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  • 1.
    Antepohl, Wolfram
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Interleukin-8 is elevated in cerebrospinal fluid following high-voltage electrical injury with late-onset paraplegia suggesting neuronal damage at the microlevel as causative factor2010In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 36, no 3, p. e7-e9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The patient, a 31-year-old male, sustained an electric burn injury (16 kV, AC/DC) while working with electric power lines. He was acutely admitted to a national burn center in Southeast Sweden, where burns equalling 29% of the total body surface area were noted. The burns were located at the front of the abdomen, upper arms bilaterally, and the left hip region, and the lesions were estimated to be mainly of the dermal type, what was believed initially to be caused mainly by an electric flash. There were no obvious entry or exit sites of the electric current. However, myoglobin in plasma was elevated as a sign of muscular degradation, suggesting that at least some current had passed through the tissues. According to the paramedic report there was an episode of a few minutes of unconsciousness immediately after the injury, but the patient was fully awake and alert on admission. There was no concomitant trauma.

  • 2.
    Bergström, Aileen
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Evaluation of manual wheelchairs by individuals with spinal cord injuries2006In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 175-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to investigate how adults with spinal cord injury assess their satisfaction regarding various aspects and use of their manual wheelchair. Method. The Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology (QUEST 2.0) together with seven additional questions was sent to 205 adults with SCI. Results. One hundred and twenty-four responses were available. The QUEST 2.0 showed a high level of satisfaction with manual wheelchair properties. However, the respondents were less satisfied with the services offered. Ease of use and comfort were identified as most important. Eighty-nine percent of the respondents rated their level of satisfaction as 'quite satisfied' or 'very satisfied' in ease of using a manual wheelchair compared with 68% of the respondents that were 'quite satisfied' or 'very satisfied' with the level of comfort. A greater satisfaction of ease in propulsion indoors compared with sitting comfort in various activities was found. Conclusions. A discrepancy was shown between users not being as satisfied with comfort in sitting in various activities as opposed to satisfaction with propulsion. This indicates the need for increased knowledge and developments concerning individual solutions, incorporating comfort as well as ease of use of a manual wheelchair.

  • 3.
    Borg, Jorgen
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Ward, Anthony B
    Haywood Hospital.
    Wissel, Joerg
    Kliniken Beelitz GmbH.
    Kulkarni, Jai
    Manchester Royal Infirmary.
    Sakel, Mohamed
    E Kent University Fdn Hospital Trust.
    Ertzgaard, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Akerlund, Per
    Falu Lasarett.
    Reuter, Iris
    University Giessen.
    Herrmann, Christoph
    Asklepios Kliniken Schildautal.
    Satkunam, Lalith
    Glenrose Rehabil Hospital.
    Wein, Theodore
    Montreal General Hospital.
    Girod, Isabelle
    Allergan Ltd.
    Wright, Nicola
    Allergan Ltd.
    RATIONALE AND DESIGN OF A MULTICENTRE, DOUBLE-BLIND, PROSPECTIVE, RANDOMIZED, EUROPEAN AND CANADIAN STUDY: EVALUATING PATIENT OUTCOMES AND COSTS OF MANAGING ADULTS WITH POST-STROKE FOCAL SPASTICITY2011In: JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE, ISSN 1650-1977, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 15-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This report describes the design of a study aiming to provide evidence for the extended use of botulinum toxin A (BOTOX(R), Allergan Inc.) in focal post-stroke upper and lower limb spasticity and to evaluate the impact of incorporating botulinum toxin A treatment into the rehabilitation of patients with spasticity. Design: International, prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study with an open-label extension. Methods: Approximately 300 adults with a stroke occurring 23 months before screening, presenting with symptoms and signs of an upper motor neuron syndrome and focal spasticity-related functional impairment, were randomized to botulinum toxin A+standard care or placebo+standard care. Study medication was administered at baseline and again at Week 12 if required, with follow-up to 52 weeks. The primary endpoint was the number of patients who achieved their investigator-rated principal active functional goal (as measured by Goal Attainment Scaling), at 10 weeks after the second injection (Weeks 22-34) or at the 24-week visit if no second injection was administered. Secondary endpoints included changes from baseline in level of goal achievement, health-related quality of life and resource utilization. Conclusion: The BOTOX(R) Economic Spasticity Trial (BEST) will provide information regarding clinical and cost-effectiveness of botulinum toxin+standard care vs standard care alone in patients with upper and/or lower limb post-stroke spasticity typically seen in clinical practice.

  • 4.
    Dahlman, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjörs, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundgren, Pontus
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Paediatric Habilitation Community Service.
    Effects of Motion Sickness on Encoding and Retrieval2010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: In this study, possible effects of motion sickness on encoding and retrieval of words were investigated.

    Background: The impact of motion sickness on human performance has been studied with regards to psychomotor functions and over learned skills, as well as to novel situations requiring encoding and retrieval skills through the use of short term memory. In this study, possible effects of motion sickness on encoding and retrieval of words were investigated.

    Method: Forty healthy participants, half of them males, performed a continuous recognition task (CRT) during exposure to a motion sickness triggering optokinetic drum. The CRT was employed as a measurement of performance and consisted of encoding and retrieval of words. The task consisted of three consecutive phases 1) encoding of familiar words; 2) encoding and retrieval of words under the influence of motion sickness; 3) retrieval of words after exposure.

    Results: Data analysis revealed no significant differences in the ability to encode or retrieve words during motion sickness compared with a control condition. In addition, there were no significant correlations between the level of motion sickness and performance of the CRT.

    Conclusion: The results indicate that encoding and retrieval of words are not affected by moderate levels of motion sickness. Application: This research has implications for operational settings where professionals experience moderate levels of motion sickness.

  • 5.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Crone, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ragnehed, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Antepohl, Wolfram
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Clinical fMRI of language function in aphasic patients: Reading paradigm successful, while word generation paradigm fails2010In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 679-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In fMRI examinations, it is very important to select appropriate paradigms assessing the brain function of interest. In addition, the patients ability to perform the required cognitive tasks during fMRI must be taken into account. Purpose: To evaluate two language paradigms, word generation and sentence reading for their usefulness in examinations of aphasic patients and to make suggestions for improvements of clinical fMRI. Material and Methods: Five patients with aphasia after stroke or trauma sequelae were examined by fMRI. The patients language ability was screened by neurolinguistic tests and elementary pre-fMRI language tests. Results: The sentence-reading paradigm succeeded to elicit adequate language-related activation in perilesional areas whereas the word generation paradigm failed. These findings were consistent with results on the behavioral tests in that all patients showed very poor performance in phonemic fluency, but scored well above mean at a reading comprehension task. Conclusion: The sentence-reading paradigm is appropriate to assess language function in this patient group, while the word-generation paradigm seems to be inadequate. In addition, it is crucial to use elementary pre-fMRI language tests to guide the fMRI paradigm decision.

  • 6.
    Ertzgaard, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Ward, Anthony B
    Haywood Hospital.
    Wissel, Joerg
    Kliniken Beelitz GmbH.
    Borg, Jorgen
    Karolinska Institute.
    PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR GOAL ATTAINMENT SCALING DURING REHABILITATION FOLLOWING ACQUIRED BRAIN INJURY2011In: JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE, ISSN 1650-1977, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 8-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Goal attainment scaling represents a unique approach to identifying and quantifying individualized, meaningful treatment outcomes, and its use in the rehabilitation medicine setting is increasing. The aim of this paper is to discuss the available literature for goal attainment scaling in patients with acquired brain injury, in terms of its advantages, disadvantages and practical application, including examples of goal setting and scaling.

  • 7.
    Grönlund, C.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Holtermann, A.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Roeleveld, K.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, J.S.
    University Hospital, Umeå.
    Motor unit synchronization during fatigue: A novel quantification method2009In: Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, ISSN 1050-6411, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 242-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motor unit (MU) synchronization is the result of commonality in the pre-synaptic input to MUs. Previously proposed techniques to estimate MU synchronization based on invasive and surface electromyography (sEMG) recordings have been, respectively, limited by the analyzed MU population size and influence of changes in muscle fibre conduction velocities (MFCVs). The aim of this paper was to evaluate a novel descriptor of MU synchronization on a large MU population, and to minimize its dependency on MFCV. The method is based on the asymmetry of MU action potentials, causing synchronized MU action potentials to skew the monopolar sEMG signal distribution. The descriptor was the skewness statistic used on sub-band filtered monopolar sEMG signals (sub-band skewness). The method was evaluated using simulated signals and its performance was evaluated in terms of bias and sensitivity of the sub-band skewness quantifying the MU synchronization level. The best sensitivity was obtained using sub-band filtering at scale 5 (Mexican hat wavelet). The sensitivity was in general about 0.1 units per 5% MU synchronization level. Changes in MFCV had a minimal influence, and caused at most a 5% deviant MU synchronization quantification level. A halved recruitment level had higher bias and a 20% lower sensitivity. Increased firing rate (14-34 Hz) reduced the sensitivity about 50%. The sensitivity of the descriptor was robust to noise, and different volume conduction properties. It should be noted that the sub-band skewness comprises a subject-dependent component implying that only changes in MU synchronization level can be quantified.

  • 8.
    Hallert, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Schmidt, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jonsson, Dick
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjukdomsförlopp, kostnader och livskvalitet vid nydebuterad reumatoid artrit2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rheumatoid  arthritis  (RA)  is  a  chronic  progressive  inflammatory   disease, associated with tissue destruction and functional disability. The yearly incidence of RA in Sweden is 25/100 000 and the prevalence is 0.5-0.7%, with women being more often affected than men. The economic consequences of the disease are substantial  for the  individual  and  their  families  and  for the society  as a whole.   Previous   studies   have   reported   that   early   treatment   limits   joint destruction and improves functional outcome.

    In 1996 a multicenter study TIRA was started in Linköping in cooperation with 10 rheumatology units and Center for Medical Technology Assessment (CMT) TIRA is the Swedish acronym for ‘early intervention  in rheumatoid  arthritis’. The   main   goal   was   to   obtain   early   diagnosis,   rapid   multiprofessional intervention  and  a  regular  follow-up.  Further,  the  TIRA  project  aimed  at forming  a research  database  and health economic  evaluation  in patients  with recent-onset RA.

    This study describes disease activity, functional ability, direct and indirect costs as well as self-reported health and quality of life (QoL) in patients with recent- onset RA, during the first 3 years after diagnosis.

    320 subjects were enrolled in the study from January 1996 through April 1998, 2/3  being  women.  At  inclusion  most  patients  had  high  disease  activity  and impaired functional capacity. More than half of patients < 65 were on sick leave and a few were already early retired.

    Highly significant improvements were seen within the first 3 months regarding disease  activity  and functional  ability,  but 15% of the patients  had sustained high or moderate disease activity throughout the study period, despite traditional treatment. The scores of ‘Health Assessment Questionnaire’ (HAQ) were similar for men and women at baseline, but had a less favourable course in women, who also had DMARDs  more frequently prescribed,  suggesting  that women might have a more severe disease.

    At inclusion QoL did not differ between groups concerning different housing, marital   status,   income   or  other  socio-demographic   factors.   Most  patients experienced their health as worse compared with others of the same age. During the first 2 years QoL was improved as well as general mobility and ability to perform activities of daily living. During year 3 a slight deterioration was noted.

    The average direct costs per patient during the first year was SEK 36 000 and indirect costs SEK 89 000 (price level of 2001). All direct costs decreased from year 1 to 3, except costs of drugs and surgery which on the contrary increased. Indirect costs were substantially unchanged over the years. Sick-leave decreased but was offset by an increase in early retirement. Indirect costs were 2-3 times higher than direct costs.

    More than 90% of the patients were satisfied or very satisfied with treatment and availability and information from the medical staff in the participating hospitals.

  • 9.
    Hammar, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Persson, Anne-Christine
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Antepohl, Wolfram
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Obituray: Professor Björn Bergdahl - a pioneer in Swedish medical education2010In: Medical teacher, ISSN 0142-159X, E-ISSN 1466-187X, Vol. 32, no 9, p. 788-788Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Professor Björn Bergdahl, MD, one of the founders of the Faculty of Health Sciences (FHS) at Linköping University, passed away in March 2009. He left us all in grief and disbelief. How could we manage without him?

    Professor Bergdahl graduated with a degree in medicine from Lund University and was recruited to the internal medicine clinic at the University Hospital of Linköping in 1968. After completing his postgraduate studies, he began to teach medical students in 1977. This was the start of a life-long commitment to medical education. He was the first clinical teacher in Sweden ever to be promoted to the position of professor on scientific as well as teaching merits....

  • 10.
    Holtermann, A.
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Gronlund, C.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Karlsson, J.S.
    University Hospital, Umeå.
    Roeleveld, K.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Motor unit synchronization during fatigue: Described with a novel sEMG method based on large motor unit samples2009In: Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, ISSN 1050-6411, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 232-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The amount of documented increase in motor unit (MU) synchronization with fatigue and its possible relation with force tremor varies largely, possibly due to inhomogeneous muscle activation and methodological discrepancies and limitations. The aim of this study was to apply a novel surface electromyographical (EMG) descriptor for MU synchronization based on large MU populations to examine changes in MU synchronization with fatigue at different sites of a muscle and its relation to tremor. Twenty-four subjects performed an isometric elbow flexion at 25% of maximal voluntary contraction until exhaustion. Monopolar EMG signals were recorded using a grid of 130 electrodes above the biceps brachii. Changes in MU synchronization were estimated based on the sub-band skewness of EMG signals and tremor by the coefficient of variation in force. The synchronization descriptor was dependent on recording site and increased with fatigue together with tremor. There was a general association between these two parameters, but not between their fluctuations. These results are in agreement with other surface EMG studies and indicate that the novel descriptor can be used to attain information of synchronization between large MU populations during fatigue that cannot be retrieved with intra-muscular EMG.

  • 11.
    Kihlström, L.
    et al.
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Borna, P.
    Skånes universitetssjukhus, Lund, Sweden.
    Björgell, O.
    Skånes universitetssjukhus, Malmö, Sweden.
    Karlander, S.
    Skånes universitetssjukhus, Malmö, Sweden.
    Johansson, A.
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Kling, A.
    Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå, Sweden.
    Walentin, F.
    Universitetssjukhuset, Örebro, Sweden.
    Antepohl, Wolfram
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Nätverk för övergripande studierektorer föreslår kompetensmål för ST-handledare2010In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 107, no 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 12.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Utformning av syntetiska ansikten som kommunikationsstöd.2002In: Vardagsliv ¿ livskvalitet ¿ habilitering: Åttonde forskningskonferensen,2002, Örebro: Örebro läns landsting , 2002, p. 57-59Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Lidestam, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Beskow, Jonas
    TMH KTH.
    Motivation and appraisal in perception of poorly specified speech2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 93-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Normal-hearing students (n=72) performed sentence, consonant, and word identification in either A (auditory), V (visual), or AV (audiovisual) modality. The auditory signal had difficult speech-to-noise relations. Talker (human vs. synthetic), topic (no cue vs. cue-words), and emotion (no cue vs. facially displayed vs. cue-words) were varied within groups. After the first block, effects of modality, face, topic, and emotion on initial appraisal and motivation were assessed. After the entire session, effects of modality on longer-term appraisal and motivation were assessed. The results from both assessments showed that V identification was more positively appraised than A identification. Correlations were tentatively interpreted such that evaluation of self-rated performance possibly depends on subjective standard and is reflected on motivation (if below subjective standard, AV group), or on appraisal (if above subjective standard, A group). Suggestions for further research are presented. © 2006 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 14.
    Lidestam, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Lundqvist, Anna
    Rehabiliteringsmedicinska kliniken, US Landstinget i Östergötland.
    Persson, Lina
    IDA Linköpings universitet.
    Det svenska körprovet ur kognitivt perspektiv: Teoretiska, praktiskt formella och informella begrepp vid bedömning av riskmedvetande2007Report (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Lidestam, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lundqvist, Anna
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Concepts from research literature and practical assessment of risk awareness: The Swedish driving test from the perspective of cognitive psychology2010In: TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH PART F-TRAFFIC PSYCHOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR, ISSN 1369-8478, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 409-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish driving test (SDT) was compared to theoretical concepts found in research literature (CRLs) with respect to the rated importance of the CRLs for the overall assessment of risk awareness and the five specific assessment areas used in the SDT. 116 traffic inspectors responded to questionnaires. Results show that visual search was the CRL given the highest rating, and that the assessment of risk awareness can be conceptualised as assessment of lower-order and higher-order cognitive functions. The assessment areas taxing higher-order cognitive functions were rated as most important for risk awareness, and visual search behaviour can be regarded as the best indicator of higher-order cognitive skills.

  • 16.
    Lundqvist, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Alinder, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Driving after brain injury: Self-awareness and coping at the tactical level of control2007In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 21, no 11, p. 1109-1117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study whether metacognition is a prerequisite for coping at the tactical level of driving. Research design: A consecutive series of 30 drivers with acquired brain injury were assessed concerning cognitive functions and driving performance. In addition the drivers assessed their driving performance through self-rating. Results: On average the drivers had cognitive impairments compared to a healthy reference group. The group that passed the driving test and the group that failed the driving test did not differ in terms of cognitive functions. Neither did they differ in their self-ratings of driving performance. However, the group that failed the driving test significantly over-estimated their performances as compared to the assessments made by the professional driving inspector, while the group that passed the test made more accurate self-ratings. Conclusions: One interpretation of these results is that the group that made a more realistic evaluation of their driving performance were more aware of their cognitive capacity compared to those who failed the driving test. They seemed to have a better ability to adjust their driving behaviour at a tactical level. Thus, the subject's metacognition, awareness of his/her own cognitive capacity, is important for coping with cognitive impairments at tactical driving.

  • 17.
    Lundqvist, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine Linköping University.
    Alinder, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Factors influencing driving 10 years after brain injury2008In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 295-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study long-term consequences of brain injury on health status, driving characteristics and car accidents. To study whether driving 10 years after brain injury was retrospectively related to cognitive functioning and on-road driving performance 10 years before. Research design: A semi-structured telephone interview with 38 patients with sequelae of brain injury and 49 healthy controls was used. Results: Hypertension, heart disease and vascular disorder were the most frequently reported diseases. The patients reported fatigue, irritability, memory and initiative problems. Concentration and vision problems influenced their driving. Patients had more car accidents reported to an insurance company during the observation period than control subjects. Present driving was retrospectively significantly related to neuropsychological test results but not to on-road test outcome 10 years before. Car accidents were not related to neuropsychological test results or to on-road test outcome 10 years back. Half of the dropouts were stroke patients and they performed significantly worse on the neuropsychological tests but not on the on-road test 10 years before. Conclusion: Neuropsychological tests focusing on information processing speed and attention is a useful screening tool for predicting driving competence. Stroke patients are vulnerable if they continue to drive and need to be evaluated for their driving capacity to drive.

  • 18.
    Lundqvist, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Grundström, Kerstin
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Computerized training of working memory in a group of patients suffering from acquired brain injury2010In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 1173-1183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Study short- and long-term transfer effects of a computerized working memory (WM) training programme for patients suffering from working memory deficits after acquired brain injury. RESEARCH DESIGN: A controlled experimental study with a cross-over design. METHODS: A consecutive sample of 21 subjects. Mean age 43.2 years, time since injury/illness onset 37 months (median). The subjects were randomly selected into two groups where one group served as controls. All subjects trained daily for 5 weeks in a computer WM task program. They were followed-up at 4 and 20 weeks after the training. RESULTS: A significant improvement in the trained WM tasks, significant improvements in neuropsychological WM-test results at 4 and 20 weeks after training compared to baseline. Improvement in the subjects rated occupational performance and satisfaction with performance in pre-defined occupational problems. Rated quality-of-life did not change. However, rated overall health increased 20 weeks after training. CONCLUSIONS: Structured and intense computerized WM training improves subjects cognitive functioning as measured by neuropsychological WM-demanding tests, rated occupational performance, satisfaction with performance and rated overall health. The training probably has an impact on the rehabilitation outcome, returning to work, as well as on daily activities for individuals with verified WM impairments.

  • 19.
    Lundqvist, Anna
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Linnros, Hannah
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Orlenius, Helene
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Improved self-awareness and coping strategies for patients with acquired brain injury-A group therapy programme2010In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 823-832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Primary objective: This study evaluates the effects of a group therapy programme for anticipatory self-awareness and coping strategies. Design: The study includes methodological triangulation using three methods to gather data: an overall self-report questionnaire, Self Regulation Skills Interview (SRSI) and focus group interview. Subjects: Twenty-one individuals with acquired brain injury participated in a group therapy programme. Methods: A self-report questionnaire developed and used especially for evaluation of the described intervention was used at the end of the last session of the group therapy programme. The Self Regulation Skills Interview-SRSI, was used within 2 weeks before and after the subjects participated in one group program. Three Focus groups were used as a third method for data collection. The Focus group interviews were accomplished 1 month after each group programme. Results: The individuals increased their self-awareness and strategy behaviour significantly. Participating in the group therapy programme had had an effect on their life and work situation and on their self-confidence. Conclusions: A structured group therapy programme helps patients with acquired brain injury understand the consequences of their neuropsychological deficits, helps them improve awareness of their impairments and helps them develop coping strategies.

  • 20.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Björk, Maarit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Erdugan, Ann-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Hansson, Anna-Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Rustner, Birgitta
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    The effect of shaped wheelchair cushion and lumbar supports on under-seat pressure, comfort, and pelvic rotation.2009In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: A wheelchair seat and position help clients perform daily activities. The comfort of the wheelchair can encourage clients to participate in daily activities and can help prevent future complications. PURPOSE: This study evaluates how a shaped seat-cushion and two different back supports affect under-seat pressure, comfort, and pelvic rotation. METHOD: Thirty healthy subjects were tested using two differently equipped manual wheelchairs. One wheelchair had a Velcro adjustable back seat and a plane seat-cushion. The other wheelchair had a non-adjustable sling-back seat and a plane cushion. The second wheelchair was also equipped with a shaped cushion and/or a detachable lumbar support. Under-seat pressure, estimated comfort, and pelvic rotation were measured after 10 min in each wheelchair outfit. RESULTS: Peak pressure increased with the shaped cushion compared to the plane cushion. No significant difference in estimated comfort was found. Pelvic posterior-rotation was reduced with the adjustable or detachable back-support irrespective of the shape of the seat cushion. CONCLUSIONS: To support a neutral pelvic position and spinal curvature, a combination of a shaped cushion and a marked lumbar support is most effective.

  • 21.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    The effect of rear-wheel position on seating ergonomics and mobility efficiency in wheelchair users with spinal cord injuries: A pilot study2004In: Journal of rehabilitation research and development, ISSN 0748-7711, E-ISSN 1938-1352, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 65-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyzed the effect of rear-wheel position on seating comfort and mobility efficiency. Twelve randomly selected paraplegic wheelchair users participated in the study. Wheelchairs were tested in two rear-wheel positions while the users operated the wheelchair on a treadmill and while they worked on a computer. Propulsion efficiency, seating comfort, and propulsion qualities were registered at different loads during the treadmill session. During the computer session, pelvic position, estimated seating comfort, and estimated activity performance were measured. The change in rear-wheel position affected wheelchair ergonomics with respect to weight distribution (p < 0.0001) and seat inclination angle (position I = 5° and position II = 12°). These changes had a significant effect on push frequency (p < 0.05) and stroke angle (p < 0.05) during wheelchair propulsion. We found no consistent effect on mechanical efficiency, estimated exertion, breathlessness, seating comfort, estimated propulsion qualities, pelvic position, or activity performance.

  • 22.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    User satisfaction with mobility assistive devices: An important element in the rehabilitation process2008In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 551-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. An assistive device often means an evident change in a person's ability, more easy to notice than the effects of most of other types of physiotherapy or occupational therapy intervention. In spite of this, there is very little evidence in this area. Purpose. The objective was to follow-up user satisfaction with and the use and usefulness of rollators and manual wheelchairs. The objective was also to determine any difference in satisfaction between users of the two different types of mobility assistive products. Methods. A random sample of 262 users participated in the study, 175 rollator users and 87 wheelchair users. The Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology - QUEST 2.0 and an additional questionnaire were used for data collection. Results. Overall satisfaction with both types of device was high and most clients reported use of their device on a daily basis. There was a difference in how the users estimated the usefulness and other characteristics as well as some service aspects related to prescription and use of the two types of device. Most users reported not having had any follow-up, however, most users had not experienced any need for one. Conclusions. A standardized follow-up will give rehabilitation professionals continuous and valuable information about the effect of and satisfaction with assistive devices.

  • 23.
    Sandström, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Adults with Cerebral Palsy: living with a lifelong disability2009Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a lifelong disability, the research has mainly focused in children with CP. However, in recent years new studies have examined the different aspects of being an adult with a congenital disability.

    The overall aim of this thesis is to contribute to increased knowledge and understanding in living with cerebral palsy as an adult, with special focus on the lived body and physiotherapy/physical activity.

    The thesis is based on two populations. The first population (study I) consists of 48 individuals with a variation in gross motor function equivalent to the general CP‐population, including all five levels according to a gross motor classification (Gross Motor Function Classification System, GMFCS). The second population (study II and III), consists of 22 individuals, representing level II to IV according to the gross motor classification (GMFCS).

    Study I comprises structured questions and clinical investigations with well‐recognized assessment instruments and are analysed according to quantitative methods. Study II and III are based on in‐depth interviews and are analysed using qualitative methods.

    The overall result is that there is a deterioration of motor function in many individuals already early in adulthood. These deteriorations are preceded and/or followed by musculoskeletal problems such as pain and limited range of motion, often in combination with fatigue. Despite deteriorations many people maintain daily personal activities, but are often forced to prioritize among societal activities.

    The deterioration is often perceived as slow and imperceptible, but it also results in a change in self‐image with new thoughts about otherness and being different. This can be experienced in relation to activity limitations with difficulties in taking part in other people’s activities, but also in relation to attitudes and treatment from other people. The process of deterioration also influences autonomy, with limited ability to determine one’s own daily life.

    Important prerequisites for carrying out physical activity in a longer perspective is that it has to be enjoyable, give effects, be comprehensible and integrated in daily life. In addition it is important with support from competent professionals in health care. Experiences of these prerequisites vary and, above all, in adulthood the lack of competent support is a factor which is illuminated of the majority of the interviewed and assessed individuals.

    List of papers
    1. Descriptions of functioning and health and relations to a gross motor classification in adults with cerebral palsy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Descriptions of functioning and health and relations to a gross motor classification in adults with cerebral palsy
    2004 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 26, no 17, p. 1023-1031Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe functioning and health, and explore the use of the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) in an adult population with cerebral palsy (CP).

    Methods: From a cohort of 199 persons, 48 persons were selected for structured interviews and functional assessments regarding activities of daily living, motor function, range of motion, pain and general health.

    Results: A third of the population had deteriorated in function from adolescence to adulthood according to the GMFCS. The majority were independent in personal ADL, but many of those were dependent in instrumental ADL. Motor function scores reflected problems in walking ability, and limited ROM and pain were common in all functional levels. General health was lower than in a general population. GMFCS seems valid for classifying adults with CP since it is correlated with instruments measuring motor function and ADL in terms of dependence.

    Conclusion: Decreased functional ability and secondary musculoskeletal problems are common in adults with CP and general health can be associated with those problems. It is important to further explore health aspects and relations between health status and self-perceived health. The GMFCS is a useful tool, especially for comparisons throughout the life span, but in order to use in an adult population further development is needed.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis Group, 2004
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16369 (URN)10.1080/09638280410001703503 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-01-19 Created: 2009-01-19 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    2. The lived body: experiences from adults with cerebral palsy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The lived body: experiences from adults with cerebral palsy
    2007 (English)In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 432-441Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To get a deeper understanding into how adults with cerebral palsy experience living with a disability and how they manage daily life.

    Design: Interviews with open-ended questions were carried out. They were analysed by one person according to the Empirical Phenomenological Psychological method (EPP).Setting and subjects : Twenty-two community-living adults (35—68 years) with cerebral palsy from five counties in Sweden participated. All had mobility problems and all had cognitive abilities making it possible to carry on a conversation.

    Results: The varied experiences resulted in themes including (1) perceptions of living with a disability and (2) strategies used for managing the described perceptions. The perceptions were: a dys-appearing body, a not-appearing body, difference, being in-between, normality, restricted autonomy and autonomy. The strategies were: to fight one's way, to plan, to get used to it, to hide and to give one's all.

    Conclusion: These interviews expressed heterogeneity in lived experiences showing the importance for professionals to meet people with cerebral palsy as individual subjects in relation to functional problems, self-image and autonomy together with seeing the consequences of different coping strategies.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Sage Journals online, 2007
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16370 (URN)10.1177/0269215507073489 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-01-19 Created: 2009-01-19 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Prerequisites for carrying out physiotherapy and physical activity: experiences from adults with cerebral palsy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prerequisites for carrying out physiotherapy and physical activity: experiences from adults with cerebral palsy
    2009 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 161-169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to get a deeper understanding into how adults with cerebral palsy (CP) experience physiotherapy and physical activity in a perspective from childhood to adulthood; and how personal and environmental factors influence possibilities for physiotherapy and physical activity.

    Method: Data was collected through interviews with 22 community-living adults (35 - 68 years) with CP, from five counties in Sweden. The questions were open-ended and the interviews were taped and transcribed to written language. The material was analysed through qualitative content analysis, a classification process resulting in different themes.

    Results: The narratives from the 22 informants, based on experiences from childhood to adulthood, resulted in a description of prerequisites for carrying out physiotherapy and physical activity. Five different themes were identified: (i) Being enjoyable, (ii) Giving effects, (iii) Being comprehensible, (iv) Being integrated in daily life, and (v) Supportive healthcare with competent professionals.

    Conclusion: The information from the interviews elucidates the importance of a lifelong support from healthcare professionals. Physiotherapists with attentiveness to different life situations in combination with good understanding and knowledge in CP could facilitate continuous physical activity in people growing up and ageing with CP.

    Keywords
    Ageing, cerebral palsy, healthcare, physical training, well-being
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16371 (URN)10.1080/09638280701850934 (DOI)
    Note
    This is an electronic version of an article published in:Karin Sandström, Kersti Samuelsson and Birgitta Öberg, Prerequisites for carrying out physiotherapy and physical activity: experiences from adults with cerebral palsy, 2009, Disability and rehabilitation, (31), 3, 161-169.Disability and rehabilitation is available online at informaworld:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09638280701850934Copyright: Taylor Francis http://www.informaworld.com/Available from: 2009-03-10 Created: 2009-01-19 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
  • 24.
    Sandström, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    The lived body: experiences from adults with cerebral palsy2007In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 432-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To get a deeper understanding into how adults with cerebral palsy experience living with a disability and how they manage daily life.

    Design: Interviews with open-ended questions were carried out. They were analysed by one person according to the Empirical Phenomenological Psychological method (EPP).Setting and subjects : Twenty-two community-living adults (35—68 years) with cerebral palsy from five counties in Sweden participated. All had mobility problems and all had cognitive abilities making it possible to carry on a conversation.

    Results: The varied experiences resulted in themes including (1) perceptions of living with a disability and (2) strategies used for managing the described perceptions. The perceptions were: a dys-appearing body, a not-appearing body, difference, being in-between, normality, restricted autonomy and autonomy. The strategies were: to fight one's way, to plan, to get used to it, to hide and to give one's all.

    Conclusion: These interviews expressed heterogeneity in lived experiences showing the importance for professionals to meet people with cerebral palsy as individual subjects in relation to functional problems, self-image and autonomy together with seeing the consequences of different coping strategies.

  • 25.
    Sandström, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Alinder, John
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Descriptions of functioning and health and relations to a gross motor classification in adults with cerebral palsy2004In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 26, no 17, p. 1023-1031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe functioning and health, and explore the use of the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) in an adult population with cerebral palsy (CP).

    Methods: From a cohort of 199 persons, 48 persons were selected for structured interviews and functional assessments regarding activities of daily living, motor function, range of motion, pain and general health.

    Results: A third of the population had deteriorated in function from adolescence to adulthood according to the GMFCS. The majority were independent in personal ADL, but many of those were dependent in instrumental ADL. Motor function scores reflected problems in walking ability, and limited ROM and pain were common in all functional levels. General health was lower than in a general population. GMFCS seems valid for classifying adults with CP since it is correlated with instruments measuring motor function and ADL in terms of dependence.

    Conclusion: Decreased functional ability and secondary musculoskeletal problems are common in adults with CP and general health can be associated with those problems. It is important to further explore health aspects and relations between health status and self-perceived health. The GMFCS is a useful tool, especially for comparisons throughout the life span, but in order to use in an adult population further development is needed.

  • 26.
    Sandström, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Prerequisites for carrying out physiotherapy and physical activity: experiences from adults with cerebral palsy2009In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 161-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to get a deeper understanding into how adults with cerebral palsy (CP) experience physiotherapy and physical activity in a perspective from childhood to adulthood; and how personal and environmental factors influence possibilities for physiotherapy and physical activity.

    Method: Data was collected through interviews with 22 community-living adults (35 - 68 years) with CP, from five counties in Sweden. The questions were open-ended and the interviews were taped and transcribed to written language. The material was analysed through qualitative content analysis, a classification process resulting in different themes.

    Results: The narratives from the 22 informants, based on experiences from childhood to adulthood, resulted in a description of prerequisites for carrying out physiotherapy and physical activity. Five different themes were identified: (i) Being enjoyable, (ii) Giving effects, (iii) Being comprehensible, (iv) Being integrated in daily life, and (v) Supportive healthcare with competent professionals.

    Conclusion: The information from the interviews elucidates the importance of a lifelong support from healthcare professionals. Physiotherapists with attentiveness to different life situations in combination with good understanding and knowledge in CP could facilitate continuous physical activity in people growing up and ageing with CP.

  • 27.
    Svensson, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology.
    Ertzgaard, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Forsum, Urban
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Bacteriuria in spinal cord injured patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction2004In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 109, no 1, p. 25-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The occurrence of bacteriuria in spinal cord injured patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction who used clean intermittent catheterisation to empty their bladders was studied in order to examine cut-off concentration breakpoints for significant bacteriuria in this group of patients using procedures of the European Urinanalysis Guideline. 344 samples were cultured, yielding 285 isolates. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (27 %), Enterococci (25 %), Klebsiella spp (19 %), and Escherichia coli (12 %) were the most common findings. Bacteria grew at concentrations of 105-108 cfu/L, but only a few at 104 cfu/L. It is concluded that low bacterial concentrations in the urine (105 cfu/L) of patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction who are on intermittent catheterisation might be as significant for bladder contamination with bacteria as a high bacterial concentration and can possibly be responsible for bladder infections.

  • 28.
    Wissel, Joerg
    et al.
    Kliniken Beelitz GmbH.
    Ward, Anthony B
    Haywood Hospital.
    Erztgaard, Per
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Bensmail, Djamel
    University of Versailles St Quentin.
    Hecht, Martin J
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg.
    Lejeune, Thierry M
    University Catholique Louvain.
    Schnider, Peter
    Landsklinikum Wiener Neustadt & Hochegg.
    EUROPEAN CONSENSUS TABLE ON THE USE OF BOTULINUM TOXIN TYPE A IN ADULT SPASTICITY2009In: JOURNAL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE, ISSN 1650-1977, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 13-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A group of clinicians from across Europe experienced in the use of botulinum toxin type a for the treatment of spasticity following acquired brain injury gathered to develop a consensus statement on best practice in managing adults with spasticity. this consensus table summarizes the current published data, which was collated following extensive literature searches, their assessment for level of evidence and discussion among the whole group. published information is supplemented by expert opinion based on clinical experience from 16 European countries, involving 28 clinicians, who treat an average of approximately 200 patients annually, representing many thousand spasticity treatments with botulinum toxin per year.

  • 29.
    Wressle, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Barriers and bridges to client-centred occupational therapy in Sweden2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 12-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates barriers to client-centred practice and solutions to overcome these barriers as experienced by Swedish occupational therapists. A British questionnaire was translated into Swedish and completed by 97 occupational therapists. The questionnaire consists of three sections: background information, a list of barriers identified in a literature review, and a list of methods to resolve barriers. The results show that the highest ranked barrier was "the therapist does not know enough about client-centred practice". The highest ranked method to resolve barriers was "management and peer support for use of client-centred practice". Introducing client-centred practice takes time, commitment, education, training, interview skills, discussions with colleagues, and reflection on the therapists' own attitudes. © 2004 Taylor & Francis.

  • 30.
    Wressle, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Barriers and bridges to occupational therapy in Sweden2004In: 7th European Congress of Occupational Therapy,2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Wressle, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    User satisfaction with mobility assistive devices2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 143-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, the most common assistive devices are related to mobility. A study was undertaken to evaluate users' opinions on prescription of mobility devices and their satisfaction with devices and services using a cross-sectional design. A random sample of adult users of mobility assistive devices living in three county councils of Sweden was selected. A postal package comprising a questionnaire and QUEST 2.0 was sent out to 400 users of manual wheelchairs, powered wheelchairs, or walkers. Included in the analysis were 208 questionnaires, a response rate of 52%. Most devices were used on a daily basis and satisfaction with the device was high. Satisfaction with the service was scored lower than satisfaction with the device. Follow-up was the single item with the lowest mean score, and 69% of the users reported that they had not received any follow-up. A positive effect especially on users' ability to be active, transport oneself, feel secure, and to take part in social activities was found. Owing to the low response rate the results have to be interpreted with caution. However, follow-up seems to be an area that needs to be improved. The majority of users are satisfied with the device but not with service.

  • 32.
    Wressle, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Henriksson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Responsiveness of the Swedish version of the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure1999In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 84-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a client-centred approach, clients and therapists work together to define the occupational performance problem, the focus of and need for intervention and the preferred outcomes. Application of specific theories or techniques to involve clients in goal-setting may influence the therapist to use a client participation approach. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) presents a structure for formulating the treatment goals identified by the client in co-operation with the therapist. The aim of this study was to test the responsiveness of the Swedish version of the COPM. After translation into Swedish, the COPM was introduced to 21 occupational therapists who performed data collection. A sample of 108 clients within geriatric, neurologic and orthopaedic rehabilitation identified 418 problems at initial scoring and reassessment. Inclusion criteria for patients were the need for rehabilitation interventions and the ability to communicate well enough in an interview. The results indicate that the Swedish version of the COPM is responsive to change, with 73% of the problems identified having a change in score of 2 points or more.

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