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  • 1.
    Bergendal, B.
    et al.
    National Oral Disability Centre, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ahlborg, B.
    Mun-H-Center, National Orofacial Resource Center for Rare Disorders, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Knudsen, E.
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Nyberg, J.
    Department of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wallenius, E.
    Swedish Association of Rare Disorders, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
    Gustafsson-Bonnier, K.
    Habilitation Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Living with facial disfigurement- Strategies for individuals and care management2011In: Special Care in Dentistry, ISSN 0275-1879, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 216-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individuals and families affected by craniofacial disorders have expressed dissatisfaction with their experiences in the healthcare system, with day care, and in school situations. To capture their views, focus group encounters were done in a group of young individuals with these disorders and in a group of parents whose children were affected. The aim was to synthesize their attitudes and experiences into improved strategies for parents, teenagers, and professionals in the healthcare system. Their views were compiled into a document that emphasizes the responsibilities of persons with craniofacial disorders and their parents to actively seek information on diagnosis and treatment options and to participate in decisions on therapy. The conclusion was that it is not lack of specific knowledge but rather a lack of implementation of existing recommendations that makes living with facial disfigurement difficult for many individuals and their families. © 2011 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 2.
    Bergkvist, Göran
    et al.
    Chonbuk National University.
    Sahlholm, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery.
    Klintström, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Lindh, Christina
    Malmö University.
    Bone Density at Implant Sites and Its Relationship to Assessment of Bone Quality and Treatment Outcome2010In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ORAL and MAXILLOFACIAL IMPLANTS, ISSN 0882-2786, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 321-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) before implant placement, implant stability measures at implant placement, and marginal bone loss of immediately loaded implants after 1 year in situ. Materials and Methods: Consecutively recruited patients received Straumann SLActive implants loaded with fixed provisional prostheses within 24 hours. BMD was measured from computed tomographic images before implant placement. Alveolar bone quality was assessed during surgery. Implant stability-both rotational and as measured with resonance frequency analysis- and marginal bone height were assessed at implant placement and after 1 year. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to calculate correlations, and significance was considered when P andlt; .05. Results: Twenty-one patients received 137 implants (87 in maxillae and 50 in mandibles). BMD was significantly correlated with bone quality classification in both arches (P andlt; .001). Mean BMD was also significantly correlated with stability values (P andlt; .001). Mean marginal bone loss at implant surfaces differed, but not significantly, at the 1-year follow-up, regardless of BMD values (P = .086) and measured stability (rotational stability P = .34, resonance frequency analysis P = .43) at implant placement. Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that computed tomographic examination can be used as a preoperative method to assess jawbone density before implant placement, since density values correlate with prevailing methods of measuring implant stability. However, in the short time perspective of 1 year, there were no differences in survival rates or changes in marginal bone level between implants placed in bone tissue of different density.

  • 3. Engquist, Bo
    et al.
    Åstrand, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Anzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Dahlgren, Simon
    Engquist, Eva
    Feldmann, Hartmut
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Karlsson, Ulf
    Nord, Per Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Sahlholm, Sten
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Svärdström, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Simplified methods of implant treatment in the edentulous lower jaw. A controlled prospective study. Part I: one-stage versus two-stage surgery.2002In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 93-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The original protocol for Brσnemark System implants in the mandible was a two-stage procedure with 3 months healing time. With five or six implants and a cast framework of gold, the treatment is rather expensive, and simplified methods would be desirable. PURPOSE: The goal of this controlled serial study was to investigate the outcome of a simplified procedure with one-stage surgery, four Brσnemark implants, shortened healing time, and a new titanium-acrylic fixed full prosthesis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty-two patients were treated in three different groups at two specialist centers. All patients were provided with four implants, loaded with a Procera All-in-One bridge (Nobel Biocare, Gothenburg, Sweden) after 12 weeks. In group A (n = 30), one-stage surgery was combined with two-piece implants. In group B (n = 30), the control group, two-stage surgery and two-piece implants were used. In group C (n = 22), one-stage surgery was combined with one-piece implants. Marginal bone level was rated from radiographs at implant insertion, at baseline, and after 1 year. RESULTS: The survival rate after 1 year for group A was 93.3%, group B, 97.5%, and group C, 93.2%. The differences were not statistically significant. Between fixture insertion and baseline, the average bone loss for group A was 1.2 mm, group B, 1.3 mm, and group C, 1.3 mm. No complications in the form of bridge loosening or acrylic fractures were recorded during the first year. CONCLUSIONS: The survival rates and the marginal bone changes did not differ significantly between the one-stage groups and the control group. The survival rate and the marginal bone changes were similar for one-piece and two-piece implants. Four implants were sufficient to support full fixed prostheses in the mandibles. The Procera All-in-One bridges proved to be of high quality, and no complications were experienced. key words: endosseous implants, nonsubmerged implants, one-piece implants, prospective clinical study, submerged implants

  • 4. Engquist, Bo
    et al.
    Åstrand, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Dahlgren, Simon
    Engquist, Eva
    Feldmann, Hartmut
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Gröndahl, Kerstin
    Marginal bone reaction to oral implants: A prospective comparative study of Astra Tech and Brσnemark System implants2002In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, ISSN 0905-7161, E-ISSN 1600-0501, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 30-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In earlier studies of Astra Tech and Brσnemark System implants, high survival rates and small marginal bone changes have been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to compare the two systems, primarily with regard to marginal bone changes, but also with regard to other clinical variables of interest. The present paper describes the results after three years. Sixty-six patients were included in the study and randomly assigned to treatment with Astra Tech implants (n = 184) or Brσnemark System implants (n = 187). The marginal bone level was radiographically examined at fixture insertion, at abutment connection, at baseline (delivery of the prosthetic construction) and at 1- and 3-year follow-up examinations. Between fixture insertion and the baseline examination, the pattern of marginal bone resorption differed between the two systems. However, there was no significant marginal bone change between baseline and the 1-year examination or between the 1- and 3-year examinations. Nor were there any differences between the systems. The mean bone loss in the upper jaw between BL (baseline) and 3 years was 0.2▒0.3 mm for Astra Tech implants and 0.2▒0.1 mm for Brσnemark System implants. The corresponding figures for the lower jaw were 0.3▒0.2 mm and 0.2▒0.1 mm. The survival rate of Astra Tech implants was significantly higher (98.9%) than for Brσnemark System implants (95.2%). However, five of the nine implant losses in the Brσnemark group occurred in one patient. For that reason, this result must be interpreted with caution. The number of patients with implant losses did not differ significantly between the systems. Few complications were recorded up to 3 years.

  • 5.
    Fermergard, Robert
    et al.
    Västervik Hospital.
    Åstrand, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery.
    Osteotome Sinus Floor Elevation without Bone Grafts - A 3-Year Retrospective Study with Astra Tech Implants2012In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 198-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The bone support for implants in the posterior part of the maxilla is often poor. This condition may be treated with augmentation of the maxillary sinus floor. The most common technique used is to elevate the sinus floor by inserting a bone graft through a window opened in the lateral antral wall. In 1994, a less-invasive technique using osteotomes was suggested by Summers. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanPurpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcome of implants placed in the posterior maxilla with the osteotome sinus floor elevation (OSFE) technique without grafting. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMaterials and Methods: The study population comprised 36 consecutive patients in whom 53 implants were inserted with the OSFE technique. The indication for sinus floor elevation was that the bone height below the maxillary sinus was considered to be 10 mm or less. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: The mean height of the alveolar process in the intended implant sites was 6.3 +/- 0.3 mm, and the mean elevation of the sinus floor was 4.4 +/- 0.2 mm. Two implants in edentulous patients were lost at the 1-year follow-up, and one more at the 3-year examination. The remaining 50 implants inserted were in function, giving a 3-year cumulative survival rate of 94%. Implants used in single-tooth replacements and in partially edentulous cases had a 100% survival rate. The marginal bone level at the time of loading of the implants was 0.1 +/- 0.04 mm below the reference point. One year later, the corresponding value was 0.5 +/- 0.06 mm. The mean bone loss between the two examinations was 0.4 +/- 0.05 mm. At the final examination after 3 years, the mean bone level was situated 0.6 +/- 0.09 mm below the reference point, indicating a nonsignificant change between 1 year and 3 years. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: The OSFE technique, without bone grafts, was found to produce predictable results in the treatment of 36 patients with restricted bone volume in the posterior part of the maxilla.

  • 6. Gunne, J
    et al.
    Åstrand, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Lindh, T
    Borg, K
    Olsson, M
    Tooth-implant and implant supported fixed partial dentures: A 10-year report.1999In: International Journal of Prosthodontics, ISSN 0893-2174, E-ISSN 1139-9791, Vol. 12, p. 216-221Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Hellem, Sölve
    et al.
    Karlsson, Ulf
    Almfeldt, Ingvar
    Brunell, Gunnar
    Hamp, Sven-Erik
    Åstrand, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Nonsubmerged implants in the treatment of the edentulous lower Jaw: A 5-year prospective longitudinal study of ITI hollow screws2001In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 3, p. 20-29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Lindman, R
    et al.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Stål, P
    Morphological characterization of the levator veli palatini muscle in children born with cleft palates2001In: The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal, ISSN 1055-6656, E-ISSN 1545-1569, Vol. 38, p. 438-448Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Lindström, FD
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Lundström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    α1 Antitrypsin deficiency in a patient with systemic vasculitis and primary Sjögren's syndrome2002In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 61, no 10, p. 945-946Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 10. List, T
    et al.
    Stenström, B
    Dworkin, SF
    Lundström, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    TMD in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome: A comparison with temporomandibular clinic cases and controls.1999In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 13, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Lundström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Orofacial and general disorders in oral medicine patients: Oral and medical history2009In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 27-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to discover possible connections between general diseases and oral mucosal disorders, and between different oral symptoms by studying the prevalence of various such conditions in oral medicine patients. For this study 2640 consecutive patients (841 men, 1799 women) were interviewed concerning orofacial and systemic symptoms and diseases. The report includes all patients and the main diagnostic groups were: oral lichen planus/lichenoid (OLP), oral dysfunction (OD), recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), oral candidosis (CAN), hyposalivation (HSA), reactive lesions (REA), and leukoplakia (LEU). Results were compared to a reference group (REF) and the normal population (NOP) (when possible). Fifty-eight per cent of all patients experienced oral smarting and orofacial pain and 36% subjective dryness. Women were more often affected. The OD, OLP, RAS and HSA groups reported significantly more orofacial pain and headache than the REF group. Tobacco was used by 17%. LEU and CAN patients had the highest frequencies, 65% and 39%. In the total patient sample cardiovascular diseases were noted in 24%, gastrointestinal disorders in 48%, skin symptoms in 45%, diabetes in 6% and thyroid diseases in 10%. The HSA and OD patients had significantly more gastrointestinal and the HSA and CAN more endocrine disorders than the NOP and REF groups. Forty-seven per cent of the women were postmenopausal and 28% reported vaginal complaints. Vaginal symptoms were most common in HSA patients (45%), 58% of them also stating dry eyes. Prolonged general pain was frequent, especially in HSA, OD, and OLP patients where significant differences were noted to the references. Women were most often affected. Psychological problems were recorded for 53% and were correlated to oral smarting, orofacial and back pain. Orofacial and general pain, symptoms from other epithelial organs, and psychological problems as well as correlation between the different disorders were frequent in oral medicine patients.

  • 12.
    Lundström, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Lindström, FD
    Iron and vitamin deficiencies, endocrine and immune status in patients with primary Sj÷gren's syndrome2001In: Oral Diseases, ISSN 1354-523X, E-ISSN 1601-0825, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 144-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To study the prevalence of iron and vitamin deficiencies, endocrine disorders and immunological parameters in patients with primary Sj÷gren's syndrome (1░SS). DESIGN AND SUBJECTS: At the time of the establishment of the diagnosis of 1░SS in 43 consecutive patients, a clinical examination including haematological analyses was performed. The patients' medical records were also reviewed. SETTING: Patients referred for diagnosis to The University Hospital, Link÷ping, a secondary or tertiary referral hospital serving the middle part of southern Sweden. RESULTS: In total, current or previously treated iron and vitamin deficiencies were registered for 63% of the 1░SS patients (iron 51%, vitamin B12 25%, folate 9%). Current low ferritin was noted in 24%, low iron saturation in 37%, decreased vitamin B12 in 13% and folate in 9%. Thyroid disease was found in a total of 33% and 30% had autoimmune thyroiditis. Three patients (7%) had verified diabetes mellitus. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was raised in 65% of the patients and 84% had a polyclonal increase of 1g. Rheumatoid factor (RF) was detected in 85%, antinuclear antibody (ANA) in 74%, anti-SS-A in 88% and anti-SS-B in 73% of the patients. CONCLUSION: Iron and vitamin deficiencies and thyroid diseases are common in patients with 1░SS. Since these disorders often are treatable and may affect the patients' distress as well as their immune and exocrine function, an active, recurrent search for deficiencies, endocrine diseases and other frequently recorded disorders is recommended.

  • 13.
    Magnusson, Anders
    et al.
    Institute Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden .
    Bjerklin, Krister
    Institute Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden .
    Kim, Hyungmin
    Harvard University, USA .
    Nilsson, Peter
    Institute Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden .
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Three-dimensional assessment of transverse skeletal changes after surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion and orthodontic treatment: A prospective computerized tomography study2012In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, ISSN 0889-5406, E-ISSN 1097-6752, Vol. 142, no 6, p. 825-833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The aim of this prospective longitudinal study was to evaluate transverse skeletal changes after surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion. The changes were registered by using a 3-dimensional computerized tomography technique based on superimposition on the anterior base of the skull. Methods: The subjects comprised 35 patients (mean age, 19.7 years; range, 16.1-43.9 years). Low-dose, helical computerized tomography images were taken at treatment start and after orthodontic treatment. The 3-dimensional models were registered and superimposed at the anterior cranial base. Results: Surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion had a significant transverse skeletal treatment effect, significantly greater posteriorly than anteriorly. The expansion was parallel anteriorly, but posteriorly there was significant transverse tipping. Although there was no statistically significant difference between the changes at the corresponding landmarks, the range of standard deviations was marked. Conclusions: The results showed that, for registering transverse skeletal changes after surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion, 3-dimensional superimposition is a reliable method, circumventing projection and measurement errors. Surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion had a significant but nonuniform skeletal treatment effect. Despite careful surgical separation, pronounced posterior tipping occurred. No correlation was found between the severity of tipping and the patients age. (Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2012;142:825-33)

  • 14.
    Magnusson, Anders
    et al.
    Department of Orthodontics, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bjerklin, Krister
    Department of Orthodontics, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Kim, Hyungmin
    Harvard University, USA .
    Nilsson, Peter
    Institute Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden .
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Three-dimensional computed tomographic analysis of changes to the external features of the nose after Surgically Assisted Rapid Maxillary Expansion and orthodontic treatment: A prospective longitudinal study2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The aim of this prospective, longitudinal study was toe valuate changes to the external shape and form of the nose after Surgically Assisted Rapid Maxillary Expansion (SARME) and orthodontic treatment. The changes were registered using a three-dimensional (3-D) computer tomography technique, based on superimposition on the anterior base of the skull.

    Method: The subjects comprised 35 patients, mean age 19.7 years (16.1-43.9). Lowdose, helical Computerized Tomography (CT) was taken at treatment start and after completed orthodontic treatment, about 18months post-surgery. The 3-D models were registered and superimposed on the anterior cranial base.

    Results: There was in general significant widening and overall anterior and inferior displacement of the nasal soft tissue. The changes varied in size and direction. No correlation was found between the initial and final widths of the nose, or between the initial and final widths of the nostrils.

    Conclusion: After SARME, the most obvious changes to the external features of the nose  are at the most lateral alar-bases. The difference in lateral displacement profoundly influenced the perception of a more rounded nose. Patients with narrow and constrained nostrils can benefit from these changes. The 3-D superimposition applied in this study is a reliable method, circumventing projection and measurement errors.

  • 15.
    Mani, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery.
    Quality of Life Varies With Gender and Age Among Adults Treated for Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate2010In: CLEFT PALATE-CRANIOFACIAL JOURNAL, ISSN 1055-6656, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 491-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate health-related quality of life among adults treated for unilateral cleft lip and palate and to investigate whether patients were affected differently depending on gender and age. Design: Cross-sectional population study with long-term follow-up. Patients/Settings: All unilateral cleft lip and palate patients born 1960-1987 and treated at Uppsala University Hospital were invited (n = 109). Response rate was 79% (n = 86). Mean follow-up time was 35 years. Norm data matched for age and gender were used for comparison (n = 1385). Main Outcome Measures: Health-related quality of life measured with the SF-36 questionnaire. High values indicate good level of health-related quality of life. Results: The total patient group had lower values in the Mental Health subscale compared with norm data (p = .005). Values in all other subscales did not differ from norm data. Women had a higher positive difference than men in the subscale emotional role function compared with the matched norm population (p andlt; .001). The younger age group (20 to 32 years old) consistently had a larger negative difference to matched norm data compared with the older age group (33 to 47 years old) in the subscales social function (p = .009), physical role function (p andlt; .001), and emotional role function (p andlt; .001). Conclusions: Unilateral cleft lip and palate affected health-related quality of life differently depending on gender and age of the patient. Younger patients were affected more negatively than older patients on several subscales. However, except for the mental health subscale, health-related quality of life was similar among unilateral cleft lip and palate patients and norm data.

  • 16.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    List, Thomas
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dworkin, Samuel
    Department of Oral Medicine and Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, School of Dentistry and Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, USA .
    Temporomandibular disorders in adults with repaired cleft lip and palate: a comparison with controls2001In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 193-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and assess psycho‐social distress in adult subjects with repaired complete cleft lip and palate (CLP). Sixty‐three adults (42 males and 21 females, mean age 24.2 years, range 19.5–29.2) with repaired CLP (CLP group) were compared with a group of 66 adults without cleft (non‐cleft group, 49 males and 17 females, mean age 25.5 years, range 20.2–29.9). All subjects underwent a clinical TMD examination, which followed the guidelines in the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD). Jaw function was assessed by evaluating answers to the mandibular function impairment questionnaire (MFIQ).

    Tension‐type headache was diagnosed according to the International Headache Society (IHS) classification. Psychological status was assessed using the depression score and the non‐specific physical symptom score with subscales of the Revised Symptom Checklist‐90 (SCL‐90‐R).

    The prevalence of reported pain in the face, jaws and/or TMJs was 14 and 9 per cent for the CLP and non‐cleft group, respectively, and did not differ significantly between the groups. The CLP group exhibited a significantly reduced jaw‐opening pattern (P < 0.001) and a higher frequency of crossbites (P < 0.05) compared with the non‐cleft group. Whilst jaw function was similar in both groups, a few items, e.g. speech and drinking, were significantly more impaired (P < 0.01) in the CLP group than in the non‐cleft group. There were no significant differences between the two groups concerning tension‐type headache or psycho‐social distress.

    The study found that overall TMD pain or psycho‐social distress was not more common in this CLP group than in a non‐cleft group.

  • 17.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alterations in occlusion and maxillary dental arch dimensions in adults with treated unilateral complete cleft lip and palateManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this stndy was to evaluate the occlusion and maxillary dental arch dimensions in adults with repaired complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) and to investigate the patterns of change in early adulthood. Study models from 39 subjects (25 men, 14 women) (mean age 24.7 years, range 20.2-29.3) with the diagnosis complete UCLP taken at a follow-up examination were analysed and compared with the study models taken at baseline examination (mean age 19.1 years, range 16.0-20.6). Lip closure was made according to the Millard technique and palatal closure according to the Wardill-Kilner technique. All subjects had received orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. The subjects were divided into three groups according to the type of retention in the upper jaw: no retention (n = 15), retention with bonded twisted retainer (n = 13), onlay or fixed bridge (n = 11).

    Occlusion was evaluated according to a scoring system (Huddart and Bodenham, 1972). The maxillary dental arch dimensions were measured with a video imaging system. In the total sample there was a significant deterioration in the total occlusal score during the follow-up period. The impairment was larger on the cleft side than on the non-cleft side. There were no significant differences in the frontal scores. A comparison of the transversal and sagittal maxillary arch dimensions revealed significant differences in all measurements during the follow-up interval. The reduction was largest for the maxillary second premolar width, followed by the first molar width. The oveijet differed significantly between the registrations. The occlusal score and the maxillary arch dimensions were reduced in all of the three subgroups, but there were no differences between the groups. No gender differences were found.

  • 18.
    Nord, Per Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Ny kirurgisk metod: Förlängning av käkben med distraktionsteknik2001In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 98, p. 2708-2712Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Slavnic, Snjezana
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Public Dental Service, Centre for Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery.
    Duration of orthodontic treatment in conjunction with orthognathic surgery2010In: SWEDISH DENTAL JOURNAL, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 159-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients considering undergoing combined orthodontic-orthognathic treatment for correction of malocclusion require appropriate information, particularly with respect to duration of treatment The primary aim of this study was to determine the duration of orthodontic treatment carried out in conjunction with orthognathic surgery and to analyze the influence of selected explanatory variables. A further aim was to compare the duration of orthodontic treatment in patients treated by orthodontists at Linkoping University hospital orthodontic clinic and six regional orthodontic clinics This is a retrospective study, based on data from the orthodontic records of patients who had undergone orthognathic surgery at the University Hospital Maxillofacial Unit in Linkoping, Sweden, from 2000 to 2005 The subjects comprised 207 out of 233 patients (107 women and 100 men), aged 15 8 - 56.9 years, median 24.2 years at the time of surgery 26 patients were excluded, either diagnosed with a syndrome, or because it was impossible to follow up the entire treatment. 59 subjects had undergone orthodontic treatment at the University hospital orthodontic clinic and 148 at the 6 regional orthodontic clinics. The variables recorded were gender, malocclusion, the number of appointments (scheduled and emergency) and treatment setting The median value for pre-operative orthodontic treatment time was 19.2 months (range 2.4 - 68.4); for postoperative orthodontic treatment 4 6 months (range 0 - 18 8) and for total orthodontic treatment 278 months (range 5.9 - 79 1). For the University hospital orthodontic clinic, pre-operative (16.7 months) and total orthodontic treatment times (25 months) were significantly shorter than for the regional clinics; the duration of postoperative treatment was significantly longer (4.1 months). No other explanatory variables had a significant influence on the duration of orthodontic treatment. Compared with the regional orthodontic clinics, there were significantly fewer scheduled appointments at the University hospital orthodontic clinic, but no significant difference in emergency attendance.

  • 20.
    Åstrand, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Engquist, B
    Dahlgren, S
    Engquist, E
    Feldmann, Hartmut
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Gröndahl, K
    Astra Tech and Brånemark System Implants: A prospective 5-year comparative study. Results after one year.1999In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 1, p. 17-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Åstrand, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Engquist, Bo
    Anzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Bergendal, Tom
    Hallman, Mats
    Karlsson, Ulf
    Kvint, Sven
    Lysell, Leif
    Rundcrantz, Torgil
    Nonsubmerged and submerged implants in the treatment of the partially edentulous maxilla.2002In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 115-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Dental implants vary in design and surfaces. In addition, different surgical techniques have been used for implant insertion. The ITI Dental Implant System (Straumann AG, Waldenburg, Switzerland) has always required a one-stage technique, whereas the Brσnemark System (Nobel Biocare AB, Gothenburg, Sweden) requires a two-stage technique. PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to compare the outcome of fixed partial bridges in the maxilla supported by both ITI and Brσnemark implants in a split-mouth design. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with a residual anterior dentition in the maxilla were included in this split-mouth study. The Brσnemark implants were used on one side and the ITI implants on the other side of the residual dentition according to a randomization procedure. A blocking size of four was used, giving equal probability of placing ITI or Brσnemark implants in the right or left side of the jaw. The surgical and prosthetic procedures followed the guidelines given by the manufacturers. The prosthetic treatment with the two-implant systems was performed at the same time, and for that reason the healing period was 6 months for both systems. The observation period for all patients was 1 year after loading. RESULTS: Two Brσnemark implants (in one patient) were lost before loading, and one ITI implant was lost 1 year after loading. There was no significant difference in survival rate. Radiographic examination of the bone level was performed at the time of delivery of the bridge and after 1 year. The mean marginal bone level at baseline was situated 1.9 mm from the reference point for the Brσnemark implants and 1.5 mm for the ITI implants. With regard to the insertion depth used, these bone levels indicate that bone loss had taken place before baseline. However, between baseline and the 1-year examination, there was no significant change of the marginal bone (0.2 +/- 0.08 mm at the Brσnemark implants and 0.1 +/- 0.11 mm at the ITI implants). The difference between results with the two implants was not statistically significant. Crater-form bone destructions were seen at some ITI implants, indicating periimplantitis. However, at only two implants were there clinical signs of periimplantitis. CONCLUSIONS: No significant difference in survival rate or in marginal bone change could be demonstrated between the two systems. At some ITI implants (18%), crater-form bone loss was observed.

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