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  • 1.
    Barker, A.
    et al.
    Cambridge Institute Public Heatlh, England .
    Lauria, A.
    University of Campus Biomed, Italy .
    Schloot, N.
    University of Dusseldorf, Germany University of Dusseldorf, Germany .
    Hosszufalusi, N.
    Semmelweis University, Hungary .
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Mathieu, C.
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium .
    Mauricio, D.
    Hospital Arnau Vilanova, Spain .
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Van der Schueren, B.
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium .
    Mandrup-Poulsen, T.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Scherbaum, W .A.
    University of Dusseldorf, Germany .
    Weets, I.
    Vrije University of Brussel, Belgium Vrije University of Brussel, Belgium Belgian Diabet Registry BDR, Belgium .
    Gorus, F. K.
    Vrije University of Brussel, Belgium Vrije University of Brussel, Belgium Belgian Diabet Registry BDR, Belgium .
    Wareham, N.
    Cambridge Institute Public Heatlh, England .
    Leslie, R. D.
    Queen Mary University of London, England .
    Pozzilli, P.
    University of Campus Biomed, Italy Queen Mary University of London, England .
    Age-dependent decline of beta-cell function in type 1 diabetes after diagnosis: a multi-centre longitudinal study2014In: Diabetes, obesity and metabolism, ISSN 1462-8902, E-ISSN 1463-1326, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 262-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimsC-peptide secretion is currently the only available clinical biomarker to measure residual -cell function in type 1 diabetes. However, the natural history of C-peptide decline after diagnosis can vary considerably dependent upon several variables. We investigated the shape of C-peptide decline over time from type 1 diabetes onset in relation to age at diagnosis, haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels and insulin dose. MethodsWe analysed data from 3929 type 1 diabetes patients recruited from seven European centres representing all age groups at disease onset (childhood, adolescence and adulthood). The influence of the age at onset on -cell function was investigated in a longitudinal analysis at diagnosis and up to 5-years follow-up. ResultsFasting C-peptide (FCP) data at diagnosis were available in 3668 patients stratified according to age at diagnosis in four groups (less than5years, n=344; greater than5yearsless than10years, n=668; greater than10yearsless than18years, n=991; greater than18years, n=1655). FCP levels were positively correlated with age (pless than0.001); the subsequent decline in FCP over time was log-linear with a greater decline rate in younger age groups (pless than0.0001). ConclusionsThis study reveals a positive correlation between age at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and FCP with a more rapid decline of -cell function in the very young patients. These data can inform the design of clinical trials using C-peptide values as an end-point for the effect of a given treatment.

  • 2.
    Berhan, Yonas T.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Mollsten, Anna
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Dahlquist, Gisela
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Five-region study finds no evidence of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes in Swedish 11- to 13-year-olds2014In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 103, no 10, p. 1078-1082Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimChildhood obesity is now an established public health problem in most developed countries, and there is concern about a parallel increase of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes in overweight Swedish school children from 11 to 13years of age. MethodsBody mass index (BMI) was measured in 5528 schoolchildren in the 6th grade, from 11 to 13years of age, in five different regions in Sweden. Overweight was defined by international age- and sex-specific BMI cut-offs, corresponding to adult BMI cut-offs of 25kg/m(2) at 18years of age (ISO-BMI 25, n=1275). Haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was measured in 1126 children with ISO-BMI 25. Children with a Diabetes Control and Complications Trial aligned HbA1c 6.1% on two occasions underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to establish the diabetes diagnosis. ResultsOf 1126 children with ISO-BMI 25, 24 (2.1%) had at least one HbA1c value 6.1%. Three of them had HbA1c 6.1% on two occasions, and all of them had a normal OGTT. ConclusionIn this cross-sectional, population-based screening study of a high-risk group of 11- to 13-year-old Swedish school children, we found no indication of undiagnosed diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance.

  • 3.
    Browaldh, Lars
    et al.
    Sachsska barnsjukhuset, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm.
    Sandstrom, Olof
    Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå.
    Agardh, Daniel
    Skånes universitetssjukhus.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå universitet.
    Celiaki är en vanlig sjukdom som är lätt att missa2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, no 11, p. 484-488Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Celiaki ansågs länge som en ovanlig barnsjukdom, men är en vanlig sjukdom som drabbar alla åldrar.

    Genomförda screeningar av normalbefolkningen visar att merparten inte fått dia­gnos eller behandling.

    Den kliniska bilden varierar: alltifrån diffusa besvär eller inga symtom alls till allvarliga gastrointestinala symtom med grav avmagring och tillväxtrubbning till följd av malabsorption.

    Klinisk misstanke om eller hereditet för celiaki bör föranleda analys av specifika serologiska markörer. Gastroskopi med tunntarmsbiopsi bör övervägas för att bekräfta eller utesluta diagnosen.

  • 4.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Angbratt, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Valter, L.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    History matters: childhood weight trajectories as a basis for planning community-based obesity prevention to adolescents2012In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 524-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To use epidemiological data and a standardized economic model to compare projected costs for obesity prevention in late adolescence accrued using a cross-sectional weight classification for selecting adolescents at age 15 years compared with a longitudinal classification. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS: All children born in a Swedish county (population 440 000) in 1991 who participated in all regular measurements of height and weight at ages 5, 10 and 15 years (n=4312) were included in the study. The selection strategies were compared by calculating the projected financial load resulting from supply of obesity prevention services from providers at all levels in the health care system. The difference in marginal cost per 1000 children was used as the primary end point for the analyses. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS: Using the cross-sectional selection strategy, 3.8% of adolescents at age 15 years were selected for evaluation by a pediatric specialist, and 96.2% were chosen for population-based interventions. In the trajectory-based strategy, 2.4% of the adolescents were selected for intensive pediatric care, 1.4% for individual clinical interventions in primary health care, 14.0% for individual primary obesity prevention using the Internet and 82.1% for population-based interventions. Costs for the cross-sectional selection strategy were projected to USD463 581 per 1000 adolescents and for the trajectory-based strategy were USD 302 016 per 1000 adolescents. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSIONS: Using projections from epidemiological data, we found that by basing the selection of adolescents for obesity prevention on weight trajectories, the load on highly specialized pediatric care can be reduced by one-third and total health service costs for obesity management among adolescents reduced by one-third. Before use in policies and prevention program planning, our findings warrant confirmation in prospective cost-benefit studies.

  • 5.
    Ekbäck, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Tedner, Michaela
    Pediatric Clinic, Täby, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Devenney, Irene
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Oldaeus, Göran
    Pediatric Clinic, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Norrman, Gunilla
    Pediatric Clinic, Hudiksvall, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Leif
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Severe Eczema in Infancy Can Predict Asthma Development. A Prospective Study to the Age of 10 Years2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 6, p. e99609-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children with atopic eczema in infancy often develop allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma, but the term "atopic march has been questioned as the relations between atopic disorders seem more complicated than one condition progressing into another. Objective: In this prospective multicenter study we followed children with eczema from infancy to the age of 10 years focusing on sensitization to allergens, severity of eczema and development of allergic airway symptoms at 4.5 and 10 years of age. Methods: On inclusion, 123 children were examined. Hanifin-Rajka criteria and SCORAD index were used to describe the eczema. Episodes of wheezing were registered, skin prick tests and IgE tests were conducted and questionnaires were filled out. Procedures were repeated at 4.5 and 10 years of age with additional examinations for ARC and asthma. Results: 94 out of 123 completed the entire study. High SCORAD points on inclusion were correlated with the risk of developing ARC, (B = 9.86, P = 0.01) and asthma, (B = 10.17, P = 0.01). For infants with eczema and wheezing at the first visit, the OR for developing asthma was 4.05(P = 0.01). ARC at 4.5 years of age resulted in an OR of 11.28(P = 0.00) for asthma development at 10 years. Conclusion: This study indicates that infant eczema with high SCORAD points is associated with an increased risk of asthma at 10 years of age. Children with eczema and wheezing episodes during infancy are more likely to develop asthma than are infants with eczema alone. Eczema in infancy combined with early onset of ARC seems to indicate a more severe allergic disease, which often leads to asthma development. The progression from eczema in infancy to ARC at an early age and asthma later in childhood shown in this study supports the relevance of the term "atopic march, at least in more severe allergic disease.

  • 6. Grant, C
    et al.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology .
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    The clinical relevance of duodenal intraepithelial lymphocyte counts in children treated for disease2008In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 7.
    Hedin-Skogman, Barbro
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Croner, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Eknefelt, Mattias
    Pediatric Clinic, Jönköping.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Lyme Neuroborreliosis in Children - a Prospective Study of Clinical features, Prognosis, and Outcome2008In: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, ISSN 0891-3668, E-ISSN 1532-0987, Vol. 27, no 12, p. 1089-1094Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    Background: Evaluation of children with clinically suspected neuroborreliosis (NB) is difficult. With a prospective study design we wanted to characterize children with signs and symptoms indicative for NB, investigate clinical outcome and, if possible, identify factors of importance for recovery.

    Material/Methods: Children being evaluated for NB (n = 177) in Southeast Sweden were categorized into 3 groups: "confirmed neuroborreliosis" (41%) with Borrelia antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid, "possible neuroborreliosis" (26%) with pleocytosis but 110 Borrelia antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid, and "not determined" (33%) with no pleocytosis and no Borrelia antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid, Antibiotic treatment was given to 69% of children. Patients were followed during 6 months and compared with a matched control group (n = 174).

    Results: Clinical recovery at the 6-month follow-up (n = 177) was generally good and no patient was found to have recurrent or progressive neurologic symptoms. However, persistent facial nerve palsy caused dysfunctional and cosmetic problems in 11% of patients. Persistent nonspecific symptoms, such as headache and fatigue, were not more frequently reported in patients than in controls. Influence on daily life was reported to the same extent in patients and controls. Consequently, persistent headache and fatigue at follow-up should not be considered as attributable to NB. No prognostic factors could be identified.

    Conclusions: Clinical recovery was satisfactory in children being evaluated for NB although persistent symptoms from facial nerve palsy occurred. Persistent nonspecific symptoms, such as headache and fatigue, were not more frequently reported in patients than in controls.

  • 8.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Carrie
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Pernehed, Sara
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    The experience of becoming a grandmother to a premature infant - A balancing act, influenced by ambivalent feeling2012In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 21-22, p. 3297-3305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives.  To explore and describe the experience of becoming a grandmother to a premature infant.

    Background.  Becoming a grandmother involves a new perspective of life. Grandmothers of sick infants find themselves in a new situation with an adult child undergoing serious stress. Few studies have approached the grandmothers’ own experience of becoming a grandmother to a premature infant.

    Design.  A qualitative content analysis was used.

    Methods.  Eleven women, 52–66 years of age, who were grandmothers to premature infants born at a gestational age of 25–34 weeks, were interviewed during 2010. The infants were less than three years old at the time of the interview. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results.  The overall theme was a balancing act. Two categories of experience were identified: emotional experiences and a new role. ‘Emotional experiences’ was related to the first meeting, ambivalent feelings and confidence in care. ‘A new role’ was related to the subcategories supportive, a balance of involvement and limitations.

    Conclusions.  To become a grandmother to a premature infant was experienced as a balancing act influenced by ambivalent feelings of joy, fear and worry. The grandmothers sensed the seriousness of the situation at the same time as they wanted to be happy about the newborn infant. They worried about their adult child’s as well as the premature infant’s health but put their own needs aside. The grandmothers’ new role was a balance between being involved and supportive without disturbing.

    Relevance to clinical practice.  Neonatal intensive care unit staff should be open to grandmothers’ needs and acknowledge them as an obvious support for the immediate family of a premature infant. The grandmothers need guidance and information about what to expect concerning the infants health, the parents situation and their own role.

  • 9.
    Hollén, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Antibodies to oat prolamines (avenins) in children with coeliac disease2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 742-746Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The use of oats in a gluten-free diet for children with coeliac disease is presently under investigation. In this study we measured the content of antibodies to oat prolamines (avenin) in sera from coeliac children and reference children.

    Methods: Crude avenin was prepared by extraction with ethanol and salt-solution and used as antigen in a three-step ELISA. Sera from 81 children, including 34 children with verified coeliac disease, were analysed for both IgA and IgG antibodies to avenin and gliadin. Sera were also incubated with gliadin before exposure to avenin, and vice versa, to assess a possible cross-reaction between the species. Keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) was used as a negative control.

    Results: Children with coeliac disease on a normal diet had significantly higher levels of antibodies to avenin, both IgG and IgA, than reference children ( P < 0.001) and the levels correlated positively with gliadin antibodies, especially of IgA-type ( r = 0.798). Both anti-avenin and anti-gliadin antibodies were only absorbed by the corresponding protein.

    Conclusions: Children with coeliac disease have antibodies to oat proteins at significantly higher levels than reference children. The absorption test did not indicate a cross-reactivity between the prolamines of wheat and oats. The method will be employed for repeated sampling of anti-avenin antibodies during a prospective interventional study with a gluten-free diet supplemented with oats.

  • 10.
    Högberg, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Danielsson, Lars
    Norrtälje Hospital.
    Jarleman, Stefan
    Astrid Lindgren's Children Hospital.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Serum zinc in small children with coeliac disease2009In: ACTA PAEDIATRICA, ISSN 0803-5253, Vol. 98, no 2, p. 343-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In coeliac disease (CD) there is a gluten-induced small bowel enteropathy leading to malabsorption of various nutrients, vitamins and trace elements. Low levels of serum zinc have been reported in adults with untreated CD. In the present study we related the serum concentration of zinc to the morphology of the small bowel mucosa in 58 children, all under 4 years of age and under investigation for coeliac disease. The mean serum concentration of zinc (mean +/- SD; mu mol/L) was significantly lower in children with untreated CD (9.7 +/- 2.0) (n = 11) compared to non-coeliac children without enteropathy (15.1 +/- 2.3) (n = 16) (p &lt; 0.001), coeliac children on a gluten-free diet without enteropathy (14.2 +/- 1.6) (n = 14) (p &lt; 0.001), coeliac children on gluten challenge with enteropathy (14.1 +/- 2.1) (n = 12) (p &lt; 0.001) and coeliac children on gluten challenge without enteropathy (13.8 +/- 1.9) (n = 6) (p &lt; 0.005).

    Conclusion: Serum zinc concentration is decreased in untreated coeliac children with enteropathy and normalizes on gluten-free diet. A low serum zinc value in a child being investigated for possible CD on clinical grounds can thus be used as a complementary marker for enteropathy indicating further investigation with small bowel biopsy. The hypothetical role of zinc in the pathogenesis of CD is discussed.

  • 11.
    Högberg, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    One thousand small-bowel biopsies in children: A single-port versus a double-port capsule2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 36, no 11, p. 1230-1232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Small-bowel biopsy is a well-established technique in the evaluation of children with intestinal malabsorption, e.g. coeliac disease. The biopsy is performed endoscopically or with a peroral capsule instrument. The aim of the present retrospective study was to compare the single-port Watson capsule with the double-port Storz capsule with regard to procedure and fluoroscopy time, complications and failure rate. Methods: All 1,078 peroral small-bowel biopsies performed at our department during 1989-99 were studied. In 387 of these, the Watson capsule was used and in the remaining 691 the Storz capsule. Median age of the children was 2.5 years. About one-third of the children were premedicated with the prokinetic drug cisapride and as sedatives alimemazine or diazepam orally. Two-thirds of the children were given metoclopramide along with midazolam intravenously. The biopsies were performed under intermittent fluoroscopy. Results: The median biopsy procedure time was significantly shorter with the Storz capsule (7 min) compared to the Watson capsule (10 min) (P<0.05). The median fluoroscopy time was 5 sec with the Storz capsule and 8 sec with the Watson capsule (P<0.01). The failure rate did not differ significantly between the two capsule types: 10.3% (Watson) and 7.7% (Storz). One potential but no serious complication occurred. Conclusions: Providing that effective sedation is available, small-bowel biopsy with a peroral capsule, and the Storz double-port multibiopsy capsule in particular, is a safe and fast method exposing the child to a minimal radiation dose.

  • 12.
    Högberg, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Sokolski, Jan
    Department of Dermatology, Norrköping Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Chronic Bullous Dermatosis of Childhood Associated with Coeliac Disease in a 6-year-old Boy2004In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 84, no 2, p. 158-159p. 158-159Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 13.
    Högberg, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Diagnosis criteria in young children2009In: Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology, ISSN 1759-5045, E-ISSN 1759-5053, Vol. 6, no 8, p. 447-448Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 14.
    Högberg, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Pediatric celiac disease-is a diagnostic biopsy necessary?2012In: Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology, ISSN 1759-5045, E-ISSN 1759-5053, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 127-128Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A small-bowel biopsy is currently required in the diagnosis of celiac disease in children. The European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition has now presented new guidelines for the diagnosis of celiac disease, which indicate that small-bowel biopsy could be avoided in certain cases.

  • 15.
    Högberg, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Webb, C
    Lund University.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Forslund, Tony
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Danielsson, L
    Norrtalje Hospital.
    Ivarsson, A
    Umea University.
    Sandstrom, O
    Umea University.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Children with screening-detected coeliac disease show increased levels of nitric oxide products in urine2011In: ACTA PAEDIATRICA, ISSN 0803-5253, Vol. 100, no 7, p. 1023-1027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Increased concentration of nitric oxide (NO) metabolites, nitrite and nitrate, in the urine is a strong indication of ongoing small intestinal inflammation, which is a hallmark of the enteropathy of coeliac disease (CD). It has previously been shown that children with symptomatic, untreated CD have increased levels of NO oxidation products in their urine. The aim of this study was to investigate whether screening-detected, asymptomatic coeliac children display the same urinary nitrite/nitrate pattern. Methods: In a multicenter screening study, serum samples were collected from 7208 12-year-old children without previously diagnosed CD. Sera were analysed for anti-human tissue transglutaminase (tTG) of isotype IgA. Small bowel biopsy was performed in antibody-positive children, yielding 153 new cases of CD. In the screening-detected individuals, the sum of nitrite and nitrate concentrations in the urine was analysed and used as an indicator of NO production. For comparison, 73 children with untreated, symptomatic CD were studied. Results: The nitrite/nitrate levels in children with screening-detected CD and those with untreated symptomatic CD did not differ significantly. Both groups had significantly increased urinary nitrite/nitrate concentrations compared to the children with normal small bowel biopsy (p andlt; 0.001). Conclusion: Children with screening-detected CD have increased production of NO just as children with untreated symptomatic CD. High NO metabolite levels in the urine may indicate a pathogenetic feature of CD and be a marker of major clinical importance.

  • 16.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Myleus, Anna
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Norstrom, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    van der Pals, Maria
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Rosen, Anna
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Danielsson, Lars
    Norrtalje Hospital, Sweden .
    Halvarsson, Britta
    Aleris Medilab, Sweden .
    Hammarroth, Solveig
    Norrtalje Hospital, Sweden .
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Karlsson, Eva
    Vaxjo Hospital, Sweden .
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Webb, Charlotta
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Sandstrom, Olof
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Prevalence of Childhood Celiac Disease and Changes in Infant Feeding2013In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 131, no 3, p. E687-E694Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Between 1984 and 1996, Sweden experienced an "epidemic" of clinical celiac disease in children andlt;2 years of age, attributed partly to changes in infant feeding. Whether infant feeding affects disease occurrence and/or the clinical presentation remains unknown. We investigated and compared the total prevalence of celiac disease in 2 birth cohorts of 12-year-olds and related the findings to each cohorts ascertained infant feeding. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS: A 2-phase cross-sectional screening study was performed in which 13 279 children from 2 birth cohorts participated: children born during the epidemic (1993) and children born after the epidemic (1997). Previously diagnosed cases were reported and confirmed. Blood samples were analyzed for serological markers and children with positive values were referred for small intestinal biopsy. Infant feeding practices in the cohorts were ascertained via questionnaires. Prevalence comparisons were expressed as prevalence ratios. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS: The total prevalence of celiac disease was 29 in 1000 and 22 in 1000 for the 1993 and 1997 cohorts, respectively. Children born in 1997 had a significantly lower risk of having celiac disease compared with those born in 1993 (prevalence ratio: 0.75; 95% confidence interval: 0.60-0.93; P = .01). The cohorts differed in infant feeding (specifically, in the proportion of infants introduced to dietary gluten in small amounts during ongoing breastfeeding). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSIONS: A significantly reduced prevalence of celiac disease in 12-year-olds indicates an option for disease prevention. Our findings suggest that the present infant feeding recommendation to gradually introduce gluten-containing foods from 4 months of age, preferably during ongoing breastfeeding, is favorable. Pediatrics 2013;131:e687-e694

  • 17.
    Kautto, E.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden Umeå University, Sweden .
    Ivarsson, A.
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Norstrom, F.
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Carlsson, A.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Hornell, A.
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Nutrient intake in adolescent girls and boys diagnosed with coeliac disease at an early age is mostly comparable to their non-coeliac contemporaries2014In: Journal of human nutrition and dietetics (Print), ISSN 0952-3871, E-ISSN 1365-277X, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 41-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundFood habits, nutrient needs and intakes differ between males and females, although few nutritional studies on patients with coeliac disease (CD) have reported results stratified by gender. ObjectivesTo compare energy and nutrient intakes among 13-year olds diagnosed with CD in early childhood with those of a non-coeliac (NC) age- and gender-matched control group, and also with estimated average requirements (EAR). MethodsA case-control study was conducted in Sweden 2006-2007 within the coeliac screening study ETICS (Exploring The Iceberg of Coeliacs in Sweden). Dietary intake was assessed among 37 adolescents (23 girls) diagnosed with CD at median age 1.7years (CD group) and 805 (430 girls) NC controls (NC group) using a food-frequency questionnaire covering 4weeks. Reported energy intake was validated by comparison with the calculated physical activity level (PAL). ResultsRegardless of CD status, most adolescents reported an intake above EAR for most nutrients. However, both groups had a low intake of vitamin C, with 13% in the CD-group and 25% in the NC-group below EAR, and 21% of boys in the CD-group below EAR for thiamine. The intake of fatty acids was unbalanced, with a high intake of saturated and a low intake of unsaturated fats. Girls and boys in the CD-group had an overall lower nutrient density in reported food intake compared to girls and boys in the NC-group. ConclusionsNutrient intake of adolescent girls and boys with CD was mostly comparable to intakes of NC controls. Dietitians should take the opportunity to reinforce a generally healthy diet when providing information about the gluten-free diet.

  • 18.
    Lahdenperä, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hölttä, V
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Ruohtula, T
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Salo, H M
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Orivuori, L
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Westerholm-Ormio, M
    Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University of Helsinki,.
    Savilahti, E
    Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University of Helsinki,.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Vaarala, O
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Up-regulation of small intestinal interleukin-17 immunity in untreated coeliac disease but not in potential coeliac disease or in type 1 diabetes2012In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 167, no 2, p. 226-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Up-regulation of interleukin (IL)-17 in small intestinal mucosa has been reported in coeliac disease (CD) and in peripheral blood in type 1 diabetes (T1D). We explored mucosal IL-17 immunity in different stages of CD, including transglutaminase antibody (TGA)-positive children with potential CD, children with untreated and gluten-free diet-treated CD and in children with T1D. Immunohistochemistry was used for identification of IL-17 and forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)-positive cells and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for IL-17, FoxP3, retinoic acid-related orphan receptor (ROR)c and interferon (IFN)-γ transcripts. IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-17 were studied in supernatants from biopsy cultures. Expression of the apoptotic markers BAX and bcl-2 was evaluated in IL-17-stimulated CaCo-2 cells. The mucosal expression of IL-17 and FoxP3 transcripts were elevated in individuals with untreated CD when compared with the TGA-negative reference children, children with potential CD or gluten-free diet-treated children with CD (P andlt; 0·005 for all IL-17 comparisons and P andlt; 0·01 for all FoxP3 comparisons). The numbers of IL-17-positive cells were higher in lamina propria in children with CD than in children with T1D (P andlt; 0·05). In biopsy specimens from patients with untreated CD, enhanced spontaneous secretion of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-17 was seen. Activation of anti-apoptotic bcl-2 in IL-17-treated CaCo-2 epithelial cells suggests that IL-17 might be involved in mucosal protection. Up-regulation of IL-17 could, however, serve as a biomarker for the development of villous atrophy and active CD.

  • 19.
    Lahdenperä, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Vaarala, Outi
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The effect of gluten-free diet on Th1--Th2--Th3-associated intestinal immune responses in celiac disease2011In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY, ISSN 0036-5521, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 538-549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To study T-helper (Th)1--Th2--Th3 gene activation profile in the small intestine and peripheral blood of children with celiac disease (CD) with special interest in the response to the gluten-free diet (GFD) treatment in order to elucidate an immune dysregulation not triggered by gluten. Material and methods. Small intestinal biopsies and venous blood were taken from seven children with CD (mean age: 8 years, four girls) at presentation and after 1 year of strict GFD. The Th1--Th2--Th3 gene expression profile was examined by real-time PCR arrays. The findings were compared with the corresponding expressions in peripheral blood and small intestinal biopsies from six reference children without CD (mean age: 6 years, four girls). Results. The Th1 gene expression profile including interferon (IFN)-gamma gamma, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 1 together with reduced interleukin (IL)-2 expression was pronounced in small intestinal biopsies from children with untreated CD. A downregulation of IFN-gamma gamma transcripts was seen after 1 year of GFD, but there was still increased expression of STAT1 and IRF1 in association with low IL-2 expression in spite of eliminated exposure to wheat gluten. By contrast, the decreased intestinal expression of Th2 gene markers observed at presentation was normalized with GFD. The alterations in the mucosal gene expression profile were not reflected in peripheral blood. Conclusion. The GFD did not correct the increased activation of the IFN-gamma gamma signaling pathway related markers and reduced IL-2 expression, suggesting that they represent an immune dysregulation not dependent on gluten exposure.

  • 20.
    Lauria, A.
    et al.
    University of Campus Biomed, Italy.
    Barker, A.
    MRC Epidemiol Unit, England.
    Schloot, N.
    University of Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Hosszufalusi, N.
    Semmelweis Univ, Hungary.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mathieu, C.
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Mauricio, D.
    Hospital Arnau Vilanova, Spain.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Van der Schueren, B.
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Mandrup-Poulsen, T.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Scherbaum, W. A.
    University of Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Weets, I.
    VUB, Belgium; VUB, Belgium; BDR, Belgium.
    Gorus, F. K.
    VUB, Belgium; VUB, Belgium; BDR, Belgium.
    Wareham, N.
    MRC Epidemiol Unit, England.
    Leslie, R. D.
    Queen Mary University of London, England.
    Pozzilli, P.
    University of Campus Biomed, Italy; Queen Mary University of London, England.
    BMI is an important driver of beta-cell loss in type 1 diabetes upon diagnosis in 10 to 18-year-old children2015In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 172, no 2, p. 107-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Body weight-related insulin resistance probably plays a role in progression to type 1 diabetes, but has an uncertain impact following diagnosis. In this study, we investigated whether BMI measured at diagnosis was an independent predictor of C-peptide decline 1-year post-diagnosis. Design: Multicentre longitudinal study carried out at diagnosis and up to 1-year follow-up. Methods: Data on C-peptide were collected from seven diabetes centres in Europe. Patients were grouped according to age at diagnosis (less than5 years, n = 126; greater than5 years less than10 years, n = 295; greater than10 years less than18 years, n = 421; greater than18 years, n = 410). Linear regression was used to investigate whether BMI was an independent predictor of change in fasting C-peptide over 1 year. Models were additionally adjusted for baseline insulin dose and HbA1c. Results: In individuals diagnosed between 0 and 5 years, 5 and 10 years and those diagnosed greater than18 years, we found no association between BMI and C-peptide decline. In patients aged 10-18 years, higher BMI at baseline was associated with a greater decline in fasting C-peptide over 1 year with a decrease (beta 95% CI; P value) of 0.025 (0.010, 0.041) nM/kg per m(2) higher baseline BMI (P = 0.001). This association remained significant after adjusting for gender and differences in HbA1c and insulin dose (beta = 0.026, 95% CI = 0.0097, 0.042; P = 0.002). Conclusions: These observations indicate that increased body weight and increased insulin demand are associated with more rapid disease progression after diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in an age group 10-18 years. This should be considered in studies of beta-cell function in type 1 diabetes.

  • 21.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Krisky, David
    Diamyd Medical, Pittsburgh.
    Casas, Rosaura
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Battelino, Tadej
    University Medical Center–University Children's Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Ljubljana, Slovenia .
    Castaño, Luis
    Hospital de Cruces–University of Basque Country, Barakaldo, Bizkaia, Spain .
    Greening, James
    Department of Paediatrics, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Leicester, UK.
    Kordonouri, Olga
    Diabetes Center for Children and Adolescents, Kinderkrankenhaus auf der Bult, Hannover, Germany .
    Otonkoski, Timo
    Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Pozzilli, Paolo
    University Campus Bio-Medico, Rome, Italy.
    Robert, Jean-Jacques
    Hôpital Necker–Enfants Malades, Université René Descartes Paris 5, Paris, France.
    Veeze, Henk J.
    Stichting Diabeter, Rotterdam, the Netherlands .
    Palmer, Jerry
    Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System and University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Elding Larsson, Helena
    Lunds universitet, Sweden.
    Åman, Jan
    Örebro universitet, Sweden.
    Kärdell, Gunilla
    Neiderud, Jan
    Helsingborgs lasarett, Sweden.
    Lundström, Göran
    Länssjukhuset Kalmar, Sweden.
    Albinsson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Skånes universitetssjukhus, Lund, Sweden.
    Nordvall, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Fors, Hans
    Sahlgrenska akademin vid Göteborgs universitet, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Carl-Göran
    Centrallasarettet, Västerås, Sweden.
    Edvardson, Stig
    Centrallasarettet, Växjö, Sweden.
    Hanås, Ragnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Karin
    Rathsman, Björn
    Sachsska Barnsjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forsgren, Henrik
    Desaix, Helena
    Forsander, Gun
    Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Nils-Östen
    Lasarettet i Halmstad, Sweden.
    Åkesson, Carl-Göran
    Keskinen, Päivi
    University of Tampere, Finland .
    Veijola, Riitta
    Uleåborgs universitetssjukhus, Finland.
    Talvitie, Timo
    Raile, Klemens
    Charite, Berlin, Germany.
    Kapellen, Thomas
    University of Leipzig, Germany.
    Burger, Walter
    Neu, Andreas
    University Children's Hospital, Tuebingen, Germany.
    Engelsberger, Ilse
    Heidtmann, Bettina
    Catholic Children’s Hospital Wilhelmstift, Hamburg, Germany.
    Bechtold, Suzanne
    Leslie, David
    Blizard Institute, Queen Mary University of London, UK.
    Chiarelli, Francesco
    University of Chieti, Italy.
    Cicognani, Alesandro
    University of Bologna, Italy.
    Chiumello, Giuseppe
    Vita-Salute University, Milan, Italy.
    Cerutti, Franco
    University of Turin, Italy.
    Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Gomez Gila, Ana
    Rica, Itxaso
    Barrio, Raquel
    Clemente, Maria
    López Garcia, Maria José
    Rodriguez, Mercedes
    Gonzalez, Isabel
    Lopez, Juan Pedro
    Oyarzabal, Mirentxu
    Reeser, H M
    Nuboer, Roos
    Stouthart, Pauline
    Bratina, Natasa
    Bratanic, Nina
    de Kerdanet, Marc
    Weill, Jacques
    Ser, Nicole
    Barat, Pascal
    Bertrand, Anne Marie
    Carel, Jean-Claude
    Reynaud, Rachel
    Coutant, Regis
    Baron, Sabine
    GAD65 antigen therapy in recently diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus2012In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 366, no 5, p. 433-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The 65-kD isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) is a major autoantigen in type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that alum-formulated GAD65 (GAD-alum) can preserve beta-cell function in patients with recent-onset type 1 diabetes.

    METHODS: We studied 334 patients, 10 to 20 years of age, with type 1 diabetes, fasting C-peptide levels of more than 0.3 ng per milliliter (0.1 nmol per liter), and detectable serum GAD65 autoantibodies. Within 3 months after diagnosis, patients were randomly assigned to receive one of three study treatments: four doses of GAD-alum, two doses of GAD-alum followed by two doses of placebo, or four doses of placebo. The primary outcome was the change in the stimulated serum C-peptide level (after a mixed-meal tolerance test) between the baseline visit and the 15-month visit. Secondary outcomes included the glycated hemoglobin level, mean daily insulin dose, rate of hypoglycemia, and fasting and maximum stimulated C-peptide levels.

    RESULTS: The stimulated C-peptide level declined to a similar degree in all study groups, and the primary outcome at 15 months did not differ significantly between the combined active-drug groups and the placebo group (P=0.10). The use of GAD-alum as compared with placebo did not affect the insulin dose, glycated hemoglobin level, or hypoglycemia rate. Adverse events were infrequent and mild in the three groups, with no significant differences.

    CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with GAD-alum did not significantly reduce the loss of stimulated C peptide or improve clinical outcomes over a 15-month period.

  • 22.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Barnkliniken Örebro.
    Ansved, Pär
    Barnkliniken, Kalmar .
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Hammersjö, Jan-Åke
    Barnkliniken, Västervik .
    Johansson, Calle
    Barnkliniken, Jönköping .
    Edvardsson, Stig
    Barnkliniken, Växjö .
    Ljungkrantz, Magnus
    Barnkliniken, Karlskrona .
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Symptoms and signs have changed in Swedish children with coeliac disease.2004In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 38, p. 181-186Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Barnkliniken Örebro.
    Krantz, M
    Drottning Silvias Barnsjukhus Linköping.
    Bodin, L
    Avd för Statistik Örebro sjukhus.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Lindquist, Bo
    Avd för Pediatrik Huddinge sjukhus, Stockholm.
    Elemental versus polymeric enteral nutrtion in paediatric Crohn´s disease: a multicentre randomized controlled trial.2004In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 93, p. 327-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To compare the efficacy and safety of an elemental and a polymeric diet as the primary therapy for active Crohn's disease in children. Methods: In a randomized, non-blind, multicentre, controlled trial in Sweden, 16 children with Crohn's disease received Elemental 028 Extra (E028E) and 17 Nutrison Standard (NuS). Remission rates (Paediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) < 10 or a PCDAI decrease of 40% or 15 points of initial level) were compared at 6 wk. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in remission rate at 6 wk (intent-to-treat analysis): E028E 11/16 (69%) and NuS 14/17 (82%) (p = 0.438). There was no difference in the decrease in PCDAI and CDAI between patients treated with E028E and those treated with NuS from 0 to 6 wk. Patients treated with NuS gained significantly more weight than patients treated with E028E (+2.5 kg, 95% CI 0.9, 4.1, p = 0.004), this difference remained when adjusting for maximum caloric intake per kilogram bodyweight (+2.9 kg, 95% CI 1.4, 4.5, p = 0.001). Concomitant disease, complications and side effects were seen in 5/33 patients (pyelonephritis, pneumonia, intraabdominal abscess, perianal abscess and borborygmi). Conclusion: E028E and NuS did not differ in terms of remission rate. Patients treated with NuS gained more weight than patients with E028E. Polymeric diet may be superior to elemental diet in the treatment of paediatric Crohn's disease where the primary aim is to increase the patient's weight.

  • 24.
    Myleus, A.
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Ivarsson, A.
    Umeå University.
    Webb, C.
    Lund University Hospital.
    Danielsson, L.
    Norrtälje Hospital.
    Hernell, O.
    Umeå University.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Karlsson, E.
    Växjö Hospital.
    Lagerqvist, C.
    Umeå University.
    Norstrom, F.
    Umeå University.
    Rosen, A.
    Umeå University.
    Sandstrom, O.
    Umeå University.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Stenlund, H.
    Umeå University.
    Wall, S.
    Umeå University.
    Carlsson, A.
    Umeå University.
    Celiac disease revealed in 3% of Swedish 12-year-olds born during an epidemic2009In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, ISSN 0277-2116, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 170-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:: Sweden experienced a marked epidemic of celiac disease between 1984 and 1996 in children younger than 2 years of age, partly explained by changes in infant feeding. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in 12-year-olds born during the epidemic (1993), including both symptomatic and screening detected cases. Patients and Methods:: All sixth-grade children in participating schools were invited (n = 10,041). Symptomatic and, therefore, previously diagnosed celiac disease cases were ascertained through the National Swedish Childhood Celiac Disease Register and/or medical records. All serum samples were analyzed for antihuman tissue transglutaminase (tTG)-IgA (Celikey), and serum-IgA, and some for tTG-IgG and endomysial antibodies. A small intestinal biopsy was recommended for all children with suspected undiagnosed celiac disease. Results:: Participation was accepted by 7567 families (75%). Previously diagnosed celiac disease was found in 67 children; 8.9/1000 (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.7-11). In another 192 children, a small intestinal biopsy was recommended and was performed in 180. Celiac disease was verified in 145 children, 20/1000 (95% CI 17-23). The total prevalence was 29/1000 (95% CI 25-33). Conclusions:: The celiac disease prevalence of 29/1000 (3%)-with two thirds of cases undiagnosed before screening-is 3-fold higher than the usually suggested prevalence of 1%. When these 12-year-olds were infants, the prevailing feeding practice was to introduce gluten abruptly, often without ongoing breast-feeding, which might have contributed to this unexpectedly high prevalence.

  • 25.
    Myleus, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Petersen, Solveig
    Umeå University, Sweden Umeå University, Sweden .
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Hammarroth, Solveig
    Norrtalje Hospital, Sweden .
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Health-related quality of life is not impaired in children with undetected as well as diagnosed celiac disease: a large population based cross-sectional study2014In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, no 425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Knowledge regarding the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of children with celiac disease remains limited and inconclusive. We investigated the HRQoL of three groups of 12-year-olds with: i) undetected celiac disease ii) clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and iii) without celiac disease. Methods: A school-based cross-sectional multicenter screening study invited 18 325 children, whereof 68% consented to participate. Participants provided a blood sample, which was later analyzed for anti-tissue-tranglutaminase antibodies, and alongside filled in a questionnaire. When anti-tissue-tranglutaminase antibodies were elevated, a small intestinal biopsy verified the screening-detected celiac disease diagnosis. Self-reported HRQoL was measured using Kidscreen, a generic 52 items instrument with proven reliability and validity. Scores were linearly transformed into a 0-100 scale with higher values indicating better HRQoL. Mean values with standard deviations (mean +/- SD) were compared, and uni- and multivariate logistic regression models tested the odds of a low HRQoL among children with undetected or diagnosed celiac disease, respectively. Results: Children with undetected celiac disease (n = 238) reported similar HRQoL as children without celiac disease (n = 12 037) (83.0 +/- 11.0 vs. 82.5 +/- 11.3, P = 0.51), and also similar HRQoL (82.2 +/- 12.2, P = 0.28) to that of children with diagnosed celiac disease (n = 90), of whom 92% were adherent to treatment. Having undetected celiac disease did not increase the odds of low overall HRQoL, independent of sex, area of residence, study year and occurrence of gastrointestinal symptoms (adjusted odds ratio 0.77, 95% CI 0.54-1.10). Comparable results were seen for diagnosed celiac disease cases (adjusted odds ratio 1.11, 95% CI 0.67-1.85). Conclusion: Children with undetected celiac disease reported comparable HRQoL as their peers with diagnosed celiac disease, and those without celiac disease, when reporting prior to receiving the diagnosis through screening. Thus, children with celiac disease, both untreated and diagnosed, perceive their HRQoL as unimpaired by their disease.

  • 26.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nelson, Nina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Neonatal Intensive Care and Child Psychiatry Inpatient Care: Do Different Working Conditions Influence Stress Levels?2013In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, Vol. 2013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Nurses often experience work-related stress. High stress can negatively affect job satisfaction and lead to emotional exhaustion with risk of burnout.

    Aim. To analyse possible differences in biological stress markers, psychosocial working conditions,health, and well-being between nurses working in two different departments.

    Methods. Stress was evaluated in nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) (𝑛 = 33) and nursesworking in a child and adolescent psychiatry inpatient ward (CAP) (𝑛 = 14) using salivary cortisol and HbA1c. Salivary cortisol was measured three times a day on two consecutive days during two one-week periods, seven weeks apart (= 12 samples/person). Psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being were measured once.

    Results. NICU nurses had better social support and more self-determination. CAP nurses had a lower salivary cortisol quotient,poorer general health, and higher client-related burnout scores.

    Conclusion.When comparing these nurses with existing normdata for Sweden, as a group their scores reflect less work-related stress than Swedes overall. However, the comparison between NICU and CAP nurses indicates a less healthy work situation for CAP nurses.

    Relevance to Clinical Practice. Healthcare managers need to acknowledge the less healthy work situation CAP nurses experience in order to provide optimal support and promote good health.

  • 27.
    Nordfeldt, Sam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Ängarne-Lindberg, Teresia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Folkhälsovetenskap, Högskolan i Skövde, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    As facts and chats go online, what is important for adolsescents with type 1 diabetes?2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 6, p. e67659-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Continued refinement of resources for patient information, education and support is needed. Considering the rapid development of new communication practices, the perspectives of young people themselves warrant more attention using a wide research focus. The purpose of this study was to understand information-seeking behaviours, Internet use and social networking online in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1DM). This applied to their everyday life, including the context of diabetes and their experiences and need of contact with T1DM peers.

    Methodology/Principal Findings

    Twenty-four adolescents aged 10–17 years with T1DM were recruited from a county hospital in the south-east of Sweden. Qualitative data were obtained using eight focus groups, wherein each participant engaged in a 60–90 minute video/audio-recorded session. The focus group data were transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Some demographic and medical information was also collected. The three main categories that were identified; Aspects of Security, Updating, and Plainness and their sub-categories gave significant information about how to enhance information retrieval and peer contacts related to T1DM. Regarding the persons' information-seeking behaviour, Internet use, and use of social media some differences could be identified depending on gender and age.

    Conclusions/Significance

    Sensitivity and adaptation to users' needs and expectations seem crucial in the development of future online resources for adolescents with T1DM. To start with, this could mean applying a wider range of already existing information and communication technologies. Health practitioners need to focus on the areas of security of information and communication, frequency of updating, and simplicity of design-less is more.

  • 28.
    Nordfeldt, Sam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Ängarne-Lindberg, Teresia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Parents of Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes: Their Views on Information and Communication Needs and Internet Use. A Qualitative Study2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Little is known about parents’ views on the use of online resources for information, education and support regarding childhood type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Considering the rapidly evolving new communication practices, parents’ perspectives need to be explored. The main purpose of this paper was to explore parents’ perceptions of their information-seeking, Internet use, and social networking online. This applied to their everyday life, including the contexts of T1DM and contact with peers. A second aim was to identify implications for future development of Internet use in this respect.

    Methodology/Principal Findings

    Twenty-seven parents of 24 young persons aged 10–17 with T1DM participated in eight focus group interviews during their regular visits to a county hospital. Focus group discussions were video/audio-taped, transcribed and analysed using inductive qualitative content analysis. Self-reported demographic and medical information was also collected. A main theme was Finding things out, including two sub-themes, Trust and Suitability. The latter were key factors affecting parents’ perceptions of online resources. Parents’ choice of information source was related to the situation, previous experiences and knowledge about sources and, most importantly, the level of trust in the source. A constantly present background theme was Life situation, including two sub-themes, Roles and functions and Emotions and needs. Parents’ information-seeking regarding T1DM varied greatly, and was closely associated with their life situation, the adolescents development phases and the disease trajectory.

    Conclusions/Significance

    Health practitioners and system developers need to focus on creating trust and suitability for users’ needs. They should understand the children’s diverse needs, which depend on their life situation, on the children’s development, and on the disease trajectory. To enhance trust in online health information and support services, the participation of local practitioners is crucial.

  • 29.
    Nordwall, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Bojestig, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Good glycemic control remains crucial in prevention of late diabetic complications - the Linkoping Diabetes Complications Study2009In: PEDIATRIC DIABETES, ISSN 1399-543X, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 168-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several intervention studies have convincingly demonstrated the importance of good glycemic control to avoid long-term diabetic complications, but the importance of other risk factors remains controversial. We previously reported a markedly reduced incidence of severe retinopathy and nephropathy during the past decades in an unselected population of type 1 diabetes mellitus diagnosed in childhood. The aim of the present study was to analyze possible risk factors, which could explain the improved prognosis.

    In this longitudinal population-based cohort study, we followed all 269 patients in whom type 1 diabetes mellitus was diagnosed in childhood 1961-1985 in a well-defined geographical area in Sweden. The patients were followed until the end of 1990s. Multivariable regression models were used to analyze the importance of hemoglobin A1c (HbA(1c)), diabetes duration, blood pressure, cardiovascular risk factors and persisting C-peptide secretion for the development of diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy.

    Beside longer duration and higher HbA(1c), blood pressure and lipid values were higher and cardiovascular disease and smoking were more common in patients with severe complications. However, multivariable analysis abolished these associations. Diabetes duration and long-term HbA(1c) were the only significant independent risk factors for both retinopathy and nephropathy. The risk of overt nephropathy increased substantially when HbA(1c) was above 9.6% [Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) corrected value], while the risk of severe retinopathy increased already when HbA(1c) exceeded 8.6%.

    In this unselected population, glycemic control was the only significant risk factor for the development of long-term complications.

  • 30.
    Nordwall, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Bojestig, M
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Declining incidence of severe retinopathy in a population of Type 1 diabetes2001In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 44, p. 1095-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Nordwall, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Bojestig, M
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Div Internal Med, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, Div Paediat, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Persistent decrease in nephropathy in Type 1 diabetes2000In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 43, p. 971-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Nordwall, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Bojestig, Mats
    Division of Internal Medicine and Diabetes Research Centre, Department of Medicine and Care, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Declining incidence of severe retinopathy in an unselected population of Type 1 diabetes: the Linköping Diabetes Complications Study2004In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, Vol. 47, no 7, p. 1266-1272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis: In a previous study conducted over the last decades we found a decreased incidence of nephropathy but unchanged incidence of severe retinopathy among patients with Type 1 diabetes diagnosed in childhood and with 20 years duration of diabetes. The aim of our current study was to investigate the incidence 5 to10 years later in the same population.

    Methods: We studied all 269 patients in whom Type 1 diabetes was diagnosed in childhood between 1961 and 1985 in a district in southeastern Sweden. Ninety-one percent were monitored for retinopathy until at least 1997 and 95% were monitored for nephropathy. Severe retinopathy was defined as laser-treated retinopathy and nephropathy as persistent proteinuria. Survival analysis was used and the patients divided into five cohorts according to the time of onset of diabetes.

    Results: The cumulative proportion of severe retinopathy had declined (p=0.006). After 25 years it was 47% (95% CI 34–61), 28% (15–40) and 24% (12–36) in the cohorts 1961 to 1965, 1966 to 1970 and 1971 to 1975 respectively. After 30 years it was 53% (40–66) and 44% (28–59) in the oldest cohorts. The cumulative proportion of nephropathy after 25 years duration was 30% (18–42), 8% (1–16) and 13% (4–23) in the cohorts 1961 to 1965, 1966 to 1970 and 1971 to 1975 respectively. After 30 years, it was 32% (20–44) and 11% (2–20) for the oldest cohorts (p<0.0001).

    Conclusions/interpretation: In an unselected population with Type 1 diabetes diagnosed in childhood, modern diabetes care markedly reduced the incidence of severe retinopathy and nephropathy.

  • 33.
    Nordwall, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Clinical manifestations and beta cell function in Swedish diabetic children have remained unchanged during the last 25 years2008In: Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews, ISSN 1520-7552, E-ISSN 1520-7560, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 472-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The incidence of type 1 diabetes in childhood has doubled in Sweden during the last decades. Environmental factors may cause a different disease process, residual beta cell function and clinical manifestation. Insulin therapy has become more intensive. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical characteristics at onset C-peptide secretion during the first years, after diagnosis and if there was any secular trends during the last 25 years.

    Methods: All 316 children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes during 1976-2000 and living in the Linkoping area were included. Information about clinical characteristics at diagnosis, duration of partial remission, insulin therapy at diagnosis and during the first years was collected from medical records. C-peptide secretion (fasting and stimulated) was measured regularly during the first 5 years. For analysis, the population was divided in five cohorts according to the year of diagnosis.

    Results: The clinical characteristics at onset were unchanged as well as duration of partial remission. C-peptide secretion was highest after 3 months and then declined gradually. After 5 years 32.7% of the patients had measurable fasting C-peptide, but only 6.5% >0.1 nmol/L. HbA(1c) and insulin doses were lower in patients with persistent fasting C-peptide secretion >0.1 nmol/L. The cohort 1996-2000 had higher stimulated C-peptide secretion at diagnosis and at 3 months, after longer follow-up there was no difference.

    Conclusion: The clinical characteristics at diagnosis, partial remission and duration of C-peptide secretion have remained largely unchanged for the last 25 years.

     

  • 34.
    Rosen, Anna
    et al.
    Umea University.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umea University.
    Nordyke, Katrina
    Umea University.
    Karlsson, Eva
    Vaxjo Hospital.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Lund University.
    Danielsson, Lars
    Norrtalje Hospital.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Emmelin, Maria
    Umea University.
    Balancing health benefits and social sacrifices: A qualitative study of how screening-detected celiac disease impacts adolescents quality of life2011In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 11, no 32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Celiac disease often goes undiagnosed. Mass screening might be an option to reduce the public health burden of untreated celiac disease. However, mass screening is still controversial since it is uncertain whether the benefits of early detection outweigh the possible negative consequences. Before implementation of screening programs, the experiences of those being identified as cases should be considered. The aim of our study was to explore how screening-detected celiac disease impacts adolescents quality of life, as perceived by themselves and their parents. Methods: All adolescents (n = 145) with screening-detected celiac disease found in a Swedish screening study, and their parents, were invited to share their experiences in a qualitative follow-up study. In total, we have information on 117 (81%) of the adolescents, either from the adolescents themselves (n = 101) and/or from their parent/s (n = 125). Written narratives were submitted by 91 adolescents and 105 parents. In addition, 14 focus group discussions involving 31 adolescents and 43 parents were conducted. Data was transcribed verbatim and analyzed based on a Grounded Theory framework. Results: The screening-detected celiac disease diagnosis had varying impact on quality of life that related both to changes in perceived health and to the adolescents experiences of living with celiac disease in terms of social sacrifices. Changes in perceived health varied from "healthy as anyone else with no positive change" to "something was wrong and then changed to the better", whereas experiences of living with celiac disease ranged from "not a big deal" to "treatment not worth the price". Perceptions about living with celiac disease and related coping strategies were influenced by contextual factors, such as perceived support from significant others and availability of gluten-free products, and were developed without a direct relation to experiencing changes in perceived health. Conclusions: Screening-detected celiac disease has varying impact on adolescents quality of life, where their perceived change in health has to be balanced against the social sacrifices the diagnosis may cause. This needs to be taken into account in any future suggestion of celiac disease mass screening and in the management of these patients.

  • 35.
    Rosen, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Sandstrom, Olof
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Olen, Ola
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Sachs Children and Youth Hospital, Sweden .
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Usefulness of Symptoms to Screen for Celiac Disease2014In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 133, no 2, p. 211-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the frequency of symptoms and associated conditions among screening-detected celiac disease (CD) cases and non-CD children and to evaluate questionnaire-based case-finding targeting the general population. METHODS: In a population-based CD screening of 12-year-olds, children and their parents completed questionnaires on CD-associated symptoms and conditions before knowledge of CD status. Questionnaire data for those who had their CD detected in the screening (n = 153) were compared with those of children with normal levels of CD markers (n = 7016). Hypothetical case-finding strategies were also evaluated. Questionnaires were returned by 7054 ( 98%) of the children and by 6294 ( 88%) of their parents. RESULTS: Symptoms were as common among screening-detected CD cases as among non-CD children. The frequency of children with screening-detected CD was similar when comparing the groups with and without any CD-related symptoms (2.1% vs 2.1%; P =.930) or CD-associated conditions (3.6% vs 2.1%; P =.07). Case-finding by asking for CD-associated symptoms and/or conditions would have identified 52 cases (38% of all cases) at a cost of analyzing blood samples for 2282 children (37%) in the study population. CONCLUSIONS: The current recommended guidelines for finding undiagnosed CD cases, so-called active case-finding, fail to identify the majority of previously undiagnosed cases if applied in the general population of Swedish 12- year-olds. Our results warrant further studies on the effectiveness of CD case-finding in the pediatric population, both at the clinical and population-based levels.

  • 36.
    Sjöberg, Veronika
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hollén, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pietz, Grzegorz
    ology, Immunology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Sundström, Mia
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Holmgren Peterson, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Olof
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hernell, Olle
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hammarström, Sten
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Noncontaminated dietary oats may hamper normalization of the intestinal immune status in childhood celiac disease.2014In: Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology, ISSN 2155-384X, E-ISSN 2155-384X, Vol. 5, no e58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Life-long, strict gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only treatment for celiac disease (CD). Because there is still uncertainty regarding the safety of oats for CD patients, the aim was to investigate whether dietary oats influence the immune status of their intestinal mucosa.

    METHODS: Paired small intestinal biopsies, before and after >11 months on a GFD, were collected from children with CD who were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind intervention trial to either of two diets: standard GFD (GFD-std; n=13) and noncontaminated oat-containing GFD (GFD-oats; n=15). Expression levels of mRNAs for 22 different immune effector molecules and tight junction proteins were determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR.

    RESULTS: The number of mRNAs that remained elevated was higher in the GFD-oats group (P=0.05). In particular, mRNAs for the regulatory T cell (Treg) signature molecules interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), the cytotoxicity-activating natural killer (NK) receptors KLRC2/NKG2C and KLRC3/NKG2E, and the tight junction protein claudin-4 remained elevated. Between the two groups, most significant differences were seen for claudin-4 (P=0.003) and KLRC3/NKG2E (P=0.04).

    CONCLUSIONS: A substantial fraction of pediatric CD patients seem to not tolerate oats. In these patients, dietary oats influence the immune status of the intestinal mucosa with an mRNA profile suggesting presence of activated cytotoxic lymphocytes and Tregs and a stressed epithelium with affected tight junctions. Assessment of changes in levels of mRNA for claudin-4 and KLC3/NKG2E from onset to after a year on oats containing GFD shows promise to identify these CD patients.

  • 37.
    Skogman, Barbro H
    et al.
    Falun General Hospital, Sweden Centre Clin Research Dalarna, Sweden .
    Glimaker, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Long-term Clinical Outcome After Lyme Neuroborreliosis in Childhood2012In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 130, no 2, p. 262-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To determine long-term clinical outcome in children with confirmed Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) and to evaluate persistent subjective symptoms compared with a control group. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS: After a median of 5 years, 84 children with confirmed LNB underwent a neurologic re-examination, including a questionnaire. Medical records were analyzed, and a control group (n = 84) was included. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS: The total recovery rate was 73% (n = 61). Objective neurologic findings, defined as "definite sequelae," were found in 16 patients (19%). The majority of these children had persistent facial nerve palsy (n = 11), but other motor or sensory deficits occurred (n = 5). Neurologic signs and/or symptoms defined as "possible sequelae" were found in another 7 patients (8%), mainly of sensory character. Nonspecific subjective symptoms were reported by 35 patients (42%) and 32 controls (38%) (nonsignificant). Affected daily activities or school performance were reported to the same extent in both groups (23% vs 20%, nonsignificant). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSIONS: The long-term clinical recovery rate was 73% in children with confirmed LNB. Persistent facial nerve palsy occurred in 13%, whereas other motor or sensory deficits were found in another 14%. Neurologic deficits did not affect daily activities or school performance more often among patients than controls and should be considered as mild. Furthermore, nonspecific subjective symptoms such as headache, fatigue, or memory or concentration problems were reported as often among patients as controls and should not be considered as sequelae after LNB.

  • 38.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Self-Care and Learning. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Barn och ungdomsmed kliniken Vrinnevisjukhuset, Norrköping.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Från ax till limpa - några svenska bidrag till forskningen om celiaki2004In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 101, no 48, p. 3932-3937Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Ascher, Henry
    Avd för Pediatrik, Sahlgrenska sjukhuset Göteborg.
    Danneus, Anders
    Avd för Pediatrik, Universitetssjukhuset, Uppsala .
    Hernell, Olle
    Avd för Pediatrik, Universitetssjukhuset, Umeå .
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Avd för Pediatrick, Universitetssjukhuset, Umeå .
    Lindberg, Eva
    Avd för Pediatrik, Universitetssjukhuset, Örebro .
    Lindquist, Bo
    Barnmottagningen, Odenplan, Stockholm .
    Nivenius, Kerstin
    Avd för Pediatrik, Universitetssjukhuset, Lund .
    How do Swedish paediatric clinics diagnose coeliac disease? Results of a nationwide questionnaire study2006In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 95, no 11, p. 1495-1497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim: Diagnosis of coeliac disease is based on the demonstration of enteropathy in a small bowel biopsy. Correct diagnosis is of utmost importance, since the need for dietary management is life long, and inadequate treatment may lead to potentially serious complications. The Swedish Working Group for Paediatric Coeliac Disease has published guidelines for the diagnosis of childhood coeliac disease. The present questionnaire was designed in order to create the basis for revision of those guidelines. Methods: In 2004, a nationwide questionnaire concerning current diagnostic routines was sent to all 45 paediatric clinics performing small bowel biopsy. All clinics responded. Results: All clinics base their diagnosis on small bowel biopsy findings at presentation. Furthermore, in 24 (53%) of the clinics, children with suspected coeliac disease are investigated by small bowel biopsy both at presentation and follow-up while on a gluten-free diet. Eighteen (40%) of the clinics employ a different diagnostic routine for children under 2 y of age than for those older than 2 y. All clinics use coeliac serological testing at various stages of the diagnostic procedure. Conclusion: All Swedish paediatric clinics perform a small bowel biopsy at presentation in children with suspected coeliac disease, and the majority of clinics perform a second biopsy when the child is on a gluten-free diet. Serological testing is frequently used as a diagnostic aid and in the monitoring of the disease while on a gluten-free diet. © 2006 Taylor & Francis.

  • 40.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Genmodifierade sädesslag - alternativ för patienter med celiaki2006In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 103, no 10, p. 740-740Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Laurin, Pia
    Myléus, Anna
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Letter: Coeliac disease and socio-economic status2014In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 103, no 8, p. e328-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Strömberg, Leif
    Barnkliniken, Vrinnevisjukhuset, Norrköping.
    Moderate dose inhaled budesonide disguising symptoms of Addison's disease in an asthmatic boy with silent celiac disease2005In: Journal of pediatric pharmacology and therapeutics, ISSN 1551-6776, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 108-111Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Tapsas, Dimitrios
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Forslund, Tony
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hollén, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Urinary nitric oxide metabolites in children with celiac disease after long-term consumption of oats-containing gluten-free diet2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 49, no 11, p. 1311-1317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Oats are accepted in the gluten-free diet (GFD) for children with celiac disease (CD). Some reports have indicated, however, that not all celiac patients tolerate oats. We have previously shown that some children still have high levels of urinary nitric oxide (NO) metabolites as markers of intestinal inflammation after 1 year on GFD with oats. In this study, we measured urinary NO metabolites in CD children who had been consuming oats-containing GFD for an extended, 2-6-year period, also taking into consideration ordinary consumption of nitrite/nitrate-rich foods close to the urine sampling. Materials and Methods. Morning urinary nitrite/nitrate concentrations were measured in 188 pediatric CD patients. A questionnaire was used to elucidate factors possibly affecting the urinary levels, for example, dietary factors, asthma, or urinary tract infection. Results. Oats were consumed by 89.4% of the patients for a median time of 3 years. The median nitrite/nitrate level was 980 mu M. The majority (70.2%) who consumed oats had low levels of urinary nitrite/nitrate, that is, less than 1400 mu M, while 29.8% demonstrated high levels, that is, greater than 1400 mu M. Nitrite/nitrate-rich foods did not significantly influence the urinary concentrations. Conclusion. The urinary levels of NO metabolites revealed two subpopulations, one with high and one with low levels. The high levels could be possibly due to poor adherence to the GFD, sensitivity to oats, or some unknown factor(s). Nitrate-rich foods, asthma, or urinary tract infection did not affect the result. The elevated levels of NO metabolites could indicate mucosal inflammation and pinpoint the need of careful follow-up of children on oats-containing GFD.

  • 44.
    Tapsas, Dimitrios
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Hammersjö, Jan-Åke
    Västervik Hospital, Sweden.
    Hollén, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swedish children with celiac disease comply well with a gluten-free diet, and most include oats without reporting any adverse effects: a long-term follow-up study2014In: Nutrition Research, ISSN 0271-5317, E-ISSN 1879-0739, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 436-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The only known treatment for celiac disease is a gluten-free diet (GFD), which initially meant abstention from wheat, rye, barley, and oats. Recently, oats free from contamination with wheat have been accepted in the GFD. Yet, reports indicate that all celiac disease patients may not tolerate oats. We hypothesized that celiac children comply well with a GFD and that most have included oats in their diet. A food questionnaire was used to check our patients; 316 questionnaires were returned. Mean time on the GFD was 6.9 years, and 96.8% of the children reported that they were trying to keep a strict GFD. However, accidental transgressions occurred in 263 children (83.2%). In 2 of 3 cases, mistakes took place when the patients were not at home. Symptoms after incidental gluten intake were experienced by 162(61.6%) patients, mostly (87.5%) from the gastrointestinal tract. Small amounts of gluten (less than4 g) caused symptoms in 38% of the cases, and 68% reported symptoms during the first 3 hours after gluten consumption. Oats were included in the diet of 89.4% of the children for a mean of 3.4 years. Most (81.9%) ate purified oats, and 45.3% consumed oats less than once a week. Among those who did not consume oats, only 5.9% refrained because of symptoms. General compliance with the GFD was good. Only the duration of the GFD appeared to influence adherence to the diet. Most patients did not report adverse effects after long-term consumption of oats.

  • 45.
    Teder, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Bolme, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Family-based behavioural intervention programme for obese children: a feasibility study2012In: BMJ open, ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 2, no 2, p. e000268-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To assess a 2-year family-based behavioural intervention programme against child obesity.

    DESIGN: Single-group pre- and post-intervention feasibility study.

    SETTING: Swedish paediatric outpatient care.

    PARTICIPANTS: 26 obese children aged 8.3-12.0 years and their parents who had consented to actively participate in a 2-year intervention.

    INTERVENTIONS: 25 paediatric outpatient group sessions over a 2-year period with parallel groups for children and parents. The basis for the programme was a manual containing instructions for tutor-supervised group sessions with obese children and their parents. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was change in standardised body mass index between baseline and after 36 months. The secondary outcome measures were change in the waist:height ratio, metabolic parameters and programme adherence. The participants were examined at baseline and after 3, 12 and 24 months of therapy and at follow-up 12 months after completion of the programme.

    RESULTS: The primary outcome measure, standardised body mass index, declined from a mean of 3.3 (0.7 SD) at baseline to 2.9 (0.7 SD) (p<0.001) at follow-up 12 months after completion of the programme. There was no change in the waist:height ratio. Biomedical markers of blood glucose metabolism and lipid status remained in the normal range. 96% of the families completed the programme.

    CONCLUSIONS: This feasibility study of a 2-year family-based behavioural intervention programme in paediatric outpatient care showed promising results with regard to further weight gain and programme adherence. These findings must be confirmed in a randomised controlled trial with longer follow-up before the intervention programme can be implemented on a larger scale.

  • 46.
    Teder, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Eva-Lotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Bolme, Per
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wilhelm, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Family-based behavioural intervention program for obese children: an observational study of child and parent lifestyle interpretations2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Family-based behavioural intervention programs (FBIPs) against childhood obesity have shown promising results, but the mediating mechanisms have not been identified. The aim of this study was to examine changes in obese childreńs lifestyle habits during a 2-year FBIP according to their own and parents’ reports, the concordance between these reports and the correlations to change in post-intervention z-BMI.

    Methods

    An observational study of 26 children (8.3–12.0 years) and their parents participating in a 2-year FBIP was performed. Weight and height were measured from baseline to 12 months after the end of the program. Eating habits and physical- and sedentary activity were reported separately by children and parents. Data were analysed with regard to concordance between parents’ and children’s reports and association between the lifestyle reports and change in z-BMI at the study endpoint using descriptive statistics and parametric and non-parametric tests.

    Results

    According to both children’s and parents’ reports, the level of physical activity among the children had increased after the intervention as well as the agreement between the informants’ reports. According to the children, eating habits had improved, while the parents’ reports showed an improvement only with regard to binge eating. The concordance between children and parents regarding eating habits was slight to fair also after the intervention. No statistically significant associations between changes in lifestyle reports and changes in z-BMI were observed.

    Conclusions

    Child and parent reports of physical activity were found to converge and display an improvement in a 2-year FBIP, while the reports on eating habits showed a more refractory pattern. Changes in concordance and agreement between children and parents reports did not correlate with weight reduction. Further methods development and studies of the processes during family-based interventions against childhood obesity are warranted.

  • 47.
    Teder, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Bolme, Per
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Eva-Lotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Assessment of a Family-based Behavioural Intervention Program for Obese Children2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Tjellstrom, B.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Norrkoping Hospital, Sweden .
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Hollén, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Norin, E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Midtvedt, T.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    The effects of oats on the function of gut microflora in children with coeliac disease2014In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 39, no 10, p. 1156-1160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Faecal short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are produced by the gut microflora. We have previously reported high faecal SCFA levels in children with coeliac disease (CD), indicating alteration in gut microfloral metabolism. Data accumulated over recent decades by us and others suggest that wheat-free oats can safely be included in a gluten-free diet (GFD). However, concerns have been raised with respect to the safety of oats in a subset of coeliacs. Aim To describe faecal SCFA patterns in children with newly diagnosed CD treated for 1year with a GFD with or without oats. Methods This report is part of a randomised, double-blind study on the effect of a GFD containing oats (GFD-oats) vs. a standard GFD (GFD-std). Faecal samples were received from 34 children in the GFD-oats group and 37 in the GFD-std group at initial diagnosis and/or after 1year on a GFD. Faecal SCFAs were analysed. Results The GFD-std group had a significantly lower total faecal SCFA concentration at 12months compared with 0months (Pless than0.05). In contrast, total SCFA in the GFD-oats group remained high after 1year on the GFD. The children in the GFD-oats group had significantly higher acetic acid (Pless than0.05), n-butyric acid (Pless than0.05) and total SCFA concentration (Pless than0.01) after 1-year diet treatment compared to the GFD-std group. Conclusions Our results indicate that oats do affect the gut microflora function, and that some coeliac children receiving oats may develop gut mucosal inflammation, that may present a risk for future complications.

  • 49.
    Tjellstrom, Bo
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Norrkoping Hospital, Sweden .
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Midtvedt, Tore
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Norin, Elisabeth
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effect of exclusive enteral nutrition on gut microflora function in children with Crohns disease2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 1454-1459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is a first-line treatment in children with active Crohns disease (CD) but is seldom used in adults with active disease. The mode of action of EEN in suppressing mucosa] inflammation is not fully understood, but modulation of intestinal microflora activity is one possible explanation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 6-week EEN in children with active CD, with special reference to intestinal microflora function. Materials and methods. Fecal samples from 18 children (11 boys, 7 girls; median age 13.5 years) with active CD (13 children with small bowel/colonic and 5 with perianal disease) were analyzed for short chain fatty acid (SCFA) pattern as marker of gut microflora function. The children were studied before and after EEN treatment. Results from 12 healthy teenagers were used for comparison. Results. Eleven (79%) of the children with small bowel/colonic CD responded clinically positively to EEN treatment showing decreased levels of pro-inflammatory acetic acid as well as increased concentrations of anti-inflammatory butyric acids and also of valeric acids, similar to the levels in healthy age-matched children. In children with active perianal CD, however, EEN had no positive effect on clinical status or inflammatory parameters. Conclusions. The authors present new data supporting the hypothesis that the well-documented anti-inflammatory effect of EEN in children with active small bowel/colonic CD is brought about by modulation of gut microflora activity, resulting in an anti-inflammatory SCFA pattern. By contrast, none of the children with perianal disease showed clinical or biochemical improvement after EEN treatment.

  • 50.
    Tjellström, Bo
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping. Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Magnusson, Karl-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Norin, Elisabeth
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Midtvedt, Tore
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Faecal short-chain fatty acid pattern in childhood coeliac disease is normalised after more than one year's gluten-free diet2013In: Microbiological Ecology in Health and Disease, ISSN 0891-060X, E-ISSN 1651-2235, Vol. 24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Recent work indicates that the gut microflora is altered in patients with coeliac disease (CD). Faecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are produced by the gut microflora. We have previously reported a high SCFA output in children with symptomatic and asymptomatic CD at presentation, as well as in CD children on a gluten-free diet (GFD) for less than 1 year, indicating deviant gut microfloral function. In this report, we focus on faecal SCFA production in coeliacs on GFD for more than 1 year.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Faecal samples were collected from 53 children with CD at presentation, 74 coeliac children on GFD for less than 1 year, and 25 individuals diagnosed with CD in childhood and on GFD for more than 1 year. The control group comprised 54 healthy children (HC). The faecal samples were analysed to show the SCFA pattern taken as a marker of gut microflora function. We applied a new fermentation index, reflecting the inflammatory activity of the SCFAs (amount of acetic acid minus propionic acid and n-butyric acid, together divided by the total amount of SCFAs).

    RESULTS: In coeliacs on GFD for more than 1 year, the individual SCFAs, total SCFA, and fermentation index did not differ significantly from the findings in controls. In contrast, the faecal SCFA level was clearly higher in coeliacs treated with GFD for less than 1 year compared to those more than 1 year.

    CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study on SCFA patterns in faecal samples from individuals with CD on GFD for more than 1 year. Our study indicates that the disturbed gut microflora function in children with CD at presentation and after less than 1 year of GFD, previously demonstrated by us, is normalised on GFD for more than 1 year.

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