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  • 1.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Andersson, Bengt
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Hahn-Zoric, Mirjana
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Long-term treatment results and the immunoglobulin G subclass distribution patterns of proteinase-3-antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA) and myeloperoxidase-ANCA in ANCA-associated vasculitis2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 160-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Small vessel vasculitis associated with antibodies to neutrophil cytoplasm antigens has been denominated antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV).

    Material and methods: Ninety-eight patients with various forms of AAV with renal involvement were studied retrospectively with regard to treatment, side-effects and outcome. The immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass distribution patterns in serum were determined in 51 patients with nephelometry and those of anti-proteinase-3 (PR3) and anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO) in 44 patients by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Results: Fifty-nine patients with a mean age of 63 years were given treatment with intermittent intravenous regimens of cyclophosphamide and continuous corticosteroids, whereas 39 patients with a mean age of 58 years were given continuous oral treatment. Malignancy, mainly due to skin tumours, was more common in AAV than in the general population. The total IgG subclass distribution pattern was asymmetric. The response to PR3 was of IgG1, IgG3 and IgG4 isotypes, while IgG1 and IgG3 predominated in the response to MPO.

    Conclusion: The aberrant IgG subclass distribution pattern detected in the autoantibodies may be of importance in the pathogenesis of AAV.

  • 2.
    Backteman, K
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ledent, E
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    A rapid and reliable flow cytometric routine method for counting leucocytes in leucocyte-depleted platelet concentrates2002In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 29-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives: To ensure a proper quality control it is important to use a reliable method to count low numbers of leucocytes in leucocyte-reduced platelet concentrates (PCs). Materials and Methods: A modified flow cytometric method for counting low numbers of leucocytes, based on a reference population contained in tubes with an exact number of fluorescent beads and staining with propidium iodide was used. To increase the number of events, the original sample volume was increased. Results: There was a good correlation in the number of leucocytes (r = 0.99) between the modified flow cytometric method and microscopy of samples from unfiltered and expected numbers from serially diluted PCs. Samples from leucocyte-reduced PCs obtained by apheresis or filtered buffy coats showed no correlation between results from the modified flow cytometric method and microscopy (Nageotte). Conclusion: Counting by microscopy gave a lower number of leucocytes than the modified flow cytometric method when counting a low number of cells. However, analysis of the serially diluted PCs proved that the modified flow cytometric method was reliable and rapid, making it suitable for clinical routine use.

  • 3.
    Backteman, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Biological and methodological variation of lymphocyte subsets in blood of human adults2007In: JIM - Journal of Immunological Methods, ISSN 0022-1759, E-ISSN 1872-7905, Vol. 322, no 1-2, p. 20-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although lymphocyte populations are often monitored over time, information about the biological variation over time is limited. Three-colour-flow cytometry was used to investigate the biological and methodological variation of lymphocyte populations in blood. Fifteen healthy individuals (11 females and 4 males) were longitudinally monitored for 2-8 years. Blood samples were drawn monthly when possible. In total, 493 observations were included. Absolute counts and proportions were determined for T-cells (CD3+), T-helper cells (CD3+ CD4+), cytolytic T-cells (CD3+ CD8+), B-cells (CD3- CD19+) and NK-cells (CD3- CD16+/56+). As to variation over the year, ANOVA testing showed only a minor monthly variation for absolute counts of the CD8+ population (p < 0.05) for October compared with June and July, whereas no significant differences were found for the other populations or in the proportions of lymphocyte subsets. Although lower than the longitudinal variation, the methodological variation, expressed as coefficient of variation (CV %), was in a similar range as the variation over time, indicating that the normal biological variation should not be overestimated, while the methodological inter-assay should be taken into consideration in longitudinal studies or monitoring of patients. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Berg, Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Lindgren, R
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Cytokine changes in postmenopausal women treated with estrogens: A placebo-controlled study2002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is being increasingly used in postmenopausal women. Sex steroids are known to affect the immune system in several ways, although this is mainly based on clinical observations and experimental studies. Method of study: We studied the in vivo effects of transdermal estrogens (50 ╡g 17 ▀-Estradiol/24 hr) on cytokine production in postmenopausal women. A total of 17 women were randomized to either placebo (n = 7) or active estrogen therapy (n = 10) for 14 weeks, with addition of oral medoxyprogesterone acetate 10 mg daily during the last 2 weeks in both groups. Secretion of the cytokines IFN-?, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-6 in blood mononuclear cells was determined, spontaneously and after stimulation with common vaccination antigens and mitogen, using the cell ELISA technique. Results: IL-6 production after stimulation with purified protein derivate (PPD) decreased in the estrogen treated group (P < 0.01). Mitogen-induced IL-6 production was reduced in the estrogen treated group in contrast to an increase in the placebo group, leading to a significant difference (P < 0.01) between the groups after 12 weeks of treatment. This difference was eliminated after an addition of progestagens for 2 weeks. No significant changes were noted for IFN-?, IL-4 or IL-10 in relation to estrogen or placebo treatment. Conclusions: In the present controlled study, the main in vivo effect of estrogens was a decrease in IL-6 production, indicating a possible beneficial effect of estrogen therapy.

  • 5.
    Berlin, Gösta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Challoner, KE
    Woodson, RD
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Low-O2 affinity erythrocytes improve performance of ischemic myocardium2002In: Journal of applied physiology, ISSN 8750-7587, E-ISSN 1522-1601, Vol. 92, no 3, p. 1267-1276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    O2 transport and O2 diffusion interact in providing O2 to tissue, but the extent to which diffusion may be critical in the heart is unclear. If O2 diffusion limits mitochondrial oxygenation, a change in blood O2 affinity at constant total O2 transport should alter cardiac O2 consumption (VO2) and function. To test this hypothesis, we perfused isolated isovolumically working rabbit hearts with erythrocytes at physiological blood-gas values and P50 (PO2 required to half-saturate hemoglobin) values at Ph of 7.4 of 17 ▒ 1 Torr (2,3-bisphosphoglycerate depletion) and 33 ▒ 5 Torr (inositol hexaphosphate incorporation). When perfused at 40 and 20% of normal coronary flow, mean VO2 decreased from the control value by 37 and 46% (P < 0.001), and function, expressed as cardiac work, decreased by 38 and 52%, respectively (P < 0.001). Perfusion at higher P50 during low-flow ischemia improved VO2 by 20% (P < 0.001) and function by 36% (P < 0.02). There was also modest improvement at basal flow (P < 0.02 and P < 0.002, respectively). The improvement in VO2 and function due to the P50 increase demonstrates the importance of O2 diffusion in this cardiac ischemia model.

  • 6.
    Borch, Kurt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Petersson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery.
    Jönsson, Kjell-Åke
    Mårdh, Sven
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Valdimarsson, Trausti
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology.
    Prevalence of coeliac disease and relations to Helicobacter pylori infection and duodenitis in a Swedish adult population sample: A histomorphological and serological survey2000In: InflammoPharmacology, ISSN 0925-4692, E-ISSN 1568-5608, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 341-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of coeliac disease and its relation to duodenitis, H. pylori infection and gastritis in a sample of the adult general population. Methods: A Swedish population sample of 482 subjects (aged 35 to 85 years) were examined with gastro-duodenoscopy with multiple biopsies taken. Circulating antibodies to endomycium, gliadin, and H. pylori were also determined. Results: Based on histomorphological findings, coeliac disease was evident in 9 of 482 subjects giving a prevalence of 1.9 [1.0-4.0, 95% confidence interval] percent. The prevalence of gastritis with or without H. pylori infection did not differ between subjects with and without coeliac disease. Considering subjects without coeliac disease, there was no difference in the serum levels of gliadin antibodies between those with and without duodenitis. However, subjects with positive H. pylori status had significantly higher levels of gliadin antibodies than those with negative H. pylori status. Conclusions: This study confirms that there is a relatively high prevalence of undiagnosed coeliac disease in Swedish adults. There was no association between coeliac disease and H. pylori infection or gastritis, although serum gliadin antibody levels were slightly increased in subjects with positive H. pylori status.

  • 7.
    Clinchy, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Youssefi, Reza
    Håkansson, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Differences in adsorption of serum proteins and production of IL-1ra by human monocytes incubated in different tissue culture microtiter plates2003In: JIM - Journal of Immunological Methods, ISSN 0022-1759, E-ISSN 1872-7905, Vol. 282, no 1-2, p. 53-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In vitro cell culture models can be of great value in order to further analyze the regulatory mechanisms underlying the inappropriate function of the immune system in diseases such as autoimmunity and cancer. Cell culture conditions have to be well controlled in a way that they mirror the in vivo situation. The objective of this study was to compare tissue culture microtiter plates from different manufacturers with respect to their ability to support monokine production by human monocytes cultured in human serum. Tissue culture ware, made of polystyrene, undergoes treatment by the manufacturers to make the surface more suitable for culture of adherent cell populations. It is possible that quality differences in this treatment can lead to variations in protein binding properties and thereby influence the adherence and functional properties of monocytes. We measured spontaneous interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) production by peripheral blood monocytes, cultured in human serum, in five different microtiter plates made for adherent cell culture. Culture in plates from two of the five manufacturers resulted in significantly lower amounts of secreted IL-1ra. IL-1ra release by human monocytes can be induced by adherent IgG cross-linking membrane receptors for the Fc part of IgG (Fc?R). We found that reduced IL-1ra production coincided with a reduced capacity for binding of serum IgG in one case. Furthermore, this brand of microtiter plate also displayed the lowest level of adsorption of human albumin. We conclude that the protein adsorption properties of the plastic tissue culture ware have to be taken into consideration when assessing monokine production by human monocytes in vitro.

  • 8. Coste, J
    et al.
    Reesink, HW
    Engelfriet, CP
    Laperche, S
    Brown, S
    Busch, MP
    Cuijpers, HT
    Elgin, R
    Ekermo, B
    Epstein, JS
    Flesland, O
    Heier, HE
    Henn, G
    Hernandez, JM
    Hewlett, IK
    Hyland, C
    Keller, AJ
    Krusius, T
    Levicnik-Stezina, S
    Levy, G
    Lin, CK
    Margaritis, AR
    Muylle, L
    Neiderhauser, C
    Pastila, S
    Pillonel, J
    Pineau, J
    van der Poel, CL
    Politis, C
    Roth, WK
    Sauleda, S
    Seed, CR
    Sondag-Thull, D
    Stramer, SL
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Strong, M
    Vamvakas, EC
    Velati, C
    Vesga, MA
    Zanetti, A
    Implementation of donor screening for infectious agents transmitted by blood by nucleic acid technology: update to 20032005In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 88, no 4, p. 289-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 9.
    Danielsson, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Cathrine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindvall, Bjorn
    University Hospital Örebro.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Expression of apoptosis related proteins in normal and diseased muscle: A possible role for Bcl-2 in protection of striated muscle2009In: NEUROMUSCULAR DISORDERS, ISSN 0960-8966, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 412-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The unique absence of major histocompatibility complex class I antigen (MHC-I) expression in normal muscle is one possible mechanism protecting striated muscle. In order to define their possible involvement in protection of normal muscle. we investigated the expression of molecules involved in muscle fibre death and survival mechanisms (Bcl-2, Fas, Fas-ligand and TRAIL), focusing on disorders with possible involvement of cytotoxic T cells. We studied muscle biopsies from 20 healthy volunteers, from 10 patients affected by polymyositis and 10 by Duchenne muscular dystrophy. By using immunohistochemistry, Western blot and real-time PCR we detected a constitutional expression of Bcl-2 in healthy muscle, whereas the expression was weaker in disease processes. Fas-L and TRAIL were not detected in muscle fibres, and Fas only in muscle affected by disease. Our findings indicate that the major apoptotic protein Bcl-2 might have a hitherto unrecognized role in the protection of normal muscle.

  • 10.
    Edström, Måns
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mellergård, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Mjösberg, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Press, Rayomand
    Karolinska Hospital.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Th1/Th2/Th17 and Treg related transcription factors and cytokines in multiple sclerosis2008In: JOURNAL OF NEUROIMMUNOLOGY, 2008, Vol. 203, no 2, p. 131-132Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Edström, Måns
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mellergård, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Mjösberg, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Press, R
    Huddinge University Hospital.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Transcriptional characteristics of CD4+ T cells in multiple sclerosis: relative lack of suppressive populations in blood2011In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 57-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Multiple sclerosis (MS) is hypothetically caused by autoreactive Th1 and Th17 cells, whereas Th2 and regulatory T cells may confer protection. The development of Th subpopulations is dependant on the expression of lineage-specific transcription factors.

    Objective:The aim of this study was to assess the balance of CD4+T cell populations in relapsing-remitting MS.

    Methods:Blood mRNA expression of TBX21, GATA3, RORC, FOXP3 and EBI3 was assessed in 33 patients with relapsing-remitting MS and 20 healthy controls. In addition, flow cytometry was performed to assess T lymphocyte numbers.

    Results:In relapsing-remitting MS, diminished expression of FOXP3 (Treg) was found (p < 0.05), despite normal numbers of CD4+CD25hiTreg. Immunoregulatory EBI3 and Th2-associated GATA3 ([a-z]+) was also decreased in MS (p < 0.005 and p < 0.05, respectively). Expression of TBX21 (Th1) and RORC (Th17) did not differ between patients and controls. Similar changes were observed when analysing beta-interferon treated (n = 12) or untreated (n = 21) patients. Analysis of transcription factor ratios, comparing TBX21/GATA3 and RORC/FOXP3, revealed an increase in the RORC/FOXP3 ratio in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (p < 0.005).

    Conclusion:Our findings indicate systemic defects at the mRNA level, involving downregulation of beneficial CD4+phenotypes. This might play a role in disease development by permitting activation of harmful T cell populations.

  • 12.
    Ekdahl, Kristina N
    et al.
    Kalmar University.
    Blomberg, Carolina
    Kalmar University.
    Henningsson, Anna J
    Ryhov County Hospital.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hakansson, Irene
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology .
    Sandholm, Kerstin
    Kalmar University.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Systemic and intrathecal complement activation in multiple sclerosis and Guillan-Barre syndrome2009In: in MOLECULAR IMMUNOLOGY, vol 46., issue 14, 2009, Vol. 46, no 14, p. 2848-2848Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 13.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Jönsson, Anna-Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ärlehag, L
    Forsum, Urban
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Lyme borreliosis in Sweden - Diagnostic performance of five commercial Borrelia serology kits using sera from well-defined patient groups2004In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 112, no 1, p. 74-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Five commercial Borrelia serology kits available in Sweden were evaluated and compared for their diagnostic performance in sera from clinically well-characterized patient groups. With the clinically defined groups as the gold standard, i.e. without knowledge of antibody status in serum and cerebrospinal fluid, the diagnostic performance of the kits was compared and important differences in diagnostic usefulness were found. The kits from Abbot and DAKO, that often predict clinically relevant Borrelia infection and do not detect antibodies in sera from patients without strong suspicion of Borrelia infection, were considered the most useful in the population studied. This kind of validation study is an important part of good laboratory practice and should be performed by laboratories serving patient populations with varying endemicity of Borrelia.

  • 14.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Detection of spontaneous and antigen-induced human interleukin-4 responses in vitro: Comparison of ELISPOT, a novel ELISA and real-time RT-PCR2002In: JIM - Journal of Immunological Methods, ISSN 0022-1759, E-ISSN 1872-7905, Vol. 260, no 1-2, p. 55-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is an important T-helper cell type 2 (Th2) cytokine in man, driving Th2 polarisation and exerting the most antagonistic effects to the Th1 cytokine interferon-? (IFN-?). Nevertheless, few data on spontaneous and antigen-specific secretion of IL-4 in man are available, mainly due to difficulties in the detection of IL-4. In this study, we compared three assays that can detect antigen-induced IL-4 responses, ELISPOT, ELISA after blocking the IL-4 receptor during cell culture, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Spontaneous, antigen- and allergen-induced responses were analysed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from three groups with different secretion patterns for IL-4: atopic individuals, nonatopic individuals and pregnant women. ELISPOT displayed the highest sensitivity and was the only assay that could detect spontaneous secretion of IL-4 in all analysed samples. The IL-4 receptor blocking ELISA was considered best for the detection of in vitro antigen- and allergen-induced responses, since the results obtained from the ELISPOT and real-time RT-PCR displayed lower specificity, possibly because of seemingly aberrant IL-4 responses in the group of pregnant women. The real-time RT-PCR for detection of IL-4 mRNA proved to be sensitive, but expression of IL-4 mRNA was not correlated with the secretion of IL-4.

  • 15.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Svenvik, Maria
    Roberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Bergström, S.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    A symptomatic Borrelia-seropositive individuals display the same incidence of Borrelia-specific interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-secreting cells in blood as patients with clinical Borrelia infection.1999In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 115, p. 498-502Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jarefors, Sara
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    Tynngard, N
    Hedlund, M
    Sander, B
    Bergström, S
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Phenotypes indicating cytolytic properties of Borrelia-specific interferon-? secreting cells in chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis2003In: Journal of Neuroimmunology, ISSN 0165-5728, E-ISSN 1872-8421, Vol. 145, no 1-2, p. 115-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The immuno-pathogenetic mechanisms underlying chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis are mainly unknown. Human Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) infection is associated with Bb-specific secretion of interferon-? (IFN-?), which may be important for the elimination of Bb, but this may also cause tissue injury. In order to increase the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms in chronic neuroborreliosis, we investigated which cell types that secrete IFN-?. Blood mononuclear cells from 13 patients with neuroborreliosis and/or acrodermatitis chronicum atrophicans were stimulated with Bb antigen and the phenotypes of the induced IFN-?-secreting cells were analyzed with three different approaches. Cells expressing CD8 or TCR?d, which both have cytolytic properties, were the main phenotypes of IFN-?-secreting cells, indicating that tissue injury in chronic neuroborreliosis may be mediated by cytotoxic cells.

  • 17.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lidström, Charlotte
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sharma, Surendra
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Spontaneous secretion of interleukin-4, interleukin-10 and interferon-gamma by first trimester decidual mononuclear cells2002In: American Journal of reproductive immunology, ISSN 8755-8920, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 159-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PROBLEM: A T-helper cell type 2 (Th2) cytokine dominated microenvironment has been predicted to be crucial for successful pregnancy. However, little information is available about local cytokine secretion in the human decidua. We determined the spontaneous secretion of interleukin-4 (IL-4), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-10 by decidual mononuclear cells at the single cell level and compared it with their secretion by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in the first trimester of pregnancy.

    METHODS OF STUDY: The cytokine secretion from decidual and blood cells was detected by a sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot-forming cell (ELISPOT)-assay.

    RESULTS: Cells secreting IL-4 (median 153, range 8–530), IL-10 (median 188, range 32–1600) and IFN-γ (median 123, range 15–1140) were detected in all decidual and blood samples. The cytokine secretion showed a co-linear pattern in both the blood and decidua, i.e. when one cytokine was secreted at high levels, the others followed the trend. No correlation was found between the number of cytokine secreting cells in blood and decidua for any of the cytokines.

    CONCLUSIONS: Interleukin-4 and IL-10 are locally secreted in the decidua early during normal pregnancy, probably counteracting the fetal rejecting effects of co-expressed IFN-γ. The cytokine secretion by blood cells does not generally reflect the local secretion pattern during first trimester pregnancy.

  • 18.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion.
    Masreliez, C
    Svenvik, M
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Roberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Antibodies and T-cell reactivity to Borrelia burgdorferi in an asymptomatic population: A study of healthy blood donors in an Inland town district in the South-East of Sweden2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 33, no 11, p. 806-808Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To address the issue of whether Borrelia infection can be asymptomatic, blood donors with no history of borreliosis (n = 408) were screened for antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi. Seropositive individuals (n = 17) were further investigated with respect to Borrelia-specific T-cell reactivity, using an interferon-? ELISPOT assay. Anti-Borrelia antibodies as well as Borrelia-specific T-cell responses were evident in 9 asymptomatic donors, strongly supporting a current or previous asymptomatic Borrelia infection.

  • 19.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Mathiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Th2-deviation of fetus-specific T cells1999In: Immunology today (Amsterdam. Regular ed.), ISSN 0167-5699, E-ISSN 1355-8242, Vol. 20, p. 534-534Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Implementation of donor screening for infectious agents transmitted by blood by nucleic acid technology2002In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 87-111Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21. Elkarim, RA
    et al.
    Mustafa, M
    Link, H
    Bakhiet, M
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Induction of neutralizing autoantibodies to interferon-gamma in patients with polyneuropathy.1999In: Human Antibodies, ISSN 1093-2607, E-ISSN 1875-869X, Vol. 9, p. 55-60Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Andersson, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Relationship between serum levels of IL-18 and IgG1 in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis and healthy controls2004In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 137, no 3, p. 617-620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is characterized by inflammation in salivary and lachrymal glands, with a local predominance of Th1-like cytokines, as well as the pleiotropic cytokine interleukin (IL) 18. High serum levels of polyclonal IgG are common, with a subclass imbalance in which IgG1 is increased and IgG2 is normal or low. IL-18 is also of pathogenetic importance in rheumatoid arthritis. In the present study we looked for any relationship between serum IL-18 as well as transforming growth factor (TGF) β1 versus IgA, IgM, and IgG subclass levels in SS (n = 16), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n = 15), and healthy controls (n = 15). SS was defined by the revised American-European classification criteria. IL-18 and TGF-β1 were analyzed with enzyme immunoassays (EIA), and IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3 by single radial immunodiffusion. In the composite group of RA, SS and normal controls, IgG1 and IL-18 were related (R = 0.52, P = 0.0005). No relation was found neither between IL-18 versus IgG2, IgG3 or IgA, nor between serum TGF-β1 versus any of the immunoglobulins. Since serum levels of IL-18 are related to serum IgG1, IL-18 may be of importance for IgG1 switch and/or release.

  • 23.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Andersson, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Sjögren´s syndrome with myalgia is associated with subnormal secretion of cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells.2004In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 31, p. 729-735Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Nyström, Sofi A
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Backteman, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Sardell, Christina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Increased plasma levels of CXCL1 and CCL20 reflecting Th17 activity in active WG and MPA in CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL IMMUNOLOGY, vol 164, issue , pp 150-1502011In: CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL IMMUNOLOGY, Blackwell Publishing Ltd , 2011, Vol. 164, p. 150-150Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 25.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Sandell, Christina
    Backteman, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    B lymphocyte subpopulations in Wegeners granulomatosis and microscopic polyangiitis with special reference to CD25+-expressing B cells2009In: in APMIS vol 117, 2009, Vol. 117, p. 116-116Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 26.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    The use of cell products for treatment of autoimmune neuroinflammatory diseases2002In: Current Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0929-8673, E-ISSN 1875-533X, Vol. 9, no 16, p. 1497-1505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cell products are live cells that are given to patients in order to replace or modify the function of missing or dysfunctional cells. Progress in technology and in the understanding of pathobiology may lead to the use of cell products in many areas. This review outlines the use of cell products in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, with focus on neuroinflammatory diseases like multiple sclerosis. Treatment of autoimmune diseases should be selective and specific in order to avoid serious side effects. To achieve this, T lymphocyte regulation has been in focus for several immunomodulatory regimens. One area of great interest is the use of T cell vaccination, when autologous attenuated auto-reactive T cells are given to patients in order to initiate a specific immune response to the pathogenic T cell populations. Phopheresis may be an immunomudulatory treatment related to T cell vaccination. Another promising area involves ex-vivo alteration of the cytokine profile of harmful auto-reactive T cells. This can be achieved by genetic manipulation or by certain cytokine stimulations. A subsequent adoptive cell transfer will, by homing mechanisms, lead to at site specific delivery of the cells, which will have a local down-regulatory effect on the inflammatory process. Although unsolved questions regarding doses, timing, optimal preparing conditions and mechanisms still remain, both T cell vaccination and adoptive transfer of ex-vivo manipulated cytokine secreting cells have proven successful for treatment of neuroinflammation in experimental models. T cell vaccination was shown to be feasible in patients with multiple sclerosis, however, otherwise the experience in humans so far is limited.

  • 27.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Effect of photopheresis on lymphocyte population in children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes2004In: Clinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology, ISSN 1071-412X, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 856-861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years photopheresis has been claimed to be an effective form of immunomodulation. It has also been shown to have an effect on the disease process at the onset of type 1 diabetes. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized study, we analyzed if the effect of photopheresis in children with newly diagnosed diabetes is related to changes in the balance of lymhocyte populations. We also analyzed if lymphocyte subsets were related to recent infection, mild or aggressive disease manifestations, heredity, or gender. Nineteen children received active treatment with photopheresis, while 21 children received sham pheresis (placebo group). No influence of a history of previous infection, heredity, or certain clinical parameters on lymphocyte subsets was found. At the onset of type 1 diabetes, girls showed a higher proportion and a larger number of T cells (CD3+) and T-helper cells (CD4+) and a higher proportion of naïve CD4 +CD45RA+ cells. In the placebo group, an increase in the number of subsets with the activated phenotype in both the CD4 (CD29 +) and the CD8 (CD11a+) compartments was noted during the course of the study. These changes did not occur in the photopheresis group. No relation between lymphocyte subsets and clinical outcome was found 1 year after the treatment with photopheresis. In conclusion, we found no major effect of photopheresis on lymphocyte populations in a group of children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. However, in the placebo group the proportions of activated CD4 and CD8 cells increased over time. Since these changes did not occur in the actively treated group, our findings suggest that photopheresis may have some suppressive effects.

  • 28.
    Faresjö, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Garcia, Jorge
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    The immunological effect of photopheresis in children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes2005In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 459-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photopheresis has been claimed to have immune-modulating effects, but the mechanisms of action are unknown. This study investigated the immune effect of photopheresis in children with type 1 diabetes, with a focus on the balance of Th1- and Th2-like cytokines. Ten children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes (10-17 y) were treated with five double treatments of photopheresis and 10 children matched for disease, age, and gender were given placebo tablets and sham pheresis. Expression of IFN-γ and IL-4 mRNA was determined by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and secretion of IFN-γ, IL-10, and IL-13 in cell-culture supernatants by ELISA after stimulation with glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) (a.a. 247-279), the ABBOS peptide (a.a. 152-169), insulin, phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). Photopheresis changed antigen-stimulated immune balance in line with a Th2-like shift. Thus, the ratio of IFN-γ/IL-4 mRNA expression after in vitro stimulation with a peptide of the autoantigen GAD 65 was reduced after treatment in the photopheresis group. The IFN-γ/IL-4 mRNA expression ratio after in vitro stimulation with insulin was also lower in children treated with photopheresis compared with the placebo group. Photopheresis has an immune-modulating effect in children with type 1 diabetes, causing a Th2-like deviation. Copyright © 2005 International Pediatric Research Foundation, Inc.

  • 29.
    Faresjö, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Cytokine profile in children during the first 3 months after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 59, no 5, p. 517-526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease with an inflammatory process directed against the β cells in pancreas. This investigation aimed at studying the immune response during the first 3 months after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, with focus on the balance of T-helper 1 (Th1)- and Th2-like cytokines, produced spontaneously and in response to relevant autoantigens. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected from type 1 diabetic children (10-17 years) at 5, 20, 35 and 90 days after diagnosis. Expression of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) mRNA were detected by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-13 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in cell supernatant after stimulation with a glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65)-peptide [amino acid (a.a.) 247-279], insulin, the ABBOS-peptide (a.a. 152-169), phytohaemagglutinin and keyhole limpet haemocyanin. Spontaneous and antigen-induced expression and secretion of cytokines were low at the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. During the first month, after diagnosis, the GAD 65-peptide caused an increased ratio of IFN-γ/IL-4 mRNA expression (P < 0.05) and increased secretion of IFN-γ (P = 0.07). Expression of IFN-γ mRNA did also increase from stimulation with insulin (P < 0.05), even though cytokine secretion remained low. Thus, duration after diagnosis as well as metabolic state should be carefully considered both in studies of the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes and in immune intervention studies at onset.

  • 30.
    Flegel, Willy A
    et al.
    University Hospital, Ulm.
    von Zabern, Inge
    Doescher, Andrea
    Wagner, Franz F
    Strathmann, Klaus P
    Geisen, Christof
    Plafi, Miodrag
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Pisacka, Martin
    Poole, Joyce
    Polin, Helene
    Gabriel, Christian
    Avent, Neil D
    D variants at the RhD vestibule in the weak D type 4 and Eurasian D clusters2009In: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 1059-1069Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: One branch of the RHD phylogenetic tree is represented by the weak D type 4 cluster of alleles with F223V as the primordial amino acid substitution. F223V as well as a large number of further substitutions causing D variants are located at the extracellular RhD protein vestibule, which represents the entrance to the transmembraneous channel of the RhD protein.

    STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: RHD and RHCE nucleotide sequences were determined from genomic DNA and cDNA. D epitope patterns were established with commercial monoclonal anti-D panels.

    RESULTS: The RHD alleles DOL-1 and DOL-2 had the two amino acid substitutions M170T (509T>C) and F223V (667T>G) in common. DOL-2 harbored the additional substitution L378V (1132C>G). Both alleles were observed in Africans and are probably evolutionary related. DMI carried M170I (510G>A), which differed from the DOL-typical substitution. DFW and DFL harbored the substitutions H166P (497A>C) and Y165C (494A>G). The antigen densities of DOL-1, DFL, and DFW were only moderately reduced.

    CONCLUSION: DOL-1 and DOL-2 belong to the weak D type 4 cluster of RHD alleles. Together with DMI, DFL, and DFW they represent D variants with amino acid substitutions located at extracellular loops 3 or 4 lining the RhD protein vestibule. These substitutions were of minor influence on antigen density while adjacent substitutions in the transmembraneous section caused weak D antigen expression. All these D variants were partial D and alloanti-D immunizations have been observed in DOL-1, DMI, and DFL carriers. The substitution at position 170 causes partial D although located deep in the vestibule.

  • 31. Forsey, RJ
    et al.
    Thompson, JM
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Hurst, TL
    Strindhall, J
    Johansson, B
    Nilsson, B-O
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases.
    Wikby, A
    Plasma cytokine profile in elderly humans.2003In: Mechanisms of Ageing and Development, ISSN 0047-6374, E-ISSN 1872-6216, Vol. 124, p. 487-493Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Forsey, R.J.
    et al.
    Unilever Research, Colworth House, Sharnbrook MK44 1LQ, United Kingdom.
    Thompson, J.M.
    Unilever Research, Colworth House, Sharnbrook MK44 1LQ, United Kingdom.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Hurst, T.L.
    Unilever Research, Colworth House, Sharnbrook MK44 1LQ, United Kingdom.
    Strindhall, J.
    Dept. of Nat. Sci. and Biomedicine, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Johansson, B.
    Department of Psychology, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, B.-O.
    Wikby, A.
    Dept. of Nat. Sci. and Biomedicine, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Plasma cytokine profiles in elderly humans2003In: Mechanisms of Ageing and Development, ISSN 0047-6374, E-ISSN 1872-6216, Vol. 124, no 4, p. 487-493Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is known that as we age, immune dysregulation often occurs, leading to failing health, and increased susceptibility to a number of different diseases. In this study we have investigated plasma cytokine profiles in order to identify immune markers of ageing. Plasma samples were obtained from 138 participants of the Swedish longitudinal NONA study (aged 86, 90 and 94 years) and 18 healthy Swedish volunteers (aged between 32 and 59 years). Our results show significantly increased levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (P<0.0001) and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (P<0.0001) in the elderly group. The anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 did not alter with age whereas active (naturally processed) transforming growth factor-ß levels were significantly (P<0.0001) increased in the elderly group. No difference was observed between males and females. These data suggest that there are measurable changes in cytokine profiles with ageing with increased levels of potentially harmful molecules, which may contribute to immune alterations and declining health in the elderly population. © 2003 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 33.
    Fryland, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Sandin, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wilhelmsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindblom, Pontus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyman, Dag
    Aland Borrelia Grp.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    Biomarkers in blood a few days after a bite by a Borrelia burgdorferi infected tick:: Asymptomatic Borrelia burgdorferi-infected subjects show higher Th1-associated response compared with subjects who later develop Lyme borreliosis2012Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The clinical outcome following infection with Borrelia (B.) burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) differs between individuals, ranging from asymptomatic infection to Lyme borreliosis (LB) with persistent symptoms post-treatment. Previous studies in mice and humans have generated the hypothesis that a successful outcome of B. burgdorferi s.l. infection is associated with an early strong pro-inflammatory T helper (Th)1-like immune response. The aim of this study was to assess the early course of events in B. burgdorferi s.l.-associated inflammation by screening for possible early immune biomarkers in peripheral blood from newly tick-bitten persons. The study subjects bitten by B. burgdorferi s.l.-infected ticks were divided into (1) those later developing clinical LB, (2) those who developed anti-B. burgdorferi s.l. antibodies but not clinical LB, (3) those who neither developed antibodies nor clinical LB. A fourth group consisted of bitten study subjects without development of antibodies or clinical LB. Two sets of samples, both comprising all four groups, were collected in order to repeat the analyses and confirm the data. Sera or plasma collected a few days after the tick bite were analysed for 18 biomarkers (IL-1β, IL-6, CXCL8/IL-8, IL-12p70, IL-17A, IL-27, TNF, CCL18, CCL20, CCL22, CXCL1, CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, calprotectin, MMP-3, MMP-8, MMP-9) by multiplex bead assay and ELISA. In the first set of samples, the neutrophil activation marker calprotectin was increased in subjects who developed clinical LB compared with subjects who developed antibodies against B. burgdorferi s.l. but did not develop LB. However, the finding could not be confirmed in the second set of samples, thus the study failed to identify an early prognostic marker for development of clinical LB. Interestingly, both sets of samples showed increases in two different Th1-associated markers, CXCL10 and IL-12p70, respectively, in subjects who following a bite by a B. burgdorferi s.l.-infected tick developed antibodies against B. burgdorferi s.l. but did not develop LB compared with subjects who developed clinical LB, thus supporting the hypothesis of an early strong Th1-response being important for optimal resolution of B. burgdorferi s.l. infection.

  • 34.
    Furubacke, A
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, Anestesi.
    Lack of significant treatment effect of plasma exchange in the treatment of drug-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis? 1999In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 25, p. 1307-1310Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Garvin, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Levels of circulating matrix metallo proteinase-9 is associated to psychosocial factors and lifestyle2006In: XIV International Symposium on Atherosclerosis,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Gati, Istvan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Danielsson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Betmark, T
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Dizdar Segrell, Nil
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Effects of inhibitors of the arachidonic acid cascade on primary muscle culture from a Duchenne muscular dystrophy patient2007In: Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, ISSN 0952-3278, E-ISSN 1532-2823, Vol. 77, no 3-4, p. 217-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms of action for potential targets of therapeutic intervention related to the arachidonic acid cascade in muscular dystrophy. Primary cultures from a Duchenne patient were used to study the expression of dystrophin-1, utrophin, desmin, neonatal myosin heavy chain (MHCn) and Bcl-2 during inhibition of phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX). Hypo-osmotic treatment was applied in order to trigger Ca2+ influx and PLA2 activity. Inhibition of PLA2 and LOX with prednisolone and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) caused a semi-quantitative increase of utrophin and Bcl-2-, and a dose-dependent, quantitative increase of desmin expression, an effect that was augmented by hypo-osmotic treatment. Our results indicate that LOX inhibitors, similarly to corticosteroids, can be beneficial in the treatment of muscular dystrophies. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 37.
    Gredmark, Sara
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Van Gosliga, Djoke
    Karilinska Institutet.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Active cytomegalovirus replication in patients with coronary disease2007In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 230-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. To study the prevalence of active cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in patients with stable and unstable conditions of coronary artery disease (CAD). Design. Forty patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), 50 patients with stable angina and angiographically verified CAD (SA) and 50 clinically healthy controls were included. Monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood and CMV-RNA expression was determined by a nested RT-PCR assay. CMV IgM and IgG antibodies, interleukin-(IL)-6, IL-10 and CRP were measured in serum. Results. The prevalence of active CMV infection was significantly higher in patients with ACS (15%) and in patients with SA (10%) compared with controls (2%) (p < 0.001). The presence of an active CMV infection was associated with increased serum concentrations of IL-6. Conclusions. Active CMV infection was found to a larger extent in CAD patients than in healthy controls. The data indicate that CAD patients are more susceptible to reactivation of CMV and put new focus on the role of CMV in atherosclerosis.

  • 38.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Andersson, C
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of health and environment. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Comparative evaluation of serological tests for celiac disease: A European initiative toward standardization.2000In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 31, p. 513-519Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ivarsson, A
    Juto, P
    Olcén, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of health and environment.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Barn.
    Persson, L.Å.
    Hernell, O
    New automated immunoassay measuring immunoglobulin A antigliadin antibodies for prediction of celiac disease in childhood.2001In: Clinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology, ISSN 1071-412X, Vol. 8, p. 564-570Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Gustafsson Lidström, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Local Immune regulation in human pregnancy: with focus on decidual macrophages2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During pregnancy, the woman carries a fetus partly foreign to her immune system, because of the expression of paternal antigens. Despite this, the fetus is normally tolerated and not rejected, as is often the case with organs in allogeneic transplantations. Systemic changes in maternal blood occur during pregnancy but, perhaps of greater importance, are changes in tissues locally in the uterus. The pregnant uterine endometrium, the decidua, is infiltrated by large numbers of leukocytes, mainly natural killer (NK) cells but also macrophages and T lymphocytes. Further, various cytokines are known to be secreted at the fetomaternal interface. However, the functions of these cells and the cytokine networks are not fully understood. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the local immune balance in normal human pregnancy decidua, both in the early phase of pregnancy and at parturition.

    First trimester decidual mononuclear cells, NK cells and macrophages were all shown to secrete IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10, as detected by ELISPOT. The secretion was not mirrored in blood from the same subjects. A significantly larger number of decidual macrophages secreted IL-10 than did their blood counterparts, indicating potential regulatory functions of this cell type.

    Further examination of early pregnancy decidual macrophages by microarray revealed 120 genes being differentially regulated at the transcriptional level in decidual compared to blood monocytes/macrophages. Several genes were associated with alternative activation/M2 polarization of macrophages, including CCL-18, CD209, IGF-1, MRC-1 and FN-1. Genes connected to immune regulation and tissue remodelling were common, in line with the potential functions for this cell type in utero. In addition, some molecules not previously connected to decidual macrophages, such as TREM-2, A2M and PGDS, were found to be upregulated, gaining new insights into the regulatory functions of decidual macrophages.

    Term decidual mononuclear cells spontaneously secrete IFN-γ, TNF, IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-β. No differences were seen between tissues obtained before and after the onset of labour, indicating that decidual mononuclear cells are not the main cell population responsible for plausible cytokine regulation in the process of labour induction. Placental and fetal membranes as well as cells in the maternal systemic circulation may instead contribute to a possible shift in immune balance prior to pregnancy termination.

    In conclusion, decidual leukocytes, including NK cells and macrophages, are potential producers of both Th1-like/pro-inflammatory and Th2-like/anti-inflammatory cytokines in early pregnancy as well as at parturition. Decidual macrophages are of a specialized phenotype with effector functions contributing to a proper invasion of the placenta and to immunological protection of the semi-allogeneic fetus. This thesis adds new knowledge on local immune balance during normal human pregnancy, however, the clinical significance of the presented data needs to be clarified.

    List of papers
    1. Spontaneous secretion of interleukin-4, interleukin-10 and interferon-gamma by first trimester decidual mononuclear cells
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spontaneous secretion of interleukin-4, interleukin-10 and interferon-gamma by first trimester decidual mononuclear cells
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    2002 (English)In: American Journal of reproductive immunology, ISSN 8755-8920, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 159-166Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    PROBLEM: A T-helper cell type 2 (Th2) cytokine dominated microenvironment has been predicted to be crucial for successful pregnancy. However, little information is available about local cytokine secretion in the human decidua. We determined the spontaneous secretion of interleukin-4 (IL-4), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-10 by decidual mononuclear cells at the single cell level and compared it with their secretion by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in the first trimester of pregnancy.

    METHODS OF STUDY: The cytokine secretion from decidual and blood cells was detected by a sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot-forming cell (ELISPOT)-assay.

    RESULTS: Cells secreting IL-4 (median 153, range 8–530), IL-10 (median 188, range 32–1600) and IFN-γ (median 123, range 15–1140) were detected in all decidual and blood samples. The cytokine secretion showed a co-linear pattern in both the blood and decidua, i.e. when one cytokine was secreted at high levels, the others followed the trend. No correlation was found between the number of cytokine secreting cells in blood and decidua for any of the cytokines.

    CONCLUSIONS: Interleukin-4 and IL-10 are locally secreted in the decidua early during normal pregnancy, probably counteracting the fetal rejecting effects of co-expressed IFN-γ. The cytokine secretion by blood cells does not generally reflect the local secretion pattern during first trimester pregnancy.

    Keywords
    Decidua, inteferon-γ, interleukin-10, interleukin-4, pregnancy
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14684 (URN)10.1034/j.1600-0897.2002.1o057.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-10-10 Created: 2007-10-10 Last updated: 2013-08-29
    2. Cytokine secretion patterns of NK cells and macrophages in early human pregnancy decidua and blood: Implications for suppressor macrophages in decidua
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cytokine secretion patterns of NK cells and macrophages in early human pregnancy decidua and blood: Implications for suppressor macrophages in decidua
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    2003 (English)In: American Journal of reproductive immunology, ISSN 8755-8920, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 444-452Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Problem: Local immune modulation has been shown to be of considerable importance for the maintenance of successful pregnancy. We have previously reported the secretion of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-10 in human decidua from early normal pregnancy. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular source of cytokine secretion in the decidua, and compare this to secretion patterns in peripheral blood.

    Method of study: Decidual tissue and peripheral blood was collected from 20 women undergoing surgical abortion during first trimester pregnancy. Monocytes/macrophages and NK cells were enriched by immunomagnetic cell separation and cytokine secretion was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot-forming cell assay.

    Results: Decidual and peripheral monocytes/macrophages and NK cells spontaneously secrete IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10. The number of IL-10 secreting cells was significantly higher in decidual macrophages compared with decidual non-monocytic cells as well as compared with blood monocytes/macrophages. These differences were not seen for IFN-γ or IL-4.

    Conclusions: Our results indicate that decidual macrophages subserve important suppressive functions in the pregnant uterus.

    Keywords
    Decidua, IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-4, macrophages, natural killer cells, pregnancy
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14685 (URN)10.1046/j.8755-8920.2003.00112.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-10-10 Created: 2007-10-10 Last updated: 2013-08-29
    3. Gene expression profiling of human decidual macrophages: Evidence for immunosuppressive phenotype
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gene expression profiling of human decidual macrophages: Evidence for immunosuppressive phenotype
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    2008 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 3, no 4, p. e2078-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although uterine macrophages are thought to play an important regulatory role at the maternal-fetal interface, their global gene expression profile is not known.

    Methodology/Principal Findings: Using micro-array comprising approximately 14,000 genes, the gene expression pattern of human first trimester decidual CD14+ monocytes/macrophages was characterized and compared with the expression profile of the corresponding cells in blood. Some of the key findings were confirmed by real time PCR or by secreted protein. A unique gene expression pattern intrinsic of first trimester decidual CD14+ cells was demonstrated. A large number of regulated genes were functionally related to immunomodulation and tissue remodelling, corroborating polarization patterns of differentiated macrophages mainly of the alternatively activated M2 phenotype. These include known M2 markers such as CCL-18, CD209, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, mannose receptor c type (MRC)-1 and fibronectin-1. Further, the selective up-regulation of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-2, alpha-2-macroglobulin (A2M) and prostaglandin D2 synthase (PGDS) provides new insights into the regulatory function of decidual macrophages in pregnancy that may have implications in pregnancy complications.

    Conclusions/Significance: The molecular characterization of decidual macrophages presents a unique transcriptional profile replete with important components for fetal immunoprotection and provides several clues for further studies of these cells.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14686 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0002078 (DOI)
    Note
    Original Publication: Charlotte Gustafsson (Lidström), Jenny Mjösberg, Andreas Matussek, Robert Geffers, Leif Matthiesen, Göran Berg, Surendra Sharma, Jan Buer and Jan Ernerudh, Gene expression profiling of human decidual macrophages: Evidence for immunosuppressive phenotype, 2008, PLoS ONE, (3), 4, e2078. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0002078 Copyright: Public Library of Science (PLoS) http://www.plos.org/ Available from: 2007-10-10 Created: 2007-10-10 Last updated: 2010-03-19
    4. Cytokine secretion in decidual mononuclear cells from term human pregnancy with or without labour: ELISPOT detection of IFN-gamma, IL-4, IL-10, TGF-beta and TNF-alpha
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cytokine secretion in decidual mononuclear cells from term human pregnancy with or without labour: ELISPOT detection of IFN-gamma, IL-4, IL-10, TGF-beta and TNF-alpha
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Journal of reproductive immunology, ISSN 0165-0378, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 41-56Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Cytokines are believed to be important in maintaining pregnancy and in the process of labour induction in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the secretion of the cytokines interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-10, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in decidual tissue with or without labour.

    Decidual tissue was collected from 32 healthy women undergoing elective caesarean sections before the onset of labour (n = 17) or after normal vaginal delivery (n = 15). Mononuclear cells were analysed for cytokine secretion with ELISPOT. To validate the widely used method of tissue collected at caesarean sections and after vaginal deliveries as a representative of before and after labour, respectively, placenta biopsies were collected from 12 healthy women to study the expression of the prostaglandin pathway enzymes cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase (mPGES).

    Decidual mononuclear cells from term human pregnancy spontaneously secrete IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, TGF-β and TNF-α. No difference was seen in cytokine secretion with or without labour, indicating that decidual leukocytes are not the main cell population responsible for plausible cytokine regulation in the process of termination of pregnancy. Placental tissues obtained after vaginal delivery showed a higher mRNA expression of the prostaglandin regulating molecules COX-2 and mPGES than tissues from caesarean sections before the onset of labour, validating that the model can be used as a representative of the state before and after labour.

    Keywords
    Parturition; Prostaglandins; COX-2; mPGES
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14687 (URN)10.1016/j.jri.2005.12.009 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-10-10 Created: 2007-10-10 Last updated: 2013-08-29
  • 41.
    Hallin, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    Mellergård, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    In vitro Th2 deviation of myelin-specific peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with multiple sclerosis2006In: Journal of Neuroimmunology, ISSN 0165-5728, E-ISSN 1872-8421, Vol. 171, no 1-2, p. 156-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed at investigating if selective ex vivo immune deviation of myelin-specific cytokine secretion towards Th2 is possible in blood cells from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Interleukin (IL)-4 (Th2) and interferon-γ (Th1) secreting cells were recorded by ELISPOT in 13 MS patients. Deviation was successful in 10 patients. Interleukin-4 alone was most effective in inducing myelin-specific immune deviation in MS patients whereas IL-1 or IL-15 in combination with IL-4 did not improve the results. Further studies and improvements are needed before ex vivo immune deviation can be considered a potential treatment in patients with MS. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 42.
    Hammar, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Asp, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Maller, Rolf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    A new program for better clinical supervision of students. A joint project at the Halsouniversitet and county council in Ostergotland2006In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 103, p. 649-654Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Hammar, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Asp, Malin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Maller, Rolf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Ny handlingsplan för bättre klinisk handledning av studenter.2006In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 103, p. 649-654Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

        

  • 44.
    Hedin-Skogman, Barbro
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Croner, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Eknefelt, Mattias
    Pediatric Clinic, Jönköping.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Lyme Neuroborreliosis in Children - a Prospective Study of Clinical features, Prognosis, and Outcome2008In: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, ISSN 0891-3668, E-ISSN 1532-0987, Vol. 27, no 12, p. 1089-1094Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    Background: Evaluation of children with clinically suspected neuroborreliosis (NB) is difficult. With a prospective study design we wanted to characterize children with signs and symptoms indicative for NB, investigate clinical outcome and, if possible, identify factors of importance for recovery.

    Material/Methods: Children being evaluated for NB (n = 177) in Southeast Sweden were categorized into 3 groups: "confirmed neuroborreliosis" (41%) with Borrelia antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid, "possible neuroborreliosis" (26%) with pleocytosis but 110 Borrelia antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid, and "not determined" (33%) with no pleocytosis and no Borrelia antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid, Antibiotic treatment was given to 69% of children. Patients were followed during 6 months and compared with a matched control group (n = 174).

    Results: Clinical recovery at the 6-month follow-up (n = 177) was generally good and no patient was found to have recurrent or progressive neurologic symptoms. However, persistent facial nerve palsy caused dysfunctional and cosmetic problems in 11% of patients. Persistent nonspecific symptoms, such as headache and fatigue, were not more frequently reported in patients than in controls. Influence on daily life was reported to the same extent in patients and controls. Consequently, persistent headache and fatigue at follow-up should not be considered as attributable to NB. No prognostic factors could be identified.

    Conclusions: Clinical recovery was satisfactory in children being evaluated for NB although persistent symptoms from facial nerve palsy occurred. Persistent nonspecific symptoms, such as headache and fatigue, were not more frequently reported in patients than in controls.

  • 45.
    Henningsson, Anna J.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Infectious Diseases, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Sandholm, Kerstin
    Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences, University of Kalmar, Kalmar.
    Carlsson, Sten-Anders
    Åland Borrelia Group, Åland Central Hospital, Finland.
    Granlund, Hans
    Åland Borrelia Group, Åland Central Hospital, Finland.
    Jansson, Christian
    Åland Borrelia Group, Åland Central Hospital, Finland.
    Nyman, Dag
    Åland Borrelia Group, Åland Central Hospital, Finland.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences, University of Kalmar, Kalmar.
    Complement activation in Lyme neuroborreliosis - Increased levels of C1q and C3a in cerebrospinal fluid indicate complement activation in the CNS2007In: Journal of Neuroimmunology, ISSN 0165-5728, E-ISSN 1872-8421, Vol. 183, no 01-Feb, p. 200-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A strong initial inflammatory response is important in neuroborreliosis. Since complement is a main player in early inflammation, we monitored the concentration and activation of complement in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid from 298 patients, of whom 23 were diagnosed with neuroborreliosis. Using sandwich ELISAs, we found significantly elevated levels of C1q, C4, C3, and C3a in cerebrospinal fluid, but not in plasma, in patients with neuroborreliosis. This finding indicates that complement plays a role in the human immune response in neuroborreliosis, that the immunologic process is compartmentalized to the CNS, and that complement activation may occur via the classical pathway.

  • 46.
    Jablonowska, Barbara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Palfi, Miodrag
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Svante
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Selbing, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blocking antibodies in blood from patients with recurrent spontaneous abortion in relation to pregnancy outcome and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment2001In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 226-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PROBLEM: To study whether the occurrence of mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) blocking antibodies is associated with pregnancy outcome in women with unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) and the in vivo effect of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment on MLC blocking effect.

    METHOD OF STUDY: Blood samples from 41 RSA patients were obtained before and after pregnancy, and blocking antibodies were estimated by one-way MLC assay. The patients received IVIG or placebo (saline) during pregnancy. Additionally, pre-pregnancy blood samples from 31 RSA women and 10 controls were obtained.

    RESULTS: We found no correlation between blocking antibodies before pregnancy and the pregnancy outcome. The occurrence of blocking antibodies was not affected by pregnancy or IVIG treatment.

    CONCLUSIONS: Blocking antibodies have no predictive value for the pregnancy outcome in RSA patients, and their production seems not to be affected by IVIG.

  • 47.
    Jablonowska, Barbara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Selbing, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Palfi, Miodrag
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Svante
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindton, B
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Huddinge University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden .
    Prevention of recurrent spontaneous abortion by intravenous immunoglobulin: a double-blind placebo-controlled study1999In: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 838-841Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) in the prevention of recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, 41 women with a history of unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion were treated with IVIG or saline infusions during pregnancy. The birth of a child was considered a successful outcome. The overall success rate was 77% in the IVIG group compared with 79% in the placebo group. For women with primary RSA the success rates were 82 (IVIG) and 89% (placebo), and for women with secondary RSA the rates were 73 (IVIG) and 70% (placebo). We found no statistically significant difference in treatment results between IVIG and placebo.

  • 48.
    Jonasson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Backteman, Karin
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Loss of natural killer cell activity in patients with coronary artery disease2005In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 183, no 2, p. 316-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:: Natural killer (NK) cells are important components of the innate immune system and have a potential role in the regulation of autoimmunity. In the present study, we evaluated the NK cells in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and related the findings to clinical and laboratory parameters of the disease. Methods and results:: We studied 45 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), 50 patients with stable angina and angiographically verified CAD (SA) and 50 healthy controls. The distribution of NK cell subsets was determined by flow cytometry and NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity was quantified ex vivo. Both ACS and SA patients had significantly reduced numbers of CD56dim NK cells compared with controls. The patients also exhibited a significant decrease in NK cell activity. The loss in NK cell function was not related to inflammatory activity or metabolic status. Conclusion:: Both stable and unstable conditions of CAD were associated with a redistribution of circulating lymphocytes, comprising a significant reduction of CD56dim NK cells and a concomitant loss of NK cell function. The findings suggest the presence of a persistent immune aberration in CAD patients independent of their clinical setting or systemic inflammatory state. © 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 49.
    Jonasson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Natural killer cells in coronary artery disease2004In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 4, p. 312-312Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Jonsson, Yvonne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nieminen, Katri
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sharma, Surendra
    Departments of Pediatrics and Pathology, Brown University and Women and Infants' Hospital of Rhode Island, Providence, RI, USA.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Systemic Th1/Th2 cytokine responses to paternal and vaccination antigens in preeclampsia: no differences compared with normal pregnancy2004In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 302-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem: A Th1-shift has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. This study was designed to compare Th1/Th2 related cytokine secretion in blood between women with preeclampsia (n = 15) and normal pregnancies (n = 15), using a high-sensitivity technique for cytokine detection.

    Methods of study: Spontaneous as well as 'fetus-specific' and recall antigen-specific (purified protein derivate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tetanus toxoid and lipopolysaccharide) secretion of interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-12 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot-forming cell assay (ELISPOT). Fetus-specific secretion was induced by stimulation with paternal PBMC in a mixed leukocyte culture assay.

    Results: All cytokines were secreted by PBMCs both from women with preeclampsia and women with normal pregnancies. No differences in the number of cytokine-secreting cells were found between the two groups.

    Conclusions: No evidence was found for a shift in the systemic Th1/Th2 responses, in preeclampsia compared with normal pregnancy. This does, however, not exclude differences in the local immune responses related to the fetoplacental unit.

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