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  • 1.
    Alkaissi, Aidah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Kalman, Sigga
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    P6 acupressure increases tolerance to nausogenic motion stimulation in women with high risk for PONV2005In: Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, ISSN 1496-8975, Vol. 52, p. 703-709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In a previous study we noticed that P6 acupressure decreased postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) more markedly after discharge. As motion sickness susceptibility is increased by, for example, opioids we hypothesized that P6 acu-pressure decreased PONV by decreasing motion sickness susceptibility. We studied time to nausea by a laboratory motion challenge in a group of volunteers, during P6 and placebo acupressure.

    Methods: 60 women with high and low susceptibilities for motion sickness participated in a randomized and double-blind study with an active P6 acupressure, placebo acupressure, and a control group (n = 20 in each group). The risk score for PONV was over 50%. The motion challenge was by eccentric rotation in a chair, blindfolded and with chin to chest movements of the head. The challenge was stopped when women reported moderate nausea. Symptoms were recorded.

    Results: Mean time to moderate nausea was longer in the P6 acu-pressure group compared to the control group. P6 acupressure = 352 (259–445), mean (95% confidence interval) in seconds, control = 151 (121–181) and placebo acupressure = 280 (161–340); (P = 0.006). No difference was found between P6 and placebo acupressure or placebo acupressure and control groups. Previous severity of motion sickness did not influence time to nausea (P = 0.107). The cumulative number of symptoms differed between the three groups (P < 0.05). Fewer symptoms were reported in the P6 acupressure compared to the control group P < 0.009. Overall, P6 acupressure was only marginally more effective than placebo acupressure on the forearms.

    Conclusion: In females with a history of motion sickness P6 acu-pressure increased tolerance to experimental nauseogenic stimuli, and reduced the total number of symptoms reported.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Phonological Deterioration in Adults with an Acquired Severe Hearing Impairment1998In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0107-8593, Vol. 27, no 49, p. 93-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study examined the phonological processing skills in a group of adults who have acquired a severe hearing loss in adult life. These severely hearing-impaired individuals performed at a significantly lower level on the rhyme judgement tasks and the letter span task, but on a par with the control group on other cognitive tests. A correlation analysis showed that duration of hearing loss is negatively related to performance on the rhyme judgement tasks and letter span task. The results indicate that the phonological processing skills in individuals who have acquired a severe hearing loss in adult life deteriorates. The results are discussed with respect to theoretical and clinical implications.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Working memory deficit in children with mathematical difficulties: A general or specific deficit?2007In: Journal of experimental child psychology (Print), ISSN 0022-0965, E-ISSN 1096-0457, Vol. 96, no 3, p. 197-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined whether children with mathematical difficulties (MDs) or comorbid mathematical and reading difficulties have a working memory deficit and whether the hypothesized working memory deficit includes the whole working memory system or only specific components. In the study, 31 10-year-olds with MDs and 37 10-year-olds with both mathematical and reading difficulties were compared with 47 age-matched and 50 younger controls (9-year-olds) on a number of working memory tasks. Compared with the age-matched controls, both groups of children with MDs performed worse on tasks tapping the central executive (e.g., visual matrix span) and the phonological loop (e.g., word span). More important, the MD group performed worse than the younger controls on the counting span task, whereas the group with comorbid mathematical and reading difficulties performed worse on the counting span task and the visual matrix span task. These findings provide support for the assumption that children with MDs have a working memory deficit. More specifically, children with MDs have a central executive deficit connected to concurrent processing and storage of numerical and visual information. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxnell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Spens, Karl-Erik
    Cognitive correlates of visual speech understanding in hearing impaired individuals2001In: Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, ISSN 1081-4159, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 103-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the extent to which different measures ofspeechreading performance correlated with particular cognitiveabilities in a population of hearing-impaired people. Althoughthe three speechreading tasks (isolated word identification,sentence comprehension, and text tracking) were highly intercorrelated,they tapped different cognitive skills. In this population,younger participants were better speechreaders, and, when agewas taken into account, speech tracking correlated primarilywith (written) lexical decision speed. In contrast, speechreadingfor sentence comprehension correlated most strongly with performanceon a phonological processing task (written pseudohomophone detection)but also on a span measure that may have utilized visual, nonverbalmemory for letters. We discuss the implications of this pattern.

  • 5.
    Ansell, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Farnebo, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Grénman, Reidar
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, and Medical Biochemistry, University of Turku, Finland.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Thunell, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Polymorphism of FGFR4 in cancer development and sensitivity to cisplatin and radiation in head and neck cancer2009In: Oral Oncology, ISSN 1368-8375, E-ISSN 1879-0593, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 23-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predisposition of the FGFR4 Gly/Arg polymorphism for development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and, furthermore, to examine if the FGFR4 Arg(388) allele can be associated with resistance to chemo-and radiotherapy.

    When analysing 110 tumour biopsies a significant 1.7-fold increased risk to develop HNSCC in individuals carrying the Gly(388) allele (p = 0.026) was found. Moreover a 2-fold increased risk for mates harbouring the Gly(388) allele (p = 0.031) to develop HNSCC was detected. In 39 HNSCC cell lines the role of the Arg(388) allele for radiation and cisplatin sensitivity was investigated. Our results show no rote of the Arg(388) allele for the radiosensitivity (p = 0.996) but indicate a tendency to increased cisplatin sensitivity (p = 0.141). When screening the transmembrane and kinase domains in the FGFR4 gene a novel mutation, probably generating a truncated protein lacking exons 14-18, was found in six of eight selected cell lines.

    Taken together, we have here identified a marker that predicts the risk to develop HNSCC and possibly the sensitivity to cisplatin as well as a novel. mutation in the FGFR4 gene.

  • 6.
    Ansell, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jerhammar, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ceder, R
    Karolinska Institute, Institute Environm Med, Div Biochem Toxicol and Expt Canc Research, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden .
    Grenman, R
    Turku University, Department Otorhinolaryngol Head and Neck Surg, Cent Hospital, Turku, Finland .
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Matrix metalloproteinase-7 and-13 predict response to cisplatin in head and neck cancer in ORAL ONCOLOGY, vol , issue , pp 94-942009In: ORAL ONCOLOGY, 2009, p. 94-94Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 7.
    Ansell, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jerhammar, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ceder, Rebecca
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grafström, Roland
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.
    Grénman, Reidar
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Matrix metalloproteinase-7 and -13 expression associate to cisplatin resistance in head and neck cancer cell lines.2009In: Oral Oncology, ISSN 1368-8375, E-ISSN 1879-0593, Vol. 45, no 10, p. 866-871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concomitant chemoradiotherapy is a common treatment for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Cisplatin is the backbone of chemotherapy regimens used to treat HNSCC. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify predictive markers for cisplatin treatment outcome in HNSCC. The intrinsic cisplatin sensitivity (ICS) was determined in a panel of tumour cell lines. From this panel, one sensitive and two resistant cell lines were selected for comparative transcript profiling using microarray analysis. The enrichment of Gene Ontology (GO) categories in sensitive versus resistant cell lines were assessed using the Gene Ontology Tree Machine bioinformatics tool. In total, 781 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed and 11 GO categories were enriched. Transcripts contributing to this enrichment were further analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) for identification of key regulator genes. IPA recognized 20 key regulator genes of which five were differentially expressed in sensitive versus resistant cell lines. The mRNA level of these five genes was further assessed in a panel of 25 HNSCC cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR. Among these key regulators, MMP-7 and MMP-13 are implicated as potential biomarkers of ICS. Taken together, genome-wide transcriptional analysis identified single genes, GO categories as well as molecular networks that are differentially expressed in HNSCC cell lines with different ICS. Furthermore, two novel predictive biomarkers for cisplatin resistance, MMP-7 and MMP-13, were identified.

  • 8.
    Ansell, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jerhammar, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ceder, Rebecca
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Division of Biochemical Toxicology and Experimental Cancer Research, Karolinska Institution, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grénman, Reidar
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Turku University Central Hospital, Finland.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Matrix metalloproteinase-7 and -13 predict response to cisplatin in head and neck cancerManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To identify gene ontology categories and key regulators with impact on the intrinsic cisplatin sensitivity (ICS) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).

    Experimental design: The ICS was determined in 35 HNSCC cell lines. Three of these cell lines, one sensitive and two resistant, were selected for microarray analysis. Gene Ontology (GO) categories were assessed using the gene ontology tree machine (GOTM) tool, and transcripts included in these categories were further analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) for detection of key regulator genes. A group of key regulators were verified at protein level by Western blot analysis and on mRNA level using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR).

    Results: 781 transcripts were detected as significantly differently expressed for the resistant cell lines compared to the sensitive cell line. A total of ten different categories were enriched in GOTM by these transcripts and a transcriptional profile was made from the 20 key regulators identified in the IPA analysis. Five key regulator genes, apolipoprotein E (APOE), catenin beta1 (CTNNB1), matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7), matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13), and thrombospondin 1 (THBS1), were verified in 25 HNSCC cell lines on mRNA level using qPCR. The results confirmed MMP-7 (p=0.0013) and implied MMP-13 (p=0.058) as potential biomarkers of ICS.

    Conclusions: We conclude that genome-wide transcriptional analysis and appropriate bioinformatics enable the identification of genes with impact on treatment response. Furthermore, we propose MMP-7 and MMP-13 as predictive markers of cisplatin resistance in HNSCC.

  • 9.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery .
    Danermark, Berth
    Espmark, Ann-Kristin
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Möller, Claes
    Steorn, Monika
    Tengstrand, Tomas
    Uhlin, Pia
    Hörselrehabilitering till vuxna. Rapport från expertgruppen för hörselvård2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

      

  • 10.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen
    University of Toronto.
    The emergence of cognitive hearing science.2009In: Scandinavian journal of psychology, ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 371-384Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive Hearing Science or Auditory Cognitive Science is an emerging field of interdisciplinary research concerning the interactions between hearing and cognition. It follows a trend over the last half century for interdisciplinary fields to develop, beginning with Neuroscience, then Cognitive Science, then Cognitive Neuroscience, and then Cognitive Vision Science. A common theme is that an interdisciplinary approach is necessary to understand complex human behaviors, to develop technologies incorporating knowledge of these behaviors, and to find solutions for individuals with impairments that undermine typical behaviors. Accordingly, researchers in traditional academic disciplines, such as Psychology, Physiology, Linguistics, Philosophy, Anthropology, and Sociology benefit from collaborations with each other, and with researchers in Computer Science and Engineering working on the design of technologies, and with health professionals working with individuals who have impairments. The factors that triggered the emergence of Cognitive Hearing Science include the maturation of the component disciplines of Hearing Science and Cognitive Science, new opportunities to use complex digital signal-processing to design technologies suited to performance in challenging everyday environments, and increasing social imperatives to help people whose communication problems span hearing and cognition. Cognitive Hearing Science is illustrated in research on three general topics: (1) language processing in challenging listening conditions; (2) use of auditory communication technologies or the visual modality to boost performance; (3) changes in performance with development, aging, and rehabilitative training. Future directions for modeling and the translation of research into practice are suggested.

  • 11.
    Asker-Árnason, Lena
    et al.
    Section of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Section of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Section of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    The Relationship between Reading Comphehension, Working Memory and Language in Children with Cochlear Implants2007In: Acta Neuropsychologica, ISSN 1730-7503, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 163-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    and profound hearing impairment treated by cochlear implants (CI). In this study we explore this relationship in sixteen Swedish children with CI. We found that over 60% of the children with CI performed at the level of their hearing peers in a reading comprehension test. Demographic factors were not predictive of reading comprehension, but a complex working memory task was. Reading percentile was significantly correlated to the working memory test, but no other correlations between reading and cognitive/linguistic factors remained significant after age was factored out. Individual results from a comparison of the two best and the two poorest readers corroborate group results, confirming the important role of working memory for reading as measured by comprehension of words and sentences in this group of children.

  • 12.
    Bergemalm, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Orebro University Hospital.
    Hennerdal, Sture
    Orebro University Hospital.
    Persson, Birger
    Orebro University Hospital.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Borg, Erik
    Orebro University Hospital.
    Perception of the acoustic environment and neuroimaging findings: a report of six cases with a history of closed head injury2009In: ACTA OTO-LARYNGOLOGICA, ISSN 0001-6489, Vol. 129, no 7, p. 801-808Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conclusion: The main finding was the relation between difficulty in determining the direction of movement of a sound source and frontal lesions and poor working memory. Poor correspondence in some cases between functional findings and imaging findings can be due to the possibility of axonal degeneration as well as plastic reorganization. Objective: The purpose of the present investigation of six cases was to identify auditory, cognitive and neuroimaging long-term sequelae of closed head injury (CHI) with particular focus on environmental sound recognition and moving sound sources. Subjects and methods: Six subjects who had experienced CHI were investigated with auditory tests. Four subjects also completed cognitive testing. CT and MRI were performed. Results: There was a large individual variability of the test results with respect to morphological findings. In five cases with central auditory processing disorders morphological brain damage was demonstrated. Two cases with shortcomings on cognitive testing and with frontal brain lesions demonstrated problems in determining the direction of movement of a sound source. The results may indicate that basal frontal lobe structures play a role in following and determining the direction of movement of a sound source. Two cases had problems with environmental sound recognition; in one left temporal brain lesions were demonstrated.

  • 13.
    Bergemalm, P.-O.
    et al.
    Ahlsèn Research Institute, Örebro University Hospital, S-701 85 Örebro, Sweden, ENT Department, Lindesberg County Hospital, Lindesberg, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Appearances are deceptive? Long-term cognitive and central auditory sequelae from closed head injury2005In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 39-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to examine possible signs of long-term cognitive and/or central auditory sequelae seven to eleven years after a closed head injury (CHI) of sufficient severity to cause scull fracture and/or brain contusion. Another purpose was that this investigation should be carried out in a group of recovered trauma victims with, to the individual, no known or minimal sequelae. A computer-based set of five cognitive tests and three central auditory tests were used in a group of formerly brain-injured patients who considered themselves as well recovered. Most of the participants did not report any signs of cognitive or auditory impairment. Tests of working memory capacity, verbal information processing speed, phonological processing and verbal inference-making ability were used. Auditory brain response (ABR), distorted speech audiometry (interrupted speech), and phase audiometry were used to test central auditory function. The initial severity of brain damage, i.e. status when the patient arrived at the emergency ward, was estimated with Swedish Reaction Level Scale (RLS). Cognitive shortcomings after CHI were demonstrated in a high percentage (59%, 13/22) of the cases seven to eleven years after the injury. Central auditory processing disorders (APD) were also demonstrated in a fairly high percentage (58%, 11/19) of the subjects. None of the correlations between RLS and the results on cognitive and central auditory tests reached statistical significance. However, there was a correlation between cognitive performance and the results on the central auditory tests used in this investigation. Eighty percent (8/10) of those participants with pathologies on ABR and/or phase audiometry and/or IS also failed on one or more of the cognitive tasks, compared to 44% (4/9) among those with no signs of APD. It is possible, many years after CHI, to observe cognitive shortcomings and APD in a relatively high percentage of CHI cases that are subjectively considered to be fairly well recovered. The cognitive tasks used in the study have proved to be a sensitive method to discover cognitive impairments. Long-term cognitive sequelae and APD could not be predicted from RLS scores. © 2005 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.

  • 14.
    Bergendal, Birgitta
    et al.
    Institute Postgrad Dent Educ, Natl Oral Disabil Centre, SE-55111 Jonkoping, Sweden Umea University, Fac Med, Department Odontol, Umea, Sweden .
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Stecksen-Blicks, Christina
    Umea University, Fac Med, Department Odontol, Umea, Sweden .
    Orofacial dysfunction in ectodermal dysplasias measured using the Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening protocol2009In: ACTA ODONTOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, ISSN 0001-6357, Vol. 67, no 6, p. 377-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To screen orofacial function in people with various ectodermal dysplasia (ED) syndromes and compare with a healthy reference sample. Material and methods. The ED group comprised 46 individuals (30 M and 16 F; mean age 14.5 years, range 3-55). Thirty-two had hypohidrotic ED, while 14 had other ED syndromes. The reference sample comprised 52 healthy individuals (22 M and 30 F; mean age 24.9 years, range 3-55). Orofacial function was screened using the Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening (NOT-S) protocol containing 12 orofacial function domains (maximum score 12 points). Results. The total NOT-S score was higher in the ED group than in the healthy group (mean 3.5 vs. 0.4; pandlt;0.001). The dysfunctions most frequently recorded in the subjects with ED occurred in the domains chewing and swallowing (82.6%), dryness of the mouth (45.7%), and speech (43.5%). Those with other ED syndromes scored non-significantly higher than those with hypohidrotic ED (mean 4.6 vs. 3.0; pandgt;0.05). Conclusions. Individuals with ED scored higher than a healthy reference sample in all NOT-S domains, especially in the chewing and swallowing, dryness of the mouth, and speech domains. Orofacial function areas and treatment and training outcomes need to be more closely evaluated and monitored.

  • 15.
    Bruder, CEG
    et al.
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Hirvela, C
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Tapia-Paez, I
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Fransson, I
    Segraves, R
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Hamilton, G
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Zhang, XX
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Evans, DG
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Wallace, AJ
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Baser, ME
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Zucman-Rossi, J
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Hergersberg, M
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Boltshauser, E
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Papi, L
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Rouleau, GA
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Poptodorov, G
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Jordanova, A
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Rask-Andersen, H
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Kluwe, L
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Mautner, V
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Sainio, M
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Hung, G
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Mathiesen, T
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Moller, C
    Pulst, SM
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Heiberg, A
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Honda, M
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Miimura, M
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Sahlen, S
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Blennow, E
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Albertson, DG
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Pinkel, D
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Dumanski, JP
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Karolinska Hosp, Dept Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol & Head & Neck Surg, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Ctr Canc, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA St Marys Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Manchester M13 0JH, Lancs, England INSERM, U434, Lab Genet Tumeurs, F-75010 Paris, France Univ Zurich, Inst Med Genet, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Zurich, Childrens Hosp, Div Pediat Neurol, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Univ Florence, Dept Physiopathol, Med Genet Unit, I-500139 Florence, Italy Montreal Gen Hosp, Ctr Res Neurosci, Montreal, PQ H3G 1A4, Canada Univ Hosp Queen Giovanna, Dept Neurosurg, BG-1527 Sofia, Bulgaria Lab Mol Pathol, BG-1431 Sofia, Bulgaria Klinikum Nord Ochsenzoll, Dept Neurol, D-22419 Hamburg, Germany Univ Helsinki, Haartman Inst, Dept Pathol, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland House Ear Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90057 USA Karolinska Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, SE-41335 Gothenburg, Sweden Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Div Neurol, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Dept Med Genet, N-0027 Oslo, Norway Jikei Univ, Sch Med, Dept Dermatol, Minato Ku, Tokyo 1058461, Japan Univ Calif San Francisco, Ctr Canc, Inst Canc Res, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    High resolution deletion analysis of constitutional DNA from neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients using microarray-CGH2001In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 271-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant disorder whose hallmark is bilateral vestibular schwannoma. It displays a pronounced clinical heterogeneity with mild to severe forms. The NF2 tumor suppressor (merlin/schwannomin) has been cloned and extensively analyzed for mutations in patients with different clinical variants of the disease. Correlation between the type of the NF2 gene mutation and the patient phenotype has been suggested to exist. However, several independent studies have shown that a fraction of NF2 patients with various phenotypes have constitutional deletions that partly or entirely remove one copy of the NF2 gene. The purpose of this study was to examine a 7 Mb interval in the vicinity of the NF2 gene in a large series of NF2 patients in order to determine the frequency and extent of deletions. A total of 116 NF2 patients were analyzed using high-resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) on an array covering at least 90% of this region of 22q around the NF2 locus. Deletions, which remove one copy of the entire gene or are predicted to truncate the schwannomin protein, were detected in 8 severe, 10 moderate and 6 mild patients. This result does not support the correlation between the type of mutation affecting the NF2 gene and the disease phenotype. This work also demonstrates the general usefulness of the array-CON methodology for rapid and comprehensive detection of small (down to 40 kb) heterozygous and/or homozygous deletions occurring in constitutional or tumor-derived DNA.

  • 16.
    Dahlman, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjörs, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Paediatric Habilitation Community Service.
    Could sound be used as a strategy for reducing symptoms of perceived motion sickness?2008In: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1743-0003, E-ISSN 1743-0003, Vol. 5, no 35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Working while exposed to motions, physically and psychologically affects a person. Traditionally, motion sickness symptom reduction has implied use of medication, which can lead to detrimental effects on performance. Non-pharmaceutical strategies, in turn, often require cognitive and perceptual attention. Hence, for people working in high demand environments where it is impossible to reallocate focus of attention, other strategies are called upon. The aim of the study was to investigate possible impact of a mitigation strategy on perceived motion sickness and psychophysiological responses, based on an artificial sound horizon compared with a non-positioned sound source.

    Method: Twenty-three healthy subjects were seated on a motion platform in an artificial sound horizon or in non-positioned sound, in random order with one week interval between the trials. Perceived motion sickness (Mal), maximum duration of exposure (ST), skin conductance, blood volume pulse, temperature, respiration rate, eye movements and heart rate were measured continuously throughout the trials.

    Results: Mal scores increased over time in both sound conditions, but the artificial sound horizon, applied as a mitigation strategy for perceived motion sickness, showed no significant effect on Mal scores or ST. The number of fixations increased with time in the non-positioned sound condition. Moreover, fixation time was longer in the nonpositioned sound condition compared with sound horizon, indicating that the subjects used more time to fixate and, hence, assumingly made fewer saccades.

    Conclusion: A subliminally presented artificial sound horizon did not significantly affect perceived motion sickness, psychophysiological variables or the time the subjects endured the motion sickness triggering stimuli. The number of fixations and fixation times increased over time in the non-positioned sound condition.

  • 17.
    Dahlman, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjörs, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Johan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Jönköping University, Jönköping Sweden.
    Performance and Autonomic Responses during Motion Sickness2009In: Human Factors, ISSN 0018-7208, E-ISSN 1547-8181, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 56-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate how motion sickness, triggered by an optokinetic drum, affects short term memory performance and to explore autonomic responses to perceived motion sickness.

    Background: Previous research has found motion sickness to decrease performance, but it is not known how short term memory in particular is affected.

    Method: Thirty-eight healthy participants performed a listening span test while seated in a rotating optokinetic drum. Measurements of motion sickness, performance, heart rate, skin conductance, blood volume pulse, and pupil size were performed simultaneously throughout the experiment.

    Results: A total of 16 participants terminated the trial due to severe nausea, while the other 22 endured the full 25 minutes. Perceived motion sickness increased over time in both groups, but less among those who endured the trial. Short term memory performance decreased towards the end for those who terminated, while it increased for the other group. Results from the measured autonomic responses were ambiguous.

    Conclusion: The present study concludes that performance, measured as short term memory, declines as perceived motion sickness progresses.

    Application: This research has potential implications for command and control personnel in risk of developing motion sickness.

  • 18.
    Dahlman, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjörs, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundgren, Pontus
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Paediatric Habilitation Community Service.
    Effects of Motion Sickness on Encoding and Retrieval2010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: In this study, possible effects of motion sickness on encoding and retrieval of words were investigated.

    Background: The impact of motion sickness on human performance has been studied with regards to psychomotor functions and over learned skills, as well as to novel situations requiring encoding and retrieval skills through the use of short term memory. In this study, possible effects of motion sickness on encoding and retrieval of words were investigated.

    Method: Forty healthy participants, half of them males, performed a continuous recognition task (CRT) during exposure to a motion sickness triggering optokinetic drum. The CRT was employed as a measurement of performance and consisted of encoding and retrieval of words. The task consisted of three consecutive phases 1) encoding of familiar words; 2) encoding and retrieval of words under the influence of motion sickness; 3) retrieval of words after exposure.

    Results: Data analysis revealed no significant differences in the ability to encode or retrieve words during motion sickness compared with a control condition. In addition, there were no significant correlations between the level of motion sickness and performance of the CRT.

    Conclusion: The results indicate that encoding and retrieval of words are not affected by moderate levels of motion sickness. Application: This research has implications for operational settings where professionals experience moderate levels of motion sickness.

  • 19.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Health and well-being of children and young adults in relation to surgery of the tonsils2007In: Svensk ÖNH tidskrift, ISSN 1400-0121, Vol. 2, p. 42-45Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

        

  • 20.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Health and well-being of children and young adults in relation to surgery of the tonsils2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tonsillectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedures in children and youths. The aim of this thesis was to study children and youths in relation to tonsil surgery with the goal of improving the care, and to describe partial tonsillectomy/tonsillotomy (TT) using radiofrequency technique (RF) (Ellman International) in comparison with the more commonly used total tonsillectomy (TE).

    The thesis covers studies of wo age-groups with obstructive problems, with or without recurrent tonsillitis. Randomization to surgery was done from the existing waiting list; 92 children, 5-15 years old to 49/TT and 43/TE, (I-III) and 76 youths, 16-25 years old to 32/TT and 44/TE (IV-V).

    The first purpose (I, IV) was to compare the two surgical techniques with respect to pain and postoperative morbidity. Pain measures were for the children the Face Pain Scale and for the youths and parents and staff a verbal-pain-rating-scale. From the first day, the TT-groups scored significantly less pain than the TE-groups. The doses of pain-killing drugs (paracetamol and diclofenac) taken were significantly less for the children and youths receiving the TT-surgery, they could stop taking pain-killers sooner, and were back to normal activity three (5-15yrs) or four (16-25yrs) days earlier compared with TE-groups.

    Paper II focused on the child’s behavior (Child Behavior Checklist/CBCL), experience of pain, anxiety (State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory for Children /STAIC), previous experiences of surgery/tonsillitis, and the management of pain. The children scored higher on CBCL than a normative group before surgery, but no connection was observed between CBCL rating and experience of pain reported post surgically. There was no relation between preoperative anxiety and reported pain, but the postoperative anxiety level correlated with pain. The Egroup scored higher anxiety after surgery. Previous experience of surgery or tonsillitis did not influence the postoperative pain. The nurses scored pain lower than the parents/children and under-medicated.

    The second purpose was to compare the long-term effects of TT and TE-surgery after one and three years (5-15yrs) and one year (16-25yrs) (III, IV). The effect on snoring was the same for both TT and TE-groups and the rate of recurrence of throat infections was low after both surgical techniques.

    After one year, all children (TT/TE) showed improvements on CBCL to the same degree and there was no longer a difference between total behavior and normative values. They also scored improvements in health-related quality of life (HRQL) with Glasgow-Children-Benefit-Inventory.

    For both TT and TE, the older group reported lower HRQL preoperatively on all dimensions of Study-Short-Form (SF-36) compared with a normal population. After one year, a large improvement was found in HRQL in both groups and there were no differences compared with a normal population.

    Conclusion: Preoperative obstructive problems, in combination with recurrent tonsillitis have a negative impact on HRQL. Both after TE and TT there are large improvements in HRQL, infections, obstructive, and behavior problems one to three years after surgery, indicating that both surgical methods are equally effective. With fewer postoperative complications, less pain, shorter recovery time, and lower cost, TT with RF should be considered as method of choice.

    List of papers
    1. Pediatric Tonsillotomy with Radiofrequency Technique: Less Morbidity and Pain
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pediatric Tonsillotomy with Radiofrequency Technique: Less Morbidity and Pain
    2004 (English)In: The Laryngoscope, ISSN 0023-852X, Vol. 114, no 5, p. 871-877Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To compare two techniques for pediatric tonsil surgery with respect to pain and postoperative morbidity. The two methods were the partial tonsil resection using radiofrequency (RF) technique (tonsillotomy [TT]) versus traditional tonsillectomy (TE).

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective clinical randomized study in one tertiary care ENT clinic and two secondary care clinics.

    METHOD: One hundred fifty children, between 5 and 15 years of age, were randomized to either TT with RF using the Surgitron Ellman, 1.7 MHz, or regular TE. Randomization was performed from the waiting list, including children with both a history of obstructive problems and recurrent tonsillitis. The TT was performed with a specially made sling electrode using a cut/coagulation mode.

    RESULTS: Forty-nine children were operated on with TT and 43 with TE. There was significantly less bleeding in the TT group, although two cases of primary postoperative bleeding occurred among the TT children and one in the TE group. The pain recordings showed significantly less pain for the TT children from the second hour postoperatively onward, and the TT children were pain free and in school 3 days earlier than the TE group. The TT group had less need of the prescribed drugs (diclofenac and paracetamol). After 9 days, 73% of the TT children were completely healed, but only 31% of the TE children. By that time, the TE children had lost a mean of 660 g, and the TT children had gained 127 g. The effect on snoring was the same for both groups.

    CONCLUSION: RF appears to be a safe and reliable method for tonsil surgery with much less postoperative morbidity than regular TE.

    Keywords
    Tonsils, tonsil surgery, RF surgery, snoring, sleep apnea
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14510 (URN)10.1097/00005537-200405000-00016 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-05-21 Created: 2007-05-21 Last updated: 2009-05-19
    2. Pre-surgical Child Behavior Ratings and Pain Management after Two Different Techniques of Tonsil Surger
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pre-surgical Child Behavior Ratings and Pain Management after Two Different Techniques of Tonsil Surger
    2006 (English)In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 70, no 10, p. 1749-1758Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare child behavior before surgery with experience of pain and anxiety in relation to two techniques of tonsil surgery, to relate previous experiences of surgery/tonsillitis with anxiety and pain, and to compare the children's, parent's and nurse's rating of pain.

    Method

    Ninety-two children (5–15 years) with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and with or without recurrent tonsillitis were randomized to partial tonsil resection/tonsillotomy (TT) or full tonsillectomy (TE). Measures: Parents: Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Children: State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC) and seven-point Faces Pain Scale (FPS). Parents/staff: seven-point Verbal Pain Rating Scale (VPRS). Pain relievers were opoids, paracetamol and diclophenac.

    Results

    These children with SDB scored significantly higher on CBCL than did normative groups, but no connection was observed between CBCL rating and experience of pain. There was no relation between pre-operative anxiety and pain. The post-operative anxiety level (STAIC) correlated with pain. The TE-group scored higher on STAIC after surgery. Previous experience of surgery or tonsillitis did not influence post-operative pain. The TE-group rated higher experience of pain despite more medication. The nurses scored pain lower than the parents/children and under-medicated.

    Conclusion

    SDB may influence children's behavior, but with no relation to post-operative pain. The surgical method predicts pain better than does the child's behavior rating. The nurses underestimated the pain experienced by the child.

    Keywords
    Children; Post-operative pain; Anxiety; Behavior; Tonsil surgery; Anesthesia
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14511 (URN)10.1016/j.ijporl.2006.05.017 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-05-21 Created: 2007-05-21 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    3. Pediatric Tonsillotomy with the Radiofrequency Technique – Long-term Follow-up
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pediatric Tonsillotomy with the Radiofrequency Technique – Long-term Follow-up
    2006 (English)In: The Laryngoscope, ISSN 0023-852X, E-ISSN 1531-4995, Vol. 116, no 10, p. 1851-1857Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Compare the effects of partial tonsil resection using a radiofrequency technique, tonsillotomy (TT), with total tonsillectomy (TE, blunt dissection) after 1 and 3 years. Compare frequency of relapse in snoring or infections and possible long-term changes in behavior among TT children with those in TE children.

    Method: Ninety-two children (5-15 yr) randomized to TT (n = 49) or TE (n = 43) groups because of obstructive problems with or without recurrent tonsillitis. One year after surgery, general health, degree of obstruction, history of infections, and behavior were investigated using two questionnaires, the Qu1 and Child Behavior Checklist, as well as an ENT visit. After 3 years, two questionnaires, Qu2 and the Glasgow Children's Benefit Inventory, were answered by mail.

    Results: After 1 year, both groups were in good health. The effect on snoring and total behavior was the same for both groups, and the rate of recurrence of infections was not higher in the TT group. After 3 years, two children in the TT group were tonsillectomized (4%, 2/49), one because of peritonsillitis and another because of increased snoring. Otherwise, no differences existed between the groups in general health, snoring, or number of infections.

    Conclusion: Removing only the protruding parts of the tonsils has the same beneficial long-term effect on obstructive symptoms and recurrent throat infections as complete TE in the majority of cases. The need for re-operation is low; therefore, it appears inadvisable to follow the current common practice of routinely removing the whole tonsil given its higher morbidity and risk for serious complications.

    Keywords
    Tonsil surgery, tonsillotomy, snoring, behavior, reduced morbidity, immunology, long-term follow-up
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14512 (URN)10.1097/01.mlg.0000234941.95636.e6 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-05-21 Created: 2007-05-21 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    4. Tonsil Surgery in Youths – Good Results with Less Invasive Method
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tonsil Surgery in Youths – Good Results with Less Invasive Method
    2007 (English)In: The Laryngoscope, ISSN 0023-852X, E-ISSN 1531-4995, Vol. 117, no 4, p. 654-661Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Comparison of two types of tonsil surgery for 16- to 25-year-old patients, with respect to primary morbidity, snoring, and recurrent infections after 1 year. Teenagers and young adults are a significant proportion (26%) of the population that receive tonsil surgery each year and appear to suffer more pain than younger children. Recurrent tonsillitis, in combination with obstructive problems, is the main indication for surgery.

    Method: One hundred fourteen patients 16 to 25 years of age were randomized to tonsillotomy (TT) with radiosurgery (RF) (Ellman International) or to cold tonsillectomy (TE). Pain and analgesics were logged until patients were pain free.

    Results: Thirty-two patients were operated on with TT and 44 with TE. The TT group had less blood loss during surgery and no postoperative bleedings, compared with the TE group (2 primary and 4 late hemorrhages). The TT group recorded significantly less pain from the first day, had less need of analgesics (diclofenac and paracetamol), and were pain free and in school/at work 4 days earlier than the TE group. After 7 days, the TE patients had lost a mean of 1.8 kg compared with TT, with no significant weight loss. After 1 year, both groups were satisfied. The positive effect on snoring was the same for both groups. There were few throat infections in both groups.

    Conclusion: TT with RF is an effective method for tonsil surgery for many teenagers and young adults, with much less postoperative morbidity than regular TE. Long-term follow-up is necessary.

    Keywords
    Tonsillotomy, tonsillectomy, radiofrequency surgery, postoperative pain, snoring, recurrent tonsillitis
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14513 (URN)10.1097/mlg.0b013e318030ca69 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-05-21 Created: 2007-05-21 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    5. Long-Term Improvement of Quality of Life as a Result of Tonsillotomy (With Radiofrequency Technique) and Tonsillectomy in Youths
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-Term Improvement of Quality of Life as a Result of Tonsillotomy (With Radiofrequency Technique) and Tonsillectomy in Youths
    2007 (English)In: The Laryngoscope, ISSN 0023-852X, E-ISSN 1531-4995, Vol. 117, no 7, p. 1272-1279Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This is a 1 year follow-up to compare the effects of partial tonsil resection using the radiofrequency technique (RF) tonsillotomy (TT) with total tonsillectomy (TE) (blunt dissection). Obstructive symptoms, tendency for infections, and health-related quality of life (HRQL) were studied and compared with the HRQL data from a normal population.

    Method: The study group consisted of 74 patients (16-25 yr old) randomized to TT (n = 31) or TE (n = 43) with obstructive throat problems with or without recurrent tonsillitis. The Short Form 36 (SF-36) and EuroQul Visual Analogue Scale were used to evaluate HRQL. A questionnaire investigated the degree of obstruction and history of infections.

    Results: Preoperatively, both groups reported significantly lower HRQL in all dimensions of the SF-36 compared with the normal population (P < .05-P < .001). After 1 year, a large improvement (P < .01-P < .001) in both groups in HRQL was found. No differences were found when these groups were compared with the normal population or between the study groups. The effect on snoring was the same for both groups, and the rate of recurrence of infections was low and not any higher in the TT group.

    Conclusion: Preoperative obstructive problems in combination with recurrent tonsillitis have a negative impact on HRQL. Both the TT and TE groups demonstrated large improvements on HRQL, infections, and obstructive problems 1 year after surgery, indicating that the surgical methods are equally effective. With its reduced postoperative complications, less pain, shorter recovery time, and cost reduction, TT with RF should be considered the method of choice.

    Keywords
    tonsillotomy, tonsillectomy, health-related quality of life, Short Form 36, snoring, recurrent tonsillitis
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14514 (URN)10.1097/MLG.0b013e31805559e1 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-05-21 Created: 2007-05-21 Last updated: 2017-12-13
  • 21.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Tonsil Surgery in Youths – Good Results with Less Invasive Method2007In: The Laryngoscope, ISSN 0023-852X, E-ISSN 1531-4995, Vol. 117, no 4, p. 654-661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Comparison of two types of tonsil surgery for 16- to 25-year-old patients, with respect to primary morbidity, snoring, and recurrent infections after 1 year. Teenagers and young adults are a significant proportion (26%) of the population that receive tonsil surgery each year and appear to suffer more pain than younger children. Recurrent tonsillitis, in combination with obstructive problems, is the main indication for surgery.

    Method: One hundred fourteen patients 16 to 25 years of age were randomized to tonsillotomy (TT) with radiosurgery (RF) (Ellman International) or to cold tonsillectomy (TE). Pain and analgesics were logged until patients were pain free.

    Results: Thirty-two patients were operated on with TT and 44 with TE. The TT group had less blood loss during surgery and no postoperative bleedings, compared with the TE group (2 primary and 4 late hemorrhages). The TT group recorded significantly less pain from the first day, had less need of analgesics (diclofenac and paracetamol), and were pain free and in school/at work 4 days earlier than the TE group. After 7 days, the TE patients had lost a mean of 1.8 kg compared with TT, with no significant weight loss. After 1 year, both groups were satisfied. The positive effect on snoring was the same for both groups. There were few throat infections in both groups.

    Conclusion: TT with RF is an effective method for tonsil surgery for many teenagers and young adults, with much less postoperative morbidity than regular TE. Long-term follow-up is necessary.

  • 22.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Long-Term Improvement of Quality of Life as a Result of Tonsillotomy (With Radiofrequency Technique) and Tonsillectomy in Youths2007In: The Laryngoscope, ISSN 0023-852X, E-ISSN 1531-4995, Vol. 117, no 7, p. 1272-1279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This is a 1 year follow-up to compare the effects of partial tonsil resection using the radiofrequency technique (RF) tonsillotomy (TT) with total tonsillectomy (TE) (blunt dissection). Obstructive symptoms, tendency for infections, and health-related quality of life (HRQL) were studied and compared with the HRQL data from a normal population.

    Method: The study group consisted of 74 patients (16-25 yr old) randomized to TT (n = 31) or TE (n = 43) with obstructive throat problems with or without recurrent tonsillitis. The Short Form 36 (SF-36) and EuroQul Visual Analogue Scale were used to evaluate HRQL. A questionnaire investigated the degree of obstruction and history of infections.

    Results: Preoperatively, both groups reported significantly lower HRQL in all dimensions of the SF-36 compared with the normal population (P < .05-P < .001). After 1 year, a large improvement (P < .01-P < .001) in both groups in HRQL was found. No differences were found when these groups were compared with the normal population or between the study groups. The effect on snoring was the same for both groups, and the rate of recurrence of infections was low and not any higher in the TT group.

    Conclusion: Preoperative obstructive problems in combination with recurrent tonsillitis have a negative impact on HRQL. Both the TT and TE groups demonstrated large improvements on HRQL, infections, and obstructive problems 1 year after surgery, indicating that the surgical methods are equally effective. With its reduced postoperative complications, less pain, shorter recovery time, and cost reduction, TT with RF should be considered the method of choice.

  • 23.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Lundeborg, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Child behavior and quality of life before and after tonsillotomy versus tonsillectomy2009In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 73, no 9, p. 1254-1262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Compare two techniques for pediatric tonsil surgery with respect to postoperative pain and morbidity and changes in sleep behavior, health related quality of life (HRQL) and benefits due to surgery. Methods: 67 children (4.5-5.5 years) with tonsillar hypertrophy and obstructive sleep-disordered breathing with or without recurrent tonsillitis were randomized to either regular tonsillectomy (TE) (n = 32) or intracapsular tonsillectomy/tonsillotomy (TT) (n = 35) with Radiofrequency surgical technique (ellman Int.). Before TT/TE, the parents completed a validated Quality of Life survey of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea, the OSA-18 (Obstructive Sleep Apnea-18) and a standardized assessment of their childrens behavior with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Six months after surgery, the parents repeated these measurements, and assessed the health related benefits of the surgery using the Glasgow Childrens Benefit Inventory (GCBI). Results: In the TT group, the children recorded less pain from the first day after surgery onwards, used fewer doses of painkillers and were pain-free 3 days earlier than the children in the TE group. Six months after surgery, there were no significant difference between TT and TE with regard to snoring and ENT-infections. The differences in the total scores and in all the individual domains between the initial OSA-18 and post-surgery scores were all significant (P andlt; 0.0001). The improvement in the total problem score measured with CBCL was also significant (P andlt; 0.01) and there was no difference between the TT and TE children. The improvements in all subscores of the GCBI indicated a significant health benefit of both TT and TE. Conclusions: TT with RF-surgery causes less pain and postoperative morbidity than regular TE and has an equal effect on snoring and recurrent infections. Pre-school children with tonsillar hypertrophy and obstructive sleep-disordered breathing all show an impact on HRQL and behavior before surgery and improve dramatically just as much after TT as after TE. Therefore TT would be considered for treatment of small children.

  • 24.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    LundeborgHammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology .
    Graf, Jonas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery .
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Child behavior and quality of life before and after tonsillotomy versus tonsillectomy2008In: International conference in pediatric otorhinolaryngology,2008, 2008, p. 40-40Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The objective of the present investigation was to compare two techniques for pediatric tonsil surgery with respect to postoperative pain and morbidity and changes in sleep behavior, health related quality of life (HRQL) and benefit due to surgery. Methods: 67 children (4,5-5,5 years) with tonsillar hypertrophy and obstructive sleep related distress with or without recurrent tonsillitis were randomized to either regular tonsillectomy (TE)(n=32) or intracapsular tonsillectomy/tonsillotomy (TT) (n=35) with Radiofrequency surgical technique (Ellman Int) Before TT/TE, the parents completed a validated Quality of Life survey of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea, the OSA18 (Obstructive Sleep Apnea-18) and a standardized assessment of their children-s behavior with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Six months after surgery, the parents repeated these measurements, and assessed the health related benefits of the surgery using the Glasgow Children´s Benefit Inventory (GCBI). Results: In the TT group, the children recorded less pain from the first day after surgery onwards, used fewer doses of painkillers and were pain-free 3 days earlier than the children in the TE group. Six months after surgery, there was no significant difference between TT and TE with regard to snoring and ENT-infections. The differences were all significant in the total scores and in all the individual domains between the initial OSA-18 and post-surgery scores (p<0.0001). The improvement in the total problem score measured with CBCL was also significant (p<0.01) and there were no differences between the TT and TE children. The improvements in all sub scores of the GCBI indicated a significant health benefit of both TT and TE. Conclusions: TT with RF-surgery is a safe method, which causes less pain and postoperative morbidity than regular TE and has a similar effect on snoring and recurrent infections. Young children with tonsillar hypertrophy and different degrees of obstructive sleep related distress all show an impact on HRQL and behavior. All improve dramatically after a tonsillar operation-improving just as much after TT as after TE. Based on these results, TT should be the first choice for treatment of these small children. Support: Financial support from the Research Council of South East Sweden (FORSS).

  • 25.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    LundeborgHammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Speech and Language Pathology.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Mc Allister, Anita
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Speech and Language Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Graf, Jonas
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Oralmotorik, artikulation och livskvalitet. Sexmånadersuppföljning efter tonsillotomi respektive tonsillektomi2007In: Rikstämman 2007,2007, 2007, p. 53-53Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Farnebo, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Predictive markers: for treatment sensitivity in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common cancer world wide. In Sweden approximately 850 new cases are diagnosed each year, and two thirds are men. The past decades of improved treatment strategies have unfortunately not significantly improved the five-year survival rates for this group of patients. Therefore, it is important to rapidly find combinations of new and strong predictive markers for treatment response. Different predictive markers have been investigated for decades, without succeeding in finding means to securely predict response to treatment. Models to combine markers are called for.

    The aim of this thesis was to test multiple predictive markers on both gene and protein level to evaluate their predictive value for radiotherapy and cisplatin response. Furthermore, to combine, and correlate them to treatment response in order to extract the panel of markers that strongest correlated to the investigated treatment. Cell lines derived from 42 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) were used for protein quantification with Western blot and ELISA of the proteins survivin, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Bax, Bad, Bak, PUMA, Heat shock protein 70, MDM2, p53, SMAD4, Cyclooxygenase-2, and Cyclin D1. The expression of the selected proteins was related to the mean expression of normal oral keratinocytes (NOK) from healthy individuals. Furthermore, mutations in the p53 gene, along with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes of p53, MDM2, FGFR4, XRCC1, XRCC3, XPD, and XPC were analysed. To allow a large number of predictive markers on both protein and gene level to be combined and correlated to treatment response, the number of negative points (NNP) model was introduced. Both correlations of sensitivity to radiotherapy and to cisplatin treatment was analysed among the cell lines. In the first paper, including nine cell lines, the panel of EGFR, survivin, and splice site/missense p53 mutations correlated strongest to radioresponse. In paper II, 42 cell lines were used and the combination of survivin, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Bax, COX-2, and the p53 Arg72Pro polymorphism was found to most strongly correlate with radioresponse. In paper IV, the panel correlating strongest with cisplatin sensitivity consisted of EGFR, Hsp70, Bax, and Bcl-2 in combination with SNPs in the DNA-repair genes XRCC3 and XPD.

    The predisposition of the FGFR4 Gly388Arg polymorphism for the development of HNSCC was investigated in paper III. DNA was isolated from 110 tumour biopsies, and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showed that 58% of the individuals in the control group carried the FGFR4 Arg388 allele, whereas the frequency in the tumour group was 45%. The Gly388 allele gave a significantly higher risk of developing HNSCC, suggesting Gly388 to be the risk allele for cancer development. Furthermore, a novel mutation was found in the FGFR4 gene. The influence of this new mutation is however unknown.

    In conclusion, predictive markers for treatment sensitivity need to be combined to receive an accurate prediction of treatment response.

    List of papers
    1. Number of negative points: a novel method for predicting radiosensitivity in head and neck tumor cell lines.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Number of negative points: a novel method for predicting radiosensitivity in head and neck tumor cell lines.
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 453-461Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The present study was aimed at establishing a method that combines multiple factors of protein and genetic changes that enables prediction of radiosensitivity in the head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines. In nine HNSCC cell lines, the quantity of protein expression and the type of genetic alterations were translated into a point system, called the Number of Negative Points. The expression of 14 proteins involved in growth control and/or apoptosis was quantified using a densitometric assessment of Western blots. The blots were adjusted to actin and standardised to normal oral keratinocytes classifying them into four groups depending on the amount of protein expressed (0-3 points). Mutations of the p53 gene were classified into three groups and each mutation was given one point. Since the cell lines each had a known intrinsic radiosensitivity, a multivariate statistical calculation could then be performed to select for the combination of factors having the strongest correlation to radiosensitivity. The strongest correlation of the investigated factors was the combination of epidermal growth factor receptor, survivin and splice site/missense p53 mutations (R=0.990 and P<0.0001). No single factor had a significant correlation to the intrinsic radiosensitivity. Since a significant correlation to the intrinsic radiosensitivity was achieved only when two or more factors were combined, we conclude that a method such as the Number of Negative Points is necessary for prediction of treatment response. We present a novel method to combine factors which enables the prediction of radiosensitivity of HNSCC cell lines.

    Keywords
    Predictive markers, p53, epidermal growth factor receptor, survivin, squamous cell carcinoma
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-19558 (URN)10.3892/or_00000028 (DOI)18636211 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-06-26 Created: 2009-06-26 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Combining factors on protein and gene level to predict radioresponse in head and neck cancer cell lines
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combining factors on protein and gene level to predict radioresponse in head and neck cancer cell lines
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 739-746Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Radiotherapy is the main therapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); however, treatment resistance and local recurrence are significant problems, highlighting the need for predictive markers. In this study, we evaluated selected proteins, mutations, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involved in apoptosis, cell proliferation, and DNA repair alone or combined as predictive markers for radioresponse in 42 HNSCC cell lines.

    METHODS: The expression of epidermal growth factor receptor, survivin, Bax, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, cyclooxygenase-2, and heat shock protein 70 was analyzed by ELISA. Furthermore, mutations and SNPs in the p53 gene as well as SNPs in the MDM2, XRCC1, and XRCC3 genes were analyzed for their relation to radioresponse. To enable the evaluation of the predictive value of several factors combined, each cell line was allocated points based on the number of negative points (NNP) system, and the NNP sum was correlated with radioresponse.

    RESULTS: Survivin was the only factor that alone was significantly correlated with the intrinsic radiosensitivity (r=0.36, p=0.02). The combination of survivin, Bax, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, cyclooxygenase-2, and the p53 Arg72Pro polymorphism was found to most strongly correlate with radioresponse (r=0.553, p<0.001).

    CONCLUSION: These data indicate that the intrinsic radiosensitivity of 42 HNSCC cell lines can be predicted by a panel of factors on both the protein and gene levels. Moreover, among the investigated factors, survivin was the most promising biomarker of radioresponse.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley and sons, 2011
    Keywords
    head and neck tumors, radiotherapy, survivin, Bcl-2 family, p53 Arg72Pro
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-61585 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0714.2011.01036.x (DOI)000296607200002 ()
    Note
    Funding agencies|Swedish Laryng Foundation||County Council of Ostergotland (OLL)||Swedish Cancer Foundation||Foundation of Olle Engkvist||Linkoping University Hospital||Available from: 2010-11-16 Created: 2010-11-16 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    3. Polymorphism of FGFR4 in cancer development and sensitivity to cisplatin and radiation in head and neck cancer
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Polymorphism of FGFR4 in cancer development and sensitivity to cisplatin and radiation in head and neck cancer
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Oral Oncology, ISSN 1368-8375, E-ISSN 1879-0593, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 23-29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predisposition of the FGFR4 Gly/Arg polymorphism for development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and, furthermore, to examine if the FGFR4 Arg(388) allele can be associated with resistance to chemo-and radiotherapy.

    When analysing 110 tumour biopsies a significant 1.7-fold increased risk to develop HNSCC in individuals carrying the Gly(388) allele (p = 0.026) was found. Moreover a 2-fold increased risk for mates harbouring the Gly(388) allele (p = 0.031) to develop HNSCC was detected. In 39 HNSCC cell lines the role of the Arg(388) allele for radiation and cisplatin sensitivity was investigated. Our results show no rote of the Arg(388) allele for the radiosensitivity (p = 0.996) but indicate a tendency to increased cisplatin sensitivity (p = 0.141). When screening the transmembrane and kinase domains in the FGFR4 gene a novel mutation, probably generating a truncated protein lacking exons 14-18, was found in six of eight selected cell lines.

    Taken together, we have here identified a marker that predicts the risk to develop HNSCC and possibly the sensitivity to cisplatin as well as a novel. mutation in the FGFR4 gene.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2009
    Keywords
    Oral tumours, Radiotherapy, Chemotherapy
    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16724 (URN)10.1016/j.oraloncology.2008.03.007 (DOI)000262607900005 ()18487077 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-02-14 Created: 2009-02-13 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    4. Proteins and single nucleotide polymorphisms involved in apoptosis, growth control, and DNA repair predict cisplatin sensitivity in head and neck cancer cell lines
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Proteins and single nucleotide polymorphisms involved in apoptosis, growth control, and DNA repair predict cisplatin sensitivity in head and neck cancer cell lines
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: International Journal of Molecular Medicine, ISSN 1107-3756, E-ISSN 1791-244X, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 549-556Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the possibility of using a panel of proteins and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involved in apoptosis, growth control, and DNA repair as predictive markers for cisplatin sensitivity. For this purpose the intrinsic cisplatin sensitivity (ICS) was determined in 39 cell lines derived from squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck using a colony-forming assay. In these cell lines and in normal oral keratinocytes (NOK), the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), Hsp70, Bax, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, survivin, and COX-2 was determined. Moreover, the p53, MDM2, FGFR4, XPC, XPD, XRCC1, and XRCC3 genes were analyzed for the presence of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Pearsons correlation test showed that EGFR was the only protein that was significantly correlated to the ICS (r=0.388, p=0.015). The combination of EGFR, Hsp70, Bax, and Bcl-2 gave the strongest correlation (r=0.566, p andlt;= 0.001), whereas Bax alone had the second highest influence on the ICS. Furthermore, all four SNPs within genes involved in DNA repair, i.e. XPC, XPD, XRCC1, and XRCC3, tended to influence the ICS. In order to find the combination of factors, on both protein and gene levels, with the highest correlation to ICS, a multivariate statistical calculation was performed. Our results indicate that SNPs in DNA repair genes (XRCC3(241) and XPD751) influence the ICS and together with the expression of EGFR, Hsp70, Bax, and Bcl-2, they could predict the cisplatin sensitivity of head and neck cancer cell lines (r=0.614, p andlt;= 0.001).

    Keywords
    epidermal growth factor receptor, Bax, Bcl-2, heat shock protein 70, DNA repair genes
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-21513 (URN)10.3892/ijmm_00000264 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-10-02 Created: 2009-10-02 Last updated: 2017-12-13
  • 27.
    Farnebo, Lovisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Jedlinski, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ansell, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vainikka, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thunell, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grenman, Reidar
    University of Turku.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Proteins and single nucleotide polymorphisms involved in apoptosis, growth control, and DNA repair predict cisplatin sensitivity in head and neck cancer cell lines2009In: International Journal of Molecular Medicine, ISSN 1107-3756, E-ISSN 1791-244X, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 549-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the possibility of using a panel of proteins and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involved in apoptosis, growth control, and DNA repair as predictive markers for cisplatin sensitivity. For this purpose the intrinsic cisplatin sensitivity (ICS) was determined in 39 cell lines derived from squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck using a colony-forming assay. In these cell lines and in normal oral keratinocytes (NOK), the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), Hsp70, Bax, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, survivin, and COX-2 was determined. Moreover, the p53, MDM2, FGFR4, XPC, XPD, XRCC1, and XRCC3 genes were analyzed for the presence of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Pearsons correlation test showed that EGFR was the only protein that was significantly correlated to the ICS (r=0.388, p=0.015). The combination of EGFR, Hsp70, Bax, and Bcl-2 gave the strongest correlation (r=0.566, p andlt;= 0.001), whereas Bax alone had the second highest influence on the ICS. Furthermore, all four SNPs within genes involved in DNA repair, i.e. XPC, XPD, XRCC1, and XRCC3, tended to influence the ICS. In order to find the combination of factors, on both protein and gene levels, with the highest correlation to ICS, a multivariate statistical calculation was performed. Our results indicate that SNPs in DNA repair genes (XRCC3(241) and XPD751) influence the ICS and together with the expression of EGFR, Hsp70, Bax, and Bcl-2, they could predict the cisplatin sensitivity of head and neck cancer cell lines (r=0.614, p andlt;= 0.001).

  • 28.
    Farnebo, Lovisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Jerhammar, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ceder, Rebecca
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Division of Biochemical Toxicology and Experimental Cancer Research, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grafström, Roland C
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Division of Biochemical Toxicology and Experimental Cancer Research, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vainikka, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thunell, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grénman, Reidar
    Medical Biochemistry, University of Turku, Finland.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Combining factors on protein and gene level to predict radioresponse in head and neck cancer cell lines2011In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 739-746Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Radiotherapy is the main therapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); however, treatment resistance and local recurrence are significant problems, highlighting the need for predictive markers. In this study, we evaluated selected proteins, mutations, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involved in apoptosis, cell proliferation, and DNA repair alone or combined as predictive markers for radioresponse in 42 HNSCC cell lines.

    METHODS: The expression of epidermal growth factor receptor, survivin, Bax, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, cyclooxygenase-2, and heat shock protein 70 was analyzed by ELISA. Furthermore, mutations and SNPs in the p53 gene as well as SNPs in the MDM2, XRCC1, and XRCC3 genes were analyzed for their relation to radioresponse. To enable the evaluation of the predictive value of several factors combined, each cell line was allocated points based on the number of negative points (NNP) system, and the NNP sum was correlated with radioresponse.

    RESULTS: Survivin was the only factor that alone was significantly correlated with the intrinsic radiosensitivity (r=0.36, p=0.02). The combination of survivin, Bax, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, cyclooxygenase-2, and the p53 Arg72Pro polymorphism was found to most strongly correlate with radioresponse (r=0.553, p<0.001).

    CONCLUSION: These data indicate that the intrinsic radiosensitivity of 42 HNSCC cell lines can be predicted by a panel of factors on both the protein and gene levels. Moreover, among the investigated factors, survivin was the most promising biomarker of radioresponse.

  • 29.
    Farnebo, Lovisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Jerhammar, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vainikka, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grénman, Reidar
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Central Hospital and University of Turku and Medical Biochemistry, University of Turku, Finland.
    Norberg-Spaak, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Number of negative points: a novel method for predicting radiosensitivity in head and neck tumor cell lines.2008In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 453-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study was aimed at establishing a method that combines multiple factors of protein and genetic changes that enables prediction of radiosensitivity in the head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines. In nine HNSCC cell lines, the quantity of protein expression and the type of genetic alterations were translated into a point system, called the Number of Negative Points. The expression of 14 proteins involved in growth control and/or apoptosis was quantified using a densitometric assessment of Western blots. The blots were adjusted to actin and standardised to normal oral keratinocytes classifying them into four groups depending on the amount of protein expressed (0-3 points). Mutations of the p53 gene were classified into three groups and each mutation was given one point. Since the cell lines each had a known intrinsic radiosensitivity, a multivariate statistical calculation could then be performed to select for the combination of factors having the strongest correlation to radiosensitivity. The strongest correlation of the investigated factors was the combination of epidermal growth factor receptor, survivin and splice site/missense p53 mutations (R=0.990 and P<0.0001). No single factor had a significant correlation to the intrinsic radiosensitivity. Since a significant correlation to the intrinsic radiosensitivity was achieved only when two or more factors were combined, we conclude that a method such as the Number of Negative Points is necessary for prediction of treatment response. We present a novel method to combine factors which enables the prediction of radiosensitivity of HNSCC cell lines.

  • 30.
    Fransen, Erik
    et al.
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Topsakal, Vedat
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Hendrickx, Jan-Jaap
    Van Laer, Lut
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Huyghe, Jeroen
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Van Eyken, Els
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Lemkens, Nele
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Hannula, Samuli
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. University of Oulu, Finland .
    Jensen, Mona
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Demeester, Kelly
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Tropitzsch, Anke
    University of Tuebingen, Germany .
    Bonaconsa, Amanda
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Mazzoli, Manuela
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Espeso, Angeles
    Cardiff University, UK .
    Verbruggen, Katia
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium .
    Huyghe, Joke
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium .
    Huygen, Patrick
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands .
    Kunst, Sylvia
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands .
    Manninen, Minna
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Diaz-Lacava, Amalia
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Steffens, Michael
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Wienker, Thomas
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Pyykkö, Ilmari
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Cremers, Cor
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands .
    Kremer, Hannie
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands .
    Dhooge, Ingeborg
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Orzan, Eva
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Pfister, Markus
    University of Tuebingen, Germany.
    Bille, Mikael
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Parving, Agnete
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Van de Heyning, Paul
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Van Camp, Guy
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Occupational Noise, Smoking, and a High Body Mass Index are Risk Factors for Age-related Hearing Impairment and Moderate Alcohol Consumption is Protective: A European Population-based Multicenter Study2008In: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, ISSN 1525-3961, E-ISSN 1438-7573, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 264-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A multicenter study was set up to elucidate the environmental and medical risk factors contributing to age-related hearing impairment (ARHI). Nine subsamples, collected by nine audiological centers across Europe, added up to a total of 4,083 subjects between 53 and 67 years. Audiometric data (pure-tone average [PTA]) were collected and the participants filled out a questionnaire on environmental risk factors and medical history. People with a history of disease that could affect hearing were excluded. PTAs were adjusted for age and sex and tested for association with exposure to risk factors. Noise exposure was associated with a significant loss of hearing at high sound frequencies (>1 kHz). Smoking significantly increased high-frequency hearing loss, and the effect was dose-dependent. The effect of smoking remained significant when accounting for cardiovascular disease events. Taller people had better hearing on average with a more pronounced effect at low sound frequencies (<2 kHz). A high body mass index (BMI) correlated with hearing loss across the frequency range tested. Moderate alcohol consumption was inversely correlated with hearing loss. Significant associations were found in the high

  • 31. Graf, J
    et al.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Persson, P
    Käll, L.G
    Ydreborg, K
    Wallqvist, J
    Tonsillotomi med radiofrekvensteknik på barn- effekt på recidiverande tonsillit och snarkning2005In: Svensk ÖNH tidskrift, ISSN 1400-0121, Vol. 12, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Graf, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery .
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    LundeborgHammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology .
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Tonsillotomi på förskolebarn-räcker det?2008In: The Annual General Meeting for the Swedish Society for Medicine,2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

     Under förskoleålder sker en fysiologisk ökning av den sk Waldeyerska ringen med tillväxt av tonsiller och adenoid som del i utvecklingen av barnets immunförsvar Många barn kan under denna tid debutera med obstruktionsbesvär(snarkning och sömnapné). Traditionellt har tonsillerna och adenoiden genom tonsillektomi och abrasio helt avlägsnats för att komma till rätta med dessa symptom, kirurgi förenad med hög postoperativ smärtnivå. På senare tid har tonsillotomi, dvs partiellt borttagande av tonsillerna, återinförts som en något mer skonsam operationsmetod. Immunsystemetpåverkas möjligtvis inte heller i lika stor omfattning. Frågan är om detta ingrepp är tillfyllest på barn som är i den ålder då tonsillerna fortfarande växer? Syftet med föreliggande studie var att jämföra tonsillotomi med radiofrekvenskirurgi med fullständig tonsillektomi på förskolebarn vad beträffar postoperativ morbiditet och långtidseffekt på snarkning och infektionsnbenägenhet upp till två år efter operation med tonsillektomi. 67 förskolebarn(4-5 år)med symtomgivade tonsillhypertrofi randomiserades till reguljär tonsillektomi(TE) eller tonsillotomi(TT) med radiofrekvensteknik. I de flesta fall utfördes samtidigt abrasio. 6 månader efter operationen svarade alla på frågeformulär och 2 år efter operationen bedömdes de åter av ÖNH-läkare. Snarkningen före, direkt efter operationen och vid tiden för läkarbesöket utvärderades då med VAS TT barnen registrerade lägre smärta från första dagen efter operation och var helt smärtfria 3 dagar tidigare än TE-barnen. Sex månader efter operationen förelåg ingen skillnad på grupperna vad gäller snarkning och infektionsbenägehet. Efter två år hade två av de 34 TT-barnen och ett av de 33 TE-barnen blivit re-opererade pga recidiv av obstruktionsbesvär, TE-barnet med reabrasio. Övriga barn i båda grupperna var i stort sett besvärsfria vad gäller snarkning och ingen ökad infektionsbenägehet noterades hos något barn. VAS före/ två år efter operationen var 8,4/1,3 för TE och 8,5/1,6 för TT. Tre av TT barnen hade tonsillvävnad något utanför tonsillogen och hälften av TE barnen hade små tonsillrester i logerna. Cirka 6 % risk föreligger att ett yngre barn som opereras med tonsillotomi för obstruktionsbesvär behöver göra om operationen inom 2 år. Denna risk bör vägas mot den betydligt lägre postoperativa morbiditeten för tonsillotomi jämfört med tonsillektomi.

  • 33. Graf, Jonas
    et al.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Persson, Pekka
    Käll, Lars-Göran
    Ydreborg, Kjell
    Wallqvist, Jan
    Tonsillotomi med radiofrekvensteknik på barn2004In: Svensk ÖNH tidskrift, ISSN 1400-0121, Vol. 1, p. 21-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Grahn Kronhed, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallberg, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Möller, Margareta
    Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro University Hospital.
    Effect of training on health-related quality of life, pain and falls in osteoporotic women2009In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 154-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical inactivity is a risk factor for osteoporosis and fractures. The aim of the study was to see if supervised training would improve health-related quality of life (HRQL), reduce pain and falls in osteoporotic women. Women with established osteoporosis (n=124) were invited to a 1-year, follow-up study. Seventy-three women aged 60-81 years met the inclusion criteria and were randomized to an exercise (E) or control (C) group. A 4-month, supervised group training programme was designed. Participants were studied using HRQL questionnaires, clinical tests and dynamic posturography. Thirty-one women in the E-group and 34 women in the C-group completed the study. The E-group improved in six SF-36 domains and mental component summary (MCsum) index and also in worst pain intensity (p<0.01) after the supervised exercise training. Differences were found between the groups when comparing changes in four SF-36 domains, MCsum and worst pain (p=0.001). Physical activity level decreased in the E-group after the supervised period. Mean time to first fall occurred earlier in the C-group than in the E-group for the first 4 months but the trend did not last for the 1-year follow-up. The study suggests that supervised group training is beneficial for women with established osteoporosis.

  • 35.
    Hagert, Britt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Wahren, Lis Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology.
    Wikblad, K
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hälsorelaterad livskvalité hos personer opererade för snarkning1999In: Hälso- och sjukvårdsstämman,1999, Stockholm: Vårdförb. SHSTF , 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Hammar, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Asp, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Maller, Rolf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    A new program for better clinical supervision of students. A joint project at the Halsouniversitet and county council in Ostergotland2006In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 103, p. 649-654Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Hammar, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Asp, Malin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Maller, Rolf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Ny handlingsplan för bättre klinisk handledning av studenter.2006In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 103, p. 649-654Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

        

  • 38. Hanna, S
    et al.
    Nordstrand, P
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Effects of mental and muscular load on human equilibrium as measured by chaos analysis2007In: ACTA ORL/Técnicas em Otorrinolaringologia, ISSN 1809-8770, Vol. 25, p. 37-42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Hansson, Kristina
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Sahlen, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Can a 'single hit' cause limitations in language development? A comparative study of Swedish children with hearing impairment and children with specific language impairment2007In: International journal of language and communication disorders, ISSN 1368-2822, E-ISSN 1460-6984, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 307-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies of language in children with mild-to-moderate hearing impairment (HI) indicate that they often have problems in phonological short-term memory (PSTM) and that they have linguistic weaknesses both in vocabulary and morphosyntax similar to children with specific language impairment (SLI). However, children with HI may be more likely than children with SLI to acquire typical language skills as they get older. It has been suggested that the more persisting problems in children with SLI are due to a combination of factors: perceptual, cognitive and/or linguistic.

    Aims: The main aim of this study was to explore language skills in children with HI in comparison with children with SLI, and how children with both HI and language impairment differ from those with non-impaired spoken language skills.

    Methods & Procedures: PSTM, output phonology, lexical ability, receptive grammar and verb morphology were assessed in a group of children with mild-to-moderate HI (n = 11) and a group of children with SLI (n = 12) aged 5 years 6 months to 9 years 0 months.

    Outcomes & Results: The HI group tended to score higher than the SLI group on the language measures, although few of the differences were significant. The children with HI had their most obvious weaknesses in PSTM, vocabulary, receptive grammar and inflection of novel verbs. The subgroup of children with HI (five out of 10) who also showed evidence of grammatical output problems was significantly younger than the remaining children with HI. Correlation analysis showed that the language variables were not associated with age, whereas hearing level was associated with PSTM.

    Conclusions: Children with HI are at risk for at least a delay in lexical ability, receptive grammar and grammatical production. The problems seen in the HI group might be explained by their low-level perceptual deficit and weak PSTM. For the SLI group the impairment is more severe. From a clinical perspective an important conclusion is that the language development in children with even mild-to-moderate HI deserves attention and support.

     

  • 40.
    Harder, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Sarberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Relationship between restless legs syndrome and snoring during pregnancy2008In: JOURNAL OF SLEEP RESEARCH,ISSN 0962-1105: Volume 17, 2008, Vol. 17, p. 114-114Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Harder, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Sarberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Snoring during pregnancy and its relation to pre-eclampsia2008In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 17, no Supplements 1, p. 159-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Does snoring during pregnancy influence development of pre-eclampsia?

    Method: Five hundred and three pregnant women were presented a questionnaire concerning snoring, daytime sleepiness and edema. Epworth Sleepiness score (ESS) and symptoms of restless legs syndrome were also included. The questionnaire was presented in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd trimester and blood pressure was recorded. Women snoring often-always at visit 2 and/or 3 were denoted habitual snorers, those snoring never-seldom non-snorers and there was also a category occasional snorers. Habitual snorers were offered a sleep respiratory recording (Embletta); 34 volunteered.

    Results: 36/503 women (7,2%) snored habitually already at the first visit. At the end of pregnancy the fraction had increased to 19,5%. At the first visit BMI of habitual snorers was 25,3 compared to 22,9 for non-snorers (s.), but there was no difference concerning increase during pregnancy. Habitual snorers reported more edema at visit 2 and 3, higher scores in morning and daytime tiredness and ESS score compared to non-snorers at all visits (s.). Their systolic blood pressure increased more (s.) already between 1st and 2nd visit. Weight and Apgar scores of the newborns showed no difference. Pre-eclampsia developed in 18 women, twice as common among habitual snorers than in those snoring never-occasionally (n.s.). Their snoring scores were higher at all visits; the greatest difference at visit 3 (P50,058). Their diastolic pressure increased more already at the 2nd visit (s.), they had more edema and higher increase in BMI (s.). ESS and tiredness scores did not differ. 9/34 sleep recordings showed supine AHI 45. Two women who later developed pre-eclampsia were recorded; both had supine AHI 45.

    Conclusions: Habitual snorers had higher BMI from start, more daytime tiredness, higher ESS scores and their diastolic blood pressure increased more already during early pregnancy. Preeclampsia was twice as common among snorers as non-snorers; not significant due to the low number of cases. The relation between pre-eclampsia and snoring therefore remains elusive.

  • 42.
    Hedin-Skogman, Barbro
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Croner, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Acute facial palsy in children - a 2-year follow-up study with focus on Lyme neuroborreliosis2003In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, Vol. 67, no 6, p. 597-602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Acute facial palsy in children is believed to be a rather benign neurological condition. Follow-up-studies are sparse, especially including a thorough otoneurological re-examination. The aim of this study was to examine children with a history of facial palsy in order to register the incidence of complete recovery and the severity and nature of sequelae. We also wanted to investigate whether there was a correlation between sequelae and Lyme Borreliosis, treatment or other health problems.

    Methods: Twenty-seven children with a history of facial palsy were included. A re-examination was performed by an Ear-Nose-Throat (ENT) specialist 1–2.9 years (median 2) after the acute facial palsy. The otoneurological examination included grading the three branches of the facial nerve with the House-Brackman score, otomicroscopy and investigation with Frenzel glasses. A paediatrician interviewed the families. Medical files were analysed.

    Result: The incidence of complete recovery was 78% at the 2-year follow-up. In six out of 27 children (22%), the facial nerve function was mildly or moderately impaired. Four children reported problems with tear secretion and pronunciation. There was no correlation between sequelae after the facial palsy and gender, age, related symptoms, Lyme neuroborreliosis (NB), treatment, other health problems or performance.

    Conclusion: One fifth of children with an acute facial palsy get a permanent dysfunction of the facial nerve. Other neurological symptoms or health problems do not accompany the sequelae of the facial palsy. Lyme NB or treatment seems to have no correlation to clinical outcome. Factors of importance for complete recovery after an acute facial palsy are still not known.

  • 43. Hellquist, Henrik B.
    et al.
    Sundelin, Kaarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    DiBacco, A.
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, Milan University School of Medicine, Milan, Italy.
    Tytor, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Manzotti, Michela
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, Milan University School of Medicine, Milan, Italy.
    Viale, Giuseppe J.
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, Milan University School of Medicine, Milan, Italy.
    Tumour growth fraction and apoptosis in salivary gland acinic cell carcinomas: Prognostic implications of Ki-67 and bcl-2 expression and of in situ end labelling (TUNEL)1997In: The Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0031-3025, Vol. 181, no 3, p. 323-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    bcl-2 protein and Ki-67 (MIB-1) were studied in 32 acinic cell carcinomas (ACCs), all with a minimum of 5 years' clinical follow-up. Tumour apoptosis was evaluated by TdT dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) and by morphological criteria. Five patients died of their disease. Patients with stage I tumours had significantly better survival compared with other stages (P<0·05). Patients with MIB-1-negative tumours had significantly better survival than patients with MIB-1-positive tumours (P=0·05). This study confirms a previous report that MIB-1 is an independent prognostic factor for survival in patients with ACC. Stage I tumours had high expression of bcl-2 protein, but there was no difference when compared with other stages. TUNEL positivity was most prevalent in stage I tumours, compared with stages II, III, and IV (P<0·05), probably indicating more apoptosis. This could imply a capacity of stage I tumours ('early tumours') for early selection of tumour cells for elimination by apoptosis. There was no significant difference between expression of bcl-2 and TUNEL, between these parameters and clinical outcome, or between any parameter and morphological subclassification. We conclude that MIB-1 has prognostic value in ACC. Clinical staging, bcl-2, and TUNEL are also potentially useful as prognostic markers.

  • 44. Hendrickx, Jan-Jaap
    et al.
    Huyghe, Jeroen
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Demeester, Kelly
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Topsakal, Velat
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Van Eyken, Els
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Fransen, Erik
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. University of Oulu, Finland.
    Hannula, Samuli
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Jensen, Mona
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Tropitzsch, A.
    Bonaconsa, Amanda
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Mazzoli, Manuela
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Espesp, Angeles
    University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK .
    Verbruggen, Katia
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium.
    Huyghe, Joke
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium.
    Huygen, Patrick
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands .
    Kremer, Hannie
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands .
    Kunst, Sylvia
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands .
    Manninen, Minna
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Diaz-Lacava, AN
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Steffens, Michael
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Parving, Agnete
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Pyykkö, Ilmari
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Dhooge, Ingeborg
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK .
    Orzan, Eva
    University of Padova, Italy.
    Pfister, Markus
    University of Tuebingen, Germany.
    Bille, Mikael
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Cremers, Cor
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands.
    Van Laer, Lut
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Van Camp, Guy
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Wienker, Thomas
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Van de Heyning, Paul
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Familial aggregation of tinnitus: a European multicentre study2007In: B-ENT, ISSN 0001-6497, Vol. 3, no Suppl. 7 7, p. 51-60Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION AND AIM:

    Tinnitus is a common condition affecting approximately 20% of the older population. There is increasing evidence that changes in the central auditory system following cochlear malfunctioning are responsible for tinnitus. To date, few investigators have studied the influence of genetic factors on tinnitus. The present report investigates the presence of a familial effect in tinnitus subjects.

    METHODS:

    In a European multicentre study, 198 families were recruited in seven European countries. Each family had at least 3 siblings. Subjects were screened for causes of hearing loss other than presbyacusis by clinical examination and a questionnaire. The presence of tinnitus was evaluated with the question "Nowadays, do you ever get noises in your head or ear (tinnitus) which usually last longer than five minutes". Familial aggregation was tested using three methods: a mixed model approach, calculating familial correlations, and estimating the risk of a subject having tinnitus if the disorder is present in another family member.

    RESULTS:

    All methods demonstrated a significant familial effect for tinnitus. The effect persisted after correction for the effect of other risk factors such as hearing loss, gender and age. The size of the familial effect is smaller than that for age-related hearing impairment, with a familial correlation of 0.15.

    CONCLUSION:

    The presence of a familial effect for tinnitus opens the door to specific studies that can determine whether this effect is due to a shared familial environment or the involvement of genetic factors. Subsequent association studies may result in the identification of the factors responsible. In addition, more emphasis should be placed on the effect of role models in the treatment of tinnitus.

     

  • 45.
    Hergils, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Analysis of measurements from the first Swedish universal neonatal hearing screening program2007In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 46, no 11, p. 680-685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses results from the first Swedish UNHS program. It includes over 33 000 measurement files from 14 287 children at two maternity wards. The screening program uses a two-stage TEOAE test procedure. A database was created in MedLog after data transformation in Word and Excel. The coverage rate was 99.1%. Bilateral pass rate after retesting was 97.0%. A unilateral pass criterion would have resulted in 1268 fewer children (9.0% of target group) for retesting and 231 fewer children (1.6% of target group) for diagnostic evaluation. When the first test was performed on the day the child was born, the pass rate was 64.8%, the pass rate increased to 89.2% when testing≥3 days after birth. High coverage rates and pass rates were found to be possible, independent of the number of children born at the maternity ward. Learning curves were observed in the program with improvements distributed over time. Test performance was clearly better when the children were tested day two after birth or later. © 2007 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.

  • 46.
    Hergils, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Analysis of the results from the first universal neonatal hearing screening program in Sweden2004In: NHS2004 - The International Conference on Newborn Hearing Screening, Diagnosis and Intervention,2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Hergils, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hörselscreening: Hög tid testa alla nyfödda!2006In: Audionytt, ISSN 0347-6308, Vol. 1-2, p. 30-31Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Hugosson, Svante
    et al.
    Öron Örebro.
    Tjell, Carsten
    Öron Skövde.
    Karlberg, Mikael
    Öron Lund.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, RC - Rekonstruktionscentrum, ÖNH - Öron- Näsa- Halskliniken.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Cervikogen yrsel - eller fobisk postural vertigo (spänningsyrsel)--- Vanlig yrselorsak men omöjlig att diagnostisera?2003In: Svensk ÖNH tidskrift, ISSN 1400-0121, Vol. 10, p. 16-18Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

      

  • 49.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hur ofta opererar vi migrän?2006In: Svensk ÖNH tidskrift, ISSN 1400-0121, Vol. 13, p. 13-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    I en sal på lasarettet...2006In: Smittnytt : information från smittskyddet och mikrobiologen, Vol. 42Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

             

1234 1 - 50 of 179
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