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  • 1.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Carlsson, C
    Att visa upp sin värld: Hur personer med stora varaktiga funktionshinder uppfattar sin livssituation relaterat till de etiska principerna i LSS2002Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Wennberg, S
    Coping with illness-related problems in persons with progressive muscular diseases: the Swedish version of the Ways of Coping Questionnaire2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 16, p. 368-375Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Alehagen, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gender and Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Ulf
    Division of Biological Psychology, Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fear, pain and stress hormones during childbirth2005In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 153-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims. To investigate the course of fear, pain and stress hormones during labor, and the associations between fear, pain, stress hormones and duration of labor in nulliparous women with and without epidural analgesia (EDA).

    Method.  One day during gestation weeks 37–39, urinary and salivary samples were collected to measure catecholamines and cortisol. Hourly during labor, the participants answered the Delivery Fear Scale and a pain intensity scale, and urinary and salivary samples were collected to measure stress hormones.

    Results. The course of fear, pain and stress hormones differed throughout labor in women with and without EDA. Pain and cortisol increased throughout labor in women without EDA. Women who received EDA had more fear, but not more pain, before the administration of the EDA than women who did not receive EDA. Pain, fear and catecholamines decreased when women received EDA, but fear and pain increased again later in labor. Fear and pain correlated, as well as levels of fear in the different phases of labor. During phase one of labor epinephrine and duration of the phase were negatively correlated.

    Conclusion.  The course of fear, pain and concentrations of stress hormones differed, highly influenced by the administration of EDA. Fear and pain correlated more pronounced than stress hormones and fear, pain and duration of labor.

  • 4.
    Alehagen, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gender and Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fear of childbirth before, during, and after childbirth2006In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 85, no 1, p. 56-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Only scanty research exists about the relationship between women's expectations during pregnancy and their experiences as reported during the actual process of labor and afterwards. The aims of the present study were: 1. to investigate the associations between fear of childbirth during pregnancy and postpartum and fear and pain during early active labor (phase 1: cervix dilatation 3–5 cm), and 2. to explore possible differences regarding fear of childbirth during pregnancy and postpartum between women who did or did not receive epidural analgesia during labor.

    Methods. Fear of childbirth was measured in 47 nulliparous women during gestation weeks 37–39 by means of the Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire (W-DEQ version A). During early active labor we measured women's fear (Delivery Fear Scale) and their experiences of pain (a pain intensity scale). Finally, fear after childbirth (W-DEQ version B) was measured two hours, two days, and five weeks after delivery.

    Results. A positive correlation appeared between fear of childbirth during pregnancy, postpartum, and early active labor. There were no differences in fear of childbirth during late pregnancy between women who received epidural analgesia and those who did not. Postpartum fear was higher in the women who had received epidural analgesia.

    Conclusions. Pregnant women who fear childbirth are prone to report fear during the actual labor and postpartum. The administration of epidural analgesia is not a sufficient response to women's fear during the process of labor.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Inger S
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Utveckling av metoder för mätning av vårdkvalitet: Med inriktning mot omvårdnad1995Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present thesis has its roots in the need to measure and evaluate quality of care, especially in times when resources allocated to health- and medical care are being limited. This is of concern for many groups in society, but perhaps mOst of all for patients, hospital staff and politicians.

    The main purpose of the thesis was to develop methods for measuring quality of care within nursing.

    The thesis has been organised in three main parts, the first of which deals with the principal concepts in this research,in addition to research and develop- ment in existing instruments for measuring quality of care. The second part contains the empirical study and its results. Finally, the third part deals with the development of variables for methods of measurement based on the empirical study: it also looks ahead, at visions and viewpoints governing future research and development work.

    Data collection was carried out by means of a thematic interview, and by measuring attitudes to quality of care on a modified attitude scale based on Osgood's semantic differential. The interview group comprised 128 people; 25 patients and 25 staff members at a local hospital, 25 patients and 27 staff members at a health centre, and 26 county council politicians. The interview material was analysed inductively using qualitative and quantitative content analysis. On analysing the three themes which dealt with the interviewees' perception of health, quality of life as a result of care received, the quality of selfcare as well as care goals, literature studies were added which dealt with the above-mentioned phenomena.

    The result of the interview study, and the literature studies included in the analysis phase, can be stated in brief, that the main focus in the perception of quality of care held by the patients, the staff and the politicians was on 1) the quality of the staff, with an emphasis on the characteristics and skills of the staff, 2) quality in implementing care, involving care measures of an affective nature and the quality of the patient- staff relationship, and 3) the patient-related quality of results, consisting of such changes in the patient's health status as a cure or a change in health; cognitively oriented results like better knowledge about one's condition; wellbeing as a result of care; satisfaction with the care and treatment provided, and with the staff.

    The result of the attitudes survey was that politicians were the most positive towards the quality of the care provided, while the personal at the health centre were the least positive. Of the various professional categories interviewed, physicians were the most positive. Other staff comprising paramedical groups were the least positive.

    Further groups of variables have been generated from the data collected and from the literature studies in order to extend the evaluation of the quality of nursing care. All of the variable groups developed in the present thesis have been named and grouped together in a system called the KISAAL system, after the initials of the author. The different groups of variables can be related to each other to facilitate a total assessment of the quality of nursing care, and its management.

  • 6. Andersson, P
    et al.
    Hallberg, I R
    Lorefält, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Renvert, S
    Oral health problems in elderly rehabiliation patients2004In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 2, p. 70-77Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Andréasson, S
    et al.
    Gullberg, Mats T
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Henny M
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hamrin, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Medical laboratory technologists' perception of professional self. A study of Swedish MLTs employed in clinical chemistry1992In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 67-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The subjective perception of professional self was studied for a sample of Medical Laboratory Technologists (MLTs) employed in Clinical Chemistry in Sweden. The sample (N = 488) consisted of a randomized tenth of members of their trade union. A mailed questionnaire with 21 items concerning self-description compared with peers in a seven-point Likert type scale was completed by 332 (68%). There was no significant overall difference concerning the four principal types of workplace: Clinical Chemistry, Blood Serology, Primary Care and Clinical Chemistry/Blood Serology. The main difference was found between those in managerial posts (N = 72) and the other MLTs (N = 260). Factor analysis showed three principal components, labelled Professionalism, Work Ethic, and Empathy, but also a different composition of variables of the components for the manager group compared with the non-manager group.

  • 8. Anund, Anna
    et al.
    Sjölander, Catarina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Ge forskarna all rätt till data från bilarnas "svarta lådor"2006In: VTI aktuellt, ISSN 0347-9382, Vol. 3, p. 24-24Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

      

  • 9.
    Appelin, G
    et al.
    Jönköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Patients' experiences of palliative care in the home. A phenomenological study of a Swedish sample.2004In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, p. 65-70Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Appelin, G
    et al.
    omvårdnad Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping.
    Brobäck, G
    omvårdnad Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    A comprehensive picture of palliative care at home from the people involved2005In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 315-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to identify the comprehensive picture of palliative care in the home, as experienced by the people involved. The study is a secondary analysis of three phenomenological studies including six cancer patients, six next of kin and six district nurses. Data were collected in qualitative interviews using an interview guide. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. In this secondary analysis, data were analysed by hermeneutic analysis guided by Gadamer. The guiding questions during the reading were: Is there an advantage receiving palliative care at home? Is there a disadvantage receiving palliative care at home? The findings indicate that the advantages of palliative care at home is, striving for normal life, including the care in the home composed of physical care and emotional/mental care. Striving for normal life also includes emotional feelings, safety and resources and policies which regulates this activity. Disadvantages of palliative care at home are commitment, composed of adaptation and extra work, and demands, composed of frustration and uncertainty. If the people involved are to be able to manage the situation and optimize living while dying, there must be support and resources facilitating the situation. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 11.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Näringstillstånd och höftfraktur2005In: Incitament, ISSN 1103-503X, Vol. 1, p. 59-62Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Christensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Kvalitetsindikationer för områdena smärta, munhålan, nutrition, trycksår2005Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jensen, Sara
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundin, Richard
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland.
    Christensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Attitudes of nursing staff working with older people towards nutritional nursing care2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 11, p. 2007-2014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim.  The aim of this study was to examine attitudes of the nursing staff in geriatric care towards factors of importance for nutritional nursing care.

    Background.  Studies show that nutritional risk assessment is seldom performed on older patients as routine and very few patients have a nutritional care plan. Patients in long-term care who are easy to feed are also found to be looked upon more positively than those with high feeding needs.

    Methods.  A total of 252 registered nurses and nurse aids working at geriatric rehabilitation and medical care clinics and resident homes participated in the study. Attitudes were examined using the Staff Attitudes to Nutritional Nursing Care Geriatric scale. The scale includes 18 items and was designed as a one to five-point Lickert-type scale. It gives a total score and five subscales representing the dimensions ‘Norms’, ‘Habits’, ‘Assessment’, ‘Intervention’ and ‘Individualization’. A higher score indicates a more positive attitude.

    Results.  Of all nursing staff, 53% displayed a positive attitude towards factors of importance for nutritional nursing care and the rest displayed a neutral or negative attitude. The ‘Intervention’ dimension, dealing with nutritional problems and how to manage them, reflected the highest level of positive attitudes, which represents 71% of the nursing staff. The ‘Norms’ dimension had the lowest relative frequency of positive attitudes, 27%. The registered nurses held significantly more positive attitudes than the nurse aids did.

    Conclusions.  Nutritional issues comprise an important and time-consuming responsibility in geriatric care; however, nursing staff do not show an unequivocal positive attitude regarding this responsibility. The consequences this entails for the older patient need to be examined further.

    Relevance to clinical practice.  Nursing staff play an important role in caring for patients who are malnourished or at risk for malnutrition. Positive attitudes might hinder the development of undernourishment or the further worsening of an already undernourished patient's condition.

  • 14.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margaretha
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nutritional status and functional capacity in elderly people with hip fracture2000Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to study nutritional status and functional capacity in elderly men and women admitted to hospital with a hip fractnre, and to evaluate the effect of nutritional intervention and surgical method. A total of 176 patients participated in the study. Of them 84 received protein- and energy-enriched meals at hospital and nutritional advice on discharge and at home. A total of 100 patients with displaced femoral neck fracture were randomised to treatment with either total hip arthroplasty or osteosynthesis with Olmed® screws.

    The patients were examined and interviewed the first time within 4-6 days after surgery, as well as one and three months aud one year after surgery. The nutritional status was assessed with body mass index, measures of triceps skinfold thickness, estimation of muscle mass and body composition. Serum albumin, insulin-like growth factor-I and hormones were measured. Functional capacity was assessed with the Modified Norton scale, Katz index of ADL and a questionnaire measuring instrumental activities of daily living.

    Mentally impaired patients had worse nutritional status aud functional condition compared with the lucid group at inclusion, deteriorated more in activity and mobility fimctions and had a higher one-year mortality rate. The nutritional intervention was not powerful enough to have effect on anthropometric or biochemical measurements. The patients treated with total hip arthroplasty had reduced pain, better locomotion ability and a slight weight gain compared with the osteosynthesis group.

    In conclusion, a marked deterioration of nutritional and functional status was found after a hip fracture. Studies of the effect of a more powerful nutritional intervention on nutritional status and functional capacity in this group are warranted. Patients treated with total hip arthroplasty had a more favourable rehabilitation period with regard to nutritional status and locomotion ability.

    List of papers
    1. Nutritional state and functional capacity among elderly Swedish people with acute hip fracture
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nutritional state and functional capacity among elderly Swedish people with acute hip fracture
    2000 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 268-274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to describe characteristics in a group of elderly men and women with hip fracture, regarding presumed risk factors, such as nutritional state and functional capacity. A total of 142 men and women aged 75 years or more were consecutively included on admittance to the hospital. Anthropometry and body composition were measured 4-6 days after the fracture. Data on functional status, activities of daily living and living arrangements at the time of the fracture were collected. The women and men had a body mass index (BMI) of 22.3 ▒ 3.7 kg/m2 and 21.7 ▒ 2.1 kg/m2, respectively. Of the whole group, 71% had a BMI < 24 kg/m2 and 25% a BMI < 20.0 kg/m2. Forty-five percent of the patients needed daily home help, and a majority of them were mentally impaired (p < 0.0001). Women with a trochanteric hip fracture were shorter, had lower body weight, lower lean body mass and lower arm muscle circumference (AMC) than the cervical fracture group (p < 0.05). Fewer women with a trochanteric fracture and fewer women with mental impairment took walks outside before the fracture, (p = 0.023 and p = 0.002, respectively). Characteristics found in the group were low BMI, low muscle mass as indicated by low lean body mass and mental impairment. It seems important to evaluate such factors when developing post-operative care plans aimed at avoiding further deterioration. Extra frail sub-groups of patients, such as people who are mentally impaired, women with trochanteric fracture and women with high dependency concerning ADL functions were identified.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-26796 (URN)12035218 (PubMedID)11402 (Local ID)11402 (Archive number)11402 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Mental Impairment as a Risk Indicator for Underweight and Aggravated Rehabilitation After Hip Fracture in Elderly Women
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental Impairment as a Risk Indicator for Underweight and Aggravated Rehabilitation After Hip Fracture in Elderly Women
    1999 (English)In: Journal of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1359-0847, E-ISSN 1364-6907, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 55-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this prospective study was to analyze the role of mental impairment on nutritional status and functional capacity after hip fracture. Fifty-seven women aged 75 years or older, acutely admitted to a university hospital with a hip fracture, were consecutively included. Nutritional status with anthropometry and body composition, functional condition and activities of daily living (ADL) were collected 4-6 days and 3 months after surgery. Both lucid and mentally impaired women deteriorated in nutritional status in the postoperative period owing to loss of fat and muscle mass. In the mentally impaired group there was a 50% greater loss of body weight (not significant), causing underweight, mean body mass index 19.5 +/- 3.0 kg m-2, whereas body mass index remained normal in the lucid group, 21.3 +/- 3.0 kg m-2. Ability for activity, mobility and continence deteriorated significantly, whereas food and fluid intake remained unchanged in the mentally impaired group. Mental impairment is a major risk indicator for loss of functional capacities after an acute hip fracture. The development of malnutrition and underweight is explained by the lower pre-fracture body weight, giving little margin for the further post-fracture weight loss in this group. Actions to preserve preoperative ability regarding activity, mobility and continence among mentally impaired women seem warranted. A special caring programme directed towards the special needs of this high-risk group might increase their well-being and ability to continue living in their own homes.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-26795 (URN)10.1080/13590849961843 (DOI)11400 (Local ID)11400 (Archive number)11400 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    3. Assessment of nutritional status using biochemical and anthropometric variables in a nutritional intervention study of women with hip fracture
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of nutritional status using biochemical and anthropometric variables in a nutritional intervention study of women with hip fracture
    2001 (English)In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 217-223Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background & Aims: The aim of this study of women with hip fracture was to describe nutritional status with biochemical markers and anthropometric variables, and to evaluate the effect of nutritional intervention with the intention of increasing protein and energy intake.

    Methods: The first consecutive 44 women were included, and used as controls. The next 44 were matched for age, fracture and mental state. Anthropometric variables, IGF-I, hormones and serum albumin were collected 4–6 days (baseline), 1 and 3 months after surgery. Twenty-four women filled out a 7-day food record.

    Results: At baseline, one fourth had BMI <20 kg/m2and subnormal triceps skinfold thickness. Baseline serum albumin, IGF-I and growth hormone levels were low, probably as an acute response to trauma. Women with BMI <20 kg/m2had lower IGF-I levels compared to those with higher BMI. At 3 months, one-third of both groups were protein and energy malnourished. The intervention group obtained higher daily energy percentage from fat but none of the groups reached their calculated energy need.

    Conclusions: Using biochemical markers in the acute postoperative situation to assess nutritional status is not recommended. The intervention had no impact on anthropometric or biochemical variables.

    Keywords
    nutritional status, IGF-I, hip fracture
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24915 (URN)10.1054/clnu.2000.0383 (DOI)9319 (Local ID)9319 (Archive number)9319 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    4. Nutritional status and functional capacity after femoral neck fractures: a prospective randomized one-year follow-up study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nutritional status and functional capacity after femoral neck fractures: a prospective randomized one-year follow-up study
    Show others...
    2000 (English)In: Aging, ISSN 1945-4589, E-ISSN 1945-4589, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 366-374Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different surgical methods on nutritional status and functional capacity during the first postoperative year in patients with displaced femoral neck fractures. A further aim was to evaluate the effect of nutritional support. One hundred patients were randomly assigned to treatment with either primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) or osteosynthesis. Half of the patients in each treatment group received protein- and energy-enriched food in the hospital in addition to individual nutritional advice in order to optimize their intake of protein- and energy-rich food. Nutritional state and functional capacity were examined at baseline, one and three months, and one year after the operation. Pain was examined at three months and one year. The effect of nutritional intervention was equal within both surgical groups. Logistic regression showed that the dependent variable "living at one year" was significantly associated with serum albumin levels at one month. Advanced age, mental impairment and deteriorated nutritional status were predominant in the non-survivors. Overall, the primary THA group performed better compared with the osteosynthesis group concerning weight change over time, locomotion and pain. This study also showed that primary THA could safely be performed in the elderly without an increased postoperative mortality rate.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13730 (URN)11126523 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2002-05-12 Created: 2002-05-12 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
  • 15.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margaretha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Förebygg undernäring!2002In: Äldre i centrum, ISSN 1401-5110, Vol. 3, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margaretha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nutritional state and functional capacity among elderly Swedish people with acute hip fracture2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 268-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to describe characteristics in a group of elderly men and women with hip fracture, regarding presumed risk factors, such as nutritional state and functional capacity. A total of 142 men and women aged 75 years or more were consecutively included on admittance to the hospital. Anthropometry and body composition were measured 4-6 days after the fracture. Data on functional status, activities of daily living and living arrangements at the time of the fracture were collected. The women and men had a body mass index (BMI) of 22.3 ▒ 3.7 kg/m2 and 21.7 ▒ 2.1 kg/m2, respectively. Of the whole group, 71% had a BMI < 24 kg/m2 and 25% a BMI < 20.0 kg/m2. Forty-five percent of the patients needed daily home help, and a majority of them were mentally impaired (p < 0.0001). Women with a trochanteric hip fracture were shorter, had lower body weight, lower lean body mass and lower arm muscle circumference (AMC) than the cervical fracture group (p < 0.05). Fewer women with a trochanteric fracture and fewer women with mental impairment took walks outside before the fracture, (p = 0.023 and p = 0.002, respectively). Characteristics found in the group were low BMI, low muscle mass as indicated by low lean body mass and mental impairment. It seems important to evaluate such factors when developing post-operative care plans aimed at avoiding further deterioration. Extra frail sub-groups of patients, such as people who are mentally impaired, women with trochanteric fracture and women with high dependency concerning ADL functions were identified.

  • 17.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margaretha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mental Impairment as a Risk Indicator for Underweight and Aggravated Rehabilitation After Hip Fracture in Elderly Women1999In: Journal of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1359-0847, E-ISSN 1364-6907, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 55-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this prospective study was to analyze the role of mental impairment on nutritional status and functional capacity after hip fracture. Fifty-seven women aged 75 years or older, acutely admitted to a university hospital with a hip fracture, were consecutively included. Nutritional status with anthropometry and body composition, functional condition and activities of daily living (ADL) were collected 4-6 days and 3 months after surgery. Both lucid and mentally impaired women deteriorated in nutritional status in the postoperative period owing to loss of fat and muscle mass. In the mentally impaired group there was a 50% greater loss of body weight (not significant), causing underweight, mean body mass index 19.5 +/- 3.0 kg m-2, whereas body mass index remained normal in the lucid group, 21.3 +/- 3.0 kg m-2. Ability for activity, mobility and continence deteriorated significantly, whereas food and fluid intake remained unchanged in the mentally impaired group. Mental impairment is a major risk indicator for loss of functional capacities after an acute hip fracture. The development of malnutrition and underweight is explained by the lower pre-fracture body weight, giving little margin for the further post-fracture weight loss in this group. Actions to preserve preoperative ability regarding activity, mobility and continence among mentally impaired women seem warranted. A special caring programme directed towards the special needs of this high-risk group might increase their well-being and ability to continue living in their own homes.

  • 18.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margaretha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Assessment of nutritional status using biochemical and anthropometric variables in a nutritional intervention study of women with hip fracture2001In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 217-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & Aims: The aim of this study of women with hip fracture was to describe nutritional status with biochemical markers and anthropometric variables, and to evaluate the effect of nutritional intervention with the intention of increasing protein and energy intake.

    Methods: The first consecutive 44 women were included, and used as controls. The next 44 were matched for age, fracture and mental state. Anthropometric variables, IGF-I, hormones and serum albumin were collected 4–6 days (baseline), 1 and 3 months after surgery. Twenty-four women filled out a 7-day food record.

    Results: At baseline, one fourth had BMI <20 kg/m2and subnormal triceps skinfold thickness. Baseline serum albumin, IGF-I and growth hormone levels were low, probably as an acute response to trauma. Women with BMI <20 kg/m2had lower IGF-I levels compared to those with higher BMI. At 3 months, one-third of both groups were protein and energy malnourished. The intervention group obtained higher daily energy percentage from fat but none of the groups reached their calculated energy need.

    Conclusions: Using biochemical markers in the acute postoperative situation to assess nutritional status is not recommended. The intervention had no impact on anthropometric or biochemical variables.

  • 19.
    Baggens, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Barns och föräldrars möte med sjuksköterskan i barnhälsovården. Sammanfattning av doktorsavhandlingen.2003In: Barnbladet, ISSN 0349-1994, Vol. 4, p. 24-27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Baggens, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The institution enters the family home: Home visits in Sweden to new parents by the child health care nurse2004In: Journal of Community Health Nursing, ISSN 0737-0016, E-ISSN 1532-7655, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 15-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to investigate interactional patterns in the dialogue that occurs during home visits of the nurse to new parents, to find out whether there are similarities between home visits and visits to the child health care centers, and to discuss this in relation to what is emphasized as important in home visits. Audiotaped conversations of encounters during 5 home visits to new parents and interviews with parents and nurses were collected and analyzed qualitatively. Results show that the interactions were orchestrated by the nurse, and operated on an agenda that was task-oriented. The interaction was dominated by the nurse, and thus was asymmetrical. It seemed that the nurse was attentive to what the parents brought up in the discussions and responded to their worries very thoroughly, in accordance with the ideology. However, sometimes the parents were not even involved in the nurse's activities.

  • 21.
    Baggens, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Baggens, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Hur normalitet skapas och förändras under det dagliga arbetet i grundskolan.2006In: Normalitetens förhandling och förvandling.: en antologi om barn, skola och föräldraskap / [ed] Judith Lind, Stockholm: Brutus Östlings Bokförlag Symposion , 2006, p. 197-229Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

              Vad innebär det att vara ett alldeles vanligt barn? Är det detsamma som att vara normal eller att ha önskvärda egenskaper? Vilka är i så fall dessa egenskaper och vem definierar dem? Antologin behandlar dessa frågor och bidragen utgår från såväl vetenskapliga diskussioner som vardagliga sammanhang. Förf:na spårar på olika sätt de processer som bidrar till att skapa och upprätthålla, men även ifrågasätta, förhandla och förändra normalitet     

  • 22.
    Berg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Postoperative recovery for day surgery patients2004In: 12th Biennal Conference of the Workgroup of European Nurse Researchers,2004, 2004, p. 77-77Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Bergman, Eva
    et al.
    Hjärtmottagningen Ryhovs länssjukhus, Jönköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    'Grasp life again'. A qualitative study of the motive power in myocardial infarction patients2003In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 303-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myocardial infarction is the most common cause of death in Sweden today and is responsible for approximately 30% of all deaths. The aim of this study was to obtain increased knowledge and understanding of what motive power is and how it affects the individual's rehabilitation and return to a functioning daily life. Thirteen patients, six females and seven males, who had experienced a myocardial infarction, aged between 39 and 72 years and with a minimum interval from myocardial infarction diagnosis of at least 12 months, were interviewed. Grounded theory was the method used for data collection and analysis, since the method is focusing on social processes and interaction. The analysis process identified motive power as a core category: zest for life. The participants expressed a desire and a longing to continue living. The participants' experiences of their disease as well as being discharged from hospital forced them to reorientation. Autonomy, the individual's own active decision-making, plays a significant role in this zest for life. Care for was identified as the support base for zest for life. As health-care professionals we must, at a very early stage on the ward, form an idea of what kind of patient we have in front of us. ⌐ 2003 European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 24.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Breast cancer survivals; a challenge for health care professionals - widening our perspectives on survivors´quality of life.2005In: Austral-Asian Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0972-2556, Vol. 4, p. 189-191Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Living with leukaemia: studies on quality of life, interaction and caring1996Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Leukaemia is one form of cancer disease, comprising both an acute or chronic form, and has a wide range of altemative therapy aids, as well as a highly unpredictable prognosis. This thesis is a study of 27 patients with acute and chronic leukaemia.

    The general aim of the present thesis was to acquire knowledge about quality of life (QOL) from the perspective of the adult individual with leukaemia. It was also to enquire how the health care system and the nursing staff can improve this individual's experienced quality of life. Data have been collected through qualitative interviews (articles I, II and III), observations, follow-up interviews and reflective conversations(articles IV and V). The data have been analysed using constant comparative analysis (articles I, II, IV and V) and narrative qualitative text analysis (article III).

    Quality of life was found to be experienced as 'a positive attitude to life' by those adults with acute leukaemia, and autonomy and interpersonal relationships were of great importance in experiencing this. Those with chronic leukaemia experienced quality of life as 'life satisfaction'. Even here interpersonal relationships played a major role, as did self-esteem, performance ability and social ability. When explaining the differentprofiles in quality of life experienced by those adults with acute and chronic leukaemia, uncertainty was the phenomenon found. Adults with acute leukaemia experienced uncertainty concerning the prognosis, recurrence, aggravations and set-backs. Those with chronic leukaemia were uncertain about adjusting their lives, changing life-styles as well as being in doubt. Both groups described this uncertainty as not feeling secure, not being in control and being undecided.

    Transition, i.e. the individual passing from one phase to another, was the core category found when studying the interaction between adults with leukaemia and their nursing staff. This transition could be described in three stages. First, being a person and trying to maintain a social status. Second, becoming a patient, accepting the disease and feeling insecure in this totally new situation. Finally, the patient becomes a leukaemia patient, isolating her/himself and becoming aware of the disease and its side-effects.

    In the study about the care supplied by the nursing staff and demanded by the leukaemia patients, the findings produced two core categories; routines and interaction. The care supplied was identified as routines, which could be seen as regular courses of procedures and a way of bringing order into daily life. Routines could also be a distancing manoeuvres to manage stress when working with seriously ill people. The care demanded by these leukaemia patients was human interaction. The leukaemia patient wants to be treated as a human being, with mutual respect, concern etc. The patients want to participate and interact while still maintaining their self-respect and individual integrity.

    This thesis points out that the QOL of those adults with leukaemia could be improved by the health care system and the nursing staff through caring for them as fellow beings, with respect and giving them autonomy and self-control. If the nurses and nursing staff are to be able to care for leukaemia/cancer patients, they have to care for themselves. If they become more aware of their own feelings and reactionS, they will also become more attentive to the patients' experiences and needs.

  • 26.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Self as female?: Women´s experiences following treatment for breast cancer or uterus cancer2005In: Austral-Asian Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0972-2556, Vol. 4, p. 91-99Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Bolse, Kärstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator: Swedish and US patients' experiences of their life situation2004Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The general aim of this study was to describe changes in uncertainty and satisfaction as well as to explore how patients with an ICD experience their life situation over a two year period. The design was explorative and descriptive, combining both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Data were collected from two locations, Sweden and the US. The data collection methods employed were questionnaires, the Uncertainty in Illness Scale- Community version (MUIS-C) and the Quality of Life Index, (Cardiac III, Parts I, II). Interviews were based on a phenomenographic approach. Statistical analysis was chosen to describe the patients' life situation.

    During the initial phase the patients went through a process of adaption and learning to trust the ICD as well as becoming aware of the restrictions in their everyday lives. This was followed by a reorientation phase during which they adapted to and accepted their new life situation, after which both the patient and his/her family regained trust. The present findings can facilitate life style modifications and ensure that the goal of care is to take account of the patients' and healthcare professionals' understanding of living with an ICD.

    List of papers
    1. Life situation related to the ICD implantation: self-reported uncertainty and satisfaction in Swedish and US samples
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Life situation related to the ICD implantation: self-reported uncertainty and satisfaction in Swedish and US samples
    Show others...
    2002 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 243-251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe changes in the life situation related to the ICD implantation of Swedish and US samples with regard to uncertainty and satisfaction. The life situation was measured by reference to the uncertainty caused by the condition and satisfaction with the life situation. Inferential statistics were used to analyse changes within and between the Swedish and US samples. Uncertainty showed a statistically significant difference between the Swedish and US samples before as well as after the ICD implantation. A higher level of uncertainty was indicated for the US sample prior to the ICD implantation and for the Swedish sample following the implantation. In the Swedish sample, satisfaction with life showed a statistically significant difference within the socio-economic domain, indicating a higher degree of satisfaction 3 months after implantation. Satisfaction within the domains of health and functioning, socio-economics and psychological-spiritual showed a statistically significant difference between the Swedish and US samples both before and after ICD implantation, indicating a higher degree of satisfaction in the US sample. The previous study shows that the ICD-patient's life situation is changed after the implantation and that it is necessary to provide the patient with information and education based on their own preconditions. The fact that US sample was investigated at a later stage after ICD implantation than the Swedish sample may have influenced the results of the study.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-26818 (URN)10.1016/S1474-5151(02)00048-8 (DOI)11431 (Local ID)11431 (Archive number)11431 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and their conceptions of the life situation: a qualitative analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and their conceptions of the life situation: a qualitative analysis
    Show others...
    2000 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 37-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    • The implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is today widely used for the treatment of sudden cardiac near-death episodes as a result of malignant ventricular dysrhythmia.

    • After examining the literature, only four descriptive studies, all carried out in the USA, with a qualitative analysis based on ICD-patients’ own perspectives on their life situation have been found.

    •  The aim of this study was to describe how patients living with an ICD-device in south-western Sweden conceive their life situation.

    •  As the focus was on patients’ conceptions seen from a holistic perspective, an analysis inspired by phenomenography was employed on a strategic sample of 15 ICD-patients.

    • Six categories emerged: a feeling of safety, a feeling of gratitude, a feeling of being, having a network, having a belief in the future, and gaining awareness.

    • Although the findings cannot be generalized because of the descriptive research design, they illuminate the beneficial as well as intrusive effects of such a device, and emphasize the need for support groups for patients and families as well as further education for personnel in hospital and primary health care.

    Keywords
    Coronary heart disease, implantable cardioverter de®brillator, life situation, phenomenography, qualitative analysis
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-51799 (URN)10.1046/j.1365-2702.2000.00335.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-11-18 Created: 2009-11-18 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    3. Ways of Experiencing the Life Situation Among United States Patients With an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator: A Qualitative Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ways of Experiencing the Life Situation Among United States Patients With an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator: A Qualitative Study
    Show others...
    2004 (English)In: Progress in Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-7204, E-ISSN 1751-7117, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 4-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to describe how a selected group of United States patients with an implantable cardioverter- defibrillator perceived their life situation. A qualitative design based on the phenomenographic approach was chosen to describe the patients' conceptions of their life situation. Fourteen patients—eight men and six women, aged 21–84—were strategically selected to obtain as broad a variation as possible. The descriptive categories to emerge from the analysis of the interviews were trust, adaptability, and empowerment. The category labeled trust describes how patients trusted in the organization around them. The category labeled adaptability describes how patients adapted to living with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator device. The category entitled empowerment describes how patients considered that they received support from family and friends as well as from health care professionals. This study suggests the need for a holistic intervention program comprising family, work, and leisure, focusing on patients' future life situation.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley InterScience, 2004
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-51802 (URN)10.1111/j.0889-7204.2005.03797.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-11-18 Created: 2009-11-18 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
  • 28.
    Bolse, Kärstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Flemme, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ivarsson, Anita
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jinhagen, Britt-Marie
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carroll, Diane
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hamilton, Glenys
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
    Life situation related to the ICD implantation: self-reported uncertainty and satisfaction in Swedish and US samples2002In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 243-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe changes in the life situation related to the ICD implantation of Swedish and US samples with regard to uncertainty and satisfaction. The life situation was measured by reference to the uncertainty caused by the condition and satisfaction with the life situation. Inferential statistics were used to analyse changes within and between the Swedish and US samples. Uncertainty showed a statistically significant difference between the Swedish and US samples before as well as after the ICD implantation. A higher level of uncertainty was indicated for the US sample prior to the ICD implantation and for the Swedish sample following the implantation. In the Swedish sample, satisfaction with life showed a statistically significant difference within the socio-economic domain, indicating a higher degree of satisfaction 3 months after implantation. Satisfaction within the domains of health and functioning, socio-economics and psychological-spiritual showed a statistically significant difference between the Swedish and US samples both before and after ICD implantation, indicating a higher degree of satisfaction in the US sample. The previous study shows that the ICD-patient's life situation is changed after the implantation and that it is necessary to provide the patient with information and education based on their own preconditions. The fact that US sample was investigated at a later stage after ICD implantation than the Swedish sample may have influenced the results of the study.

  • 29.
    Brobäck, Gunilla
    et al.
    Avd för omvårdnad Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    How next of kin experience palliative care of relatives at home2003In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 339-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Primary health care teams are the teams responsible nowadays in Sweden for the greater part of the home health care system, providing palliative care in the patient's home. If palliative care in the home is to be ethically defensible, it should be voluntary from the point of view of the next of kin and should be designed in such a way that he or she receives different forms of support during the care period. The purpose of this paper is to explore the meaning of palliative care in the home as experienced by the next of kin. The data consist of transcripts from interviews with the next of kin. Giorgi's phenomenological method was selected as the method/analysis for this study, because it focuses on uncovering the meaning of experiences of the participants by studying descriptions from their perspective. A feeling of insufficiency is the phenomenon, which permeates all the five themes: adjustment, awareness, being perceived as a person, emotional effects and feelings of uncertainty. Because the informal carer/next of kin is a significant contributor to palliative care in the home, it is important to promote feelings of control and also self-efficacy.

  • 30.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    How can nurses objectively measure sleep and sleep disordered breathing in patients with heart failure? A methodological description2005In: Annual spring meeting of the working group on cardiovascular nursing,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Sleep disturbances in patients with chronic heart failure and their holistic consequences-what different care actions can be implemented?2005In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 183-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sleep disturbances are prevalent among elderly, especially among those with chronic heart failure (CHF) and can affect all dimensions of quality of life (QOL) negatively. Aim: To describe the most common causes leading to sleep disturbances in patients with CHF, their consequences from a holistic perspective and different care actions that can be implemented. Methods: MEDLINE and CINAHL databases were searched from 1989 to July 2004. Findings: Sleep disordered breathing (SDB), and insomnia were the most common causes for sleep disturbances and occurs in 45-82% (SDB) and one-third (insomnia) of all patients with CHF. SDB cause a disturbed sleep structure with frequent awakenings, as well as several adverse effects on the cardiovascular system causing increased morbidity and mortality. Insomnia, caused by anxiety, an unknown life situation in relation to the debut of CHF, or symptoms/deteriorations of CHF can lead to negative effects on all aspects of QOL, as well as daytime sleepiness. Conclusion: The high prevalence of sleep disturbances and their holistic consequences should be taken into account when nurses asses and plan the care for patients with CHF. Randomized studies with large sample sizes evaluating non-pharmacological nursing interventions that improve sleep are needed. © 2005 European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 32.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Sleep disturbances in patients with chronic heart failure from a holistic perspective - A new nursing topic2005In: Annual spring meeting of the working group on cardiovascular nursing,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Albers, Jan
    Wiberg, Jan
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Clinical Neurophysiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    P374 3-Month CPAP treatment in a young male patient with severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome - a qualitative case study from the couple´s perspective2006In: 8th World Congress on Sleep Apnea 27-30 September 2006,2006, 2006, p. 76-76Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Albers, J
    County Hospital Ryhov.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome - Patients' perceptions of their sleep and its effects on their life situation2007In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 318-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Title. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome - patients' perceptions of their sleep and its effects on their life situation Aim. This paper reports a descriptive study of how untreated patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome perceived their sleep situation and how the syndrome affected their life situation. Background. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome is a prevalent problem independently associated with an increased risk for hypertension, cardiovascular disease, chronic heart failure and mortality. Increased consumption of healthcare resources can often be seen among patients over a long period of time since many have been undiagnosed and untreated. Methods. A phenomenographic approach was employed. Data were collected by interviews during 2005 with 20 purposively selected participants with untreated obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. Findings. Participants described loud snoring, frequent awakenings, dyspnoea, frustration over nocturia, fear of dying during sleep and partners' anxiety about the apnoea, as being night-time effects of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. They described dry and sore throats, tiredness and daytime sleepiness, shame about falling asleep and snoring, thoughts about complications and depressed mood as daytime effects. Needs, such as increased alertness, improved ability to concentrate, improved relationship, adequate information as well as effective treatment, were described. Participants tried self-care strategies such as information-seeking about sleep disturbances and treatment, adapted sleeping routines, change of bedroom arrangements, adapted daily schedules, hyperactivity and avoidance of difficult situations. Conclusion. The perceived effects and needs, as well as tried self-care actions by the patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in this study, could be used to identify and evaluate concerns of other patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome waiting for treatment. © 2007 The Authors.

  • 35.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Albers, Jan
    Wiberg, Jan
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Clinical Neurophysiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - Patient perceptions of their life situation before initiation of CPAP treatment2006In: 8th World Congress on Sleep Apnea 27-30 September, 2006,2006, 2006, p. 124-124Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Clinical Neurophysiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Fridlund, B
    Mårtensson, J
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Clinical Neurophysiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Informational needs, side effects and their consequences on adherence: A comparison between swedish healthcare professionals and CPAP-treated patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome2007In: World Sleep 07,2007, 2007, p. 141-141Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 37.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurophysiology.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Mårtensson, J
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Clinical Neurophysiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Association of type D personality to perceived side effects and adherence in CPAP-treated patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome2007In: World Sleep 07,2007, 2007, p. 142-142Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 38. Bäckman, C
    et al.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Nordlund, P
    Simonsson, E
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Do ICU-diaries influence health related quality of life after critical illness?2007In: in Intensive Care Medicine(ISSN 0342-4642), vol 33, 2007, Vol. 33, p. 13-13Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Creating practical antiematic guidelines2002In: Newsletter, ISSN 0260-5104, Vol. 9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40. Carlsson, M
    et al.
    Hamrin, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Lindqvist, R
    Psychometric assessment of the life satisfaction questionnaire (LSQ) and a comparison of a randomised sample of Swedish women and those suffering from breast cancer.1999In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 8, p. 245-253Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Christensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Malnutrition in elderly people in need of municipal care2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis was to describe nutritional status in elderly people at the time of entering municipal care, to evaluate nutritional assessment techniques and to investigate the effect of a nutritional care plan. Furthermore the aim was to investigate the staffs' attitudes towards nutritional nursing care. A total of 261 residents, mean age 84 years (range 65-103 years), admitted to a community resident home in a municipality in the south of Sweden were included. At the same municipalities, 151 nursing staff responded to an attitude scale on two occasions with one year between.

    During the first or second week after admission nutritional status was assessed using a combination of anthropometry and serum protein measurements as the criterion to define protein- energy malnutrition (PEM). This combination constituted the standard criterion when validity of the Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) and the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) were evaluated. In 40 residents assessed as non-PEM on admission health problems were measured by the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP). To investigate the effect of a nutritional programme energy intake, anthropometry, serum protein measurements and functional capacity were assessed continuously during a five months period in 11 residents assessed as being PEM on admission. The nutritional programme consisted of meals based on individual energy requirements. An attitude scale was developed and used in order to measure whether the attitudes of nursing staff towards important issues within eating and nutrition changed after implementation of an educational programme.

    On admission, 33% of 261 elderly people were assessed as being PEM. The frequency of pressure sores or leg ulcers, psychological stress or acute disease in the previous 3 months, reduced fluid intake, deteriorated appetite, reduced mobility, need of help during meals and gastrointestinal symptoms were significant higher in residents assessed as PEM compared with residents assessed as non-PEM. Both SGA and MNA proved to be useful in detecting residents objectively assessed as PEM. NHP, measuring health problems, showed power to predict residents at risk of malnutrition. Anthropometric measurements, serum protein concentration and functional capacity increased significantly in 11 residents assessed as PEM after 3 months on the individualised care programme. Nutritional education and implementation of a nutritional programme did not change the attitudes of nursing staff towards important nutritional issues.

    In conclusion, at the time of entering municipal care a high frequency of residents assessed as PEM or at risk of PEM was found. The SGA and MNA were shown to be useful tools in detecting resident in need of nutritional attention. For early detection of residents at risk of malnutrition, measurement of health problems added important information. An individualised nutritional care programme was one useful approach to the improvement of nutritional status and functional capacity in residents assessed as PEM on admission. On the whole, nursing staff responded with positive attitudes towards nutritional nursing care. Nutritional education and implementation of a nutritional programme did not significantly change their attitudes.

    List of papers
    1. Malnutrition in elderly people newly admitted to a community resident home
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Malnutrition in elderly people newly admitted to a community resident home
    1999 (English)In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 133-139Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to assess nutritional status in elderly people, newly admitted to a community resident home, and to describe the characteristics of residents with protein-energy malnutrition (PEM). The participants were 261 people, 65 to 103 years of age (M= 84.8+/-7.1 in women, 82.5+/-6.4 in men) who during one year entered special types of housing for the elderly in a municipality in the south of Sweden. During the first two weeks after admission nutritional status was assessed using weight index, triceps skinfold thickness, arm muscle circumference, serum albumin and transthyretin. Demographic and sociomedical data and eating-related factors were collected by using structured interviews and studying residents records. PEM was found in 29% of the residents who entered municipal care from their own homes, 33% among those moving within municipal care and 43% of the residents who entered from hospital care. Pressure sores or leg ulcers, psychological stress or acute disease in the previous 3 months, reduced fluid intake, deteriorated appetite, reduced mobility, need of help during meals and gastrointestinal symptoms were factors associated with PEM.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-81529 (URN)10823979 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2012-09-18 Created: 2012-09-18 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    2. Evaluation of nutritional assessment techniques in elderly people newly admitted to municipal care
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of nutritional assessment techniques in elderly people newly admitted to municipal care
    2002 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 56, no 9, p. 810-818Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To evaluate the Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) and the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) with regard to validity using a combination of anthropometric and serum-protein measurements as standard criteria to assess protein-energy malnutrition (PEM).

    Design: Cross-sectional study with consecutive selection of residents aged 65 y.

    Setting: A municipality in the south of Sweden.

    Subjects: During a year, starting in October 1996, 148 females and 113 males, aged 65-104 y of age, newly admitted to special types of housing for the elderly, were included in the study.

    Results: According to SGA, 53% were assessed as malnourished or moderately malnourished on admission. The corresponding figure from MNA was 79% malnourished or at risk of malnutrition. Both tools indicated that anthropometric values and serum proteins were significantly lower in residents classified as being malnourished (P<0.05). Sensitivity in detecting PEM was in SGA 0.93 and in MNA 0.96 and specificity was 0.61 and 0.26, respectively. Using regression analysis, weight index and serum albumin were the best objective nutritional parameters in predicting the SGA- and MNA classifications. Item 'muscle wasting' in SGA and 'self-experienced health status' in MNA showed most predictive power concerning the odds of being assessed as malnourished.

    Conclusions: SGA was shown to be the more useful tool in detecting residents with established malnutrition and MNA in detecting residents who need preventive nutritional measures.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-26841 (URN)10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601394 (DOI)11459 (Local ID)11459 (Archive number)11459 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    3. Measurement of perceived health problems as a means of detecting elderly people at risk of malnutrition
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measurement of perceived health problems as a means of detecting elderly people at risk of malnutrition
    2003 (English)In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 257-262Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    As nutritional preventative measures are more effective in elderly people assessed as non protein-energy malnourished (non-PEM) than such interventions are in those who are malnourished, early detection of those at risk of malnutrition is important.

    OBJECTIVE:

    This study tests the hypothesis that health problems measured by the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) can predict residents at risk of malnutrition.

    DESIGN:

    Nutritional status was assessed in 261 residents newly admitted to municipal care using a combination of anthropometry and serum protein measurements. From this sample, 20 non-PEM residents, simultaneously assessed as moderately malnourished according to a subjective method, were consecutively included. Using a paired matched design, 20 other non-PEM residents, who were simultaneously subjectively assessed as well nourished, completed the pairs.

    RESULTS:

    Univariate logistic regression analyses showed that the dimensions of emotional reactions, energy, pain, physical mobility and sleep had significant power to predict residents at risk of malnutrition. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, energy had the highest explanatory power.

    CONCLUSION:

    Non-PEM residents, assessed as moderately malnourished according to the Subjective Global Assessment, perceived significantly greater health problems than non-PEM residents subjectively assessed as well nourished. Measurement of health problems adds important information to that used in early detection of residents at risk of malnutrition.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-26840 (URN)12917751 (PubMedID)11458 (Local ID)11458 (Archive number)11458 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    4. Individually adjusted meals for older people with protein-energy malnutrition: a single-case study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individually adjusted meals for older people with protein-energy malnutrition: a single-case study
    2001 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 491-502Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    • The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a 3-month intervention programme consisting of meals based on individual nutritional requirements in residents assessed as protein-energy malnourished on admission to a municipal care Institution.

    • Using a single-case design, 11 malnourished residents were given individual care aimed at fulfilling their personal requirements for energy intake during a period of 12 weeks. The residents were selected from a sample of 261 newly admitted older adults of whom 87 were assessed to be malnourished on admission. Nutritional status, including anthropometric and biochemical variables and functional capacities were assessed before, during, and after the intervention. Energy intake was recorded every day. Body weight, and serum concentration of albumin and transthyretin were measured every other week.

    •  During a 3-month period, the mean value of energy intake reached the calculated energy requirement in 10 residents. Eight residents increased in weight, triceps skin-fold thickness, and transthyretin concentration. Nine residents increased in arm muscle circumference, and 10 showed increased serum albumin concentration and functional capacity.

    • We conclude that nursing care based on individual nutritional requirements, resources, and desires improves nutritional status and functional capacity in a group of malnourished residents.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-26838 (URN)10.1046/j.1365-2702.2001.00508.x (DOI)11456 (Local ID)11456 (Archive number)11456 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    5. Attitudes of nursing staff towards nutritional nursing care
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attitudes of nursing staff towards nutritional nursing care
    2003 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 223-231Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Fulfilling nutritional requirements in residents with eating problems can be a challenge for both the person in need of help and for the caregiver. In helping and supporting these residents, a positive attitude is assumed to be as important as practical skill. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that nutritional education and implementation of a nutritional programme would change the attitudes towards nutritional nursing care among nursing staff with daily experience of serving food and helping residents in municipal care. The study was carried out as a before and after experimental design. An attitude scale, staff attitudes to nutritional nursing care (SANN scale), was developed and used. The response on the scale gives a total SANN-score and scores in five underlying dimensions: self ability, individualization, importance of food, assessment and secured food intake. Nursing staff at eight different residential units (n = 176) responded to the attitude scale and, of these, staff at three of the units entered the study as the experimental group. After responding to the attitude scale, nutritional education was introduced and a nutritional programme was implemented in the experimental units. One year later, attitudes were measured a second time (n = 192). Of these, 151 had also responded on the first occasion. Education and implementation of a nutritional programme did not significantly change attitudes. Overall, nursing staff responded with positive attitudes towards nutritional nursing care. Most of the positive attitudes concerned items within the dimension importance of food. In contrast, items within self ability showed the lowest number of staff with positive attitudes.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24815 (URN)10.1046/j.1471-6712.2003.00226.x (DOI)7101 (Local ID)7101 (Archive number)7101 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
  • 42.
    Christensson, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Individually adjusted meals for older people with protein-energy malnutrition: a single-case study2001In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 491-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    • The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a 3-month intervention programme consisting of meals based on individual nutritional requirements in residents assessed as protein-energy malnourished on admission to a municipal care Institution.

    • Using a single-case design, 11 malnourished residents were given individual care aimed at fulfilling their personal requirements for energy intake during a period of 12 weeks. The residents were selected from a sample of 261 newly admitted older adults of whom 87 were assessed to be malnourished on admission. Nutritional status, including anthropometric and biochemical variables and functional capacities were assessed before, during, and after the intervention. Energy intake was recorded every day. Body weight, and serum concentration of albumin and transthyretin were measured every other week.

    •  During a 3-month period, the mean value of energy intake reached the calculated energy requirement in 10 residents. Eight residents increased in weight, triceps skin-fold thickness, and transthyretin concentration. Nine residents increased in arm muscle circumference, and 10 showed increased serum albumin concentration and functional capacity.

    • We conclude that nursing care based on individual nutritional requirements, resources, and desires improves nutritional status and functional capacity in a group of malnourished residents.

  • 43.
    Christensson, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margaretha
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Attitudes of nursing staff towards nutritional nursing care2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 223-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fulfilling nutritional requirements in residents with eating problems can be a challenge for both the person in need of help and for the caregiver. In helping and supporting these residents, a positive attitude is assumed to be as important as practical skill. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that nutritional education and implementation of a nutritional programme would change the attitudes towards nutritional nursing care among nursing staff with daily experience of serving food and helping residents in municipal care. The study was carried out as a before and after experimental design. An attitude scale, staff attitudes to nutritional nursing care (SANN scale), was developed and used. The response on the scale gives a total SANN-score and scores in five underlying dimensions: self ability, individualization, importance of food, assessment and secured food intake. Nursing staff at eight different residential units (n = 176) responded to the attitude scale and, of these, staff at three of the units entered the study as the experimental group. After responding to the attitude scale, nutritional education was introduced and a nutritional programme was implemented in the experimental units. One year later, attitudes were measured a second time (n = 192). Of these, 151 had also responded on the first occasion. Education and implementation of a nutritional programme did not significantly change attitudes. Overall, nursing staff responded with positive attitudes towards nutritional nursing care. Most of the positive attitudes concerned items within the dimension importance of food. In contrast, items within self ability showed the lowest number of staff with positive attitudes.

  • 44.
    Christensson, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of nutritional assessment techniques in elderly people newly admitted to municipal care2002In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 56, no 9, p. 810-818Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To evaluate the Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) and the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) with regard to validity using a combination of anthropometric and serum-protein measurements as standard criteria to assess protein-energy malnutrition (PEM).

    Design: Cross-sectional study with consecutive selection of residents aged 65 y.

    Setting: A municipality in the south of Sweden.

    Subjects: During a year, starting in October 1996, 148 females and 113 males, aged 65-104 y of age, newly admitted to special types of housing for the elderly, were included in the study.

    Results: According to SGA, 53% were assessed as malnourished or moderately malnourished on admission. The corresponding figure from MNA was 79% malnourished or at risk of malnutrition. Both tools indicated that anthropometric values and serum proteins were significantly lower in residents classified as being malnourished (P<0.05). Sensitivity in detecting PEM was in SGA 0.93 and in MNA 0.96 and specificity was 0.61 and 0.26, respectively. Using regression analysis, weight index and serum albumin were the best objective nutritional parameters in predicting the SGA- and MNA classifications. Item 'muscle wasting' in SGA and 'self-experienced health status' in MNA showed most predictive power concerning the odds of being assessed as malnourished.

    Conclusions: SGA was shown to be the more useful tool in detecting residents with established malnutrition and MNA in detecting residents who need preventive nutritional measures.

  • 45.
    Christensson, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Malnutrition in elderly people newly admitted to a community resident home1999In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 133-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to assess nutritional status in elderly people, newly admitted to a community resident home, and to describe the characteristics of residents with protein-energy malnutrition (PEM). The participants were 261 people, 65 to 103 years of age (M= 84.8+/-7.1 in women, 82.5+/-6.4 in men) who during one year entered special types of housing for the elderly in a municipality in the south of Sweden. During the first two weeks after admission nutritional status was assessed using weight index, triceps skinfold thickness, arm muscle circumference, serum albumin and transthyretin. Demographic and sociomedical data and eating-related factors were collected by using structured interviews and studying residents records. PEM was found in 29% of the residents who entered municipal care from their own homes, 33% among those moving within municipal care and 43% of the residents who entered from hospital care. Pressure sores or leg ulcers, psychological stress or acute disease in the previous 3 months, reduced fluid intake, deteriorated appetite, reduced mobility, need of help during meals and gastrointestinal symptoms were factors associated with PEM.

  • 46.
    Christensson, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unossoon, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Measurement of perceived health problems as a means of detecting elderly people at risk of malnutrition2003In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 257-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    As nutritional preventative measures are more effective in elderly people assessed as non protein-energy malnourished (non-PEM) than such interventions are in those who are malnourished, early detection of those at risk of malnutrition is important.

    OBJECTIVE:

    This study tests the hypothesis that health problems measured by the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) can predict residents at risk of malnutrition.

    DESIGN:

    Nutritional status was assessed in 261 residents newly admitted to municipal care using a combination of anthropometry and serum protein measurements. From this sample, 20 non-PEM residents, simultaneously assessed as moderately malnourished according to a subjective method, were consecutively included. Using a paired matched design, 20 other non-PEM residents, who were simultaneously subjectively assessed as well nourished, completed the pairs.

    RESULTS:

    Univariate logistic regression analyses showed that the dimensions of emotional reactions, energy, pain, physical mobility and sleep had significant power to predict residents at risk of malnutrition. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, energy had the highest explanatory power.

    CONCLUSION:

    Non-PEM residents, assessed as moderately malnourished according to the Subjective Global Assessment, perceived significantly greater health problems than non-PEM residents subjectively assessed as well nourished. Measurement of health problems adds important information to that used in early detection of residents at risk of malnutrition.

  • 47. Claesson, A
    et al.
    Mattson, H
    Idvall, Ewa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Experiences expressed by artificially ventilated patients.2003In: 16th annual congress European Society of intensive care medicine,2003, 2003, p. 78-78Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Claesson, Annica
    et al.
    Department of Intensive Care Unit, Oskarshamn Hospital, Kalmar County Council, Sweden.
    Mattson, Helen
    Department of Intensive Care Unit, Oskarshamn Hospital, Kalmar County Council, Sweden.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Experiences expressed by artificially ventilated patients2005In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 116-117Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 49. Dahl, Å
    et al.
    Nyberg, H
    Edell-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Nurses' clinical experiences of the inverse bed position on a neurointensive care unit - A phenomenographic study2003In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 289-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our knowledge of unstable critically ill patients placed in an inverse bed position on the neurointensive care unit (NICU) is fairly limited. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the variation in nurses' conceptions of the impact of clinical experiences on the care and working environments among patients with the head towards the centre of the room on an NICU. An important research question was: how is the nursing care of patients facing inwards on an NICU perceived? Interviews were conducted and analysed with 15 nurses, using the method of phenomenography. From a nursing perspective, four descriptive categories were found, which partly distinguished the nursing psychosocial environment from the physical environment. These were safety and security of mobile computer tomography (CT) on the NICU, availability and overview, integrated holistic view in an open nursing psychosocial environment and adaptation of practical equipment. In conclusion, inverse bed position is important for more individualised neurointensive nursing care among unstable patients subjected to frequent CT scans on the unit. More stable patients should be turned back to the traditional bed position in order to promote their recovery process. This new knowledge is important for the development of quality assurance, with regard to, amongst other things, the patient's dignity. ⌐ 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 50. Dahl, Å
    et al.
    Nyberg, H
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Omvårdnadsaspekter vid omvänt sängläge2002In: Studiedagar för Neuro-sjuksköterskor, Linköping 2002,2002, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
1234567 1 - 50 of 339
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