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  • 1.
    A Hulten, Maj
    et al.
    University Warwick, Warwick Med Sch, Coventry CV4 7AL, W Midlands England .
    Patel, Suketu
    University Warwick, Department Biol Science, Coventry CV4 7AL, W Midlands England .
    Jonasson, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Iwarsson, Erik
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Department Mol Med and Surg, Clin Genet Unit, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden .
    On the origin of the maternal age effect in trisomy 21 Down syndrome: the Oocyte Mosaicism Selection model2010In: Reproduction, ISSN 1470-1626, E-ISSN 1476-3990, Vol. 139, no 1, p. 1-9Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have recently documented that trisomy 21 mosaicism is common in human foetal ovaries. On the basis of this observation we propose that the maternal age effect in Down syndrome (DS) is caused by the differential behaviour of trisomy 21 in relation to disomy 21 oocytes during development from foetal life until ovulation in adulthood. in particular, we suggest that trisomy 21 oocytes, lagging behind those that are disomic, may escape the timed pruning of the seven million in foetal life to the 300-400 finally selected for ovulation. The net effect of this preferential elimination will be an accumulation of trisomy 21 oocytes in the ovarian reserve of older women. We here highlight the implications of this Oocyte Mosaicism Selection (OMS) model with respect to the prevalent view that the maternal age effect is complex, dependent on many different biological and environmental factors. We examine conclusions drawn from recent large-scale studies in families, tracing DNA markers along the length of chromosome 21q between parents and DS children, in comparison to the OMS model. We conclude that these family linkage data are equally compatible with the maternal age effect originating from the accumulation of trisomy 21 oocytes with advancing maternal age. One relatively straightforward way to get to grips with what is actually going on in this regard would be to compare incidence of trisomy 21 oocytes (and their pairing configurations) in foetal ovaries with that in oocytes at the meiosis I stage from adult women.

  • 2.
    Agholme, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Geriatrics.
    Lindström, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    An In Vitro Model for Neuroscience: Differentiation of SH-SY5Y Cells into Cells with Morphological and Biochemical Characteristics of Mature Neurons2010In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 1069-1082Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuroscience, including research on Alzheimers disease, is hampered by the lack of suitable in vitro models to study the human nervous system. To counteract this, many attempts to differentiate cell lines into more neuron-like cells have been performed, resulting in partial expression of neuronal features. Furthermore, it has been reported that neuroblastoma cell lines lack mature isoforms of tau. Our aim was to develop an improved in vitro model, generating sustainable cells with morphology and biochemistry of human, mature neurons. To obtain cells with neuronal differentiation and function, we investigated the effect of combining three-dimensional culturing of SH-SY5Y cells in extracellular matrix (ECM) gel with several factors reported to have neuro-differentiating effects. This resulted in cells with apparent neuronal morphology with long, extensively branched neurites. Further investigation revealed expression of several neurospecific markers including synapse protein Sv2 and nuclear marker NeuN, as well as the presence of synapses and axonal vesicle transport. In addition, these cells expressed mature tau isoforms, and tau protein expression was significantly increased compared to undifferentiated cells, reaching levels found in adult human brain. In conclusion, we found that pre-treatment with retinoic acid followed by ECM gel culturing in combination with brain derived neurotrophic factor, neuregulin beta(1), nerve growth factor, and vitamin D-3 treatment generated sustainable cells with unambiguous resemblance to adult neurons. These cells also expresses adult splicing forms of tau with neuronal localization, making this cellular in vitro model useful in many areas of neuroscience research, particularly the Alzheimers disease field.

  • 3.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Cystatin C and NT-proBNP, a powerful combination of biomarkers for predicting cardiovascular mortality in elderly patients with heart failure: results from a 10-year study in primary care2009In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF HEART FAILURE, ISSN 1388-9842, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 354-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart failure (HF) is common among the elderly patients. It is essential to identify those at high risk in order to optimize the use of resources. We aimed to evaluate whether a combination of two biomarkers might give better prognostic information about the risk of cardiovascular (CV) mortality in patients with symptoms associated with HF, compared with only one biomarker. Four hundred and sixty-four primary health-care patients (mean age 73 years, range 65-87) with symptoms of HF were examined. All patients were evaluated using Doppler echocardiography and blood samples, including measurement of cystatin C and NT-proBNP. The patients were followed over a 10-year period. Patients with serum cystatin C levels within the highest quartile had almost three times the risk (HR: 2.92; 95% CI: 1.23-4.90) of CV mortality compared with those patients who had levels within the first, second, or third quartiles. If, at the same time, the patient had a plasma concentration of NT-proBNP within the highest quartile, the risk increased to andgt; 13 times (HR: 13.61; 95% CI: 2.56-72.24) during 10 years of follow-up or andgt; 17 times (HR: 17.04; 95% CI: 1.80-163.39) after 5 years of follow-up. Combined analysis of cystatin C and NT-proBNP could provide important prognostic information among elderly patients in the community with symptoms of HF.

  • 4.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Elevated D-dimer level is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular death in out-patients with symptoms compatible with heart failure2004In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 92, no 6, p. 1250-1258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    D-dimer, a marker of fibrin turnover, exhibits many interesting properties as a biological marker of thrombosis. Some of the properties of D-dimer might also be used to provide additional information about patients with heart failure. In this study, we evaluate the prognostic information acquired from D-dimer concerning increased risk of cardiovascular mortality in an elderly population with symptoms associated with heart failure. A cardiologist examined 458 elderly patients, out of 548 invited, attending primary care for symptoms of dyspnoea, fatigue and/or peripheral oedema and assessed NYHA functional class and cardiac function. Abnormal systolic function was defined as EF <40% on Doppler echocardiography. Abnormal diastolic function was defined as reduced E/A ratio and/or an abnormal pattern of pulmonary venous flow. Blood samples were drawn, and BNP and D-dimer were analysed. D-dimer was analysed using an automated micro-latex assay. A statistical analysis was performed to identify the prognostic value of increased plasma concentration of D-dimer. Results showed that during a median follow-up period of 5.5 years, 68 (14%) patients died of cardiovascular disease. No gender difference was noted. A plasma concentration of D-dimer >0.25mg/L increased the risk almost 4-fold. In conclusion, D-dimer is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality that may be used to risk-stratify patients with heart failure. © 2004 Schattauer GmbH, Stuttgart.

  • 5.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Lindahl, Tomas L
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Low plasma concentrations of coagulation factors II, VII and XI indicate increased risk among elderly with symptoms of heart failure.2010In: Blood coagulation & fibrinolysis : an international journal in haemostasis and thrombosis, ISSN 1473-5733, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 62-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart failure is a serious condition, and it is, therefore, important to identify patients at high risk as early as possible in order to initiate appropriate treatment. The condition results in complicated disease mechanisms including disturbances in blood coagulation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether low plasma concentrations of coagulation factors (F) II, VII and XI influence cardiovascular mortality in an elderly population with possible heart failure. A cardiologist evaluated 450 elderly patients who attended primary healthcare because of symptoms associated with heart failure. He recorded new patient history, conducted a clinical examination, took blood samples, determined concentrations of B-type natriuretic peptide and FII, FVII, FXI and performed Doppler echocardiography. The patients were followed over almost a 10-year period during which all mortality was registered. In patients with suspected heart failure, those with low plasma concentrations of FII, FVII, FXI or all had a significantly higher mortality rate during the follow-up period of 10 years as compared with those with higher plasma concentrations, in contrast with findings in previous reports on patients with acute coronary syndromes. In the group with a plasma concentration of the first versus the ninth decile of FII, FVII, FXI or all, the risk of cardiovascular mortality increased two to three times.

  • 6.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Andersson, Bengt
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Hahn-Zoric, Mirjana
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Long-term treatment results and the immunoglobulin G subclass distribution patterns of proteinase-3-antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA) and myeloperoxidase-ANCA in ANCA-associated vasculitis2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 160-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Small vessel vasculitis associated with antibodies to neutrophil cytoplasm antigens has been denominated antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV).

    Material and methods: Ninety-eight patients with various forms of AAV with renal involvement were studied retrospectively with regard to treatment, side-effects and outcome. The immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass distribution patterns in serum were determined in 51 patients with nephelometry and those of anti-proteinase-3 (PR3) and anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO) in 44 patients by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Results: Fifty-nine patients with a mean age of 63 years were given treatment with intermittent intravenous regimens of cyclophosphamide and continuous corticosteroids, whereas 39 patients with a mean age of 58 years were given continuous oral treatment. Malignancy, mainly due to skin tumours, was more common in AAV than in the general population. The total IgG subclass distribution pattern was asymmetric. The response to PR3 was of IgG1, IgG3 and IgG4 isotypes, while IgG1 and IgG3 predominated in the response to MPO.

    Conclusion: The aberrant IgG subclass distribution pattern detected in the autoantibodies may be of importance in the pathogenesis of AAV.

  • 7.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Transfusion Medicine and Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Isaksson, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kaijser, B.
    Department of Clinical Bacteriology, Sahlgren´s University Hospital/Göteborg University.
    Sällberg, M.
    Department of Clinical Virology, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uhlin, F.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Immunoglobulin G Subclass Response to Hepatitis B Vaccine and the Antibody Response to Pneumococcal Polysaccharides in Dialysis PatientsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined the response to hepatitis B vaccination in dialysis patients, and evaluated our vaccination program to hepatitis B virus. No new cases of hepatitis B occurred during the study period, i.e. from 1980 and onwards. Sera were analyzed for anti-HBs in 25 dialysis patients vaccinated at least three times against hepatitis B and 53 health care staff vaccinated three times. The IgG subclass distribution of antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) was determined in 11 dialysis patients and in 45 healthy controls. The antibody response to pneumococci was determined in 29 vaccinated patients.

    Results: Ten of 25 (40%) of the dialysis patients had anti-HBs when both tests after the third and/or fourth injections were considered. In four patients a fourth injection was cancelled due to transplantation or bad health, while such data were lacking in 8 cases. In staff 49/53 (93%) of the persons responded with anti-HBs production. In anti-HBs positive patients and controls a significant difference in the response of healthy adults was observed in anti-HBs IgG 1 (p<0.001) vs all other IgG subclasses. Dialysis patients had low levels, or negative findings, in all cases, with lgGI as the highest proportion found (3/11 patients). An antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was registred in 25 out of 29 dialysis patients (in all 86 %).Dialysis patients respond poorly to hepatitis B vaccine. An anti-HBs subclass response mainly restricted to IgG I was observed in healthy adults, while dialysis patients had low or negative test results affecting all subclasses.

    The findings suggest a general deficit in the ability to produce anti-HBs rather than a deficit in the production of a specific subclass of this antibody. Moreover, RBV-vaccination schedules in renal transplant recipients should be started early, as some patients otherwise, due to transplantation or bad health, may not receive a fourth injection.

    The antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination indicates that the antigen involved is important in vaccination responses in dialysis patients.

  • 8.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Transfusion Medicine and Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Månsson, A-S.
    Department of Clinical Virology, University Hospital of Malmö, Sweden.
    Svensson, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Widell, A.
    Department of Clinical Virology, University Hospital of Malmö, Sweden.
    Detection and prevention of hepatitis C in dialysis patients and renal transplant recipients: A long-term follow up (1989–January 1997)2002In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 251, no 2, p. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Hepatitis C is frequent problem in dialysis wards.

    Design.  A long time (1989–97) follow up of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in a Swedish nephrology unit was performed with anti-HCV screening, confirmatory antibody tests, viral RNA detection and molecular characterization. Case histories were reviewed with focus, onset of infection, liver morbidity and mortality.

    Results.  In October 1991, 10% (19 of 184) of the patients in the unit (haemodialysis-, peritoneal dialysis and transplanted patients) were verified or suspected HCV carriers, whilst the number at the end of 1996 was 8% (13 of 157). Most patients were infected before 1991 but only in one case from a known HCV-infected blood donor. No new HCV infections associated with haemodialysis occurred during the study period. A total of 13 of 24 viremic patients had HCV genotype 2b, a pattern suggesting nosocomial transmission. This was further supported by phylogenetic analysis of HCV viral isolates in seven. HCV viremia was also common in patients with an incomplete anti-HCV antibody pattern as 8 of the 12 indeterminant sera were HCV-RNA positive.

    Conclusions.  Awareness, prevention, identification of infected patients and donor testing limited transmission. Indeterminant recombinant immunoblot assays (RIBA)-results should be regarded with caution as a result of the relative immunodeficiency in uremic patients. Our data indicate nosocomial transmission in several patients.

  • 9.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Åkerlind, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Månsson, Ann-Sofie
    Malmö University Hospital.
    Widell, Anders
    Malmö University Hospital.
    Monitoring hepatitis C infection in a major Swedish nephrology unit and molecular resolution of a new case of nosocomial transmission.2010In: Journal of medical virology, ISSN 1096-9071, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 249-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a frequent problem in hemodialysis units. The prevalence and incidence of HCV infection over a decade were studied in a nephrology unit affected by previous nosocomial HCV transmission. The HCV non-structural 5B protein gene was sequenced to achieve phylogenetic analysis of a new (incident) case of infection. Proportions of patients who were and were not infected with HCV remained similar over the period, as did the inflow and outflow of patients infected previously. In 1997, 12/157 (8%) of patients at the unit (treatment: hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and renal transplant recipients) were positive in HCV RNA, whereas in 2007 the overall number was 9/239 (4%). One patient acquired an HCV infection, and the NS5B sequence in that case clustered with genotype 2b sequences found in patients from an earlier outbreak. Comparing the HCV from the incident patient with several stored longitudinal samples and cloned PCR products from the most likely source patient revealed close phylogenetic relationship with an HCV quasispecies member from the possible source. The source patient and the incident newly infected patient were not scheduled on the same dialysis shift, although the records showed that simultaneous treatment occurred on two occasions during the months preceding transmission. In conclusion, over the 10-year period, the proportion of HCV-infected patients at the unit was unchanged. Only one new infection occurred, which originated from a fellow patient's quasispecies. This establishes phylogenetic analysis as a valuable tool for tracing patient sources of HCV transmission.

  • 10.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Nephrology.
    Eneström, S.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hed, J.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Transfusion Medicine and Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, I.
    Section of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine. Örebro Medical Centre, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sjöström, P.
    Section of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine. Örebro Medical Centre, Örebro, Sweden.
    Autoantibodies to leucocyte antigens in hydralazine-associated nephritis1992In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 231, no 1, p. 37-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical and laboratory findings and drug history were studied in 17 patients with suspected hydralazine-associated nephritis, five of whom only had renal disease, while twelve also had extrarenal manifestations. Renal biopsies revealed extracapillary proliferative or focal segmental proliferative glomerulonephritis in 10 patients, and tubulo-interstitial nephritis in five patients. Antinuclear antibody (ANA) was found in 16 patients, but none of the 14 patients tested had antibodies to DNA. Tests for antibodies to myeloperoxidase (anti-MPO) and antibodies to neutrophil cytoplasm antigen (ANCA) were performed by ELISA. Twelve of the 14 patients tested had anti-MPO; five of these 14 patients had ANCA, while one had borderline levels. These findings suggest that hydralazine facilitates the induction of a systemic disease with multiple autoantibody production.

  • 11.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Lindell, Å
    Åselius, H
    Sörén, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Svensson, L
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Eribe, ERK
    Olsen, I
    Acute glomerulonephritis associated with streptococcus pyogenes with concomitant spread of streptococcus constellatus in four rural families2005In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 110, no 3, p. 217-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied history, renal histopathology and microbiology of an epidemic of acute glomerulonephritis associated with throat infections and uncommon culture results in four neighbour families. A 40-year-old man (index patient) was referred to a university hospital for dialysis and kidney biopsy due to a suspected acute glomerulonephritis. An acute tonsillitis had preceded the condition. Penicillin treatment had been started four days before the discovery of renal failure. Throat swabs were positive for β-hemolytic streptococci, group C (GCS). GCS were also found in throat cultures from his wife and two of their children. The bacteria were typed as Streptococcus constellatus. A third child had S. constellatus expressing Lancefield antigen group G. A neighbour and two of his children fell ill the following week with renal involvement. Throat swabs from both these children were positive for S. constellatus. His third child had erythema multiforme and S. constellatus in the throat while a fourth child had β-hemolytic streptococci group A, Streptococcus pyogenes. Kidney biopsies on the index patient and his neighbour showed an acute diffuse prolipherative glomerulonephritis compatible with acute post-streptococcal nephritis and microbiological analysis of renal tissue revealed in both cases S. pyogenes and S. constellatus. The families had had much contact and had consumed unpasteurized milk from our index patient's farm. In four of seven persons in two additional neighbouring families S. constellatus was found in throat swabs during the same month while two persons carried Streptococcus anginosus expressing the Lancefield C antigen. In conclusion spread of S. constellatus coincided with the occurrence of four cases of acute glomerulonephritis. The two biopsied patients had both S. pyogenes and S. constellatus present in renal tissue. The epidemic either suggested that the outbreak of glomerulonephritis was due to S. pyogenes but coincided with the transmission and colonization of S. constellatus or that the S. constellatus strains were highly pathogenic or nephritogenic and that this organism can be transmitted in such cases.

  • 12.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Uhlin, F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Isaksson, Barbro
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Kaijser, B
    Andersson, B
    Hahn-Zoric, M
    Sällberg, M
    Perspectives on hepatitis B infections and the efficacy of vaccination (hepatitis B and pneumococci) in dialysis patients2003In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 108, no 1, p. 61-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hepatitis B is a well known problem in dialysis units. We therefore examined the historical frequency of hepatitis B carriers in our unit, our vaccination program to hepatitis B virus (HBV), the response to hepatitis B vaccine, the IgG subclass response of anti-HBs and the response and IgG subclass response to pneumococcal vaccination (another vaccine) in dialysis patients. From 1970 and onwards 23 HBV carriers were found, but no new cases of hepatitis B occurred during the study period, i.e. from 1980 and onwards.Only one of the carriers was alive by the end of 2001. In four patients liver disease(in one of them liver cirrhosis) may have been a concomitant cause of death. The antibody response to hepatitis B vaccine was significantly lower in patients than in staff. In four patients a fourth injection was cancelled due to transplantation and bad health, while such data were lacking in 8 cases. In anti-HBs positive patients and controls a significant difference in the response of healthy adults was observed in anti-HBs IgG1 (p<0.001) vs all other IgG subclasses. Dialysis patients had low levels, or negative findings, in all cases, with IgG1 as the highest proportion found (3/11 patients). An antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was registered in 25 out of 29 dialysis patients (in all 86 %). The IgG-subclass vaccination response to pneumococci in 28 dialysis patients was mainly IgG2 and IgG1 but also occurred in IgG3 and IgG4. Prevaccination antibody levels of the controls were higher in IgG1 and IgG2 (p< 0.01) (n=21) than in dialysis patients (n=28). Hepatitis B is nowadays a rare, but still dangerous disease in nephrology units. Dialysis patients have a reduced response to hepatitis B vaccine and vaccination schedules should be started early as some patients otherwise may not receive a fourth injection. The adequate antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination mainly due to IgG2 and IgG1 antibodies indicates that the antigen involved is important in vaccination responses in dialysis patients.

  • 13. Alstergren, P
    et al.
    Ernberg, M
    Kopp, S
    Lundeberg, T
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    TMJ pain in relation to circulating neuropeptide Y, serotonin, and interleukin-1 beta in rheumatoid arthritis.1999In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 13, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Alstergren, P
    et al.
    Kopp, S
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Synovial fluid sampling fromthe temporomandibular joint: sample quality criteria and levels of interleukin-1 beta and serotonin.1999In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 57, p. 16-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Amandusson, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Hermanson, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Estrogen-induced alterations of spinal cord enkephalin gene expression1999In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 83, no 2, p. 243-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enkephalin-synthesizing neurons in the super®cial laminae of the spinal and trigeminal dorsal horn are critical components of the endogenous pain-modulatory system. We have previously demonstrated that these neurons display intracellular estrogen receptors, suggesting that estrogen can potentially influence their enkephalin expression. By using Northern blot, we now show that a bolus injection of estrogen results in a rapid increase in spinal cord enkephalin mRNA levels in ovariectomized female rats. Thus, 4 h after estrogen administration the enkephalin mRNA-expression in the lumbar spinal cord was on average 68% higher (P , 0:05) than in control animals injected with vehicle only. A small increase in the amount of enkephalin mRNA was also seen after 8 h (P , 0:05), whereas no difference between estrogen-injected and control animals was found after 24 h or at time periods shorter than 4 h. Taken together with the previous anatomical data, the present findings imply that estrogen has an acute effect on spinal opioid levels in areas involved in the transmission of nociceptive information.

  • 16.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kågedal, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Monitoring of troponin release from cardiomyocytes during exposure to toxic substances using surface plasmon resonance biosensing2010In: ANALYTICAL AND BIOANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, ISSN 1618-2642, Vol. 398, no 3, p. 1395-1402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Troponin T (TnT) is a useful biomarker for studying drug-induced toxicity effects on cardiac cells. We describe how a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor was applied to monitor the release of TnT from active HL-1 cardiomyocytes in vitro when exposed to cardiotoxic substances. Two monoclonal human TnT antibodies were compared in the SPR immunosensor to analyse the TnT release. The detection limit of TnT was determined to be 30 ng/ml in a direct assay set-up and to be 10 ng/ml in a sandwich assay format. Exposure of the cardiomyocytes to doxorubicin, troglitazone, quinidine and cobalt chloride for periods of 6 and 24 h gave significant SPR responses, whereas substances with low toxicity showed insignificant effects (ascorbic acid, methotrexate). The SPR results were verified with a validated immunochemiluminescence method which showed a correlation of r(2)=0.790.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Steel, Daniella
    Cellartis AB, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Asp, Julia
    University of Gothenburg.
    Dahlenborg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jonsson, Marianne
    University of Gothenburg.
    Jeppsson, Anders
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Lindahl, Anders
    University of Gothenburg.
    Kågedal, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Sartipy, Peter
    Cellartis AB, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Assaying cardiac biomarkers for toxicity testing using biosensing and cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells2010In: JOURNAL OF BIOTECHNOLOGY, ISSN 0168-1656, Vol. 150, no 1, p. 175-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derived cardiomyocytes are in the present study being used for testing drug-induced cardiotoxicity in a biosensor set-up. The design of an in vitro testing alternative provides a novel opportunity to surpass previous methods based on rodent cells or cell lines due to its significantly higher toxicological relevance. In this report we demonstrate how hESC-derived cardiomyocytes release detectable levels of two clinically decisive cardiac biomarkers, cardiac troponin T and fatty acid binding protein 3, when the cardiac cells are exposed to the well-known cardioactive drug compound. doxorubicin. The release is monitored by the immuno-biosensor technique surface plasmon resonance, particularly appropriate due to its capacity for parallel and high-throughput analysis in complex media.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Boeryd, Bernt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Increased anal resting pressure and rectal sensitivity in Crohn's disease2003In: Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, ISSN 0012-3706, E-ISSN 1530-0358, Vol. 46, no 12, p. 1685-1689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Anal pathology occurs in 20 to 80 percent of patients with Crohn's disease in which abscesses, fistulas, and fissures account for considerable morbidity. The etiology is not clearly defined, but altered anorectal pressures may play a role. This study was designed to investigate anorectal physiologic conditions in patients with Crohn's disease compared with healthy controls.

    METHODS: Twenty patients with Crohn's disease located in the ileum (n = 9) or the colon (n = 11) without macroscopic proctitis or perianal disease were included. All were subjected to rectal examination, anorectal manometry, manovolumetry, and rectoscopy. Comparison was made with a reference group of 173 healthy controls of whom 128 underwent anorectal manometry, 29 manovolumetry, and 16 both examinations.

    RESULTS: Maximum resting pressure and resting pressure area were higher in patients than in controls (P = 0.017 and P = 0.011, respectively), whereas maximum squeeze pressure and squeeze pressure area were similar. Rectal sensitivity was increased in patients expressed as lower values both for volume and pressure for urge (P = 0.013 and P = 0.014, respectively) as well as maximum tolerable pressure (P = 0.025).

    CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates how patients with Crohn's disease without macroscopic proctitis have increased anal pressures in conjunction with increased rectal sensitivity. This may contribute to later development of anal pathology, because increased intra-anal pressures may compromise anal circulation, causing fissures, and also discharging of fecal matter into the perirectal tracts, which may have a role in infection and fistula development.

  • 19.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Geriatrics.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Mohammed, Abdul H
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Geriatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Influence of environmental enrichment on steady-state mRNA levels for EAAC1, AMPA1 and NMDA2A receptor subunits in rat hippocampus2007In: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240, Vol. 1174, no 1, p. 18-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction with the environment has a key role in refining the neuronal circuitry required for normal brain function throughout life. Profound effects of enriched environment have been shown on neuronal structure and chemistry in experimental animals. Epidemiological studies imply that this is true also in man, thus cognitive stimulation has a protective effect on neurodegeneration, e.g., in Alzheimer's disease. Glutamatergic pathways are imperative for cognitive functions, such as memory, learning and long-term potentiation, and relies on the AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors and the hippocampus, with its specific subregions, is an important anatomical substrate in this. The glutamate signalling is also dependent on a fine-tuned transport system, in the hippocampus primarily achieved by the glutamate transporter EAAC1. In this study we show how environmental enrichment modulates these parts of the glutamatergic system using quantitative in situ hybridisation. This work demonstrates for the first time that environmental enrichment modulates the mRNA expression of EAAC1 which is significantly and region specifically decreased in the hippocampus. We also provide evidence for regional and hemisphere-specific upregulation of NMDA mRNA in the hippocampus after environmental enrichment. The current work also shows that AMPA mRNA of the hippocampus is not per se changed by environmental enrichment in adult animals. Taken together, our results extend the knowledge of the glutamatergic system of specific regions of the hippocampus and its modulation by environmental enrichment and could contribute to the development of strategies aimed at limiting pathological changes associated with glutamatergic dysfunctions. © 2007.

  • 20. Andreen Sachs, Magna
    et al.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Övergripande kvalitetsindikatorer framtagna för hälso- och sjukvården2002In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 99, p. 797-803Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Andreen-Sachs, Magna
    et al.
    Hälso- och sjukvårdsnämndens stab, Stockholms läns landsting.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Overgripande kvalitetsindikatorer framtagna for halso- och sjukvarden2002In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 99, p. 797-803Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22. Antunes, Fernando
    et al.
    Cadenas, Enrique
    Brunk, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Apoptosis, induced by exposure to a low and steady-state concentration of H2O2, is a consequence of lysosomal rupture2001In: Biochemical Journal, ISSN 0264-6021, E-ISSN 1470-8728, Vol. 356, p. 549-555Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23. Apelqvist, G
    et al.
    Wikell, C
    Carlsson, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Hjorth, S
    Bergqvist, P B F
    Ahlner, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Bengtsson, Finn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Dynamic and kinetic effects of chronic citalopram treatment in experimental hepatic encephalopathy2000In: Clinical neuropharmacology, ISSN 0362-5664, E-ISSN 1537-162X, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 304-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric syndrome that arises in liver-impaired subjects. Patients with HE display various neuropsychiatric symptoms including affective disturbances and may therefore likely receive treatment with novel thymoleptics like citalopram (CIT). The simultaneous pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic outcome of the commonly used serotonin-selective thymoleptic drugs in liver-impaired subjects with pending chronic HE is far from understood today. We therefore investigated the effects of chronic, body-weight-adjusted (10 mg ╖ kg-1 ╖ day-1), treatment with CIT in rats with and without portacaval shunts (PCS). Open-field activity was monitored. The 5-HT, 5-HIAA, noradrenaline (NA), and dopamine (DA) output were assessed in the frontal neocortex. The racemic levels of CIT and its metabolites DCIT and DDCIT, including the S- and R-enantiomers, were determined in serum, brain parenchyma, and extracellular fluid. The rats with PCS showed higher (2-3-fold) levels of CIT than rats undergoing a sham treatment with CIT in all compartments investigated. The PCS rats also showed elevated levels of DCIT and DDCIT. No major differences in the S/R ratios between PCS rats and control rats could be detected. The CIT treatment resulted in neocortical output differences between PCS rats and control rats mainly within the 5-HT and DA systems but not within the NA system. For the 5-HT system, this change was further evidenced by outspoken elevation in 5-HT output after KCl-depolarizing challenges. Moreover, the CIT treatment to PCS rats was shown to "normalize" the metabolic turnover of 5-HT, measured as a profound lowering of a basal elevation in the 5-HIAA levels. The CIT treatment resulted in an increased or "normalized" behavioral activity in the PCS group. Therefore, a dose-equal chronic treatment with CIT in PCS rats produced pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes not observed in control rats. The results further support the contention of an altered 5-HT neurotransmission prevailing in the chronic HE condition. However, the tentatively beneficial behavioral response also seen following chronic CIT treatment to PCS rats in this study has to be viewed in relation to both the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes observed.

  • 24.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Cathrine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Garner, Brett
    University of Wollongong.
    Brown, Andrew J
    University of New South Wales.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Attenuation of the Lysosomal Death Pathway by Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation2011In: American Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0002-9440, E-ISSN 1525-2191, Vol. 178, no 2, p. 629-639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past decade, lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) has emerged as a significant component of cell death signaling. The mechanisms by which lysosomal stability is regulated are not yet fully understood, but changes in the lysosomal membrane lipid composition have been suggested to be involved. Our aim was to investigate the importance of cholesterol in the regulation of lysosomal membrane permeability and its potential impact on apoptosis. Treatment of normal human fibroblasts with U18666A, an amphiphilic drug that inhibits cholesterol transport and causes accumulation of cholesterol in lysosomes, rescued cells from lysosome-dependent cell death induced by the lysosomotropic detergent 0-methyl-serine dodecylamide hydrochloride (MSDH), staurosporine (STS), or cisplatin. LMP was decreased by pretreating cells with U18666A, and there was a linear relationship between the cholesterol content of lysosomes and their resistance to permeabilization induced by MSDH. U18666A did not induce changes in expression or localization of 70-kDa heat shock proteins (Hsp70) or antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins known to protect the lysosomal membrane. Induction of autophagy also was excluded as a contributor to the protective mechanism. By using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with lysosomal cholesterol overload due to a mutation in the cholesterol transporting protein Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1), the relationship between lysosomal cholesterol accumulation and protection from lysosome-dependent cell death was confirmed. Cholesterol accumulation in lysosomes attenuates apoptosis by increasing lysosomal membrane stability.

  • 25.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandin, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björnström, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Intensive Care.
    Saftig, Paul
    Biochemical Institute, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Garner, Brett
    Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Australia.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sensitivity to Lysosome-Dependent Cell Death is Directly Regulated by Lysosomal Cholesterol Content2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alterations in lipid homeostasis are implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, although the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. We evaluated the impact of cholesterol accumulation, induced by U18666A, quinacrine or mutations in the cholesterol transporting Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1) protein, on lysosomal stability and sensitivity to lysosome-mediated cell death. We found that neurons with lysosomal cholesterol accumulation were protected from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. In addition, human fibroblasts with cholesterol-loaded lysosomes showed higher lysosomal membrane stability than controls. Previous studies have shown that cholesterol accumulation is accompanied by the storage of lipids such as sphingomyelin, glycosphingolipids and sphingosine and an up regulation of lysosomal associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2), which may also influence lysosomal stability. However, in this study the use of myriocin and LAMP deficient fibroblasts excluded these factors as responsible for the rescuing effect and instead suggested that primarily lysosomal cholesterol content determined the cellular sensitivity to toxic insults. Further strengthening this concept, depletion of cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin or 25-hydroxycholesterol decreased the stability of lysosomes and cells became more prone to undergo apoptosis. In conclusion, cholesterol content regulated lysosomal membrane permeabilization and thereby influenced cell death sensitivity. Our data suggests that lysosomal cholesterol modulation might be used as a therapeutic strategy for conditions associated with accelerated or repressed apoptosis.

  • 26.
    Arman, Maria
    et al.
    Karlskrona.
    Rehnsfeldt, Arne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    Carlsson, Marianee
    Uppsala universitet Uppsala.
    Hamrin, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Indications of change in life perspective among women with breast cancer admitted to complementary care2001In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 192-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, qualitative content analysis was used in order to understand the reported changes of life perspective in interviews with 59 women with breast cancer who were admitted to complementary care. The aim of this research was to study women's perceived consequences as well as perceived causes of breast cancer and to explore aspects of importance to the women. The material was collected in semistructured interviews from women with breast cancer at different stages of the disease. The women received complementary care at an anthroposophic clinic in Sweden. Findings showed that these women's view of their relationships with others grew more valuable. Their self-confidence and experience of strength improved, and they regarded life as being more enriched. A change in their disposition towards becoming more fragile and low-spirited was experienced as a hardship by the women. An interesting finding was that the patients described the aetiology of the disease from several interacting perspectives, which also affected their ideas of how to achieve well-being and health. The findings support the view that changes of both benefit and harm are present in the experience of breast cancer.

  • 27.
    Arman, Maria
    et al.
    Finland.
    Rehnsfeldt, Arne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    Hamrin, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Bröstcancerpatienters upplevelser av komplementär vård vid en antroposofisk klinik - en fallstudie2002In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 22Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28. Arnelo, Urban
    et al.
    Herrington, Margery
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Adrian, Thomas
    Reidelberger, Roger
    Larsson, Jörgen
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Geriatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MC - Medicincentrum, Geriatrik-LAH.
    Strömmer, Lisa
    Ding, Xianzhong
    Permert, Johan
    Effects of long-term infusion of anorexic concentrations of islet amyloid polypeptide on neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in rat brain.2000In: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240, Vol. 887, p. 391-398Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Arvidsson, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Askendal, Agneta
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Detection of surface bound complement at increasing serum anticoagulant concentrations2008In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 62, p. 214-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 30.
    Aspevall, O
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of health and environment.
    Forsum, Urban
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of health and environment. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Kjerstadius, T
    Hallander, H
    Evaluation of two methods for improving quality of diagnosis of bacteriuria by culture in primary healthcare.2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 60, p. 387-394Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Aspevall, O
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Osterman, Björn
    Dittmer, R
    Stén, L
    Lindbäck, E
    Forsum, Urban
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Performance of four chromogenic urine culture media after one or two days of incubation compared with reference media.2002In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, ISSN 0095-1137, E-ISSN 1098-660X, Vol. 40, p. 1500-1503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four chromogenic urine culture media were compared to culture on blood agar, MacConkey agar, and CLED (cysteine-, lactose-, and electrolyte-deficient) agar for detection of uropathogens in 1,200 urine specimens. After 2 nights of incubation, 96% of all isolates were recovered on blood agar, 96% were recovered on CLED agar, 92% were recovered on CPS ID2, 96% were recovered on CHROMagar Orientation from BBL, 95% were recovered on CHROMagar Orientation from The CHROMagar Company, and 95% were recovered on Chromogenic UTI Medium.

  • 32.
    Aspevall, Olle
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst Stockholm.
    Forsum, Urban
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Karlsson, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Preiminary report: Concepts and terms used to describe urinary tract infection in primary health care and in the clinical microbiology laboratory1999In: Medical Informatics Europe99,1999, Amsterdam: IOS Press , 1999, p. 899-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Aspevall, Olle
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet Stockholm.
    Karlsson, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Forsum, Urban
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Building a concept system to structure the contents of a decision support system - a grounded theory study of concepts in the knowledge domain of urinary tract infection2001In: Medical informatics and the Internet in medicine (Print), ISSN 1463-9238, E-ISSN 1464-5238, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 115-129Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Astrom, E
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Eksborg, S
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Soderhall, S
    Karolinska Institute.
    Biochemical bone markers in the assessment and pamidronate treatment of children and adolescents with osteogenesis imperfecta2010In: ACTA PAEDIATRICA, ISSN 0803-5253, Vol. 99, no 12, p. 1834-1840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To assess the role of biochemical bone markers in classification of children with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), their possible association with vertebral compression fractures in milder forms of OI and their role in monitoring of intravenous pamidronate (APD) treatment. Methods: Serum total alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone ALP isoforms (in a subgroup), osteocalcin, type I procollagen carboxy-terminal propeptide, carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen, and urine deoxypyridinoline (DPD) were measured in a cross-sectional study of 130 untreated individuals, 0.25-20.9 years (median 6.7), with OI types I, III and IV. Of those, sixty-nine were also assessed longitudinally during monthly APD treatment. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results: Significant differences in bone markers, however not sufficient for individual clinical use, were found in the larger untreated group but not between subgroups with or without vertebral compressions. All bone markers decreased during treatment for 1.0-12.5 years, but with different relative amounts. Changes were not correlated to the improvement in BMD, mobility or pain. Conclusion: Bone markers are, despite significant differences, not useful for the classification of OI type in the individual child and are not associated with vertebral compressions. Serum ALP and urinary DPD are sensitive in monitoring bisphosphonate treatment.

  • 35. Axelsson Rosén, Stina
    et al.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Eriksson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Whiss, Per A
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology.
    In vitro effects of antipsychotics on human platelet adhesion and aggregation and plasma coagulation2007In: Clinical and experimental pharmacology & physiology, ISSN 0305-1870, E-ISSN 1440-1681, Vol. 34, no 8, p. 775-780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Several studies suggest an association between venous thromboembolism and the use of antipsychotic drugs, especially clozapine, but the biological mechanisms are unknown. It has been suggested that antipsychotic drugs enhance aggregation of platelets and thereby increase the risk of venous thrombosis. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of clozapine and its main metabolite, N-desmethyl clozapine, as well as olanzapine, risperidone and haloperidol, on platelet adhesion and aggregation and on plasma coagulation in vitro. 2. Blood was collected from healthy subjects free of medication. Platelet adhesion to different protein surfaces and aggregation were measured in microplates. The coagulation methods of activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and prothrombin time were performed in platelet-poor plasma. 3. Clozapine was the only compound that increased platelet adhesion and aggregation and shortened APTT. The effect appeared at therapeutic concentrations and was significant but weak. 4. This weak effect of clozapine on haemostasis may explain, in part, the association of this compound and venous thromboembolism. © 2007 The Authors.

  • 36.
    Babic, Ankica
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik
    Oskarshamns sjukhus .
    Åhlfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Wigertz, Ove
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Machine learning to support diagnostics in the domain of asymptomatic liver disease1995In: MEDINFO95,1995, Edmonton: HC & CC , 1995, p. 809-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Babic, Ankica
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Hedin, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik
    Oskarshamns sjukhus .
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Frydén, Aril
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Wigertz, Ove
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Decision support for monitoring of chronic Hepatitis C: can blood laboratory tests help?1996In: Medical Informatics Europe 96,1996, Amsterdam: IOS Press , 1996, p. 551-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Backteman, K
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ledent, E
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    A rapid and reliable flow cytometric routine method for counting leucocytes in leucocyte-depleted platelet concentrates2002In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 29-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives: To ensure a proper quality control it is important to use a reliable method to count low numbers of leucocytes in leucocyte-reduced platelet concentrates (PCs). Materials and Methods: A modified flow cytometric method for counting low numbers of leucocytes, based on a reference population contained in tubes with an exact number of fluorescent beads and staining with propidium iodide was used. To increase the number of events, the original sample volume was increased. Results: There was a good correlation in the number of leucocytes (r = 0.99) between the modified flow cytometric method and microscopy of samples from unfiltered and expected numbers from serially diluted PCs. Samples from leucocyte-reduced PCs obtained by apheresis or filtered buffy coats showed no correlation between results from the modified flow cytometric method and microscopy (Nageotte). Conclusion: Counting by microscopy gave a lower number of leucocytes than the modified flow cytometric method when counting a low number of cells. However, analysis of the serially diluted PCs proved that the modified flow cytometric method was reliable and rapid, making it suitable for clinical routine use.

  • 39.
    Backteman, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Biological and methodological variation of lymphocyte subsets in blood of human adults2007In: JIM - Journal of Immunological Methods, ISSN 0022-1759, E-ISSN 1872-7905, Vol. 322, no 1-2, p. 20-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although lymphocyte populations are often monitored over time, information about the biological variation over time is limited. Three-colour-flow cytometry was used to investigate the biological and methodological variation of lymphocyte populations in blood. Fifteen healthy individuals (11 females and 4 males) were longitudinally monitored for 2-8 years. Blood samples were drawn monthly when possible. In total, 493 observations were included. Absolute counts and proportions were determined for T-cells (CD3+), T-helper cells (CD3+ CD4+), cytolytic T-cells (CD3+ CD8+), B-cells (CD3- CD19+) and NK-cells (CD3- CD16+/56+). As to variation over the year, ANOVA testing showed only a minor monthly variation for absolute counts of the CD8+ population (p < 0.05) for October compared with June and July, whereas no significant differences were found for the other populations or in the proportions of lymphocyte subsets. Although lower than the longitudinal variation, the methodological variation, expressed as coefficient of variation (CV %), was in a similar range as the variation over time, indicating that the normal biological variation should not be overestimated, while the methodological inter-assay should be taken into consideration in longitudinal studies or monitoring of patients. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 40.
    Barklin, A.
    et al.
    Aarhus University Hospital.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Larsson, A.
    Aarhus University Hospital.
    Tyvold, S.
    Norwegian University of Science & Technology.
    Granfeldt, A.
    Aarhus University Hospital.
    Tonnesen, E.
    Aarhus University Hospital.
    Neuropeptides in brain death-induced neurogenic pulmonary edema2009In: in ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, vol 53, 2009, Vol. 53, p. 45-45Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 41.
    Barklin, Anne
    et al.
    Aarhus University Hospital.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Tyvold, Stig S
    Norwegian Univ Science & Technology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Aarhus University Hospital.
    Granfeldt, Asger
    Aarhus University Hospital.
    Sloth, Erik
    Aarhus University Hospital.
    Tonnesen, Else
    Aarhus University Hospital.
    Alteration of Neuropeptides in the Lung Tissue Correlates Brain Death-Induced Neurogenic Edema2009In: JOURNAL OF HEART AND LUNG TRANSPLANTATION, ISSN 1053-2498, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 725-732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: increased intracranial pressure induces neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE), potentially explaining why only lungs from less than 20% of brain dead organ donors can be used for transplantation. This study investigated the underlying mechanisms of NPE, focusing on neuropeptides, which potently induce vasoconstriction, vasodilatation, and neurogenic inflammation. Methods: Brain death was induced in 10 pigs by increasing the intracranial pressure. Eight additional pigs served as controls. Neuropeptide Y (NPY), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and substance P were analyzed in plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and homogenized lung tissue 6 hours after brain death. Pulmonary oxygen exchange was estimated using partial pressure of arterial oxygen (Pao(2))/fraction of inspired oxygen (FIO2), and pulmonary edema by wet/dry weight ratio. Results: Brain death induced a decrease in PaO2/FIO2 (P less than 0.001) and increased the wet/dry weight of both apical (p = 0.01) and basal lobes (p = 0.03). NPY and CGRP concentrations were higher in the BAL fluid of brain-dead animals compared with controls (p = 0.02 and p = 0.02) and were positively correlated with the wet/dry weight ratio. NPY content in lung tissue was lower in brain-dead animals compared with controls (p = 0.04) and was negatively correlated with the wet/dry weight ratio. There were no differences in substance P concentrations between the groups. Conclusion: NPY was released from the lung tissue of brain-dead pigs, and its concentration was related to the extent of pulmonary edema. NPY may be one of several crucial mediators of neurogenic pulmonary edema, raising the possibility of treatment with NPY-antagonists to increase the number of available lung donors.

  • 42. Ben Rayana, Mohammed C
    et al.
    Burnett, Robert W
    Covington, Arthur K
    DOrazio, Paul
    Fogh-Andersen, Niels
    Jacobs, Ellis
    Kataky, Rity
    Külpmann, Wolf R
    Kuwa, Katsuhiko
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Lewenstam, Andrzej
    Maas, Anton H J
    Mager, Gerhard
    Naskalski, Jerzy W
    Okorodudu, Anthony O
    Ritter, Christoph
    St John, Andrew
    Recommendation for measuring and reporting chloride by ISEs in undiluted serum, plasma or blood2006In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, E-ISSN 1437-4331, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 346-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The proposed recommendation for measuring and reporting chloride in undiluted plasma† or blood by ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) will provide results that are identical to chloride concentrations measured by coulometry for standardized normal plasma or blood samples. It is applicable to all current ISEs dedicated to chloride measurement in undiluted samples that meet the requirements. However, in samples with reduced water concentration, results by coulometry are lower than by ion-selective electrode due to volume displacement. The quantity measured by this standardized ISE procedure is called the ionized chloride concentration. It may be clinically more relevant than the chloride concentration as determined by coulometry, photometry or by ISE after dilution of the sample. © 2006 by Walter de Gruyter.

  • 43.
    Bengtsson, Finn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Arrogant maktspråk från landstingsledningen2005In: Östgöta Correspondenten, ISSN 1104-0394, Vol. 11 marsArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Bengtsson, Finn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Fler arbetsgivare i vården2005In: Östgöta Correspondenten, ISSN 1104-0394, Vol. 24 augustiArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Bengtsson, Finn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Hur är det ställt med demokratin?2005In: Östgöta Correspondenten, ISSN 1104-0394, Vol. 23 marsArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Bengtsson, Finn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Klinisk farmakokinetik vid antidepressiv läkemedelsbehandling. Inom ramen för projektgruppen för depressionsbehandling.2004Report (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Bengtsson, Finn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Ahlner, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Insights in stereopharmacology in modern antidepressant treatment2005In: Association of European Psychiatrists AEP Congress,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Bengtsson, Finn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Kugelberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Fate of psychotropic drugs at the blood-brain-barrier and the brain: pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and clinical consequences2005In: Association of European Psychiatrists AEP Congress,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Berg, Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Lindgren, R
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Cytokine changes in postmenopausal women treated with estrogens: A placebo-controlled study2002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is being increasingly used in postmenopausal women. Sex steroids are known to affect the immune system in several ways, although this is mainly based on clinical observations and experimental studies. Method of study: We studied the in vivo effects of transdermal estrogens (50 ╡g 17 ▀-Estradiol/24 hr) on cytokine production in postmenopausal women. A total of 17 women were randomized to either placebo (n = 7) or active estrogen therapy (n = 10) for 14 weeks, with addition of oral medoxyprogesterone acetate 10 mg daily during the last 2 weeks in both groups. Secretion of the cytokines IFN-?, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-6 in blood mononuclear cells was determined, spontaneously and after stimulation with common vaccination antigens and mitogen, using the cell ELISA technique. Results: IL-6 production after stimulation with purified protein derivate (PPD) decreased in the estrogen treated group (P < 0.01). Mitogen-induced IL-6 production was reduced in the estrogen treated group in contrast to an increase in the placebo group, leading to a significant difference (P < 0.01) between the groups after 12 weeks of treatment. This difference was eliminated after an addition of progestagens for 2 weeks. No significant changes were noted for IFN-?, IL-4 or IL-10 in relation to estrogen or placebo treatment. Conclusions: In the present controlled study, the main in vivo effect of estrogens was a decrease in IL-6 production, indicating a possible beneficial effect of estrogen therapy.

  • 50.
    Bergdahl, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Läkarutbildningen i Linköpings förnyas. Problembaserat lärande, basvetenskap och folkhälsa förstärks2005In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 102, no 38, p. 2654-2658Article in journal (Other academic)
1234567 1 - 50 of 835
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