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  • 1.
    Abdiu, Avni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Ohannessian, Peter
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Berggren, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The nasal alar elevator: A new device that may reduce the need for primary operation of the nose in patients with cleft lip2009In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY AND HAND SURGERY, ISSN 0284-4311, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 71-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve the shape of the cleft lip nose preoperatively, we have developed the nasal alar elevator. This has been used routinely since 1996 on all our cleft lip patients who have an asymmetrical nose, from the first week after birth until the date of primary lip surgery. We present our 11-year-long experience of using the device on patients born with complete, unilateral cleft lip. In this study 56 children, born between 1996 and 2006 inclusive, with complete unilateral cleft lip, had preoperative treatment with the elevator. During this 11-year period, continuous evaluation during the preoperative period, and its effects on the cleft lip nose, were evaluated, both preoperatively and postoperatively. Our results show that the preoperative use of the device has led to less need for primary nasal surgery. Instead of having to have a primary rhinoplasty (McComb) together with a lip plasty, as a routine, now only about 30% of the patients need primary surgical correction of the nose. If nasal correction is needed, a rather limited undermining of skin over the ala on the cleft side will often be sufficient. The use of a nasal elevator reduces both the length and the extent of the primary intervention, without compromising the final result.

  • 2.
    Berggren, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Abdiu, Avni
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Letter: The nasal alar elevator: An effective tool in the presurgical treatment of infants born with cleft lip2005In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery (1963), ISSN 0032-1052, E-ISSN 1529-4242, Vol. 115, no 6, p. 1785-1787Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 3.
    Bergkvist, Goran
    et al.
    Malmö University.
    Nilner, Krister
    Malmö University.
    Sahlholm, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Karlsson, Ulf
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Lindh, Christina
    Malmö University.
    Immediate Loading of Implants in the Edentulous Maxilla: Use of an Interim Fixed Prosthesis Followed by a Permanent Fixed Prosthesis: A 32-Month Prospective Radiological and Clinical Study2009In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the survival rate of splinted and immediately loaded Straumann sandblasted, large-grit, acid-etched, solid-screw dental implants in the edentulous maxilla after 32 months of loading.

    Twenty-eight patients (mean age 63 years) with edentulous maxillae received 168 implants (six each) and an implant-supported fixed interim prosthesis within 24 hours after surgery. After a mean healing time of 15 weeks, the patients received permanent screw-retained prostheses. Clinical and radiological examinations were made at implant placement and after 8, 20, and 32 months of loading. All permanent prostheses were removed at the 32-month follow-up; implant stability was checked with a torque device, and the implant stability quotient was determined with resonance frequency analysis.

    Mean marginal bone loss from baseline to 8 months after loading was 1.6 mm (SD 1.16; p = .094), from 8 to 20 months 0.41 mm (SD 0.63; p = .094), and from 20 to 32 months 0.08 mm (SD 0.49; p = .039). The 32-month cumulative survival rate was 98.2%.

    The 32-month survival of solid-screw implants - immediately loaded within 24 hours after placement - was similar to survival rates reported for solid-screw implants with conventional loading. Immediate loading and splinting of implants in the edentulous maxilla is a viable treatment alternative.

  • 4. Bergkvist, Göran
    et al.
    Sahlholm, Sten
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Karlsson, Ulf
    Nilner, Krister
    Lindh, Christina
    Immediately loaded implants supporting fixed prostheses in the edentulous maxilla: A preliminary clinical and radiologic report2005In: International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants, ISSN 0882-2786, E-ISSN 1942-4434, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 399-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the survival rate of immediately loaded ITI sand-blasted, large-grit, acid-etched (SLA) solid-screw dental implants in the edentulous maxilla after 8 months of loading. Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight patients (mean age 63 years) with edentulous maxillae each received 6 implants and 1 implant-supported fixed provisional prosthesis within 24 hours after surgery. After a mean healing time of 15 weeks, the patient received a definitive, screw-retained, implant-supported fixed prosthesis. A total of 168 implants were placed. Clinical parameters were registered after 1 month of loading with the implant-supported fixed prostheses as well as 8 months after implant place ment. Radiologic examinations and assessments were made at implant placement and after 8 months. Results: The mean marginal bone level at implant placement was 1.6 mm (range 0 to 5.1, SD 1.1) apical of the reference point (the implant shoulder). The mean marginal bone level at the 8-month follow-up was 3.2 mm (range 0.4 to 5.9, SD 1.1) apical of the reference point. Three implants failed during the healing period. Discussion: The improved results in the present study might be a result of the positive effect of splinting the implants immediately after placement Conclusion: ITI SLA solid-screw implants immediately loaded (ie, loaded within 24 hours of placement) and supporting fixed prostheses had successful survival rates after 8 months. The present results constitute a solid base line for future follow-up studies.

  • 5. Bergkvist, Göran
    et al.
    Sahlmholm, Sten
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Nilner, Krister
    Lindh, Christina
    Implant-supported fixed prostheses in the edentulous maxilla. A 2-year clinical and radiological follow-up of treatment with non-submerged ITI implants2004In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, ISSN 0905-7161, E-ISSN 1600-0501, Vol. 15, p. 351-359Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Engquist, Bo
    et al.
    Åstrand, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Anzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Dahlgren, Simon
    Engquist, Eva
    Feldmann, Hartmut
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Karlsson, Ulf
    Nord, Per Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Sahlholm, Sten
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Svärdström, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Simplified methods of implant treatment in the edentulous lower jaw. A controlled prospective study. Part I: one-stage versus two-stage surgery.2002In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 93-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The original protocol for Brσnemark System implants in the mandible was a two-stage procedure with 3 months healing time. With five or six implants and a cast framework of gold, the treatment is rather expensive, and simplified methods would be desirable. PURPOSE: The goal of this controlled serial study was to investigate the outcome of a simplified procedure with one-stage surgery, four Brσnemark implants, shortened healing time, and a new titanium-acrylic fixed full prosthesis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty-two patients were treated in three different groups at two specialist centers. All patients were provided with four implants, loaded with a Procera All-in-One bridge (Nobel Biocare, Gothenburg, Sweden) after 12 weeks. In group A (n = 30), one-stage surgery was combined with two-piece implants. In group B (n = 30), the control group, two-stage surgery and two-piece implants were used. In group C (n = 22), one-stage surgery was combined with one-piece implants. Marginal bone level was rated from radiographs at implant insertion, at baseline, and after 1 year. RESULTS: The survival rate after 1 year for group A was 93.3%, group B, 97.5%, and group C, 93.2%. The differences were not statistically significant. Between fixture insertion and baseline, the average bone loss for group A was 1.2 mm, group B, 1.3 mm, and group C, 1.3 mm. No complications in the form of bridge loosening or acrylic fractures were recorded during the first year. CONCLUSIONS: The survival rates and the marginal bone changes did not differ significantly between the one-stage groups and the control group. The survival rate and the marginal bone changes were similar for one-piece and two-piece implants. Four implants were sufficient to support full fixed prostheses in the mandibles. The Procera All-in-One bridges proved to be of high quality, and no complications were experienced. key words: endosseous implants, nonsubmerged implants, one-piece implants, prospective clinical study, submerged implants

  • 7. Engquist, Bo
    et al.
    Åstrand, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Anzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Dahlgren, Simon
    Engquist, Eva
    Feldmann, Hartmut
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Karlsson, Ulf
    Nord, Per Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Sahlholm, Sten
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Svärdström, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Simplified methods of implant treatment in the edentulous lower jaw. Part II: Early loading2004In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 90-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Most implant treatment is performed with a two-stage surgical procedure. A disadvantage of these implant treatments is that they are time-consuming. Purpose: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the results of early loading in the edentulous mandible and to compare those results with treatment results of one-stage surgery followed by a healing period and with two-stage surgery. Material and Methods: The material comprises four treatment groups with a total of 108 patients with edentulous lower jaws and 432 implants. All patients were treated with Brånemark implants (Nobel Biocare AB, Gothenburg, Sweden) with a turned surface and fixed prostheses in the lower jaw, supported by four implants. The patients in group A were treated with a one-stage procedure, a two-piece implant, and a 3-month healing period before loading. Group B (control group) had a two-stage procedure, a two-piece implant, and a 3-month healing period. Group C had a one-stage procedure, a one-piece implant, and a 3-month healing period. Group D was treated with a one-stage surgical procedure, a two-piece implant, and early loading (within 3 weeks). All patients were provided with a Procera® Implant Bridge (Nobel Biocare) with a framework made by computer-assisted milling of one piece of pure titanium. All patients have been followed up for 1 year. Results: The survival rates were 93.2 to 93.3% in the experimental groups and 97.5% in the control group. The difference was not statistically significant. The measurements of the marginal bone level demonstrated a mean bone loss of 0.8 mm between fixture insertion and the 1-year examination in patients with early loading (group D) whereas the bone loss in patients who underwent a healing period before loading was 1.3 to 1.6 mm. The difference between the control group and the group with early loading was significant. Conclusions: Survival rates for patients treated with a one-stage procedure were lower than survival rates for patients treated according to a "classical concept," but the differences were not statistically significant. There was no difference between treatment results with one-piece and two-piece implants. The implant loss in patients with early loading was probably caused by overloading, and careful supervision of occlusal loading is recommended. Early loading gave significantly less marginal bone loss when compared with two-stage surgery.

  • 8. Engquist, Bo
    et al.
    Åstrand, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Anzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Engquist, Eva
    Feldmann, Hartmut
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Nord, Per Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Sahlholm, Sten
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Svärdström, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Simplified methods of implant treatment in the edentulous lower jaw: A 3-year follow-up report of a controlled prospective study of one-stage versus two-stage surgery and early loading2005In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 95-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Interest in the use of one-stage surgery and immediate loading of oral implants has lately been increasing. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the 3-year results of one-stage surgery versus two-stage surgery, early loading versus loading after a 3-month healing period, and the use of one-piece implants versus the use of two-piece implants. Materials and Methods: The study included 108 patients with edentulous mandibles. Each patient was treated with four Brånemark System® implants (Nobel Biocare AB, Göteborg, Sweden) and with full fixed prostheses. Patients were consecutively treated and were distributed in four groups: group A (one-stage surgery), group B (control group with two-stage surgery), group C (one-piece implants), and group D (early loading). In groups A and B Brånemark Standard implants and standard abutments were used. In group C the conical one-piece Brånemark implant was used, and in group D the patients had Brånemark System Mk III implants together with multiunit abutments. All patients were observed for 3 years. Results: Of the 432 inserted implants, 24 were lost. Survival rates in the three experimental groups ranged from 93.2 to 93.3% whereas the survival rate in group B (the control group with two-stage surgery) was 97.5%. The differences between the groups were not statistically significant. The changes in marginal bone level were measured from fixture insertion to the final follow-up at 3 years. The bone loss in group D (early loading) was significantly less than in group B (the control group) whereas there were no differences in marginal bone change between the other groups. Conclusions: Early loading seemed to give good results in the anterior part of the mandible. The survival rate of the early-loaded implants did not significantly differ from that of implants inserted with the conventional two-stage procedure, but the mean marginal bone loss around the surviving implants was less with early loading. ©2005 BC Decker Inc.

  • 9. Engquist, Bo
    et al.
    Åstrand, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Dahlgren, Simon
    Engquist, Eva
    Feldmann, Hartmut
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Gröndahl, Kerstin
    Marginal bone reaction to oral implants: A prospective comparative study of Astra Tech and Brσnemark System implants2002In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, ISSN 0905-7161, E-ISSN 1600-0501, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 30-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In earlier studies of Astra Tech and Brσnemark System implants, high survival rates and small marginal bone changes have been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to compare the two systems, primarily with regard to marginal bone changes, but also with regard to other clinical variables of interest. The present paper describes the results after three years. Sixty-six patients were included in the study and randomly assigned to treatment with Astra Tech implants (n = 184) or Brσnemark System implants (n = 187). The marginal bone level was radiographically examined at fixture insertion, at abutment connection, at baseline (delivery of the prosthetic construction) and at 1- and 3-year follow-up examinations. Between fixture insertion and the baseline examination, the pattern of marginal bone resorption differed between the two systems. However, there was no significant marginal bone change between baseline and the 1-year examination or between the 1- and 3-year examinations. Nor were there any differences between the systems. The mean bone loss in the upper jaw between BL (baseline) and 3 years was 0.2▒0.3 mm for Astra Tech implants and 0.2▒0.1 mm for Brσnemark System implants. The corresponding figures for the lower jaw were 0.3▒0.2 mm and 0.2▒0.1 mm. The survival rate of Astra Tech implants was significantly higher (98.9%) than for Brσnemark System implants (95.2%). However, five of the nine implant losses in the Brσnemark group occurred in one patient. For that reason, this result must be interpreted with caution. The number of patients with implant losses did not differ significantly between the systems. Few complications were recorded up to 3 years.

  • 10.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    LundeborgHammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Speech and Language Pathology.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Mc Allister, Anita
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Speech and Language Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Graf, Jonas
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Oralmotorik, artikulation och livskvalitet. Sexmånadersuppföljning efter tonsillotomi respektive tonsillektomi2007In: Rikstämman 2007,2007, 2007, p. 53-53Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11. Gunne, J
    et al.
    Åstrand, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Lindh, T
    Borg, K
    Olsson, M
    Tooth-implant and implant supported fixed partial dentures: A 10-year report.1999In: International Journal of Prosthodontics, ISSN 0893-2174, E-ISSN 1139-9791, Vol. 12, p. 216-221Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Hallman, Mats
    et al.
    Mordenfeld, Arne
    Strandqvist, Tomas
    Lindgren, Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Holmquist, Per
    Benersättning vid implantatkirurgi2007In: Tandläkartidningen, ISSN 0039-6982, Vol. 99, p. 48-55Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13. Hellem, Sölve
    et al.
    Karlsson, Ulf
    Almfeldt, Ingvar
    Brunell, Gunnar
    Hamp, Sven-Erik
    Åstrand, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Nonsubmerged implants in the treatment of the edentulous lower Jaw: A 5-year prospective longitudinal study of ITI hollow screws2001In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 3, p. 20-29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Hellem, Sölve
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Åstrand, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Stenström, Birgitta
    Engquist, Bo
    Bengtsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Dahlgren, Simon
    Implant treatment in combination with lateral augmentation of the alveolar process: A 3-year prospective study2004In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 5, p. 233-240Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15. Küseler, A
    et al.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Hurmerinta, K
    Soft tissue changes in patients with complete cleft lip and palate after maxillary distraction osteogenesis and orthognatic bimaxillary surgery2005In: 10 International congress on cleft Palate and Related Craniofacial Anomalies,2005, 2005, p. 107-107Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Larsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    John, Mike T.
    University of Minnesota.
    Nilner, Krister
    Malmö University.
    Bondemark, Lars
    Malmö University.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University.
    Development of an Orofacial Esthetic Scale in Prosthodontic Patients2010In: International Journal of Prosthodontics, ISSN 0893-2174, E-ISSN 1139-9791, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 249-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Despite the interest and need to assess orofacial esthetics in prosthodontic patients, few self-reporting instruments are available to measure this construct, and none describe how prosthodontic patients perceive the appearance of their face, mouth, teeth, and dentures. The development of the Orofacial Esthetic Scale (DES) is reported in this article, in particular its conceptual framework, how questionnaire items were generated, and the scales measurement model. Materials and Methods: After test conceptualization, the authors solicited esthetic concerns from 17 prosthodontic patients by asking them to evaluate their own photographs. A focus group of 8 dental professionals reduced the initial number of concerns/items and decided on an item response format. Pilot testing in 9 subjects generated the final instrument, the DES. Exploratory factor analysis was performed to investigate DES dimensionality and item analysis to investigate item difficulty and discrimination in 119 subjects. Results: Prosthodontic patients generated an initial 28 esthetic concerns. These items were reduced to 8 preliminary representative items that were subsequently confirmed during pilot testing. Analysis supported 8 items assessing appearance: face, profile, mouth, tooth alignment, tooth shape, tooth color, gums, and overall impression, measured on an 11-point numeric rating scale (0 = very dissatisfied, 10 = very satisfied). Exploratory factor analysis found only 1 factor and high positive loadings for all items (.73 to .94) on the first factor, supporting the unidimensionality of the DES. Conclusions: The OES, developed especially for prosthodontic patients, is a brief questionnaire that assesses orofacial esthetic impacts.

  • 17.
    Larsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    John, Mike T.
    University of Minnesota.
    Nilner, Krister
    Malmö University.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University.
    Reliability and Validity of the Orofacial Esthetic Scale in Prosthodontic Patients2010In: International Journal of Prosthodontics, ISSN 0893-2174, E-ISSN 1139-9791, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 257-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study evaluated the reliability and validity of the Orofacial Esthetic Scale (OES) an instrument assessing self-reported orofacial esthetics in prosthodontic patients. Materials and Methods: The OES has seven items addressing direct esthetic impacts in the orofacial region, as well as an eighth global assessment item. The response format was a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale (very dissatisfied to very satisfied with appearance, respectively). OES summary scores ranged from 0 (worst score) to 70 (best score). Test-retest reliability (n = 27) and internal consistency (n = 119) were assessed. Content validation (asking patients about their satisfaction with the questionnaire content, n = 119) and discriminative validation (comparing OES scores between patients and healthy controls, n = 119) were performed. Convergent validity was assessed by correlating patients own OES scores (n = 29) with ratings from a consensus expert group (n = 4) and with the Oral Health Impact Profile (CHIP) esthetic-item summary score (n = 119). Results: Test-retest reliability was excellent for the OES scores (intraclass correlation coefficient = .96). Internal consistency was satisfactory for esthetically impaired patients (n = 27, Cronbach alpha = .86). Patients rated their satisfaction with the questionnaire content as 7.8 +/- 1.3 units on a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale (0 = very dissatisfied, 10 = very satisfied). OES scores discriminated esthetically impaired patients (31.4 units) from healthy controls (45.9 units, P less than .001). OES scores correlated well with other measures of the same construct (r = .43 for patients own assessment with an assessment by experts using the OES, r = -.72 for a correlation with the OHIPs three esthetic-related items). Conclusions: The OES, developed especially for prosthodontic patients, exhibited good score reliability and validity.

  • 18.
    Limchaichana, N
    et al.
    Chulalongkorn University.
    Nilsson, H
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Ekberg, E.C.
    Malmö University.
    Nilner, M
    Malmö University.
    Petersson, A
    Malmö University.
    Clinical diagnoses and MRI findings in patients with TMD pain2007In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182X, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 237-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to compare the findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) pain patients with clinical diagnoses of myofascial pain or arthralgia/osteoarthritis in combination with myofascial pain according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD. The temporomandibular joints of 60 consecutive patients, 19 with myofascial pain and 41 patients with arthralgia/osteoarthritis in combination with myofascial pain were examined clinically and with MRI. Overall the most common MRI findings were different kinds of disc displacements and structural bone changes, which were found in both pain groups. However, disc displacements were found significantly (P = 0.002) more often in the group arthralgia/osteoarthritis in combination with myofascial pain. One hundred and four joints were found to have no clinical diagnosis of disc displacements, but 64 of these joints had findings of disc displacements on MRI. Joint fluid was found in both pain groups Patients having a combination of disc displacement and joint fluid were significantly (P = 0.047) more common in the pain group arthralgia/osteoarthritis in combination with myofascial pain. In conclusion, the MRI findings of different kinds of disc displacement and structural bone changes were common in TMD patients. The clinical diagnoses for subdivision into myogenous only or combined arthrogenous and myogenous pain groups were not confirmed by MRI

  • 19.
    Lindgren, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Hallman, Mats
    County Hospital, Gävle.
    Sennerby, Lars
    Sahlgrens Academy.
    Sammons, Rachel
    University of Birmingham.
    Back-scattered electron imaging and elemental analysis of retrieved bone tissue following sinus augmentation with deproteinized bovine bone or biphasic calcium phosphate2010In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, ISSN 0905-7161, E-ISSN 1600-0501, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 924-930Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To compare resorption of a synthetic biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) bone-graft substitute with deproteinized bovine bone (DBB) used for human maxillary sinus augmentation. Materials and methods Eleven patients underwent bilateral maxillary sinus floor augmentation with DBB in one side and a BCP (40% beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) and 60% hydroxyapatite) in the contralateral side. Simultaneously, with the augmentation on each side a microimplant was placed vertically from the top of the alveolar crest penetrating the residual bone and the grafting material. Eight months after initial surgery the microimplants were retrieved with a surrounding bone core. The composition of residual graft material and surrounding bone was analysed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results Residual graft material of both types was present as 10-500 mu m particles in direct contact with, or completely surrounded by, newly formed bone; smaller particles were also present in non-mineralized tissue. In the case of BCP the bone-graft substitute interface showed evidence of superficial disintegration of particles into individual grains. Median Ca/P ratios (at.%), determined from andgt; 200 discreet sites within residual graft particles and adjacent bone, were: DBB: 1.61 (confidence interval [CI] 1.59-1.64); BCP: 1.5 (CI 1.45-1.52); DBB-augmented bone: 1.62 (CI 1.59-1.66); BCP-augmented bone: 1.52 (CI 1.47-1.55); P=0.028 for DBB vs. BCP and DBB- vs. BCP-augmented bone. The reduction in Ca/P ratio for BCP over the healing period is consistent with the dissolution of beta-TCP and reprecipitation on the surface of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite. Conclusion The beta-TCP component of BCP may be gradually substituted by calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite over the healing period. This process and superficial degranulation of BCP particles may influence the progress of resorption and healing. To cite this article:Lindgren C, Hallman M, Sennerby L, Sammons R. Back-scattered electron imaging and elemental analysis of retrieved bone tissue following sinus augmentation with deproteinized bovine bone or biphasic calcium phosphate.

  • 20. Lindman, R
    et al.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Stål, P
    Morphological characterization of the levator veli palatini muscle in children born with cleft palates2001In: The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal, ISSN 1055-6656, E-ISSN 1545-1569, Vol. 38, p. 438-448Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Lindström, FD
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Lundström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    α1 Antitrypsin deficiency in a patient with systemic vasculitis and primary Sjögren's syndrome2002In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 61, no 10, p. 945-946Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 22. List, T
    et al.
    Stenström, B
    Dworkin, SF
    Lundström, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    TMD in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome: A comparison with temporomandibular clinic cases and controls.1999In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 13, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Lundström, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Lindström, FD
    Iron and vitamin deficiencies, endocrine and immune status in patients with primary Sj÷gren's syndrome2001In: Oral Diseases, ISSN 1354-523X, E-ISSN 1601-0825, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 144-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To study the prevalence of iron and vitamin deficiencies, endocrine disorders and immunological parameters in patients with primary Sj÷gren's syndrome (1░SS). DESIGN AND SUBJECTS: At the time of the establishment of the diagnosis of 1░SS in 43 consecutive patients, a clinical examination including haematological analyses was performed. The patients' medical records were also reviewed. SETTING: Patients referred for diagnosis to The University Hospital, Link÷ping, a secondary or tertiary referral hospital serving the middle part of southern Sweden. RESULTS: In total, current or previously treated iron and vitamin deficiencies were registered for 63% of the 1░SS patients (iron 51%, vitamin B12 25%, folate 9%). Current low ferritin was noted in 24%, low iron saturation in 37%, decreased vitamin B12 in 13% and folate in 9%. Thyroid disease was found in a total of 33% and 30% had autoimmune thyroiditis. Three patients (7%) had verified diabetes mellitus. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was raised in 65% of the patients and 84% had a polyclonal increase of 1g. Rheumatoid factor (RF) was detected in 85%, antinuclear antibody (ANA) in 74%, anti-SS-A in 88% and anti-SS-B in 73% of the patients. CONCLUSION: Iron and vitamin deficiencies and thyroid diseases are common in patients with 1░SS. Since these disorders often are treatable and may affect the patients' distress as well as their immune and exocrine function, an active, recurrent search for deficiencies, endocrine diseases and other frequently recorded disorders is recommended.

  • 24.
    Magnusson, Anders
    et al.
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bjerklin, Krister
    Departments of *Orthodontics, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Maxillofacial Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion: long-term stability2009In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 142-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment outcomes and long-term stability in patients treated by surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME) and to compare the results with a matched, untreated control group. The sample comprised consecutive study models from 31 subjects (17 males and 14 females) with a mean pre-treatment age of 25.9 years [standard deviation (SD) 9.6]. The mean follow-up time was 6.4 years (SD 3.3). The transverse distances between the maxillary canines and maxillary first molars were measured with digital sliding callipers before treatment (T0), after treatment (T1), and at follow-up (T2). The data were analysed with a Mann-Whitney U, Spearman's rho, and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. At T1, all posterior crossbites were corrected and the expansions were statistically significant. At T2, despite some reduction in the transverse measurements, the posterior crossbites remained corrected. There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment and control groups at T2 regarding transverse measurements, except for the distance between the mesio-buccal cusp tips of the maxillary first molars. In the treatment group, there was no significant difference in terms of reductions in the transverse dimensions over the short- or long-term, no significant correlations between age or gender and the decrease in transverse dimensions or between the degree of anterior and posterior expansion. There were no significant correlations between the degree of expansion and subsequent post-treatment decrease. The results indicate that SARME normalizes the transverse discrepancies and is stable a mean of 6 years post-treatment. The decreases in the transverse dimensions are most pronounced during the first 3 years post-treatment. 

  • 25.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Does teasing affect satisfaction with facial appearance in subjects with treated cleft lip and palate2005In: 10 International congress on cleft Palate and Related Craniofacial Anomalies,2005, 2005, p. 120-120Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Evaluation of the eurocran yardstick for study model rating with and without lateral cephalogram2005In: 10 International congress on cleft Palate and Related Craniofacial Anomalies,2005, 2005, p. 119-199Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum.
    List, Thomas
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of health and environment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Reliability of a multidimensional questionnaire for adults with treated complete cleft lip and palate2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 271-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of a multidimensional questionnaire for Swedish adults with treated complete unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and palate (CLP). The questionnaire was designed to be used in the evaluation of adults with treated CLP after treatment. Before any conclusions were drawn from the results of the study we assessed the test-retest reliability of the questionnaire. The questionnaire included 168 questions and assessed the following domains: aesthetics, functions associated with CLP, satisfaction with treatment and perceived need for treatment, quality of life, depression and non-specific physical symptoms, body image, and jaw function. The subjects answered the questionnaire twice at a 2-3-week interval. Sixty-one adults (38 men, 23 women) mean age 24 years (range 20-29) participated in the study. The response rate for the questionnaire was acceptable at 75%. The test-retest reliability varied among the different domains. The reliability of questions regarding aesthetics, functions associated with CLP, and treatment satisfaction was good to excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.51 to 0.89). Good to excellent (ICC = 0.61 to 1.0) reliability was also found for the quality of life in various life domains and the wellbeing scales. The reliability of the body image scale was moderate (kappa = 0.43-0.60) for most items and lower than that of other scales used in this study. The reliability of the mean depression symptom score (ICC = 0.93) and the mean non-specific physical symptoms score (ICC = 0.85) were excellent. The reliability of the mandibular function impairment was good (ICC = 0.67). The conclusion of the study is that an overall reliability was good for the multidimensional questionnaire.

  • 28.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Changes in occlusion and maxillary dental arch dimensions in adults with treated unilateral complete cleft lip and palate2005In: 10 International congress on cleft Palate and Related Craniofacial Anomalies,2005, 2005, p. 119-119Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 29.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Changes in occlusion and maxillary dental arch dimensions in adults with treated unilateral complete cleft lip and palate: A follow-up study2004In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 385-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the occlusion and maxillary dental arch dimensions in adults with repaired complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) and to investigate the patterns of change in early adulthood. Study models from 39 patients (25 men, 14 women, mean age 24.7 years, range 20.2-29.3 years) with a diagnosis of complete UCLP taken at a follow-up examination were analysed and compared with the study models taken at baseline examination (mean age 19.1 years, range 16.0-20.6 years). Lip closure was carried out according to the Millard technique and palatal closure according to the Wardill-Kilner technique. All patients had received orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. The patients were divided into three groups according to the type of retention in the upper arch: no retention (n = 15), retention with a bonded twisted retainer (n = 13), an onlay or fixed bridge (n = 11). Occlusion was evaluated according to a scoring system. The maxillary dental arch dimensions were measured with a video imaging system. There was a significant deterioration in the total occlusal score during the follow-up period and this was larger on the cleft than on the non-cleft side. There were no significant differences in the anterior scores. A comparison of the transversal and sagittal maxillary arch dimensions revealed significant differences in all measurements during the follow-up interval. The reduction was largest for the maxillary second premolar width, followed by the first molar width. The overjet differed significantly between the registrations. The occlusal score and the maxillary arch dimensions were reduced in all of the three subgroups, but there were no differences between the groups.

  • 30.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Quality of life in adults with repaired complete cleft lip and palate2001In: The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal, ISSN 1055-6656, E-ISSN 1545-1569, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 379-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study evaluated the quality of life in adult Swedish subjects with repaired complete cleft lip and palate (CLP).

    Design/Patients: Sixty-eight adults with repaired CLP were compared with a group of 66 adults without cleft matched by gender and age.

    Outcome Measures: The outcome measures included a self-report questionnaire concerning quality of life in general, well-being, and health-related quality of life.

    Results: The CLP group rated their quality of life significantly lower than did the control group in the areas of life meaning (p < .05), family life (p < .0001), and private economy (p < .01). There were no significant differences between the groups concerning well-being. In the CLP group, the health-related quality of life was significantly lower concerning global life (p < .0001), disturbance to life (p < .01), well-being (p < .0001), social contacts (p < .0001), and family life (p < .05) but significantly higher concerning ability to make the most of leisure time (p < .001) and to be active (p < .001).

    Conclusions: The CLP group perceived a marked impact of the handicap on their lives concerning global aspects, well-being, and social life. More practical and tangible aspects of their daily living, however, were not affected, and only some minor aspects of their quality of life in general were poor in comparison with the control group, which indicates a fairly good life adjustment in spite of the handicap.

  • 31.
    Nord, Per Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Ny kirurgisk metod: Förlängning av käkben med distraktionsteknik2001In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 98, p. 2708-2712Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Ohannessian, Peter
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Berggren, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Abdiu, Avni
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    The cleft lip evaluation profile (CLEP): A new approach for postoperative nasolabial assessment in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate2011In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY AND HAND SURGERY, ISSN 0284-4311, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 8-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To assess the postoperative results after primary or secondary operation on unilateral cleft lip and nose, various methods have been published, in which qualitative methods are often based on the opinions of an expert panel and the quantitative methods are based on measurements of different landmarks of the lip and nose. Common problems with the present methods are the associated costs, based on the need for advanced techniques and expertise. Our cleft team now present a simplified, inexpensive, and reproducible protocol to evaluate the cosmetic and functional outcome after operations on the cleft lip and nose, together with the patients. Our protocol has been developed as a guideline to evaluate and score six variables of the lip and seven variables of the nose, including scars, projections of the lips and nose, volumes of the lip, and the alae and septum. The protocol contains series of three photographs of each of the variables that present a good postoperative result, an acceptable result, and finally a result with a clearly visible disfigurement. We also tested the reproducibility and validity of the protocol. Plastic surgeons with no knowledge of the index were approached twice and asked to assess a version with photographs in random order. The evaluation protocol is a simple and cost-effective tool for evaluation of the lip or nose, or both, among patients with repaired unilateral complete cleft lip.

  • 33.
    Wahlund, Kerstin
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University.
    Ohrbach, Richard
    University of Buffalo.
    The relationship between somatic and emotional stimuli: a comparison between adolescents with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and a control group2005In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 219-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall purpose of this study was to determine whether adolescents with chronic temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain are more sensitive to all types of somatic and emotional stimuli compared with a matched healthy control group. Sixty adolescents, 8 boys and 52 girls ranging from 12 to 18 years, participated in the study. Thirty of the subjects exhibited TMD, reporting pain of at least 3 months duration. The age- and gender-matched control group consisted of 30 dental recall patients who reported TMD pain less than once a week. All participants completed a 40-item questionnaire comprising 10 items each of pleasant and aversive qualities crossed with somatic and emotional forms of stimuli The items, a selection of a broad range of familiar stimuli by a panel of experts, were rated based on intensity of experience (0-10, numerical rating scale). Well-fitting items that formed a valid construct within each of the four domains were selected using Rasch analysis The results showed that adolescents with TMD pain reported significantly greater sensitivity (p less than 0.05) to aversive somatic and pleasant somatic stimuli than the controls. The differences between groups for the aversive emotional and pleasant emotional stimuli were non-significant. These findings suggest that chronic TMD pain states in adolescents are accompanied by amplification of bodily, but not purely emotional stimuli and that cognitive systems are implicated, not only an alteration of the nociceptive systems.

  • 34.
    Åstrand, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Engquist, B
    Dahlgren, S
    Engquist, E
    Feldmann, Hartmut
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Gröndahl, K
    Astra Tech and Brånemark System Implants: A prospective 5-year comparative study. Results after one year.1999In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 1, p. 17-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Åstrand, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Engquist, Bo
    Anzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Bergendal, Tom
    Hallman, Mats
    Karlsson, Ulf
    Kvint, Sven
    Lysell, Leif
    Rundcrantz, Torgil
    Nonsubmerged and submerged implants in the treatment of the partially edentulous maxilla.2002In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 115-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Dental implants vary in design and surfaces. In addition, different surgical techniques have been used for implant insertion. The ITI Dental Implant System (Straumann AG, Waldenburg, Switzerland) has always required a one-stage technique, whereas the Brσnemark System (Nobel Biocare AB, Gothenburg, Sweden) requires a two-stage technique. PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to compare the outcome of fixed partial bridges in the maxilla supported by both ITI and Brσnemark implants in a split-mouth design. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with a residual anterior dentition in the maxilla were included in this split-mouth study. The Brσnemark implants were used on one side and the ITI implants on the other side of the residual dentition according to a randomization procedure. A blocking size of four was used, giving equal probability of placing ITI or Brσnemark implants in the right or left side of the jaw. The surgical and prosthetic procedures followed the guidelines given by the manufacturers. The prosthetic treatment with the two-implant systems was performed at the same time, and for that reason the healing period was 6 months for both systems. The observation period for all patients was 1 year after loading. RESULTS: Two Brσnemark implants (in one patient) were lost before loading, and one ITI implant was lost 1 year after loading. There was no significant difference in survival rate. Radiographic examination of the bone level was performed at the time of delivery of the bridge and after 1 year. The mean marginal bone level at baseline was situated 1.9 mm from the reference point for the Brσnemark implants and 1.5 mm for the ITI implants. With regard to the insertion depth used, these bone levels indicate that bone loss had taken place before baseline. However, between baseline and the 1-year examination, there was no significant change of the marginal bone (0.2 +/- 0.08 mm at the Brσnemark implants and 0.1 +/- 0.11 mm at the ITI implants). The difference between results with the two implants was not statistically significant. Crater-form bone destructions were seen at some ITI implants, indicating periimplantitis. However, at only two implants were there clinical signs of periimplantitis. CONCLUSIONS: No significant difference in survival rate or in marginal bone change could be demonstrated between the two systems. At some ITI implants (18%), crater-form bone loss was observed.

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