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  • 1.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    A survey of public health policy on bilateral fittings and comparison with market trends: The evidence-base required to frame policy2006In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 45, no SUPPL. 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents a review of the situation in a number of countries with respect to public health policy for funding of hearing aid services in general and support to bilateral fittings in particular. The data show considerable variations among the countries studied in number of hearing aids fitted per 1000 inhabitants, differing by a factor of 6 between the extremes. Also the percentage of bilateral fittings differs with an average estimated to be of the order of 50%. For hearing-impaired children, bilateral fittings are given full financial support in most countries studied. The data presented indicate the need for a reliable, scientifically valid evidence-base regarding bilateral hearing aid fitting. © 2006 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.

  • 2.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, RC - Rekonstruktionscentrum, ÖNH - Öron- Näsa- Halskliniken.
    Audiologic diagnosis of infants2000In: Seminars in Hearing, ISSN 0734-0451, E-ISSN 1098-8955, Vol. 21, p. 379-387Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, RC - Rekonstruktionscentrum, ÖNH - Öron- Näsa- Halskliniken.
    Can we establish internationally equivalent outcome measures in audiological rehabilitation?2000In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 21, no 4 SUPPL.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This paper intends to discuss issues related to cultural, ethnic, and other nonaudiological variables that may affect the response when trying to determine outcome of audiological rehabilitation in different countries. Design: The ideal measure for the determination of outcome of audiological rehabilitation would be sensitive to changes in disability as well as handicap. Further, it would allow unforeseen effects to be identified and not be limited by language borders or cultural and ethnic differences. A variety of critical factors are discussed that are related to culture, social traditions, ethnic factors, etc. that may affect outcome measures and thus make international equivalence difficult. Conclusions: With careful consideration of the factors discussed, a basic set of questions could be formulated and agreed on, calibrated on suitable populations in different countries, and thereafter used as a bridge across borders to allow comparison of different procedures or meta-analyses of studies performed by different laboratories.

  • 4.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    How to assess outcome of hearing aid fitting in children2001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment of outcome of hearing aid fitting in children should contain several dimensions: audibility, speech recognition, subjective benefit and speech production. Audibility may be: determined by means of aided hearing thresholds or real-ear measurements. For determining speech recognition, methods different from those used for adult patients must be used, especially for children with congenital hearing loss. In these children the development of the spoken language and vocabulary has to be considered, especially when testing speech recognition but also with regard to speech production. Subjective assessment of benefit to a large extent has to rely on the assessment by parents and teachers for children younger than school age. However, several studies have shown that children from the age of around 7 years can usually produce reliable responses in this respect. Speech production has to be assessed in terms of intelligibility by others, who may or may not be used to the individual child's speech. Ideally, the outcome should be assessed repeatedly at suitable intervals in order to be able to follow the child's communicative development.

  • 5.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Measurement of hearing thresholds2007In: Noise and its effects / [ed] Deepak Prasher ,Linda M Luxon, London: John Wiley & Sons , 2007, 1, p. 148-164Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       Noise is an increasing problem in everyday life, and many noise-induced hearing problems are irreversible. This book focuses on all aspects of noise-related problems, including noise effects on stress levels, functional changes after noise-induced cochlear damage, occupational hearing loss and noise conservation problems.

  • 6.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, RC - Rekonstruktionscentrum, ÖNH - Öron- Näsa- Halskliniken.
    Negative consequences of uncorrected hearing loss - A review2003In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 42, no SUPPL. 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hearing loss gives rise to a number of disabilities. Problems in recognizing speech, especially in difficult environments, give rise to the largest number of complaints. Other kinds of disabilities may concern the reduced ability to detect, identify and localize sounds quickly and reliably. Such sounds may be warning or alarm signals, as well as music and birds singing. The communicative disability affects both hearing-impaired people and other people in their environment-family members, fellow workers, etc. Hearing-impaired people are not always aware of all the consequences of the impairment, they do not always know what they are missing. Several studies have shown that uncorrected hearing loss gives rise to poorer quality of life, related to isolation, reduced social activity, and a feeling of being excluded, leading to an increased prevalence of symptoms of depression. These findings indicate the importance of early identification of hearing loss and offers of rehabilitative support, where the fitting of hearing aids is usually an important component. Several studies also point to a significant correlation between hearing loss and loss of cognitive functions. Most of these studies show such a correlation without being able to show whether the hearing loss caused the reduction in cognitive performance or if both the hearing loss and the cognitive decline are parts of a common, general age-related degeneration. A couple of these studies, however, indicate that the uncorrected hearing loss may be the cause of cognitive decline. Whichever alternative is true, the correlation should be seen as a clear indication for early hearing aid fitting for those needing it. Monaural hearing aid fitting in subjects with bilateral hearing loss may give rise to a reduced ability to recognize speech presented to the unaided ear, the so-called late-onset auditory deprivation effect. This functional decline is reversible in some but not all subjects after fitting of a hearing aid also on the previously unaided ear.

  • 7.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, RC - Rekonstruktionscentrum, ÖNH - Öron- Näsa- Halskliniken.
    Lyregaard, Poul-Erik
    Billermark, Erica
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, RC - Rekonstruktionscentrum, ÖNH - Öron- Näsa- Halskliniken.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, RC - Rekonstruktionscentrum, ÖNH - Öron- Näsa- Halskliniken.
    Fitting hearing aids to first-time users2000In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 150-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical experience indicates that first-time hearing aid users prefer less gain and lower maximum output levels than experienced users. This hypothesis was tested on 20 subjects being fitted with their first aids. The study was double blinded by using a programmable hearing aid, set to either the standard setting according to the manufacturer's software or to reduced gain and maximum output. Half of the subjects started with one hearing aid and half with the other, changing to the other hearing aid after 3 days trial with each setting. At the end of the study, subjects stated preference in specified situations and overall. No significant differences in APHAB, sound quality, estimated communication ability or perceived loudness scores were seen for the two settings. Nine subjects preferred the standard setting, seven the reduced setting and four were undecided. No correlation could be found between preference and audiological variables.

  • 8.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Communication in the profoundly hearing impaired and deaf: From signal to dialogue.1998In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 27, no 49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Cox, Robyn
    et al.
    Hyde, Martyn
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, RC - Rekonstruktionscentrum, ÖNH - Öron- Näsa- Halskliniken.
    Optimal outcome measures, research priorities, and international cooperation.2000In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 21, p. 106-115Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Durrant, JD
    et al.
    Palmer, CV
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Analysis of counted behaviors in a single-subject design: Modeling of hearing-aid intervention in hearing-impaired patients with Alzheimer's disease2005In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 31-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical procedures related to patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) largely fail to address the patient's hearing. Given the challenges of this population, unconventional indicators of treatment efficacy may be required. Palmer et al (1999) reported on caregiver-tracked behaviors as outcome measures for hearing aid intervention. Using these data, hearing aid use and subsequent behavior was modeled as a first-order dynamic system, characterized by responses following an exponential time course. The results of such modeling suggest predictable outcomes of hearing aid intervention, or at least useful parameters of quantification (e.g. time-constant and steady-state response), permitting critical assessment of effects of intervention on negative behaviors versus hearing aid use, comparisons among behaviors, and/or comparisons of hearing-aid-use patterns and behavior counts among patients. Use in this and other difficult-to-test populations warrant further study to evaluate clinical efficacy of the analysis described. © 2005 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.

  • 11. Flynn, Mark C
    et al.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Clinical verification of a hearing aid with artificial intelligence2005In: Hearing journal, ISSN 0745-7472, Vol. 58, p. 34-38Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Hellgren, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    System identification of feedback in hearing aids.1999In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 105, p. 3481-3496Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Hellgren, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Variations in the feedback of hearing aids.1999In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 106, p. 2821-2833Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, RC - Rekonstruktionscentrum, ÖNH - Öron- Näsa- Halskliniken.
    Nosrati-Zarenoe, Ramesh
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Nationell databas kan lösa gåtan med plötslig sensorineural hörselnedsättning2003In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 100, p. 3055-3059Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Hydén, Dag
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    On the sneeze-reflex and its control2007In: Rhinology, ISSN 0300-0729, E-ISSN 1996-8604, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 218-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experiments in cats have shown that sneezing can be induced using low intensity electrical current. This study focusses on answering the question whether the sneezing-reflex can also be induced in man through electrical stimulation, whether it is reproducible, and if the response can be abolished pharmacologically? Three healthy males were tested using intranasal stimulation in different parts of the nose using a current from an electric pulse generator. Using currents in the range 2-11 mA, it was possible to induce and reproduce sneezing in the anterior portion of the nose corresponding to the distribution area of the anterior ethmoidal nerve. In one tested subject, local anaesthetics applied to the mucous membranes of the nose abolished the sneezing. Sneeze reflex-reduction may be one way to reduce viral contamination between subjects. Further research could include pharmacological investigations to identify a sneeze-inhibiting substance with small risks for side effects that can be added to common cold nasal sprays.

  • 16. Hygge, S
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Normal and hearing-impaired subjects ability to follow conversation in competing speech, reversed speech, and noise backgrounds.1992In: 22nd Congress of Applied Psychology,1992, Hillsdale: Lawrence Erlbaum Ass , 1992Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17. Hygge, S.
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Normal and hearing-impaired subjects´ ability to just follow conversation in competing speech, reversed speech, and noise backgrounds.1992In: Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, ISSN 0022-4685, Vol. 35, p. 208-215Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Assessment of central auditory functions: methods and applications2001Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Central auditory processing is complex and can not be completely evaluated by a single method. This thesis focuses on assessment of some aspects of central auditory functions by the use of dichotic speech tests, cognitive tests that tax functions important for speech processing and electrophysiological tests.

    Paper A deals with the cognitive effects in dichotic speech testing in elderly hearing impaired subjects. Dichotic speech tests and cognitive tests were performed on 30 hearing impaired subjects ranging in age from 42 to 84 years. The dichotic test material consisted of digits, short sentences and consonant-vowel-syllables. The cognitive test material comprised tests for short-term memory, verbal information processing and phonological processing. Effects of age in dichotic speech tests in elderly were verified. The degree of effect was dependent upon focusing condition and test material. The different listening tasks in the dichotic tests put different demands on cognitive ability, shown by a varying degree of correlation between cognitive functions and dichotic test parameters. Age-related cognitive decline in the elderly was strongly connected with problems to perceive stimuli presented to the left ear.

    Paper B presents a new cognitive test battery, performed in text, auditory and audiovisual modalities. The tests are sensitive for functions important for speech processing and understanding. The test battery was evaluated in four groups, differing in age and hearing status. Each group comprised twelve subjects. The effect of low-level noise on cognitive functions was investigated. The only significant result in the text modality was an age effect in speed of performance, which was also seen in the auditory and audiovisual modalities. In the auditory and audiovisual modalities effects of hearing status and modality were seen in accuracy parameters. Interaction between hearing status and modality, both in accuracy and speed of performance, shows that hearing-impaired subjects benefit more from visual cues. In noise generally poorer results were obtained, especially in the auditory modality and for the elderly, affecting both accuracy and speed. The test battery has proven to be useful in assessing the relative contribution of different input-modalities and the effect of age, hearing-impairment and visual contribution on functions important for speech processing.

    Paper C describes the development of a system for recording of auditory evoked potentials. The system is built around a personal computer with a data-acquisition board with analogue input and output channels. Acoustic stimuli are presented to the test subject and responses to the acoustic stimuli are recorded in an EEG-recording system. The program is written in the graphical programming environment LabView (National Instruments). With the system it is possible to perform all clinical standard measurements. In addition, test-procedures not available in commercial auditory evoked potential systems have been developed. For the assessment of auditory discrimination a toolkit for evaluation of the mismatch negativity potential was developed and evaluated in six normal-hearing subjects.

    List of papers
    1. Cognitive effects in dichotic speech testing in elderly persons
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive effects in dichotic speech testing in elderly persons
    2001 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 120-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of chronologic age on central auditory functions using dichotic speech tests and to study whether and how the age effect in dichotic listening is related to cognitive ability.

    DESIGN: Dichotic speech tests and cognitive tests were performed on 30 bilaterally hearing-impaired subjects, with a pure-tone average better than 50 dB HL. They were between 42 and 84 yr of age and were divided into an older and a younger group comprising 15 subjects each. The dichotic test material were digits, low-redundancy sentences and consonant-vowel syllables. The subjects reported stimuli heard in both ears (free report) or in one ear (directed report to left or right ear). The cognitive test battery comprised tests focusing on short-term memory, verbal information-processing speed and phonologic processing.

    RESULTS: A decreased overall performance in all dichotic speech tests was observed in the older group. In the syllable test the older subjects showed poorer results when focusing on the stimuli heard in the left ear, as compared with when focusing on stimuli heard in the right ear, whereas the younger group showed almost equal results for left- and right ear-focusing conditions. An age effect was also seen in reaction times recorded in the cognitive tests and in the scores of the reading span test. These cognitive parameters correlate with the results of the dichotic test when focusing to the left, but not when focusing to the right in the directed report condition. In the free report condition the overall performance showed a high correlation with cognitive test parameters.

    CONCLUSIONS: Effects of chronologic age in dichotic speech tests in the elderly have been verified. The degree of effect is dependent on test material, way of reporting and focusing condition. The different listening tasks in dichotic tests put different demands on cognitive ability shown by a varying degree of correlations between cognitive function and dichotic test parameters. Also, the results indicate a strong connection between age-related cognitive decline in the elderly and problems to perceive stimuli presented to the left ear.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13584 (URN)10.1097/00003446-200104000-00005 (DOI)
    Available from: 2005-05-28 Created: 2005-05-28 Last updated: 2016-03-14
    2. Evaluation of a cognitive test battery in young and elderly normal-hearing and hearing-impaired persons
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of a cognitive test battery in young and elderly normal-hearing and hearing-impaired persons
    2001 (English)In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 357-370Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A cognitive test battery sensitive to processes important for speech understanding was developed and investigated. Test stimuli are presented as text or in an auditory or audiovisual modality. The tests investigate phonologic processing and verbal information processing. Four subject groups, young/elderly with normal-hearing and young/elderly with hearing impairment, each including 12 subjects, participated in the study. The only significant effect in the text modality was an age effect in the speed of performance, seen also in the auditory and audiovisual modalities. In the auditory and audiovisual modalities, the effects of hearing status and modality were seen in accuracy parameters. Interactions between hearing status and modality, both in accuracy and in reaction times, show that hearing-impaired subjects have difficulties without visual cues. Performing the test battery in noise made the tasks more difficult, especially in the auditory modality and for the elderly, affecting both accuracy and speed. Test-retest measurements showed learning effects and a modality-dependent variability. The test battery has proven useful in assessing the relative contribution of different input signals and the effects of age, hearing impairment, and visual contribution on functions important for speech processing.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13585 (URN)
    Available from: 2005-05-28 Created: 2005-05-28 Last updated: 2013-11-13
    3. A system for recording of auditory evoked responses
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A system for recording of auditory evoked responses
    2000 (English)In: Technology and Health Care, ISSN 0928-7329, E-ISSN 1878-7401, Vol. 8, p. 315-326Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A system for recording of evoked potentials from auditory stimulation was developed. The system consists of a PC equipped with an audio bandwidth board with analog input and output channels. The sound stimulus signal is generated in the computer, D/A converted, and via audio amplifier fed to earphones on the test subject. Auditory evoked potentials in response to sound stimuli are recorded via electrodes, amplified and filtered in an EEG recording system and fed to an A/D converter. The signal is analysed in the PC. The modular design of the program makes it a flexible system where stimulus and recording parameters can easily be modified and new applications can be added to standard clinical measurements.

    Three applications that are not possible with commercially available systems were developed and evaluated. a) A diagnostic procedure to verify hydrops in patients with Meniere's disease. b) Intraoperative recordings of auditory evoked potentials during neurootological surgery. c) Recording of mismatch negativity (MMN) potentials in evaluation of central auditory functions.

    Keyword
    evoked potentials, evoked potentials, evoked potentials, evoked potentials, evoked potentials, evoked potentials, evoked potentials, evoked potentials, evoked potentials
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-27612 (URN)11258578 (PubMedID)12342 (Local ID)12342 (Archive number)12342 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13
  • 19.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Att förstå tal - mer än bara hörsel2005In: Audionytt, ISSN 0347-6308, Vol. 4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    HINT Hearing in Noise Test, nu på svenska2006In: Audionytt, ISSN 0347-6308, Vol. 3, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Dichotic speech tests1999In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 27, no Suppl. 49, p. 35-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    EU-HearCom: Diagnostiska verktyg för att bestämma auditiv profil2007In: STAF,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    A Swedish version of the Hearing In Noise Test (HINT) for measurement of speech recognition2006In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 227-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Swedish Hearing In Noise Test (HINT), consisting of everyday sentences to be used in an adaptive procedure to estimate the speech recognition thresholds in noise and quiet, has been developed. The material consists of 250 sentences, with a length of five to nine syllables, normalized for naturalness, difficulty and reliability. The sentences were recorded with a female speaker. From the sentences, 25 phonemically balanced lists were created. All lists fluctuate less than 1 dB of the overall mean. The standard deviation of the test-retest difference is 0.94 dB when testing with one list, and decreases to 0.68 dB and 0.56 dB for two and three lists, respectively. The average speech recognition thresholds in noise for the Swedish sentences were -3.0 dB signal/noise ratio (SD = 1.1 dB). The present study has resulted in a well-defined and internationally comparable set of sentences, which can be used in Swedish audiological rehabilitation and research to measure speech recognition in noise and quiet. © 2006 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.

  • 24.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Hearing in noise test (HINT) på svenska, med kvinnlig och manlig röst2006In: Tema Hörsel,2006, 2006, p. 22-22Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 25.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    A cognitive test-battery based on text, auditory and audio-visual stimuli. Evaluation in young and elderly, normal hearing and hearing-impaired subjects2003In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Speech Processing in the Elderly2004In: 1st International Congress on Geriatric/Gerontologic Audiology,2004, 2004, p. 73-73Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 27.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Speech understanding in quiet and noise, with and without hearing aids2005In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 44, no 10, p. 574-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Speech recognition and cognitive functions important for speech understanding were evaluated by objective measures and by scores of perceived effort, with and without hearing aids. The tests were performed in silence, and with background conditions of speech spectrum random noise and ordinary speech. One young and one elderly group of twelve hearing-impaired subjects each participated. Hearing aid use improved speech recognition in silence (7 dB) and in the condition with speech as background (2.5 dB S/N), but did not change the perceived effort scores. In the cognitive tests no hearing aid benefit was seen in objective measures, while there was an effect of hearing aid use in scores of perceived effort, subjects reported less effort. There were no age effects on hearing aid benefit. In conclusion, hearing aid use may result in reduced effort in listening tasks that is not associated with improvement in objective scores. © 2005 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.

  • 28.
    Johansson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Tamura, Toshiyo
    Öberg, Åke
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Fallförebyggande sensor för äldre2005In: National Medical Convent,2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Johansson, Linda
    et al.
    Department of Psychology , Uppsala University , Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Department of Psychology , Uppsala University , Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience , Psychiatry Section , Karolinska Institutet , Stockholm, Sweden.
    Implicit memory bias for eating- and body appearance-related sentences in eating disorders: An application of Jacoby's white noise task2008In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 135-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Jacoby's white noise task and an explicit recognition task were used to investigate whether individuals with eating disorders demonstrate implicit memory bias and explicit memory bias, respectively, for information related to eating and body appearance. Included were 33 women with eating disorders (seven with anorexia nervosa and 26 with bulimia nervosa), 29 with nonclinical eating disorder‐related concerns, and 36 healthy controls. Results showed partial support for implicit memory bias but no support for explicit memory bias. These findings suggest that eating disorders may be characterized by relative initial automatic bias for eating disorder‐relevant information but not by bias at later stages of information processing. However, previous studies have demonstrated explicit memory bias in eating disorders, which is inconsistent with this interpretation. Future research is required to clarify the precise cognitive biases associated with eating disorders.

  • 30.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Reference data for evaluation of occupationally noise-induced hearing loss2004In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 6, no 24, p. 35-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relevant reference data are required in order to determine the effect from occupational noise exposure on hearing. Pure-tone averages (PTA) of hearing threshold levels simplify the evaluation for audiometric frequencies typically affected by noise. The present study provides reference data of high frequency (HF) PTA over 3, 4 and 6 kHz for a general adult population, aged from 20 to 79 years, not exposed to hazardous occupational noise. The results are presented as statistical distributions of HF PTA values as functions of age, and as prevalence of different degree of HF PTA in the age groups 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69 and 70-79 years.

  • 31.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Hur påverkar olika typer av störning vår förmåga att uppfatta och förstå tal?2005In: Seminariet Människan och bullret,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

      

  • 32.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A method for evaluating temporal, spectral and combined temporal-spectral resolution of hearing1998In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 3-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method for evaluating the spectral, temporal and combined spectral temporal resolution of hearing is presented; it was used to obtain masked hearing thresholds using the fixed frequency Békéy technique. The masking noise was a broadband random noise with a 3 dB/octave roll off (pink noise). Spectral resolution was assessed by introducing a spectral gap in the masking noise centered at the test tone frequency. Temporal resolution was assessed by introducing temporal gaps, the centre of which coincided in time with the centre of the test tone-pulses. The spectral and temporal gaps were used either separately or simultaneously. Release of masking values were calculated from masked hearing thresholds. One test group comprised 16 normal-hearing subjects, a second group 16 elderly (age 55-75 years) subjects with normal hearing for their age. Temporal gaps were 20, 50 and 100 ms long. Spectral gaps had a bandwidth of 1/10, 1/3, and 1 octave. Each gap or combination of gaps was tested at the frequencies 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz. Release of masking increased with increasing temporal or spectral gaps. If a temporal gap and a spectral gap were combined, the release of masking increased further. Maximum release of masking was obtained with the 100 ms temporal gap combined with the 1 octave notch filter. The overall difference in release of masking between the young and elderly normal-hearing group was 2 dB.

  • 33.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Auditory temporal and spectral resolution in normal and impaired hearing1999In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 10, p. 198-210Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Axelsson, Mårten
    World flight sätter hörseln på kartan.2005In: Audionytt, ISSN 0347-6308, Vol. 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Cognitive aspects of speech comprehension in noise2006In: Satellite symposium at Baltic-Nordic Acoustics Meeting BNAM,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Kognition och taluppfattning/talförståelse i brus2007In: STAF,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Kombinerad allvarlig hörsel- och synnedsättning - en grupp med speciella behov2007In: STAF,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Speech comprehension in noise2005In: British Society of Audiology News, Vol. 46, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A system for recording of auditory evoked responses2000In: Technology and Health Care, ISSN 0928-7329, E-ISSN 1878-7401, Vol. 8, p. 315-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A system for recording of evoked potentials from auditory stimulation was developed. The system consists of a PC equipped with an audio bandwidth board with analog input and output channels. The sound stimulus signal is generated in the computer, D/A converted, and via audio amplifier fed to earphones on the test subject. Auditory evoked potentials in response to sound stimuli are recorded via electrodes, amplified and filtered in an EEG recording system and fed to an A/D converter. The signal is analysed in the PC. The modular design of the program makes it a flexible system where stimulus and recording parameters can easily be modified and new applications can be added to standard clinical measurements.

    Three applications that are not possible with commercially available systems were developed and evaluated. a) A diagnostic procedure to verify hydrops in patients with Meniere's disease. b) Intraoperative recordings of auditory evoked potentials during neurootological surgery. c) Recording of mismatch negativity (MMN) potentials in evaluation of central auditory functions.

  • 40.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Development of a Swedish version of the Hearing In Noise Test (HINT)2005In: The 7st EFAS Congress,2005, 2005, p. 58-58Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

         

  • 41.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    EU-projektet HEARCOM - Hearing in the Communication Society2006In: Team HÖRSEL,2006, 2006, p. 39-39Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    The effect of noise on speech processing: Effects of individual cognitive ability2005In: The 7th EFAS Congress,2005, 2005, p. 46-46Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 43.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Leijon, Arne
    EU-HearCom. Översikt över pågående EU-hörselprojekt2007In: STAF,2007, 2007, p. 10-10Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

        

  • 44.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Cognitive test performance in background conditions of broadband noise and speech2005Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Lyzenga, Johannes
    Cognitive aspects of speech recognition in noise2007In: European Federation of Audiology Congress EFAS,2007, 2007, p. 124-124Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Elisabeth, Sundewall-Thorén
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Karlsson Foo, Catharina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Exceeding individual working memory capacity restrains aided speech recognition performance - effects in complex listening situations and effects of acclimatization.2007In: Aging and speech communication: An International and Interdisciplinary research conference.,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 47.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Hellgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Elberling, Claus
    A digital filterbank hearing aid: Predicting user preference and performance for two signal processing algorithms1997In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 18, p. 12-25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Hellgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Elberling, Claus
    A digital filterbank hearing aid: Three digital signal processing algorithms-User preference and performance1997In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 18, p. 373-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

        

  • 49.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Sundewall-Thorén, Elisabeth
    Interactions between cognition, compression, and listening conditions: Effects on speech-in-noise performance in a two-channel hearing aid2007In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 604-617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study which included 23 experienced hearing aid users replicated several of the experiments reported in Gatehouse et al (2003, 2006) with new speech test material, language, and test procedure. The performance measure used was SNR required for 80% correct words in a sentence test. Consistent with Gatehouse et al, this study indicated that subjects showing a low score in a cognitive test (visual letter monitoring) performed better in the speech recognition test with slow time constants than with fast time constants, and performed better in unmodulated noise than in modulated noise, while subjects with high scores on the cognitive test showed the opposite pattern. Furthermore, cognitive test scores were significantly correlated with the differential advantage of fast-acting versus slow-acting compression in conditions of modulated noise. The pure tone average threshold explained 30% of the variance in aided speech recognition in noise under relatively simple listening conditions, while cognitive test scores explained about 40% of the variance under more complex, fluctuating listening conditions, where the pure tone average explained less than 5% of the variance. This suggests that speech recognition under steady-state noise conditions may underestimate the role of cognition in real-life listening.

  • 50.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Sundewall-Thorén, Elisabeth
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Karlsson Foo, Catharina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Aided listening performance in complex conditions correlates with performance on cognitive tests rather than with simple tests of audibility.2007In: International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Reserach,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 68
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