically Informed Bayesian Spatial Priors for FMRI Analysis2020In: ISBI 2020: IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging / [ed] IEEE, IEEE, 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Existing Bayesian spatial priors for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data correspond to stationary isotropic smoothing filters that may oversmooth at anatomical boundaries. We propose two anatomically informed Bayesian spatial models for fMRI data with local smoothing in each voxel based on a tensor field estimated from a T1-weighted anatomical image. We show that our anatomically informed Bayesian spatial models results in posterior probability maps that follow the anatomical structure.

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  • 10.
    Adelöf, Anna
    et al.
    Fackspråk och informatik, Regler och tillstånd, Socialstyrelsen.
    Lindberg, Christina
    Fackspråk och informatik, Regler och tillstånd, Socialstyrelsen.
    Barlow, Lotti
    Fackspråk och informatik, Regler och tillstånd, Socialstyrelsen.
    Gerdin, Ulla
    Fackspråk och informatik, Regler och tillstånd, Socialstyrelsen.
    Bränd Persson, Kristina
    Fackspråk och informatik, Regler och tillstånd, Socialstyrelsen.
    Ericsson, Erika
    Fackspråk och informatik, Regler och tillstånd, Socialstyrelsen.
    Testi, Stefano
    Fackspråk och informatik, Regler och tillstånd, Socialstyrelsen.
    Nyström, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Förvaltning av SNOMED CT som en del i det nationella fackspråket för vård och omsorg2011Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Förvaltningsrapporten fokuserar på Snomed CT, eftersom det redan i dag finns rutiner för förvaltningar av termbanken och nationella hälsorelaterade klassifikationer. Ett särskilt utvecklingsarbete kommer att krävas för dessa delar.

    Rapporten tar upp syfte och mål med förvaltningen. Utöver det redogör rapporten för vilka konkreta ansvarsområden som ingår i förvaltningen av Snomed CT. Målet för förvaltningen är att Socialstyrelsen regelbundet ska kunna tillhandahålla en kontrollerad och uppdaterad release av Snomed CT. Det skulle möjliggöra användning inom vård och omsorg. Rapporten tar även upp behovet av kompetens, utbildning och finansiella resurser.

  • 11.
    ADOK, ILDI
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Development of a tool for analysis and visualization of longitudinal magnetic resonance flowmeasurements: of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients in the neurointensivecare unit2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Patients who are treated in an intensive care unit need continuous monitoring in orderfor clinicians to be prepared to intervene should a secondary event occur. For patientstreated at the neurointensive care unit (NICU) who have suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) this secondary event could be ischemia, resulting in a lack of blood flow.Blood flow can be measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The process is facilitated with a software called NOVA. Repeated measurements can therefore be performedas a way to monitor the patients, which in this context would be referred to as longitudinalmeasurements. As more data can be collected ways of analyzing and visualizing the datain a comprehensible way is needed. The aim of this thesis was therefore to develop and implement a method for analyzing and visualizing the longitudinal MR measurement data.With this aim in mind two research questions were relevant. The first one was how NOVAflow longitudinal measurements can be visualized to simplify interpretation by cliniciansand the second one was in what ways the longitudinal data can be analyzed. A graphicaluser interface (GUI) was created to present the developed analysis and visualization tool.Development of the tool progressed using feedback from supervisors and neurosurgeons.Visualization and analysis was done through plots of blood velocity and blood flow as themain component as well as a 2D vessel map. The final implementation showed multipleexamples of how the longitudinal data could be both visualized and analyzed. The resultstherefore provided a tool to analyze and visualize NOVA flow longitudinal measurementsin a way which was easily interpreted. Further improvements of the tool is possible andan area of improvement could involve increasing the adaptability of the tool.

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  • 12.
    Adolfsson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Visual Evaluation of 3D Image Enhancement2006Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Technologies in image acquisition have developed and often provide image volumes in more than two dimensions. Computer tomography and magnet resonance imaging provide image volumes in three spatial dimensions. The image enhancement methods have developed as well and in this thesis work 3D image enhancement with filter networks is evaluated.

    The aims of this work are; to find a method which makes the initial parameter settings in the 3D image enhancement processing easier, to compare 2D and 3D processed image volumes visualized with different visualization techniques and to give an illustration of the benefits with 3D image enhancement processing visualized using these techniques.

    The results of this work are;

    1. a parameter setting tool that makes the initial parameter setting much easier and

    2. an evaluation of 3D image enhancement with filter networks that shows a significant enhanced image quality in 3D processed image volumes with a high noise level compared to the 2D processed volumes. These results are shown in slices, MIP and volume rendering. The differences are even more pronounced if the volume is presented in a different projection than the volume is 2D processed in.

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  • 13.
    Afshari, Ali
    et al.
    Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA.
    Saager, Rolf B.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Burgos, David
    Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA.
    Vogt, William
    Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA.
    Wang, Jianting
    Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA.
    Mendoza, Gonzalo
    Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA.
    Weininger, Sandy
    Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA.
    Sung, Kung-Bin
    National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Durkin, Anthony
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Natural Sciences II, Irvine, California, USA; Beckman Laser Institute & Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, East Irvine, California, USA.
    Pfefer, T. Joshua
    Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA.
    Evaluation of the robustness of cerebral oximetry to variations in skin pigmentation using a tissue-simulating phantom2022In: Biomedical Optics Express, E-ISSN 2156-7085, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 2909-2928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that epidermal pigmentation level can affect cerebral oximetry measurements. To evaluate the robustness of these devices, we have developed a phantom-based test method that includes an epidermis-simulating layer with several melanin concentrations and a 3D-printed cerebrovascular module. Measurements were performed with neonatal, pediatric and adult sensors from two commercial oximeters, where neonatal probes had shorter source-detector separation distances. Referenced blood oxygenation levels ranged from 30 to 90%. Cerebral oximeter outputs exhibited a consistent decrease in saturation level with simulated melanin content; this effect was greatest at low saturation levels, producing a change of up to 15%. Dependence on pigmentation was strongest in a neonatal sensor, possibly due to its high reflectivity. Overall, our findings indicate that a modular channel-array phantom approach can provide a practical tool for assessing the impact of skin pigmentation on cerebral oximeter performance and that modifications to algorithms and/or instrumentation may be needed to mitigate pigmentation bias.

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  • 14.
    Afzali, Maryam
    et al.
    Cardiff Univ, Wales; Univ Leeds, England.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Özarslan, Evren
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Jones, Derek K.
    Cardiff Univ, Wales.
    Computing the orientational-average of diffusion-weighted MRI signals: a comparison of different techniques2021In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 14345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous applications in diffusion MRI involve computing the orientationally-averaged diffusion-weighted signal. Most approaches implicitly assume, for a given b-value, that the gradient sampling vectors are uniformly distributed on a sphere (or shell), computing the orientationally-averaged signal through simple arithmetic averaging. One challenge with this approach is that not all acquisition schemes have gradient sampling vectors distributed over perfect spheres. To ameliorate this challenge, alternative averaging methods include: weighted signal averaging; spherical harmonic representation of the signal in each shell; and using Mean Apparent Propagator MRI (MAP-MRI) to derive a three-dimensional signal representation and estimate its isotropic part. Here, these different methods are simulated and compared under different signal-to-noise (SNR) realizations. With sufficiently dense sampling points (61 orientations per shell), and isotropically-distributed sampling vectors, all averaging methods give comparable results, (MAP-MRI-based estimates give slightly higher accuracy, albeit with slightly elevated bias as b-value increases). As the SNR and number of data points per shell are reduced, MAP-MRI-based approaches give significantly higher accuracy compared with the other methods. We also apply these approaches to in vivo data where the results are broadly consistent with our simulations. A statistical analysis of the simulated data shows that the orientationally-averaged signals at each b-value are largely Gaussian distributed.

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  • 15.
    Afzali, Maryam
    et al.
    University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom; University of Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Pieciak, Tomasz
    Universidad de Valladolid, Spain.
    Jones, Derek K.
    Cardiff University, United Kingdom.
    Schneider, Jürgen E.
    Leeds University, United Kingdom.
    Özarslan, Evren
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Cumulant expansion with localization: A new representation of the diffusion MRI signal2022In: Frontiers in Neuroimaging, E-ISSN 2813-1193, Vol. 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diffusion MR is sensitive to the microstructural features of a sample. Fine-scale characteristics can be probed by employing strong diffusion gradients while the low b-value regime is determined by the cumulants of the distribution of particle displacements. A signal representation based on the cumulants, however, suffers from a finite convergence radius and cannot represent the ‘localization regime' characterized by a stretched exponential decay that emerges at large gradient strengths. Here, we propose a new representation for the diffusion MR signal. Our method provides not only a robust estimate of the first three cumulants but also a meaningful extrapolation of the entire signal decay.

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  • 16.
    Afzali, Maryam
    et al.
    Cardiff Univ, Wales.
    Pieciak, Tomasz
    AGH Univ Sci & Technol, Poland; Univ Valladolid, Spain.
    Newman, Sharlene
    Indiana Univ, IN 47405 USA; Indiana Univ, IN 47405 USA.
    Garyfallidis, Eleftherios
    Indiana Univ, IN 47405 USA; Indiana Univ, IN 47408 USA.
    Özarslan, Evren
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Cheng, Hu
    Indiana Univ, IN 47405 USA; Indiana Univ, IN 47405 USA.
    Jones, Derek K.
    Cardiff Univ, Wales.
    The sensitivity of diffusion MRI to microstructural properties and experimental factors2021In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods, ISSN 0165-0270, E-ISSN 1872-678X, Vol. 347, article id 108951Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diffusion MRI is a non-invasive technique to study brain microstructure. Differences in the microstructural properties of tissue, including size and anisotropy, can be represented in the signal if the appropriate method of acquisition is used. However, to depict the underlying properties, special care must be taken when designing the acquisition protocol as any changes in the procedure might impact on quantitative measurements. This work reviews state-of-the-art methods for studying brain microstructure using diffusion MRI and their sensitivity to microstructural differences and various experimental factors. Microstructural properties of the tissue at a micrometer scale can be linked to the diffusion signal at a millimeter-scale using modeling. In this paper, we first give an introduction to diffusion MRI and different encoding schemes. Then, signal representation-based methods and multi-compartment models are explained briefly. The sensitivity of the diffusion MRI signal to the microstructural components and the effects of curvedness of axonal trajectories on the diffusion signal are reviewed. Factors that impact on the quality (accuracy and precision) of derived metrics are then reviewed, including the impact of random noise, and variations in the acquisition parameters (i.e., number of sampled signals, b-value and number of acquisition shells). Finally, yet importantly, typical approaches to deal with experimental factors are depicted, including unbiased measures and harmonization. We conclude the review with some future directions and recommendations on this topic.

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  • 17.
    Agebratt, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ström, Edvin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Leandersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    A Randomized Study of the Effects of Additional Fruit and Nuts Consumption on Hepatic Fat Content, Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Basal Metabolic Rate2016In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 1, p. e0147149-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Fruit has since long been advocated as a healthy source of many nutrients, however, the high content of sugars in fruit might be a concern.

    Objectives

    To study effects of an increased fruit intake compared with similar amount of extra calories from nuts in humans.

    Methods

    Thirty healthy non-obese participants were randomized to either supplement the diet with fruits or nuts, each at +7 kcal/kg bodyweight/day for two months. Major endpoints were change of hepatic fat content (HFC, by magnetic resonance imaging, MRI), basal metabolic rate (BMR, with indirect calorimetry) and cardiovascular risk markers.

    Results

    Weight gain was numerically similar in both groups although only statistically significant in the group randomized to nuts (fruit: from 22.15±1.61 kg/m2 to 22.30±1.7 kg/m2, p = 0.24 nuts: from 22.54±2.26 kg/m2 to 22.73±2.28 kg/m2, p = 0.045). On the other hand BMR increased in the nut group only (p = 0.028). Only the nut group reported a net increase of calories (from 2519±721 kcal/day to 2763±595 kcal/day, p = 0.035) according to 3-day food registrations. Despite an almost three-fold reported increased fructose-intake in the fruit group (from 9.1±6.0 gram/day to 25.6±9.6 gram/day, p<0.0001, nuts: from 12.4±5.7 gram/day to 6.5±5.3 gram/day, p = 0.007) there was no change of HFC. The numerical increase in fasting insulin was statistical significant only in the fruit group (from 7.73±3.1 pmol/l to 8.81±2.9 pmol/l, p = 0.018, nuts: from 7.29±2.9 pmol/l to 8.62±3.0 pmol/l, p = 0.14). Levels of vitamin C increased in both groups while α-tocopherol/cholesterol-ratio increased only in the fruit group.

    Conclusions

    Although BMR increased in the nut-group only this was not linked with differences in weight gain between groups which potentially could be explained by the lack of reported net caloric increase in the fruit group. In healthy non-obese individuals an increased fruit intake seems safe from cardiovascular risk perspective, including measurement of HFC by MRI.

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  • 18.
    Aghajary, Mohammad Mahdi
    et al.
    Natl Iranian Gas Co, Iran.
    Gharehbaghi, Arash
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A novel adaptive control design method for stochastic nonlinear systems using neural network2021In: Neural Computing & Applications, ISSN 0941-0643, E-ISSN 1433-3058, Vol. 33, no 15, p. 9259-9287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a novel method for designing an adaptive control system using radial basis function neural network. The method is capable of dealing with nonlinear stochastic systems in strict-feedback form with any unknown dynamics. The proposed neural network allows the method not only to approximate any unknown dynamic of stochastic nonlinear systems, but also to compensate actuator nonlinearity. By employing dynamic surface control method, a common problem that intrinsically exists in the back-stepping design, called "explosion of complexity", is resolved. The proposed method is applied to the control systems comprising various types of the actuator nonlinearities such as Prandtl-Ishlinskii (PI) hysteresis, and dead-zone nonlinearity. The performance of the proposed method is compared to two different baseline methods: a direct form of backstepping method, and an adaptation of the proposed method, named APIC-DSC, in which the neural network is not contributed in compensating the actuator nonlinearity. It is observed that the proposed method improves the failure-free tracking performance in terms of the Integrated Mean Square Error (IMSE) by 25%/11% as compared to the backstepping/APIC-DSC method. This depression in IMSE is further improved by 76%/38% and 32%/49%, when it comes with the actuator nonlinearity of PI hysteresis and dead-zone, respectively. The proposed method also demands shorter adaptation period compared with the baseline methods.

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  • 19. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Ahlström, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nonlinear phonocardiographic Signal Processing2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis work has been to develop signal analysis methods for a computerized cardiac auscultation system, the intelligent stethoscope. In particular, the work focuses on classification and interpretation of features derived from the phonocardiographic (PCG) signal by using advanced signal processing techniques.

    The PCG signal is traditionally analyzed and characterized by morphological properties in the time domain, by spectral properties in the frequency domain or by nonstationary properties in a joint time-frequency domain. The main contribution of this thesis has been to introduce nonlinear analysis techniques based on dynamical systems theory to extract more information from the PCG signal. Especially, Takens' delay embedding theorem has been used to reconstruct the underlying system's state space based on the measured PCG signal. This processing step provides a geometrical interpretation of the dynamics of the signal, whose structure can be utilized for both system characterization and classification as well as for signal processing tasks such as detection and prediction. In this thesis, the PCG signal's structure in state space has been exploited in several applications. Change detection based on recurrence time statistics was used in combination with nonlinear prediction to remove obscuring heart sounds from lung sound recordings in healthy test subjects. Sample entropy and mutual information were used to assess the severity of aortic stenosis (AS) as well as mitral insufficiency (MI) in dogs. A large number of, partly nonlinear, features was extracted and used for distinguishing innocent murmurs from murmurs caused by AS or MI in patients with probable valve disease. Finally, novel work related to very accurate localization of the first heart sound by means of ECG-gated ensemble averaging was conducted. In general, the presented nonlinear processing techniques have shown considerably improved results in comparison with other PCG based techniques.

    In modern health care, auscultation has found its main role in primary or in home health care, when deciding if special care and more extensive examinations are required. Making a decision based on auscultation is however difficult, why a simple tool able to screen and assess murmurs would be both time- and cost-saving while relieving many patients from needless anxiety. In the emerging field of telemedicine and home care, an intelligent stethoscope with decision support abilities would be of great value.

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  • 20. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Ahlström, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Processing of the Phonocardiographic Signal: methods for the intelligent stethoscope2006Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Phonocardiographic signals contain bioacoustic information reflecting the operation of the heart. Normally there are two heart sounds, and additional sounds indicate disease. If a third heart sound is present it could be a sign of heart failure whereas a murmur indicates defective valves or an orifice in the septal wall. The primary aim of this thesis is to use signal processing tools to improve the diagnostic value of this information. More specifically, three different methods have been developed:

    • A nonlinear change detection method has been applied to automatically detect heart sounds. The first and the second heart sounds can be found using recurrence times of the first kind while the third heart sound can be found using recurrence times of the second kind. Most third heart sound occurrences were detected (98 %), but the amount of false extra detections was rather high (7 % of the heart cycles).

    • Heart sounds obscure the interpretation of lung sounds. A new method based on nonlinear prediction has been developed to remove this undesired disturbance. High similarity was obtained when comparing actual lung sounds with lung sounds after removal of heart sounds.

    • Analysis methods such as Shannon energy, wavelets and recurrence quantification analysis were used to extract information from the phonocardiographic signal. The most prominent features, determined by a feature selection method, were used to create a new feature set for heart murmur classification. The classification result was 86 % when separating patients with aortic stenosis, mitral insufficiency and physiological murmurs.

    The derived methods give reasonable results, and they all provide a step forward in the quest for an intelligent stethoscope, a universal phonocardiography tool able to enhance auscultation by improving sound quality, emphasizing abnormal events in the heart cycle and distinguishing different heart murmurs.

    List of papers
    1. Heart sound cancellation from lung sound recordings using recurrence time statistics and nonlinear prediction
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heart sound cancellation from lung sound recordings using recurrence time statistics and nonlinear prediction
    2005 (English)In: IEEE Signal Processing Letters, ISSN 1070-9908, E-ISSN 1558-2361, Vol. 12, no 12, p. 812-815Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Heart sounds (HS) obscure the interpretation of lung sounds (LS). This letter presents a new method to detect and remove this undesired disturbance. The HS detection algorithm is based on a recurrence time statistic that is sensitive to changes in a reconstructed state space. Signal segments that are found to contain HS are removed, and the arising missing parts are replaced with predicted LS using a nonlinear prediction scheme. The prediction operates in the reconstructed state space and uses an iterated integrated nearest trajectory algorithm. The HS detection algorithm detects HS with an error rate of 4% false positives and 8% false negatives. The spectral difference between the reconstructed LS signal and an LS signal with removed HS was 0.34/spl plusmn/0.25, 0.50/spl plusmn/0.33, 0.46/spl plusmn/0.35, and 0.94/spl plusmn/0.64 dB/Hz in the frequency bands 20-40, 40-70, 70-150, and 150-300 Hz, respectively. The cross-correlation index was found to be 99.7%, indicating excellent similarity between actual LS and predicted LS. Listening tests performed by a skilled physician showed high-quality auditory results.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Institutionen för medicinsk teknik, 2005
    Keywords
    Bioacoustics, heart sound (HS), lung sound (LS), nonlinear prediction, recurrence time statistics
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-11857 (URN)10.1109/LSP.2005.859528 (DOI)
    Note
    Original publication: Ahlstrom, C., Liljefeldt, O., Hult, P. and Ask, P., Heart sound cancellation from lung sound recordings using recurrence time statistics and nonlinear prediction, 2005, IEEE Signal Processing Letters, (12), 12, 812-815. http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/LSP.2005.859528. Copyright: IEEE, http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/RecentIssue.jsp?punumber=97Available from: 2008-05-20 Created: 2008-05-20 Last updated: 2021-11-25
    2. Detection of the 3rd Heart Sound using Recurrence Time Statistics
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detection of the 3rd Heart Sound using Recurrence Time Statistics
    2006 (English)In: Proc. 31st IEEE Int. Conf. on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, Toulouse, France, 2006, 2006, p. 1040-1043Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The 3rd heart sound (S3) is normally heard during auscultation of younger individuals, but it is also common in many patients with heart failure. Compared to the 1st and 2nd heart sounds, S3 has low amplitude and low frequency content, making it hard to detect (both manually for the physician and automatically by a detection algorithm). We present an algorithm based on a recurrence time statistic which is sensitive to changes in a reconstructed state space, particularly for detection of transitions with very low energy. Heart sound signals from ten children were used in this study. Most S3 occurrences were detected (98 %), but the amount of false extra detections was rather high (7% of the heart cycles). In conclusion, the method seems capable of detecting S3 with high accuracy and robustness.

    Series
    IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing. Proceedings, ISSN 1520-6149
    Keywords
    acoustic, signal detection, bioacoustics, signal reconstruction, statistics, heart sound, auscultation, heart failure, reconstructed state space, recurrence time statistics
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14058 (URN)
    Available from: 2006-10-09 Created: 2006-10-09 Last updated: 2021-11-25
    3. Feature Extraction for Systolic Heart Murmur Classification
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feature Extraction for Systolic Heart Murmur Classification
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering, ISSN 0090-6964, E-ISSN 1573-9686, Vol. 34, no 11, p. 1666-1677Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Heart murmurs are often the first signs of pathological changes of the heart valves, and they are usually found during auscultation in the primary health care. Distinguishing a pathological murmur from a physiological murmur is however difficult, why an “intelligent stethoscope” with decision support abilities would be of great value. Phonocardiographic signals were acquired from 36 patients with aortic valve stenosis, mitral insufficiency or physiological murmurs, and the data were analyzed with the aim to find a suitable feature subset for automatic classification of heart murmurs. Techniques such as Shannon energy, wavelets, fractal dimensions and recurrence quantification analysis were used to extract 207 features. 157 of these features have not previously been used in heart murmur classification. A multi-domain subset consisting of 14, both old and new, features was derived using Pudil’s sequential floating forward selection (SFFS) method. This subset was compared with several single domain feature sets. Using neural network classification, the selected multi-domain subset gave the best results; 86% correct classifications compared to 68% for the first runner-up. In conclusion, the derived feature set was superior to the comparative sets, and seems rather robust to noisy data.

    Keywords
    Auscultation, Bioacoustics, Feature selection, Heart sounds, Valvular disease
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13044 (URN)10.1007/s10439-006-9187-4 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-03-20 Created: 2008-03-20 Last updated: 2021-11-25
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  • 21.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rask, Peter
    University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden .
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Assessment of Suspected Aortic Stenosis by Auto Mutual Information Analysis of Murmurs2007In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2007. EMBS 2007, 2007, p. 1945-1948Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mild sclerotic thickening of the aortic valve affects 25% of the population, and the condition causes aortic valve stenosis (AS) in 2% of adults above 65 years. Echocardiography is today the clinical standard for assessing AS. However, a cost effective and uncomplicated technique that can be used for decision support in the primary health care would be of great value. In this study, recorded phonocardiographic signals were analyzed using the first local minimum of the auto mutual information (AMI) function. The AMI method measures the complexity in the sound signal, which is related to the amount of turbulence in the blood flow and thus to the severity of the stenosis. Two previously developed phonocardiographic methods for assessing AS severity were used for comparison, the murmur energy ratio and the sound spectral averaging technique. Twenty-nine patients with suspected AS were examined with Doppler echocardiography. The aortic jet velocity was used as a reference of AS severity, and it was found to correlate with the AMI method, the murmur energy ratio and the sound spectral averaging technique with the correlation coefficient R = 0.82, R = 0.73 and R = 0.76, respectively.

  • 22.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst, S-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Diederichs, Frederik
    Fraunhofer Inst Optron, Germany.
    Teichmann, Daniel
    Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark; MIT, MA 02139 USA.
    Technologies for Risk Mitigation and Support of Impaired Drivers2022In: IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), ISSN 1524-9050, E-ISSN 1558-0016, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 4736-4738Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This editorial serves as an extended introduction to the Special Issue on Technologies for Risk Mitigation and Support of Impaired Drivers. It gives the context to recent advances in assisted and automated driving and the new challenges that arise when modern technology meets human users. The Special Issue focuses on the development of robust sensors and detection algorithms for driver state monitoring of fatigue, stress, and inattention, and on the development of personalized multimodal, user-oriented, and adaptive information, warning, actuation, and handover strategies. A summary of more recent developments serves as a motivation for each article that follows.

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  • 23.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Georgoulas, George
    Univ Patras, Greece; DataWise Data Engn LLC, GA 30318 USA.
    Kircher, Katja
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Towards a Context-Dependent Multi-Buffer Driver Distraction Detection Algorithm2022In: IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), ISSN 1524-9050, E-ISSN 1558-0016, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 4778-4790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents initial work on a context-dependent driver distraction detection algorithm called AttenD2.0, which extends the original AttenD algorithm with elements from the Minimum Required Attention (MiRA) theory. Central to the original AttenD algorithm is a time buffer which keeps track of how often and for how long the driver looks away from the forward roadway. When the driver looks away the buffer is depleted and when looking back the buffer fills up. If the buffer runs empty the driver is classified as distracted. AttenD2.0 extends this concept by adding multiple buffers, thus integrating situation dependence and visual time-sharing behaviour in a transparent manner. Also, the increment and decrement of the buffers are now controlled by both static requirements (e.g. the presence of an on-ramp increases the need to monitor the sides and the mirrors) as well as dynamic requirements (e.g., reduced speed lowers the need to monitor the speedometer). The algorithm description is generic, but a real-time implementation with concrete values for different parameters is showcased in a driving simulator experiment with 16 bus drivers, where AttenD2.0 was used to ensure that drivers are attentive before taking back control after an automated bus stop docking and depot procedure. The scalability of AttenD2.0 relative to available data sources and the level of vehicle automation is demonstrated. Future work includes expanding the concept to real-world environments by automatically integrating situational information from the vehicles environmental sensing and from digital maps.

  • 24.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Detection of the 3(rd) heart sound using recurrence time statistics2006In: 2006 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, Vols 1-13, 2006, Vol. 1-13, p. 2288-2291Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 3(rd) heart sound (S3) is normally heard during auscultation of younger individuals, but it is also common in many patients with heart failure. Compared to the 1(st) and 2(nd) heart sounds, S3 has low amplitude and low frequency content, making it hard to detect (both manually for the physician and automatically by a detection algorithm). We present an algorithm based on a recurrence time statistic which is sensitive to changes in a reconstructed state space, particularly for detection of transitions with very low energy. Heart sound signals from ten children were used in this study. Most S3 occurrences were detected (98%), but the amount of false extra detections was rather high (7% of the heart cycles). In conclusion, the method seems capable of detecting S3 with high accuracy and robustness.

  • 25.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Detection of the 3rd Heart Sound using Recurrence Time Statistics2006In: Proc. 31st IEEE Int. Conf. on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, Toulouse, France, 2006, 2006, p. 1040-1043Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The 3rd heart sound (S3) is normally heard during auscultation of younger individuals, but it is also common in many patients with heart failure. Compared to the 1st and 2nd heart sounds, S3 has low amplitude and low frequency content, making it hard to detect (both manually for the physician and automatically by a detection algorithm). We present an algorithm based on a recurrence time statistic which is sensitive to changes in a reconstructed state space, particularly for detection of transitions with very low energy. Heart sound signals from ten children were used in this study. Most S3 occurrences were detected (98 %), but the amount of false extra detections was rather high (7% of the heart cycles). In conclusion, the method seems capable of detecting S3 with high accuracy and robustness.

  • 26.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Thresholding distance plots using true recurrence points2006In: Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, 2006. ICASSP 2006, IEEE , 2006, p. 688-691Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recurrence plots (RP) visualize multi-dimensional state spaces and represent the recurrence of states of a system. Recurrence points can be divided into true recurrence points and false recurrence points (also called sojourn points). We introduce the true recurrence point recurrence plot, TRP, a variant of the traditional RP excluding the sojourn points. This is a cleaned up RP free from recurrence points originating from tangential motion, and hence a more robust representation of unstable periodic orbits. The method is demonstrated with three simple systems, a periodic sine wave, a quasi-periodic torus and the x-component of the chaotic Lorenz system

  • 27.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Wheeze analysis and detection with non-linear phase-space embedding2005In: Nordic Baltic Conference Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics,2005, Umeå: IFMBE , 2005, p. 305-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Rask, P
    Karlsson, J-E
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Using the intelligent stethoscope for extraction of features for systolic heart murmur classification2006In: World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering WC2006,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rask, Peter
    Örebro university.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Feature Extraction for Systolic Heart Murmur Classification2006In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering, ISSN 0090-6964, E-ISSN 1573-9686, Vol. 34, no 11, p. 1666-1677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart murmurs are often the first signs of pathological changes of the heart valves, and they are usually found during auscultation in the primary health care. Distinguishing a pathological murmur from a physiological murmur is however difficult, why an “intelligent stethoscope” with decision support abilities would be of great value. Phonocardiographic signals were acquired from 36 patients with aortic valve stenosis, mitral insufficiency or physiological murmurs, and the data were analyzed with the aim to find a suitable feature subset for automatic classification of heart murmurs. Techniques such as Shannon energy, wavelets, fractal dimensions and recurrence quantification analysis were used to extract 207 features. 157 of these features have not previously been used in heart murmur classification. A multi-domain subset consisting of 14, both old and new, features was derived using Pudil’s sequential floating forward selection (SFFS) method. This subset was compared with several single domain feature sets. Using neural network classification, the selected multi-domain subset gave the best results; 86% correct classifications compared to 68% for the first runner-up. In conclusion, the derived feature set was superior to the comparative sets, and seems rather robust to noisy data.

  • 30.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Schmekel, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Automatisk detektering av ronki med icke-linjära metoder2004In: Svenska Läkaresällskapets riksstämma,2004, 2004, p. 66-66Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Schmekel, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Wheeze detection with nonlinear statespace embedding2004In: International Lung Sound Association,2004, 2004, p. 38-39Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Höglund, Katja
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Häggström, Jens
    Kvart, Clarence
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Assessing Aortic Stenosis using Sample Entropy of the Phonocardiographic Signal in Dogs2008In: IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, ISSN 0018-9294, E-ISSN 1558-2531, Vol. 55, no 8, p. 2107-2109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In aortic valve stenosis (AS), heart murmurs arise as an effect of turbulent blood flow distal to the obstructed valves. With increasing AS severity, the flow becomes more unstable, and the ensuing murmur becomes more complex. We hypothesize that these hemodynamic flow changes can be quantified based on the complexity of the phonocardiographic (PCG) signal. In this study, sample entropy (SampEn) was investigated as a measure of complexity using a dog model. Twenty-seven boxer dogs with various degrees of AS were examined with Doppler echocardiography, and the peak aortic flow velocity (Vmax) was used as a reference of AS severity. SampEn correlated to Vmax with R = 0.70 using logarithmic regression. In a separate analysis, significant differences were found between physiologic murmurs and murmurs caused by AS (p < 0.05), and the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve was calculated to 0.96. Comparison with previously presented PCG measures for AS assessment showed improved performance when using SampEn, especially for differentiation between physiological murmurs and murmurs caused by mild AS. Studies in patients will be needed to properly assess the technique in humans.

  • 33.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Höglund, Katja
    Dept. of Anatomy and Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Häggström, Jens
    Dept. of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kvart, Clarence
    Dept. of Anatomy and Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Distinguishing Innocent Murmurs from Murmurs caused by Aortic Stenosis by Recurrence Quantification Analysis2006In: ROCEEDINGS OF WORLD ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, VOL 18, Canakkale, Turkey: World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology (W A S E T) , 2006, p. 40-45Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is sometimes difficult to differentiate between innocent murmurs and pathological murmurs during auscultation. In these difficult cases, an intelligent stethoscope with decision support abilities would be of great value. In this study, using a dog model, phonocardiographic recordings were obtained from 27 boxer dogs with various degrees of aortic stenosis (AS) severity. As a reference for severity assessment, continuous wave Doppler was used. The data were analyzed with recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) with the aim to find features able to distinguish innocent murmurs from murmurs caused by AS. Four out of eight investigated RQA features showed significant differences between innocent murmurs and pathological murmurs. Using a plain linear discriminant analysis classifier, the best pair of features (recurrence rate and entropy) resulted in a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 88%. In conclusion, RQA provide valid features which can be used for differentiation between innocent murmurs and murmurs caused by AS.

  • 34.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute VTI, S-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Jansson, Sabina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Anund, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute VTI, S-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Local changes in the wake electroencephalogram precedes lane departures2017In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 816-819Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this exploratory study is to investigate if lane departures are associated with local sleep, measured via source-localized electroencephalography (EEG) theta power in the 5-9 Hz frequency range. Thirty participants drove in an advanced driving simulator, resulting in 135 lane departures at high levels of self-reported sleepiness. These lane departures were compared to matching non-departures at the same sleepiness level within the same individual. There was no correspondence between lane departures and global theta activity. However, at the local level an increased risk for lane departures was associated with increased theta content in brain regions related to motor function.

  • 35.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Johansson, Anders
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Chaotic dynamics of respiratory sounds2006In: Chaos, Solitons & Fractals, ISSN 0960-0779, E-ISSN 1873-2887, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 1054-1062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing interest in nonlinear analysis of respiratory sounds (RS), but little has been done to justify the use of nonlinear tools on such data. The aim of this paper is to investigate the stationarity, linearity and chaotic dynamics of recorded RS. Two independent data sets from 8 + 8 healthy subjects were recorded and investigated. The first set consisted of lung sounds (LS) recorded with an electronic stethoscope and the other of tracheal sounds (TS) recorded with a contact accelerometer. Recurrence plot analysis revealed that both LS and TS are quasistationary, with the parts corresponding to inspiratory and expiratory flow plateaus being stationary. Surrogate data tests could not provide statistically sufficient evidence regarding the nonlinearity of the data. The null hypothesis could not be rejected in 4 out of 32 LS cases and in 15 out of 32 TS cases. However, the Lyapunov spectra, the correlation dimension (D2) and the Kaplan-Yorke dimension (DKY) all indicate chaotic behavior. The Lyapunov analysis showed that the sum of the exponents was negative in all cases and that the largest exponent was found to be positive. The results are partly ambiguous, but provide some evidence of chaotic dynamics of RS, both concerning LS and TS. The results motivate continuous use of nonlinear tools for analysing RS data. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 36.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Johansson, Anders
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    A respiration monitor based on electrocardiographic and photoplethysmographic sensor fusion2004In: IEEE Engineering in Medical and Biological Society,2004, Piscataway, N.J. USA: IEEEEMBS , 2004, p. 2311-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Johansson, Anders
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Monitorering av andning and blodtrycksförändringar baserat på EKG och hjärtljud2007In: Medicinteknik dagarna,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Johansson, Anders
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Uhlin, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Noninvasive investigation of blood pressure changes using the pulse wave transit time: A novel approach in the monitoring of hemodialysis patients2005In: Journal of Artificial Organs, ISSN 1434-7229, E-ISSN 1619-0904, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 192-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Severe blood pressure changes are well known in hemodialysis. Detection and prediction of these are important for the well-being of the patient and for optimizing treatment. New noninvasive methods for this purpose are required. The pulse wave transit time technique is an indirect estimation of blood pressure, and our intention is to investigate whether this technique is applicable for hemodialysis treatment. A measurement setup utilizing lower body negative pressure and isometric contraction was used to simulate dialysis-related blood pressure changes in normal test subjects. Systolic blood pressure levels were compared to different pulse wave transit times, including and excluding the cardiac preejection period. Based on the results of these investigations, a pulse wave transit time technique adapted for dialysis treatment was developed and tried out on patients. To determine systolic blood pressure in the normal group, the total pulse wave transit time was found most suitable (including the cardiac preejection period). Correlation coefficients were r = 0.80 ± 0.06 (mean ± SD) overall and r = 0.81 ± 0.16 and r = 0.09 ± 0.62 for the hypotension and hypertension phases, respectively. When applying the adapted technique in dialysis patients, large blood pressure variations could easily be detected when present. Pulse wave transit time is correlated to systolic blood pressure within the acceptable range for a trend-indicating system. The method's applicability for dialysis treatment requires further studies. The results indicate that large sudden pressure drops, like those seen in sudden hypovolemia, can be detected. © The Japanese Society for Artificial Organs 2005.

  • 39.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Liljefeldt, Olle
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Heart sound cancellation from lung sound recordings using recurrence time statistics and nonlinear prediction.2005In: Medicinteknikdagarna, 2005, Vol. 12, p. 812-815Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart sounds (HS) obscure the interpretation of lung sounds (LS). This letter presents a new method to detect and remove this undesired disturbance. The HS detection algorithm is based on a recurrence time statistic that is sensitive to changes in a reconstructed state space. Signal segments that are found to contain HS are removed, and the arising missing parts are replaced with predicted LS using a nonlinear prediction scheme. The prediction operates in the reconstructed state space and uses an iterated integrated nearest trajectory algorithm. The HS detection algorithm detects HS with an error rate of 4% false positives and 8% false negatives. The spectral difference between the reconstructed LS signal and an LS signal with removed HS was 0 34 0 25, 0 50 0 33, 0 46 0 35, and 0 94 0 64 dB/Hz in the frequency bands 20–40, 40–70, 70–150, and 150–300 Hz, respectively. The cross-correlation index was found to be 99.7%, indicating excellent similarity between actual LS and predicted LS. Listening tests performed by a skilled physician showed high-quality auditory results.

  • 40.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liljefeldt, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Heart sound cancellation from lung sound recordings using recurrence time statistics and nonlinear prediction2005In: IEEE Signal Processing Letters, ISSN 1070-9908, E-ISSN 1558-2361, Vol. 12, no 12, p. 812-815Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart sounds (HS) obscure the interpretation of lung sounds (LS). This letter presents a new method to detect and remove this undesired disturbance. The HS detection algorithm is based on a recurrence time statistic that is sensitive to changes in a reconstructed state space. Signal segments that are found to contain HS are removed, and the arising missing parts are replaced with predicted LS using a nonlinear prediction scheme. The prediction operates in the reconstructed state space and uses an iterated integrated nearest trajectory algorithm. The HS detection algorithm detects HS with an error rate of 4% false positives and 8% false negatives. The spectral difference between the reconstructed LS signal and an LS signal with removed HS was 0.34/spl plusmn/0.25, 0.50/spl plusmn/0.33, 0.46/spl plusmn/0.35, and 0.94/spl plusmn/0.64 dB/Hz in the frequency bands 20-40, 40-70, 70-150, and 150-300 Hz, respectively. The cross-correlation index was found to be 99.7%, indicating excellent similarity between actual LS and predicted LS. Listening tests performed by a skilled physician showed high-quality auditory results.

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  • 41.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A method for accurate localization of the first heart sound and possible applications2008In: Physiological Measurement, ISSN 0967-3334, E-ISSN 1361-6579, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 417-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously developed a method for localization of the first heart sound (S1) using wavelet denoising and ECG-gated peak-picking. In this study, an additional enhancement step based on cross-correlation and ECG-gated ensemble averaging (EA) is presented. The main objective of the improved method was to localize S1 with very high temporal accuracy in (pseudo-) real time. The performance of S1 detection and localization, with and without EA enhancement, was evaluated on simulated as well as experimental data. The simulation study showed that EA enhancement reduced the localization error considerably and that S1 could be accurately localized at much lower signal-to-noise ratios. The experimental data were taken from ten healthy subjects at rest and during invoked hyper- and hypotension. For this material, the number of correct S1 detections increased from 91% to 98% when using EA enhancement. Improved performance was also demonstrated when EA enhancement was used for continuous tracking of blood pressure changes and for respiration monitoring via the electromechanical activation time. These are two typical applications where accurate localization of S1 is essential for the results.

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  • 42.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish Natl Rd and Transport Res Inst VTI, S-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Solis-Marcos, Ignacio
    Swedish Natl Rd and Transport Res Inst VTI, S-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Volvo Car Corp, Sweden; Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Akerstedt, Torbjorn
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    The impact of driver sleepiness on fixation-related brain potentials2020In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 29, no 5, article id e12962Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of driver sleepiness are often quantified as deteriorated driving performance, increased blink durations and high levels of subjective sleepiness. Driver sleepiness has also been associated with increasing levels of electroencephalogram (EEG) power, especially in the alpha range. The present exploratory study investigated a new measure of driver sleepiness, the EEG fixation-related lambda response. Thirty young male drivers (23.6 +/- 1.7 years old) participated in a driving simulator experiment in which they drove on rural and suburban roads in simulated daylight versus darkness during both the daytime (full sleep) and night-time (sleep deprived). The results show lower lambda responses during night driving and with longer time on task, indicating that sleep deprivation and time on task cause a general decrement in cortical responsiveness to incoming visual stimuli. Levels of subjective sleepiness and line crossings were higher under the same conditions. Furthermore, results of a linear mixed-effects model showed that low lambda responses are associated with high subjective sleepiness and more line crossings. We suggest that the fixation-related lambda response can be used to investigate driving impairment induced by sleep deprivation while driving and that, after further refinement, it may be useful as an objective measure of driver sleepiness.

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  • 43.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst VTI, S-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    van Leeuwen, Wessel
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Krupenia, Stas
    Scania CV AB, Sweden.
    Jansson, Herman
    Smart Eye AB, Sweden.
    Finer, Svitlana
    Smart Eye AB, Sweden.
    Anund, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst VTI, S-58195 Linkoping, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Kecklund, Goran
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Real-Time Adaptation of Driving Time and Rest Periods in Automated Long-Haul Trucking: Development of a System Based on Biomathematical Modelling, Fatigue and Relaxation Monitoring2022In: IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), ISSN 1524-9050, E-ISSN 1558-0016, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 4758-4766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hours of service regulations govern the working hours of commercial motor vehicle drivers, but these regulations may become more flexible as highly automated vehicles have the potential to afford periods of in-cab rest or even sleep while the vehicle is moving. A prerequisite is robust continuous monitoring of when the driver is resting (to account for reduced time on task) or sleeping (to account for the reduced physiological drive to sleep). The overall aims of this paper are to raise a discussion of whether it is possible to obtain successful rest during automated driving, and to present initial work on a hypothetical data driven algorithm aimed to estimate if it is possible to gain driving time after resting under fully automated driving. The presented algorithm consists of four central components, a heart rate-based relaxation detection algorithm, a camera-based sleep detection algorithm, a fatigue modelling component taking time awake, time of day and time on task into account, and a component that estimates gained driving time. Real-time assessment of driver fitness is complicated, especially when it comes to the recuperative value of in-cab sleep and rest, as it depends on sleep quality, time of day, homeostatic sleep pressure and on the activities that are carried out while resting. The monotony that characterizes for long-haul truck driving is clearly interrupted for a while, but the long-term consequences of extended driving times, including user acceptance of the key stakeholders, requires further research.

  • 44.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish Natl Rd and Transport Res Inst VTI, S-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Wachtmeister, Jesper
    Mobile Behav, Sweden.
    Nyman, Mattias
    DING Designingenjorerna Sverige AB, Sweden.
    Nordenstrom, Axel
    DING Designingenjorerna Sverige AB, Sweden.
    Kircher, Katja
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Swedish Natl Rd and Transport Res Inst VTI, S-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Using smartphone logging to gain insight about phone use in traffic2020In: Cognition, Technology & Work, ISSN 1435-5558, E-ISSN 1435-5566, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 181-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of mobile phone usage in traffic has been studied by road-side counting, naturalistic driving data, surveillance cameras, smartphone logging, and subjective estimates via surveys. Here, we describe a custom-made smartphone logging application along with suggestions on how future such applications should be designed. The developed application logs start and end times of all phone interactions (mobile phone applications, incoming/outgoing phone calls and text messages, audio output, and screen activations). In addition, all movements are automatically classified into transport, cycling, walking, running, or stationary. The capabilities of the approach are demonstrated in a pilot study with 143 participants. Examples of results that can be gained from smartphone logging include prevalence in different transportation modes (here found to be 12% while driving, 4% while cycling, and 7% while walking), which apps are being used (here found to be 19% navigation, 12% talking, 12% social media, and 10% games) and on which road types (rural, urban, highway etc.). Smartphone logging was found to be an insightful complement to the other methods for assessing phone use in traffic, especially since it allows the analyses of which apps are used and where they are used, split into transportation mode and road type, all at a relatively low cost.

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  • 45.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst VTI, Linkoping, Sweden; VTI, Olaus Magnus vag 35, S-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Zemblys, Raimondas
    SmartEye AB, Sweden.
    Finer, Svitlana
    SmartEye AB, Sweden.
    Kircher, Katja
    Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst VTI, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Alcohol impairs driver attention and prevents compensatory strategies2023In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 184, article id 107010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the negative effects of alcohol on driving performance are undisputed, it is unclear how driver attention, eye movements and visual information sampling are affected by alcohol consumption. A simulator study with 35 participants was conducted to investigate whether and how a drivers level of attention is related to self-paced non-driving related task (NDRT)-engagement and tactical aspects of undesirable driver behaviour under increasing levels of breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) up to 1.0 %o. Increasing BrAC levels lead to more frequent speeding, short time headways and weaving, and higher NDRT engagement. Instantaneous distraction events become more frequent, with more and longer glances to the NDRT, and a general decline in visual attention to the forward roadway. With alcohol, the compensatory behaviour that is typically seen when drivers engage in NDRTs did not appear. These findings support the theory that alcohol reduces the ability to shift attention between multiple tasks. To conclude, the independent reduction in safety margins in combination with impaired attention and an increased willingness to engage in NDRTs is likely the reason behind increased crash risk when driving under the influence of alcohol.

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  • 46.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst VTI, Olaus Magnus Vag 35, SE-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Zemblys, Raimondas
    SmartEye AB, Sweden.
    Jansson, Herman
    SmartEye AB, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Christian
    Autol Dev AB, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Johan
    Autol Dev AB, Sweden.
    Anund, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst VTI, Olaus Magnus Vag 35, SE-58330 Linkoping, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Effects of partially automated driving on the development of driver sleepiness2021In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 153, article id 106058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to compare the development of sleepiness during manual driving versus level 2 partially automated driving, when driving on a motorway in Sweden. The hypothesis was that partially auto-mated driving will lead to higher levels of fatigue due to underload. Eighty-nine drivers were included in the study using a 2 ? 2 design with the conditions manual versus partially automated driving and daytime (full sleep) versus night-time (sleep deprived). The results showed that night-time driving led to markedly increased levels of sleepiness in terms of subjective sleepiness ratings, blink durations, PERCLOS, pupil diameter and heart rate. Partially automated driving led to slightly higher subjective sleepiness ratings, longer blink durations, decreased pupil diameter, slower heart rate, and higher EEG alpha and theta activity. However, elevated levels of sleepiness mainly arose from the night-time drives when the sleep pressure was high. During daytime, when the drivers were alert, partially automated driving had little or no detrimental effects on driver fatigue. Whether the negative effects of increased sleepiness during partially automated driving can be compensated by the positive effects of lateral and longitudinal driving support needs to be investigated in further studies.

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  • 47.
    Ahn, Henrik Casimir
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Jodal, M.
    Lindhagen, J
    Lundgren, O.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Bestämning av tunntarmsblodflödet med laser Doppler teknik1984In: Läkarsällskapets Riksstämma,1984, 1984Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Ahn, Henrik Casimir
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Johansson, K.
    Lindhagen, J.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Förändringar av blodflödet i ventrikeln i samband med mätt med laser Dopplerteknik1984In: Läkarsällskapets Riksstämma,1984, 1984Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Ahn, Henrik Casimir
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Johansson, K.
    Lindhagen, J.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Laser Doppler flowmetry in the assessment of gastric blood flow1984In: man. Scand J of Gastroenterology,1984, 1984, p. 98:33-98:33Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Ahn, Henrik Casimir
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Lindhagen, J.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Jodal, M.
    Lundgren, O.
    Evaluation of Laser Doppler Flowmetry in the assessment of blood flow in the small intestine1984In: Third World Congress of Microcirculation,1984, 1984Conference paper (Other academic)
1234567 1 - 50 of 2485
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