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  • 1.
    Bergström, G
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg / Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Berglund, G
    Lund University.
    Blomberg, A
    Umeå University.
    Brandberg, J
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital / University of Gothenburg.
    Engström, G
    Lund University.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Eriksson, M
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    de Faire, U
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm / Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Flinck, A
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Stockholm / University of Gothenburg.
    Hansson, M G
    Uppsala University.
    Hedblad, B
    Lund University.
    Hjelmgren, O
    University of Gothenburg / Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Janson, C
    Uppsala University.
    Jernberg, T
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm / Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Johnsson, Å
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg / University of Gothenburg.
    Johansson, L
    Unit of Radiology.
    Lind, L
    Uppsala University.
    Löfdahl, C-G
    Lund University / Lund University Hospital.
    Melander, O
    Lund University / Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Persson, M
    Lund University / Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Sandström, A
    Umeå University.
    Schmidt, C
    University of Gothenburg.
    Söderberg, S
    Umeå University.
    Sundström, J
    Uppsala University / Uppsala Clinical Resarch Centre.
    Toren, K
    University of Gothenburg.
    Waldenström, A
    Umeå University Hospital.
    Wedel, H
    Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg.
    Vikgren, J
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg / University of Gothenburg.
    Fagerberg, B
    University of Gothenburg.
    Rosengren, A
    University of Gothenburg.
    The Swedish CArdioPulmonary BioImage Study: objectives and design2015In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 278, no 6, p. 645-659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiopulmonary diseases are major causes of death worldwide, but currently recommended strategies for diagnosis and prevention may be outdated because of recent changes in risk factor patterns. The Swedish CArdioPulmonarybioImage Study (SCAPIS) combines the use of new imaging technologies, advances in large-scale 'omics' and epidemiological analyses to extensively characterize a Swedish cohort of 30 000 men and women aged between 50 and 64 years. The information obtained will be used to improve risk prediction of cardiopulmonary diseases and optimize the ability to study disease mechanisms. A comprehensive pilot study in 1111 individuals, which was completed in 2012, demonstrated the feasibility and financial and ethical consequences of SCAPIS. Recruitment to the national, multicentre study has recently started.

  • 2.
    Blomstrand, Peter
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Engvall, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Maret, Eva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Maret-Ouda, John
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Left ventricular diastolic function, assessed by echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging, is a strong predictor of cardiovascular events, superior to global left ventricular longitudinal strain, in patients with type 2 diabetes.2015In: European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 1000-1007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim of the study was to determine whether left ventricular systolic function, in terms of global left ventricular longitudinal strain (GLS), and diastolic function, expressed as the ratio between early diastolic transmitral flow and mitral annular motion velocities (E/e'), can predict cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: We prospectively investigated 406 consecutive patients, aged 55-65 years, with diabetes mellitus, who participated in the CARDIPP study. Echocardiography, pulse pressure (pp), and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were analysed. Twelve cases of myocardial infarction and seven cases of stroke were identified during the follow-up period of 67 ± 17 months. Univariate Cox regression analysis showed that E/e' was a strong predictor of cardiovascular events (hazards ratio 1.12; 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.18, P < 0.001). E/e' was prospectively associated with cardiovascular events independent of age, sex, GLS, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), pp, and HbA1c in multivariate analysis. Receiver operating characteristic curves showed that E/e' and HbA1c were the strongest predictors for cardiovascular events, both having an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.71 followed by LVEF with an AUC of 0.65 and GLS of 0.61. In a Kaplan-Meyer analysis, the cumulative probability of an event during the follow-up period was 8.6% for patients with an E/e' ratio >15 compared with 2.6% for patients with E/e' ≤15, P = 0.011.

    CONCLUSION: In middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes, E/e' is a strong predictor of myocardial infarction and stroke, comparable with HbA1c and superior to GLS and LVEF.

  • 3.
    Borgstrom Bolmsjo, Beata
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Ulf
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Molstad, Sigvard
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Midlov, Patrik
    Lund University, Sweden.
    The nutritional situation in Swedish nursing homes - A longitudinal study2015In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 128-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poor nutritional status is widespread among the elderly and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to longitudinally describe the nutritional status in elderly people living in nursing homes. Nutritional status was recorded longitudinally in elderly people living in 11 different nursing homes in Sweden. Participants were examined at baseline by specially trained nurses who also assisted with questionnaires and collected data for current medical treatment from patient records. Nutritional status was evaluated at baseline and after 24 months with the mini nutritional assessment (MNA). The study included 318 subjects. The mean age of the participants was 85.0 years (range 65-101). At baseline, 41.6% were well nourished, 40.3% at risk of malnutrition, and 17.7% malnourished according to the MNA. Survival was significantly lower in the malnourished group. After 24 months, almost half of the population had died. The group of participants who survived at 24 months represents a population of better nutritional state, where 10.6% were malnourished at baseline increasing to 24.6% after 24 months. After 24 months, 38.7% of the participants showed a decline in nutritional state. The group with deteriorating MNA scores had higher weight, BMI values, and a higher hospitalization rate. The prevalence of malnutrition in nursing home residents increased over time and it is important to evaluate nutritional state regularly. Nutritional interventions should be considered in better nourished groups, as well as in malnourished individuals, to prevent a decline in nutritional state.

  • 4.
    Borgstrom Bolmsjo, Beata
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Molstad, Sigvard
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Midlov, Patrik
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Prevalence and treatment of heart failure in Swedish nursing homes2013In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 13, no 118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Since the burden of care for elderly patients with heart failure (HF) can be decreased by therapeutic measures, it is important that such patients are identified correctly. This study explores the prevalence of HF in nursing homes in Sweden, with special consideration of the risk of failure to diagnose HF in the study population. A second aim is to explore medication and the adherence to guidelines for the treatment of HF. Methods: 429 patients from 11 nursing homes were included during 2008-2011. Information about diagnoses and medications from patient records, blood samples, questionnaire responses and blood pressure measurements were collected. The baseline characteristics of the patients, their medications and one-year mortality were identified and then compared regarding HF diagnosis and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. A BNP level of greater than 100 ng/L was used to identify potential cases of HF. Results: The point prevalence of HF diagnosis in the medical records in the study population was 15.4%. With the recommended cut-off value for BNP, up to 196 subjects in the study population (45.7%) qualified for further screening of potential HF. The subjects in the HF and non-HF groups were similar with the exception of mean age, BNP levels and Mini Mental State Examination results which were higher in the HF group, and the eGFR and blood pressure, which were lower when HF. The subjects with higher BNP values were older and had lower eGFR, Hb, diastolic blood pressure and BMI. The subjects with HF diagnoses were in many cases not treated according to the guidelines. Loop diuretics were often used without concomitant ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. The subjects without HF diagnoses in the medical records at inclusion but with BNP values greater than 100 ng/L had less appropriate HF medication. The one-year mortality was 52.9% in the population with HF. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the estimated prevalence of HF in nursing homes in Sweden would increase if BNP measurements were used to select patients for further examinations. The pharmacological treatment of HF varied substantially, as did adherence to guidelines.

  • 5.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindberg, Malou
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Experiences of the implementation of a tool for lifestyle intervention in primary health care: a qualitative study among managers and professional groups2011In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 11, no 195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:In recent years there has been increasing interest in transferring new knowledge into health care practices, a process often referred to as implementation. The various subcultures that exist among health care workers may be an obstacle in this process. The aim of this study was to explore how professional groups and managers experienced the implementation of a new tool for lifestyle intervention in primary health care (PHC). The computer-based tool was introduced with the intention of facilitating the delivery of preventive services.

    Methods:Focus group interviews with staff and individual interviews with managers at six PHC units in the southeast of Sweden were performed 9 months after the introduction of the new working tool. Staff interviews were conducted in groups according to profession, and were analysed using manifest content analysis. Experiences and opinions from the different staff groups and from managers were analysed.

    Results: Implementation preconditions, opinions about the lifestyle test, and opinions about usage were the main areas identified. In each of the groups, managers and professionals, factors related to the existing subcultures seemed to influence their experiences of the implementation. Managers were visionary, GPs were reluctant, nurses were open, and nurse assistants were indifferent.

    Conclusion: This study indicates that the existing subcultures in PHC influence how the implementation of an innovation is perceived by managers and the different professionals. In PHC, an organization with several subcultures and an established hierarchical structure, an implementation strategy aimed at all groups did not seem to result in a successful uptake of the new method.

  • 6.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andreasson, Thomas
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg.
    Cinthio, Magnus
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Is there an underestimation of intima-media thickness based on M-mode ultrasound technique in the abdominal aorta?2012In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measuring intima-media thickness (IMT) in the common carotid artery (CCA) is a valuable resource for the evaluation of subclinical atherosclerosis. The main objective of this study was to explore whether a B-mode ultrasound technique, Philips ATL, and an M-mode ultrasound technique, Wall Track System (WTS), show interchangeable results when measured in CCA and the abdominal aorta (AA). A total of 24 healthy, young subjects were examined. IMT and lumen diameter (LD) of the AA and the CCA were measured twice by two skilled ultrasonographers with two different ultrasound equipment B-mode: (Philips, ATL and M-mode: WTS).The intra-observer variability of IMT in CCA and AA using B-mode showed a coefficient of variation 8% and 9%, and with M-mode 11% and 15%, respectively. Interobserver variability of IMT in CCA and AA using B-mode was 6% and 12%, and with M-mode 11% and 18%, respectively. CCA IMT was 0·53 ± 0·07 and 0·53 ± 0·09 mm using B-mode and M-mode, respectively. However, in AA, IMT was 0·61 ± 0·5 and 0·54 ± 0·10 mm using B-mode and M-mode, respectively. Thus, AA IMT was 11·5% thicker using B-mode (P<0·01). We received adequate IMT readings from the carotid artery as well as the AA using two commonly used B-mode and M-mode techniques. B-mode technique seems to show less variability, especially in the AA. More importantly, the two techniques measured different IMT thickness in the aorta, emphasizing the importance of using similar technique when comparing the impact of absolute values of IMT on cardiovascular disease.

  • 7.
    Davidsson, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Stratelis, Georgios
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Acevedo, F.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Schmekel, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Can we predict development of COPD?2008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cigarette smoking is one of the main causes of chronic obstructive pulmonarydisease (COPD). Chronic inflammation of airways may start years before manifestation ofclinical symptoms, thus early identification of smokers at risk to develop COPD is crucial.Objectives: To evaluate if a single breath test for diffusion capacity (DLCO) or concentrationsof certain biomarkers in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), saliva or serum could identifysubjects with COPD or non-COPD smokers and ex-smokers supposed to be at risk to developCOPD, as suggested by rapid decline of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) during afive year period.

    Methods: Twenty-nine symptom free smokers/ex-smokers, 16 smokers/ex-smokers with COPDand 19 matched healthy non-smoking volunteers were studied by means of spirometry, DLCO,and analyses of EBC, saliva and serum [chlorine, lysozyme, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP)and myeloperoxidase (MPO)]. Area under a receiver operated curve (AUCROC) was used toassess sensitivity and specificity of measurements to identify manifest or risk to get COPD.

    Results: Only DLCO could identify subjects with COPD or risk to develop COPD, as judged byAUCROC (0.85 or 0.75, respectively). Lower DLCO (p=0.003) and higher serum concentrationsof lysozyme (p=0.011) were recorded in those with COPD than non-COPD subjects.Furthermore, concentration of chlorine was higher in EBC from COPD subjects than fromhealthy volunteers (p<0.05). Except for chlorine, none of the remaining biomarkers weredetected in EBC and there was a vast variability of concentrations of biomarkers in saliva.

    Conclusion: DLCO was the most effective discriminator of COPD and rapid decline of lungfunction. Serum concentration of lysozyme was the second strongest discriminator, confirmingprevious findings on involvement of neutrophils in the disease process. The use of EBC as a toolto measure exhaled biomarkers involved in COPD is dubious due to large variability and lowconcentrations of markers in EBC.

  • 8.
    Falk, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Hegic, Sabina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wilson, Daniel
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Home-sampling as a Tool in the Context of Chlamydia trachomatis Partner Notification: A Randomized Controlled Trial2014In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 94, no 1, p. 72-74Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Measuring sun exposure habits and sun protection behaviour using a comprehensive scoring instrument: An illustration of a possible model based on Likert scale scorings and on estimation of readiness to increase sun protection2012In: Cancer Epidemiology, ISSN 1877-7821, E-ISSN 1877-783X, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 265-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Few attempts to present a comprehensive scoring instrument for sun exposure and protection have been made. The present paper aims to describe a possible set of questions suitable for such an instrument, comprising the most important aspects of sun exposure and protection. Methods: The material from a previously performed intervention study, using a questionnaire based on Likert scales and on the Transtheoretical Model of Behaviour Change (TTM), was utilised. 213 primary healthcare patients filled in the questionnaire and were randomised into two groups receiving sun protection advice, in Group 1 in letter-form, and in Group 2 orally during a doctor's consultation. In the original study, increased sun protection/readiness to increase sun protection was demonstrated for several items in Group 2, at six months. To compose a comprehensive scoring instrument, five questions concerning sun exposure/protection (intentional tanning, sunscreen use, choice of SPF, number of occasions with sunburn, and time spent in the sun at midday), were selected to give a 20 point behavioural score. Similarly, four TTM-based questions (giving up sunbathing, using clothes for sun protection, using sunscreens, and staying in the shade) gave a 16 point "propensity-to-change"-score. Results: At follow-up, increased sun protection reflected in the behavioural score occurred only in Group 2 (p<0.001). For the propensity-to-change-score, increased readiness to increase sun protection occurred in both groups, but the change was significantly higher in Group 2 (p<0.05). Categorisation of the 20 point behavioural score, into three risk levels, revealed a significantly higher shift of subjects moving to a lower risk level in Group 2 compared to Group 1 (p<0.05). Conclusions: In conclusion, twinning of a summarised Likert scale behavioural score with a TTM-based propensity-to-change-score seems promising for the creation of a questionnaire-based, comprehensive scoring instrument for sun exposure and protection.

  • 10.
    Franck, Niclas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Åstrand, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Lindström, Torbjön
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Cardiovascular risk factors related to the PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism in patients with type 2 diabetes are gender dependent2012In: Blood Pressure, ISSN 0803-7051, E-ISSN 1651-1999, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 122-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interaction of the PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism with diabetes and cardiovascular risk is controversial. We studied 173 women and 309 men in the observational CARDIPP trial in which determination of left ventricular mass, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were performed. Blood pressures were measured with 24-h ambulatory technique (ABP). Heterozygotes and homozygotes of Ala were defined as Ala in the analyses. Men with Ala-isoform displayed higher waist circumference (Ala: 107 ± 14 cm, Pro: 104 ± 11 cm, p = 0.045) and body weight (Ala: 95.7 ± 18 kg, Pro: 91.6 ± 14 kg, p = 0.042) than Pro-homozygotes. Men with ALA-isoform also showed higher systolic ABP levels (Ala: 134 ± 15 mmHg, Pro: 130 ± 14 mmHg, p = 0.004), whereas left ventricular mass index, IMT and PWV were unrelated to isoforms. In contrast, carotid–radial PWV was lower in women with the Ala-isoform (Ala: 7.9 ± 1.0 m/s, Pro: 8.5 ± 1.3 m/s, p = 0.01) and levels of apolipoprotein A1 were higher (Ala: 1.43 ± 0.27 g/l, Pro: 1.35 ± 0.17 g/l, p = 0.03). In conclusion, we found that men with type 2 diabetes having the Ala-isoform of PPARγ Pro12Ala had an unfavorable cardiovascular risk profile, whereas women with this isoform had lower carotid–radial PWV and higher apolipoprotein A1 levels suggesting a beneficial prognosis. These differences according to gender of the ALA isoform in type 2 diabetes deserve further attention.

  • 11.
    Franck, Niclas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Åstrand, Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    The Ala isoform of the PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism is related to increased abdominal obesity in men but has little impact on cardiovascular risk markers in patients with type 2 diabetes2009Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The interaction of the PPARγ Pro12Ala with obesity and cardiovascular risk is controversial. We aimed to study potential associations of the Ala isoform of this polymorphism with obesity, blood pressure and markers of cardiovascular disease and organ damage in middle aged patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Subjects and methods: We recruited 148 women and 246 men in the CArdiovascular Risk factors in Patients with DIabetes – a Prospective study in the Primary health care setting (CARDIPP) study in which early markers of organ damage by cardiac echocardiography, determination of carotid intima media thickness (IMT) and measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV) was performed. Blood pressures were measured as both as 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure and as a noninvasive recording of central blood pressure. Allelic discrimination was detected with the ABI prism 7500HT Sequence Detection System. Due to the low prevalence of Ala homozygotes, heterozygotes and homozygotes of Ala were defined as Ala isoform in the analyses.

    Results: Men with Ala isoform exhibited higher sagittal abdominal diameter (Pro: 25.4±3.4 cm, Ala: 26.7±4.9 cm, p= 0.04) waist circumference (Pro: 104±11 cm, Ala: 108±15 cm, p= 0.046) and body weight (Pro: 91.6±14, Ala: 96.5±18, p= 0.035) than homozygotes for the Pro isoform. However, there were no differences in either gender with respect to blood pressures, left-ventricular mass-index, carotid IMT or carotid-femoral PWV in the participants.

    Conclusion: It is unlikely that determination of the PPARγ Pro12Ala isoform in clinic practice adds any major information on cardiovascular risk or circulatory organ damage in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  • 12.
    Grahn Kronhed, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Community-based osteoporosis prevention: Physical activity in relation to bone density, fall prevention, and the effect of training programmes: The Vadstena Osteoporosis Prevention Project2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is based on studies of the ten-year community-based intervention programme entitled, the Vadstena Osteoporosis Prevention Project (VOPP). The specific aims of the research were to describe the effects of physical activity and training programmes on bone mass and balance performance in adults, to determine whether a fall risk prevention programme could motivate personal actions among the elderly, to ascertain whether the intervention programme could reduce the incidence of forearm and hip fractures.

    Two studies addressed training programmes for middle-aged and old people. First, VOPP participants who were aged 40–70 years and had low forearm bone mineral density (BMD) values were invited to take part in a one-year weight-bearing training study. Thirty of those individuals were included in the investigation. Additional bone mass measurements were performed at the hip and the lumbar spine, and balance and aerobic capacity were also tested. The training programme was performed twice a week (I). In the second study, healthy persons aged 70–75 years were invited to participate in a balance-training study. Fifteen persons joined an exercise group, and another fifteen were controls. The training programme comprised specific balance exercises and was carried out twice a week for nine weeks (II). The association between forearm BMD values and several lifestyle factors was explored in random samples of the population aged 20–72 years (n=880) in a cross-sectional study (III). Another study explored the association between calcaneal stiffness, forearm BMD, and lifestyle factors amongst participants aged 20–79 years (n=956) at the final registration of the VOPP (V). Effects of the VOPP interventions directed at environmental risk factors for falls and the promotion of physical activity were examined in people aged ≥ 65 years (IV). The incidence of forearm and hip fractures was studied amongst middle-aged and elderly individuals in the intervention and the control communities during the study period 1987–2001 (VI).

    The exercise group (n=15) in the weight-bearing training study showed increases in BMD at the greater trochanter (p<0.01), one-leg stance balance with the eyes closed and coordination tests (p<0.05), and aerobic capacity (p<0.05). No significant difference was found when the groups were compared concerning changes in the different tests during the intervention period (I). In the balance-training study, the exercise group showed post-training improvement in the following tests: standing on the right leg with eyes closed (p<0.01), standing on the right leg (p<0.01) and on the left leg (p<0.05) while turning the head, and walking 30 metres (p<0.01). There were significant differences between the groups in these tests when changes were compared at the post-intervention test (II). Age (p<0.0001) and body mass index (p≤.0001) were associated with forearm BMD in both sexes. Reported moderate physical activity levels in men were positively associated with forearm BMD (p<0.05) (III). In both sexes, reported moderate (p<0.05) and high (women p<0.05 and men p<0.001) physical activity levels were positively associated with calcaneal stiffness. The correlation coefficient between forearm BMD and calcaneal stiffness was 0.58 in women and 0.34 in men (V). Persons aged ≥ 65 years at the follow-up in 1994 reported more use of shoe/cane spikes

    and moderate physical activity levels compared to controls (IV). There was no change in the general incidence of forearm and hip fractures between the communities for the study period. However, there was a tendency towards decreasing incidence of forearm and trochanteric hip fracture in both sexes during the late intervention period in the intervention community (VI).

    A community-based intervention programme aimed at reducing the incidence of osteoporotic fractures must be regarded as a long-term project and should preferably be monitored over an extended post-intervention period.

    List of papers
    1. Effects of physical exercise on bone mass, balance skill and aerobic capacity in women and men with low bone mineral density, after one year capacity in women and men with low bone mineral density, after one year: a prospective study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of physical exercise on bone mass, balance skill and aerobic capacity in women and men with low bone mineral density, after one year capacity in women and men with low bone mineral density, after one year: a prospective study
    1998 (English)In: Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports, ISSN 0905-7188, Vol. 8, no 5 Pt 1, p. 290-298Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Vadstena is a small community in the county of Ostergötland, Sweden, where a project began in 1989 to prevent osteoporosis and to lower the expected incidence of osteoporotic fractures. Persons aged 40-70 years who had a low bone mineral density (BMD) value at screening of the distal radius by single-photon absorptiometry (SPA) were invited to participate in a training study during one year. The definition of low BMD was a densitometry value below -1 SD (standard deviation) from a sex- and age-specific reference value (z-score). Fifteen persons wanted to exercise in a group and 15 persons wanted to become a control group. All participants answered a questionnaire about lifestyle, occupation, diseases, medication and heredity. Clinical tests were made regarding mobility of the joints and muscles, balance and physical fitness. BMD for the hip and the lumbar spine were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) before and after the investigation period. The training programme was carried out for 60 min twice a week during one year and had the intention to improve bone mass, muscle strength and flexibility, balance skill and aerobic capacity. After the training period there was a significant increase in BMD at the greater trochanter (P < 0.01), in balance skill (standing on one leg with closed eyes and "ski step"-test) (P < 0.05) and in oxygen uptake capacity (P < 0.05) in the exercise group. In the control group, there was a significant increase in BMD at the lumbar spine (P < 0.05). However, these results should be judged with caution because several participants were over the age of 60, and at that age degenerative changes in the lumbar spine may increase to a greater or lesser extent. Regular weight-bearing exercises during one year seem to influence BMD at the greater trochanter in a training group comprising both women and men. However, our study was small in number and further training studies are needed to assess the effect of weight-bearing training on bone mass in different sex- and age-specific groups.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13678 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-05-19 Created: 2003-05-19
    2. The effect of short-term balance training on community-dwelling older adults
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of short-term balance training on community-dwelling older adults
    2001 (English)In: Journal of Aging & Physical Activity, ISSN 1063-8652, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 19-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated a balance-training program's influence in healthy older adults. Fifteen community-dwelling participants aged 70Ð75 years were randomized to an exercise group, and 15 gender- and age-matched participants, to a control group. The 9-week training program comprised ordinary-life balance, vestibular-habituation, and ball exercises and station training. Clinical balance tests were conducted before and after training. Tests that showed significant improvement in the exercise group after the intervention included standing on the right leg with eyes closed, standing on the right leg and the left leg while turning the head and walking 30 m. Significant between-group differences were found at posttest. A significant decrease was seen in the control group in the walking-forward test, and this change was significantly different between groups. The study indicates that balance performance in healthy older adults might be improved by balance training including exercises that stimulate multiple sensory systems and their central integration.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13679 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-05-19 Created: 2003-05-19 Last updated: 2009-05-15
    3. Association between physical activity and forearm bone mineral density in 20-72-year-olds
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between physical activity and forearm bone mineral density in 20-72-year-olds
    Show others...
    2002 (English)In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 87-96Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activity may influence bone mineral density (BMD) in different ways. In the present study the amount of physical activity and the associations between forearm BMD, body mass index, physical activity and several other lifestyle factors were explored. A random sample of the population in a Swedish municipality was invited to the study and examined by a questionnaire and by forearm bone mineral measurements using single photon absorptiometry. Forearm BMD was measured in 880 subjects. Forearm BMD was stable from 20 to 50 years of age in women and from 20 to 60 years of age in men. Reported moderate leisure-time physical activity levels in men were significantly associated with higher forearm BMD than low leisure-time physical activity levels ( p = 0.042). The findings that moderate levels of leisure-time physical activity in men were associated with higher forearm BMD, give some support to the hypothesis that increased amount of physical activity in a population might be of benefit in the prevention of osteoporosis. Further longitudinal studies of the effect of physical activity in the prevention of osteoporosis, falls and fractures are warranted.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis, 2002
    Keywords
    Body Mass Index, Cross-SECTIONAL, Osteoporosis, Population-BASED, Prevention
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13680 (URN)10.1080/140381902320141498 (DOI)
    Available from: 2003-05-19 Created: 2003-05-19 Last updated: 2018-05-22
    4. Evaluation of an osteoporosis and fall risk intervention program for community-dwelling elderly.: a quasi-experimental study of behavioural modifications
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of an osteoporosis and fall risk intervention program for community-dwelling elderly.: a quasi-experimental study of behavioural modifications
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 235-241Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Osteoporosis and fall fractures are increasing problems amongst the elderly. The aim of this study was to explore whether combined population-based and individual interventions directed at risk factors for osteoporosis and falls result in behavioral changes in an elderly population.

    METHODS: A quasi-experimental design was used for the study. Persons aged >or=65 years were randomly selected in the intervention and control community. An intervention program was managed from the primary health care center and delivered to the community. Health education was designed to increase awareness of risk factors for the development of osteoporosis and falling. Questionnaires about lifestyle, health, previous fractures, safety behavior and physical activity level were distributed at baseline in 1989 and at the follow-ups in 1992 and 1994 in both communities.

    RESULTS: There was a difference of 17.7% between the dual intervention (receiving both population-based and individual interventions) and the control samples regarding the self-reported use of shoe/cane spikes, and a difference of 20.5% regarding the reported "moderate level" of physical activity in 1994. There was an increase in the number of participants in the dual intervention sample who, at baseline, had not reported equipping their homes with non-slip mats and removing loose rugs but who did report these changes in 1994. The increase in the reported use of shoe/cane spikes in the dual intervention sample was observed mainly for the period 1992-1994.

    CONCLUSIONS: A public health intervention model, including both population-based and individual interventions, can contribute to behavioral changes in the prevention of falls and changed physical activity patterns amongst elderly people.

    Keywords
    Environmental hazard, fall prevention, population-based
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13681 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-05-19 Created: 2003-05-19 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    5. Is calcaneal stiffness more sensitive to physical activity than forearm bone mineral density?: A population-based study of persons aged 20-79 years
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is calcaneal stiffness more sensitive to physical activity than forearm bone mineral density?: A population-based study of persons aged 20-79 years
    Show others...
    2004 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 333-339Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between forearm bone mineral density (BMD), calcaneal stiffness, and physical activity levels in a normal population using different non-invasive methods.

    Methods: The participants were invited to undergo bone measurements using single photon absorptiometry of the forearm and quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the calcaneal bone, and also to complete a questionnaire. Physical activity levels were designated low, moderate, and high in the question on leisure-time activity.

    Results: There were 956 participants included in the present study. Forearm BMD in the eighth age decade was 0.40 g/cm2 (95% CI 0.33 - 0.46 g/cm2) lower than in the third decade among women and 0.28 g/cm2 (95% CI 0.18 - 0.37 g/cm2) lower among men. The differences in calcaneal stiffness between the same age decades were 22.4 (95% CI 17.5 - 27.4) among women and 15.8 (95% CI 8.0 - 23.5) among men. The correlation between forearm BMD and calcaneal stiffness was 0.58 (95% CI 0.52 - 0.64) in women and 0.34 (95% CI 0.25 - 0.42) in men. Reported moderate and high leisure-time activity levels in both genders were associated with higher calcaneal stiffness but not with forearm BMD.

    Conclusions: The QUS may be used to measure the effect of present physical activity levels on calcaneal bone at the population level. Further longitudinal studies are warranted in order to determine the most appropriate non-invasive method in population-based studies.

    Keywords
    community-based interventions, osteoporosis, prevention, quantitative ultrasound, questionnaire, reference values, single photon absorptiometry
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13682 (URN)10.1080/14034940410026273 (DOI)
    Available from: 2003-05-19 Created: 2003-05-19 Last updated: 2013-09-05
    6. Impact of a community-based osteoporosis and fall prevention program on fracture incidence
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of a community-based osteoporosis and fall prevention program on fracture incidence
    Show others...
    2005 (English)In: Osteoporosis international, ISSN 0937-941X, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 700-706Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Associations between a 10-year community-based osteoporosis and fall prevention program and fracture incidence amongst middle-aged and elderly residents in an intervention community are studied, and comparisons are made with a control community. A health-education program was provided to all residents in the intervention community, which addressed dietary intake, physical activity, smoking habits and environmental risk factors for osteoporosis and falls. Both communities are small, semi-rural and situated in Östergötland County in southern Sweden. The analysis is based on incidences of forearm fractures in the population 40 years of age or older, and hip fractures in the population 50 years of age or older. Data for three 5-year periods (pre-, early and late intervention) are accumulated and compared. In the intervention community, forearm fracture incidence decreased in women. There are also tendencies towards decreasing forearm fracture incidence in men, and towards decreasing trochanteric hip fracture incidences in women and in men in the late intervention period. No such changes in fracture incidences are found in the control community. Cervical hip fracture incidence did not change in the intervention and the control communities. Although the reported numbers of fractures are small (a total of 451 forearm and 357 hip fractures), the numbers are based on total community populations and thus represent a true difference. The decrease in forearm fracture incidence among women, and the tendency towards decreasing trochanteric hip fractures, in contrast to the absence of change in cervical hip fractures, might be mainly due to a more rapid effect of fall preventive measures than an increase in bone strength in the population. For the younger age groups an expected time lag between intervention and effect might invalidate the short follow-up period for outcome measurements. Thus, the effect of the 10-year intervention program on fracture incidence should be followed during an extended post-intervention period.

    Keywords
    Fracture outcome, Fragility fractures, Prevention, Quasi-experimental
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13683 (URN)10.1007/s00198-004-1732-0 (DOI)
    Available from: 2003-05-19 Created: 2003-05-19 Last updated: 2013-09-05
  • 13.
    Grundvold, Irene
    et al.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Bodegard, Johan
    AstraZeneca Nord, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Body weight and risk of atrial fibrillation in 7,169 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes; an observational study2015In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 14, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Obesity, type 2 diabetes and atrial fibrillation (AF) are closely associated, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We aimed to explore associations between body mass index (BMI) or weight change with risk of AF in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: A total of 7,169 participations with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes were stratified according to baseline BMI, and after a second BMI measurement within 18 months, further grouped according to relative weight change as "weight gain" (greater than 1 BMI unit), " stable weight" (+/- 1 BMI unit) and " weight loss" (less than 1 BMI unit). The mean follow-up period was 4.6 years, and the risk of AF was estimated using adjusted Cox regression models. Results: Average age at diabetes diagnosis was 60 years and the patients were slightly obese (mean BMI 30.2 kg/m(2)). During follow-up, 287 patients developed incident AF, and those with overweight or obesity at baseline had 1.9 fold and 2.9-fold higher risk of AF, respectively, than those with normal BMI. The 14% of the patients with subsequent weight gain had 1.5-fold risk of AF compared with those with stable weight or weight loss. Conclusions: In patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes, baseline overweight and obesity, as well as modest weight increase during the first 18 months after diagnosis, were associated with a substantially increased risk of incident AF. Patients with type 2 diabetes may benefit from efforts to prevent weight gain in order to reduce the risk of incident AF.

  • 14.
    Grönlund, V.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Carlsson, A.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kärner, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The desire for a good life - patients beliefs of self-care after a coronary event2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

         

    Introduction: After a first coronary event there is an increased risk for a recurrent event. Despite that risk, 1/5 of the patients continue to smoke, 1/3 is obese and more than half of the patients have elevated blood pressure and total cholesterol. Secondary preventive self-care activities are needed to improve outcomes and the belief of patients plays a vital role in changing behavior.                         

    Aim: To examine patients’ beliefs of self-care 6-12 months after a coronary event.                         

    Method: The study design was qualitative. Twenty-five patients, including 10 women, mean age 65 years with stable coronary artery disease participated in four focus group interviews. Data were taped, transcribed and analyzed according to the conventional content analysis.                         

    Findings: Patients’ belief of self-care is influenced by their desire of a good life even though life seems fragile. Patients try to live up to the standard of health care prescription and advices. However, these achievements require behavior change and conscious boundaries, which are challenged by various obstacles such as fear of, overstrain and stress. Physical activity is considered as both a source to well-being and a necessity, but patients are uncertain and afraid for overstraining. A healthy diet is seen as important but the advices given are sometimes contradictory and create confusion. Medication is found important but not at the cost of all the side-effects. Patients also report that in order to believe in their ability and to be responsible for self-care, support from health care providers is expected. But at the same time the invaluable support and information is often not provided, creating uncertainty.                         

    Discussion: The study highlights the patients’ perspective of self-care and what they view as important in self-care after an event of coronary artery disease. The patients’ expectations on health services comprise information, support and continuous follow-up. This is necessary to facilitate the patient’s responsibility for their own care.                         

    Conclusion: Patients’ beliefs about the concept of self-care after an event of coronary artery disease are multifaceted and voluminous compared to the health care definition. The findings of the study challenge health care policies approach to self-care. There is a need to reconsider and assess what and how secondary preventive patient education should be performed after an event of coronary artery disease.  

                        

  • 15.
    Guldbrand, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dizdar, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bunjaku, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Endocrinology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Endocrinology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    In type 2 diabetes, randomisation to advice to follow a low-carbohydrate diet transiently improves glycaemic control compared with advice to follow a low-fat diet producing a similar weight loss2012In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 55, no 8, p. 2118-2127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The study aimed to compare the effects of a 2 year intervention with a low-fat diet (LFD) or a low-carbohydrate diet (LCD), based on four group meetings to achieve compliance. METHODS: This was a prospective randomised parallel trial involving 61 adults with type 2 diabetes consecutively recruited in primary care and randomised by drawing ballots. Patients that did not speak Swedish could not be recruited. The primary outcomes in this non-blinded study were weight and HbA(1c). Patients on the LFD aimed for 55-60 energy per cent (E%) and those on LCD for 20 E% from carbohydrate. RESULTS: The mean BMI and HbA(1c) of the participants were 32.7 ± 5.4 kg/m(2) and 57.0 ± 9.2 mmol/mol, respectively. No patients were lost to follow-up. Weight loss did not differ between groups and was maximal at 6 months: LFD -3.99 ± 4.1 kg (n = 31); LCD -4.31 ± 3.6 kg (n = 30); p < 0.001 within groups. At 24 months, patients on the LFD had lost -2.97 ± 4.9 kg and those on LCD -2.34 ± 5.1 kg compared with baseline (p = 0.002 and p = 0.020 within groups, respectively). HbA(1c) fell in the LCD group only (LCD at 6 months -4.8 ± 8.3 mmol/mol, p = 0.004, at 12 months -2.2 ± 7.7 mmol/mol, p = 0.12; LFD at 6 months -0.9 ± 8.8 mmol/mol, p = 0.56). At 6 months, HDL-cholesterol had increased with the LCD (from 1.13 ± 0.33 mmol/l to 1.25 ± 0.47 mmol/l, p = 0.018) while LDL-cholesterol did not differ between groups. Insulin doses were reduced in the LCD group (0 months, LCD 42 ± 65 E, LFD 39 ± 51 E; 6 months, LCD 30 ± 47 E, LFD 38 ± 48 E; p = 0.046 for between-group change). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Weight changes did not differ between the diet groups, while insulin doses were reduced significantly more with the LCD at 6 months, when compliance was good. Thus, aiming for 20% of energy intake from carbohydrates is safe with respect to cardiovascular risk compared with the traditional LFD and this approach could constitute a treatment alternative. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01005498 FUNDING: University Hospital of Linköping Research Funds, Linköping University, the County Council of Östergötland, and the Diabetes Research Centre of Linköping University.

  • 16.
    Guldbrand, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Dizdar, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bunjaku, B.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Randomization to a low-carbohydrate diet advice improves health related quality of life compared with a low-fat diet at similar weight-loss in Type 2 diabetes mellitus2014In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 221-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To compare the effects on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of a 2-year intervention with a low-fat diet (LFD) or a low-carbohydrate diet (LCD) based on four group-meetings to achieve compliance. To describe different aspects of taking part in the intervention following the LFD or LCD.

    Methods

    Prospective, randomized trial of 61 adults with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. The SF-36 questionnaire was used at baseline, 6, 12 and 24 months. Patients on LFD aimed for 55–60 energy percent (E%) and those on LCD for 20 E% from carbohydrates. The patients were interviewed about their experiences of the intervention.

    Results

    Mean body-mass-index was 32.7 ± 5.4 kg/m2 at baseline. Weight-loss did not differ between groups and was maximal at 6 months, LFD: −3.99 ± 4.1 kg, LCD: −4.31 ± 3.6 kg (p < 0.001 within groups). There was an increase in the physical component score of SF-36 from 44.1 (10.0) to 46.7 (10.5) at 12 months in the LCD group (p < 0.009) while no change occurred in the LFD group (p < 0.03 between groups). At 12 months the physical function, bodily pain and general health scores improved within the LCD group (p values 0.042–0.009) while there was no change within the LFD group.

    Conclusions

    Weight-changes did not differ between the diet groups while improvements in HRQoL only occurred after one year during treatment with LCD. No changes of HRQoL occurred in the LFD group in spite of a similar reduction in body weight.

     

  • 17.
    Holmberg, Sara
    et al.
    Växjö.
    André, Malin
    Uppsala.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Björkelund, Cecilia
    Göteborg.
    Samuelsson, Eva
    Umeå.
    Thulesius, Hans
    Växjö.
    Midlöv, Patrik
    Lund.
    Nager, Anna
    Stockholm.
    Engfeldt, Peter
    Örebro.
    Slår vårdval undan fötterna för allmänmedicinsk forskning?2011In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 108, no 41, p. 2004-2005Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Jennersjö, Pär E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Circadian blood pressure variation in patients with type 2 diabetes - relationship to macro- and microvascular subclinical organ damage2011In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 167-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To explore the association between nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipper status and macro- and microvascular organ damage in type 2 diabetes.

    Methods

    Cross-sectional data from 663 patients with type 2 diabetes, aged 55–66 years, were analysed. Nurses measured office BP and ambulatory BP during 24 h. Individuals with ≥10% difference in nocturnal systolic blood pressure (SBP) relative to daytime values were defined as dippers. Non-dippers were defined as <10% nocturnal decrease in SBP. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated and microalbuminuria was measured by albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR). Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry over the carotid and femoral arteries.

    Results

    We identified 433 dippers and 230 subjects with a nocturnal non-dipping pattern. Nocturnal SBP dipping was independently of office SBP associated with decreased PWV (p = 0.008), lower ACR (p = 0.001) and NT-proBNP (p = 0.001) and increased GFR (p < 0.001).

    Conclusions

    We conclude that diurnal BP variation provides further information about early macro- and microvascular subclinical organ damage that goes beyond standardized office BP measurements in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  • 19.
    Jennersjö, Pär
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Pedometer-determined physical activity is linked to low systemic inflammation and low arterial stiffness in Type 2 diabetes2012In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 1119-1125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diabet. Med. 29, 11191125 (2012) Abstract Aims The aim of this study was to explore the association between pedometer-determined physical activity versus measures of obesity, inflammatory markers and arterial stiffness in people with Type 2 diabetes. Methods We analysed data from 224 men and 103 women with Type 2 diabetes, aged 5466 years. Physical activity was measured with waist-mounted pedometers during three consecutive days and the number of steps/day were calculated and classified in four groups: andlt; 5000 steps/day, 50007499 steps/day, 75009999 steps/day and andgt;= 10000 steps/day. Blood samples were analysed for lipids, HbA1c, inflammatory markers including C-reactive protein and interleukin-6. Nurses measured blood pressure and anthropometrics. Aortic pulse wave velocity was measured with applanation tonometry over the carotid and femoral arteries. Results Mean steps/day was 7683 +/- 3883 (median 7222, interquartile range 486910 343). There were no differences in age, diabetes duration, blood pressure, lipids or glycaemic control between the four groups of pedometer-determined physical activity. Subjects with higher steps/day had lower BMI (28.8 vs. 31.5 kg/m2, P andlt; 0.001), waist circumference (101.7 vs. 108.0 cm, P andlt; 0.001), lower levels of C-reactive protein (1.6 vs. 2.6 mg/l, P = 0.007), lower levels of interleukin-6 (1.9 vs. 3.8 pg ml, P andlt; 0.001) and lower pulse wave velocity (10.2 vs. 11.0 m/s, P = 0.009) compared with less physically active people. Conclusions We conclude that physical activity measured with pedometer was associated not only with less abdominal obesity, but also with decreased systemic low-grade inflammation as well as with low arterial stiffness, in people with Type 2 diabetes.

  • 20.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bergström, Anna
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Schröder, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Foldevi, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Subacromial corticosteroid injection or acupuncture with home exercises when treating patients with subacromial impingement in primary care-a randomized clinical trial2011In: Family Practice, ISSN 0263-2136, E-ISSN 1460-2229, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 355-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    bjective. To compare the efficacy of subacromial corticosteroids injected by a GP with physiotherapy combining acupuncture and home exercises as treatments for SIS. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. A randomized clinical trial was performed in primary health care. Patients diagnosed with SIS were randomized to either subacromial corticosteroid injection (s) or 10 acupuncture treatments combined with home- exercises. The main outcomes were pain and shoulder function (Adolfsson-Lysholm shoulder assessment score). Secondary outcomes were health-related quality of life (HRQL) (EuroQol-five dimension self-report questionnaire) and the patients global assessment of change. All patients were assessed at baseline and after 6 weeks and 3, 6 and 12 months. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. One hundred and seventeen patients with SIS were included, of which 91 complied with the study protocol. There were no significant differences between treatments with regard to pain, shoulder function and HRQL in change over time. However, both treatment groups improved significantly from baseline over time. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions. Both subacromial corticosteroid injection and a series of acupuncture treatments combined with home exercises significantly decreased pain and improved shoulder function in patients with SIS, but neither treatment was significantly superior to the other.

  • 21.
    Jonasson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Guldbrand, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Lundberg, Anna K
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Advice to follow a low-carbohydrate diet has a favourable impact on low-grade inflammation in type 2 diabetes compared with advice to follow a low-fat diet2014In: Annals of Medicine, ISSN 0785-3890, E-ISSN 1365-2060, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 182-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Inflammation may play an important role in type 2 diabetes. It has been proposed that dietary strategies can modulate inflammatory activity.

    METHODS: We investigated the effects of diet on inflammation in type 2 diabetes by comparing a traditional low-fat diet (LFD) with a low-carbohydrate diet (LCD). Patients with type 2 diabetes were randomized to follow either LFD aiming for 55-60 energy per cent (E%) from carbohydrates (n = 30) or LCD aiming for 20 E% from carbohydrates (n = 29). Plasma was collected at baseline and after 6 months. C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), IL-6, tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) 1 and TNFR2 were determined.

    RESULTS: Both LFD and LCD led to similar reductions in body weight, while beneficial effects on glycaemic control were observed in the LCD group only. After 6 months, the levels of IL-1Ra and IL-6 were significantly lower in the LCD group than in the LFD group, 978 (664-1385) versus 1216 (974-1822) pg/mL and 2.15 (1.65-4.27) versus 3.39 (2.25-4.79) pg/mL, both P < 0.05.

    CONCLUSIONS: To conclude, advice to follow LCD or LFD had similar effects on weight reduction while effects on inflammation differed. Only LCD was found significantly to improve the subclinical inflammatory state in type 2 diabetes.

  • 22.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of physiotherapists as primary assessors of patients with musculoskeletal disorders seeking primary health care2012In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 98, no 2, p. 131-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To evaluate primary physiotherapist assessment and management of patients with musculoskeletal disorders in primary care, and to compare patient satisfaction with primary assessment by a physiotherapist or a general practitioner (GP). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign An observational, retrospective cohort study reviewing medical records, and a separate consecutive non-randomised study of patient satisfaction. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSetting Primary healthcare centre. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanParticipants Four hundred and thirty-two patients with musculoskeletal disorders, primarily assessed by a physiotherapist. Fifty-one of these patients primarily assessed by a physiotherapist and 42 patients assessed by a GP answered a patient satisfaction questionnaire. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanInterventions Primary assessment and management of patients with musculoskeletal disorders. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMain outcome measures Data from medical records within 3-month after the visit, and patient satisfaction questionnaire. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults Eighty-five percent (367/432) of patients did not need to see a GP. Serious pathologies were found among the 6% (26/432) of patients who were referred to a GP by a physiotherapist, but no serious pathologies were found among the 9% (39/432) of patients who subsequently returned for a GP appointment for the same disorder. Patients assessed by a physiotherapist were more satisfied with the information received about their disorder and self-care than patients assessed by a GP. Patients also had higher confidence in the ability of physiotherapists to assess their disorder (P andlt; 0.002). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion Physiotherapists can be considered primary assessors of patients with musculoskeletal disorders in primary care as few patients needed additional assessment by a GP, patients with confirmed serious pathologies were identified by the physiotherapists, and patients were satisfied with assessment by a physiotherapist.

  • 23.
    Ljungberg, Liza
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johan Östgren, Carl
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Associations of genetic polymorphisms in the renin-angiotensin system with central aortic and ambulatory blood pressure in type 2 diabetic patients2014In: jraas. Journal of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, ISSN 1470-3203, E-ISSN 1752-8976, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 61-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are at high risk of developing hypertension and related cardiovascular disease. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a central role in regulation of blood pressure (BP). Accordingly, each component of this system represents a potential candidate in the etiology of hypertension. This study investigated the impact of polymorphisms within the RAS on ambulatory and central BP in T2D subjects. A cohort of 761 subjects (55-65 years) with T2D was studied. Ambulatory and central BP were measured, and ACE I/D genotype, angiotensinogen M235T, renin rs6693954 and ATR1-A1166C polymorphisms were analyzed. Women carrying the AA-genotype had lower 24-hour and day-time systolic and diastolic BP (pless than0.05), and lower night-time and central diastolic BP (pless than0.05), compared to T allele carriers. In men, the AA-genotype was instead associated with higher central diastolic BP (p=0.018) and higher augmentation index (p=0.016). Further, the associations between the renin rs6693954 SNP and diastolic BP were strongly gender dependent (p less than= 0.001). In T2D patients, there is a gender-dependent association of the renin rs6693954 SNP with central and ambulatory BP. Women carrying the renin rs6693954 AA-genotype may be protected against the higher BP seen in men with the same genotype.

  • 24.
    Midlov, Patrik
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Andersson, Martin
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Molstad, Sigvard
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Depression and use of antidepressants in Swedish nursing homes: a 12-month follow-up study2014In: International psychogeriatrics, ISSN 1041-6102, E-ISSN 1741-203X, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 669-675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The prescription of antidepressants in nursing homes has increased markedly since the introduction of SSRIs, while at the same time depressive symptoms often go unrecognized and untreated. The aim of this study was to examine whether depression among residents in nursing homes is treated adequately.

    METHODS:

    A sample of 429 participants from 11 Swedish nursing homes was selected and was assessed with the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) and using medical records and drug prescription data. For 256 participants a follow-up assessment was performed after 12 months.

    RESULTS:

    The prevalence of depression, according to medical records, was 9.1%, and the prevalence of CSDD score of ≥8 was 7.5%. Depression persisted in more than 50% of cases at the 12-month follow-up. Antidepressants were prescribed to 33% of the participants without a depression diagnosis or with a CSDD score of <8. 46.2% of all participants were prescribed antidepressants. 14% of the participants without a depression diagnosis or with a CSDD score of <8 had psychotropic polypharmacy. 15.2% of all participants had psychotropic polypharmacy, which persisted at the 12-month follow-up in three-quarters of cases.

    CONCLUSION:

    The prescription of antidepressants in frail elderly individuals is extensive and may be without clear indication. The clinical implication is that there is a need for systematic drug reviews at nursing homes, paying special attention to the subjects which are on antidepressants.

  • 25.
    Modig, Sara
    et al.
    Lund University, Malmö.
    Lannering, Christina
    Futurum, Jönköping.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Mölstad, Sigvard
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Midlöv, Patrik
    Lund University, Malmö.
    The assessment of renal function in relation to the use of drugs in elderly in nursing homes; a cohort study2011In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 11, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Renal function decreases with age. Dosage adjustment according to renal function is   indicated for many drugs, in order to avoid adverse reactions of medications and/or   aggravation of renal impairment. There are several ways to assess renal function in   the elderly, but no way is ideal. The aim of the study was to explore renal function   in elderly subjects in nursing homes and the use of pharmaceuticals that may be harmful   to patients with renal impairment.

    Methods

    243 elderly subjects living in nursing homes were included. S-creatinine and s-cystatin   c were analysed. Renal function was estimated using Cockcroft-Gault formula, Modification   of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and cystatin C-estimated glomerular filtration rate   (GFR). Concomitant medication was registered and four groups of renal risk drugs were   identified: metformin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), angiotensin-converting   enzyme -inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers and digoxin. Descriptive statistics   and the Kappa test for concordance were used.

    Results

    Reduced renal function (cystatin C-estimated GFR < 60 ml/min) was seen in 53%. Normal   s-creatinine was seen in 41% of those with renal impairment. Renal risk drugs were   rather rarely prescribed, with exception for ACE-inhibitors. Poor concordance was   seen between the GFR estimates as concluded by other studies.

    Conclusions

    The physician has to be observant on renal function when prescribing medications to   the elderly patient and not only rely on s-creatinine level. GFR has to be estimated   before prescribing renal risk drugs, but using different estimates may give divergence   in the results.

  • 26.
    Mohamed, A F
    et al.
    RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    Zhang, J
    RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    Johnson, F R
    RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    Lomon, I Duprat
    Bristol-Myers Squibb, Rueil-Malmaison, France.
    Malvolti, E
    Bristol-Myers Squibb, Rueil-Malmaison, France.
    Townsend, R
    AstraZeneca UK Limited, London, United Kingdom.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Parhofer, K G
    Klinikum der Universität München, Germany.
    Avoidance of weight gain is important for oral type 2 diabetes treatments in Sweden and Germany: patient preferences2013In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 397-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    The aim of the study was to quantify patient preferences for outcomes associated with oral antidiabetic medications (OAMs) in Sweden and Germany through a discrete-choice experiment.

    Methods

    Adults taking OAMs who had a self-reported physician's diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) made a series of nine choices between pairs of hypothetical profiles. Each profile had a predefined range of attributes: blood glucose control, frequency of mild-to-moderate hypoglycaemia, annual severe hypoglycaemic events, annual weight gain, pill burden and frequency of administration, and cost. Choice questions were based on an experimental design with known statistical properties. Bivariate probit analysis estimated the probabilities of choice of medication administration from patient characteristics and, conditional on that choice, preferences for treatment outcomes.

    Results

    The final sample consisted of 188 Swedish and 195 German patients. For both countries, weight gain was the most important attribute, followed by blood glucose control. Avoiding a 5-kg weight gain was 1.5 times more important in Sweden and 2.3 times more important in Germany than achieving moderate blood glucose control, thereby, suggesting that blood glucose control is relatively more important to Swedish than to German patients. Least important outcomes were the number of daily pills (Sweden) and frequency of mild-to-moderate hypoglycaemia (Germany).

    Conclusion

    Patients in both Sweden and Germany preferred OAMs not associated with weight gain.

  • 27.
    Nilsson, Peter
    et al.
    Skånes universitetssjukhus, Malmö.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Blodtryck och diabetes typ 2: ACCORD-studiens resultat måste respekteras2011In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 108, no 5, p. 216-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Olofsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Midlöv, P.
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Sweden.
    Mölstad, Sigvard
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Colonization with Staphylococcus aureus in Swedish nursing homes: A cross-sectional study2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 3-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Screening for bacterial colonization among risk populations could provide better estimates of the volume of the bacteria-related disease reservoir and the level of antimicrobial resistance, than do conventional laboratory reports. Methods: Two hundred and one participants at 10 Swedish nursing homes were screened for colonization with Staphylococcus aureus between January and October 2009. Of the 201 participants, 61 (30%) were male. The median age was 86 y. All participants were systematically sampled from the nasal mucosa, the pharyngeal mucosa, the groin, and active skin lesions, if any. Results: Ninety-nine of 199 participants (50%) were colonized with S. aureus. The colonization rate was 34% for the nose, 35% for throat, 10% for groin, and 54% for active skin lesions. An antibiotic-resistant S. aureus isolate was identified in 8.5% of all participants regardless of colonization status. A total of 24 resistant isolates were detected, and 21 of these were resistant to fluoroquinolones. There was no case of colonization with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Conclusions: The presence of resistant isolates was generally low, and the greater part of the resistance was fluoroquinolone-related. To achieve reasonable precision, screening programmes of this kind must include samples from both the nose and throat, and, although low, the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in Swedish nursing homes still calls for reflection on how to use the fluoroquinolones wisely. © 2012 Informa Healthcare.

  • 29.
    Olofsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Toepfer, Michael
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Midlöv, Patrik
    Division of General Practice/Family Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University .
    Matussek, Andreas
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mölstad, Sigvard
    Division of General Practice/Family Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University.
    Low level of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli among Swedish nursing home residents2013In: Scandinavian journal of infectious diseases, ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Screening for bacterial colonization and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) among a defined population could aid in the identification of at-risk populations and provide targets for antibiotic stewardship and infection control programmes. Methods: Two hundred and sixty-eight participants at 11 Swedish nursing homes underwent serial screening for colonization with Escherichia coli between March 2008 and September 2010. Seventy-two of the 268 participants (27%) were male. The median age was 85 y. Samples were collected from urine, the rectal mucosa, the groin, and active skin lesions. Results: Two hundred and nine of 268 participants (78%) were colonized with E. coli at any body site/fluid. The specific colonization rates were 81% (rectum), 48% (urine), 30% (groin), 59% (unknown), and 13% (skin lesion). An antibiotic-resistant E. coli isolate was identified in 18% of all participants regardless of colonization status; all together, 87 resistant isolates were detected. Only 1 participant carried isolates with resistance to third-generation cephalosporins (cefotaxime and ceftazidime). Conclusions: The presence of resistance was generally low, and the greater part of the resistant cases was connected with 3 common antibiotics: ampicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and ciprofloxacin. In spite of generally increasing resistance against third-generation cephalosporins in E. coli in Sweden, this study does not implicate residence at a Swedish nursing home as a risk factor for the acquisition of expressed cephalosporin resistance.

  • 30.
    Petersson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brismar, K.
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Nilsson, P. M.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Low levels of insulin-like growth-factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) are prospectively associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT): The Söderåkra Cardiovascular Risk Factor Study2009In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 198-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To explore the association between baseline levels of insulin-like growth-factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), a marker of insulin sensitivity, and the development of type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in a specifically defined middle-aged population.

    METHODS: This cross-sectional population-based screening study was conducted in 1989-1990 and included baseline data for 664 non-diabetic subjects aged 40-59 years. Clinical data were collected and blood samples analyzed for blood glucose, serum lipids and insulin. Blood specimens were frozen at baseline and later analyzed for IGF-I, IGFBP-1 and C-reactive protein (CRP). At the follow-up in 2006, the incidence of type 2 diabetes and IGT was reported based on primary-care medical records.

    RESULTS: During the 17-year observation period, 42 subjects (6.3%) developed type 2 diabetes/IGT. Those in the lowest quintile of IGFBP-1 (/=59mug/L), the incidence was 1.5%. Cox's proportional-hazards model regression analyses were used to determine the incidence of type 2 diabetes/IGT, corrected for age and gender, in relation to IGFBP-1, CRP and waist circumference. Subjects in the lowest IGFBP-1 quintile showed an independently increased risk of type 2 diabetes/IGT [hazards ratio (HR): 3.54; 95% CI 1.18-10.6; P=0.024]. For CRP and waist circumference, the corresponding figures were HR: 6.81; 95% CI 2.50-18.6; P<0.001 and HR: 3.33; 95% CI 1.47-7.6; P=0.004, respectively.

    CONCLUSION: Low levels of IGFBP-1 predicted the long-term development of type 2 diabetes or IGT in a middle-aged population. The association was independent of CRP and abdominal obesity.

  • 31.
    Petersson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, University Hospital, Malmö , Sweden.
    A consultation-based method is equal to SCORE and an extensive laboratory-based method in predicting risk of future cardiovascular disease2009In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation, ISSN 1741-8267, E-ISSN 1741-8275, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 536-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: As cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the most common causes of mortality worldwide, much interest has been focused on reliable methods to predict cardiovascular risk.

    DESIGN: A cross-sectional, population-based screening study with 17-year follow-up in Southern Sweden.

    METHODS: We compared a non-laboratory, consultation-based risk assessment method comprising age, sex, present smoking, prevalent diabetes or hypertension at baseline, blood pressure (systolic >/=140 or diastolic >/=90), waist/height ratio and family history of CVD to Systemic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) and a third model including several laboratory analyses, respectively, in predicting CVD risk. The study included clinical baseline data on 689 participants aged 40-59 years without CVD. Blood samples were analyzed for blood glucose, serum lipids, insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, C-reactive protein, asymmetric dimethyl arginine and symmetric dimethyl arginine. During 17 years, the incidence of total CVD (first event) and death was registered.

    RESULTS: A non-laboratory-based risk assessment model, including variables easily obtained during one consultation visit to a general practitioner, predicted cardiovascular events as accurately [hazard ratio (HR): 2.72; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.18-3.39, P<0.001] as the established SCORE algorithm (HR: 2.73; 95% CI: 2.10-3.55, P<0.001), which requires laboratory testing. Furthermore, adding a combination of sophisticated laboratory measurements covering lipids, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, did not confer any additional value to the prediction of CVD risk (HR: 2.72; 95% CI: 2.19-3.37, P<0.001). The c-statistics for the consultation model (0.794; 95% CI: 0.762-0.823) was not significantly different from SCORE (0.767; 95% CI: 0.733-0.798, P=0.12) or the extended model (0.806; 95% CI: 0.774-0.835, P=0.55).

    CONCLUSION: A risk algorithm based on non-laboratory data from a single primary care consultation predicted long-term cardiovascular risk as accurately as either SCORE or an elaborate laboratory-based method in a defined middle-aged population.

  • 32.
    Petersson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ovhed, Ingvar
    Blekinge Institute for R&D, Karlshamn, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter M
    Department of Clinical Sciences Medicine, University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Predictors of successful, self-reported lifestyle changes in a defined middle-aged population: the Soderakra Cardiovascular Risk Factor Study, Sweden2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 389-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: It is well established that the main cause of the development of cardiovascular disease can be found in unhealthy lifestyle habits. In our study, we wanted to explore the long-term predictors of self-reported lifestyle changes in a middle-aged population after screening for cardiovascular risk factors 10 years earlier.

    Methods: We conducted a 10-year follow-up telephone interview on self-reported lifestyle changes in a rural population in south-eastern Sweden, after a cardiovascular screening programme. The population comprised 90% of all inhabitants (n=705) aged 40-59 years at baseline, and 90% of these (n=629) were reached for the telephone interview.

    Results: When multivariate logistic regression was used, a higher success rate for lifestyle changes was independently associated with female gender (odds ratio (OR)=1.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-2.18). When stratified for gender, significant predictors for success in men were prevalent cardiovascular risk conditions (OR=4.77, 95% CI 2.18-10.5; p<0.001) and previous myocardial infarction (OR=22.8, 95% CI 4.73-110; p<0.001) at baseline. For women, elevated blood pressure (> or = 160 and/or > or = 90 mmHg) measured at baseline (OR=1.84, 95% CI 1.12-3.02; p=0.016) was significantly associated with successful lifestyle changes. Smoking at baseline was also associated with significant success: OR=3.36 (95% CI:2.05-5.51; p<0.001) and OR=1.81 (95% CI 1.11-2.95; p=0.017) for men and women, respectively.

    Conclusions: Female gender was associated with significant improvements in self-reported lifestyle changes. Furthermore, smoking, a medical history of diabetes, hypertension, angina pectoris or myocardial infarction at baseline predicted success in lifestyle change in this 10-year follow-up study.

  • 33.
    Rådholm, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Myocardial infarction in subjects using anti-diabetic and/or anti-depressant agents compared tonon-users: a nationwide register study in Sweden2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Rådholm, Karin
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Wressle, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Nägga, Katarina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Atrial fibrillation (AF) and co-morbidity in elderly. A population based survey of 85 years old subjects.2011In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 52, no 3, p. e170-e175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The occurrence of AF increases sharply with age. The aim of this study was to explore and compare prevalent co-morbidity and self-estimated health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in subjects with AF versus subjects with sinus rhythm or pacemaker in 85 years old subjects. We analyzed data from a population of 336 eighty-five years old subjects participating in the Elderly in Linköping Screening Assessment (ELSA-85) study. Medical history was obtained from postal questionnaire, medical records and during medical examination that included a physical examination, cognitive tests, non-fasting venous blood samples and electrocardiographic (ECG) examination. 19% had an ECG showing AF. There were very few significant differences regarding medical history, self-estimated quality of life (QoL), laboratory- and examination findings and use of public health care between the AF group and the non-AF group. The study showed that the population of 85 years old subjects with AF was surprisingly healthy in terms of prevalent co-existing medical conditions, healthcare contacts and overall HRQoL. We conclude that elderly patients with AF do not in general have increased co-morbidity than subjects without AF.

  • 35.
    Samefors, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Mölstad, Sigvard
    Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lannering, Christina
    Futurum, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Midlöv, Patrik
    Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Tengblad, Anders
    Futurum, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Vitamin D deficiency in elderly people in Swedish nursing homes is associated with increased mortality2014In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 170, no 5, p. 667-675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    Institutionalised elderly people at northern latitudes may be at elevated risk for vitamin D deficiency. In addition to osteoporosis-related disorders, vitamin D deficiency may influence several medical conditions conferring an increased mortality risk. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and its association with mortality.

    DESIGN:

    The Study of Health and Drugs in the Elderly (SHADES) is a prospective cohort study among elderly people (>65 years) in 11 nursing homes in Sweden.

    METHODS:

    We analysed the levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D₃ (25(OH)D₃) at baseline. Vital status of the subjects was ascertained and hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality according to 25(OH)D₃ quartiles were calculated.

    RESULTS:

    We examined 333 study participants with a mean follow-up of 3 years. A total of 147 (44%) patients died within this period. Compared with the subjects in Q4 (25(OH)D₃ >48  nmol/l), HR (with 95% CI) for mortality was 2.02 (1.31-3.12) in Q1 (25(OH)D₃ <29  nmol/l) (P<0.05); 2.03 (1.32-3.14) in Q2 (25(OH)D₃ 30-37  nmol/l) (P<0.05) and 1.6 (1.03-2.48) in Q3 (25(OH)D₃ 38-47  nmol/l) (P<0.05). The mean 25(OH)D₃ concentration was 40.2  nmol/l (S.D. 16.0) and 80% had 25(OH)D₃ below 50  nmol/l. The vitamin D levels decreased from baseline to the second and third measurements.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Vitamin D deficiency was highly prevalent and associated with increased mortality among the elderly in Swedish nursing homes. Strategies are needed to prevent, and maybe treat, vitamin D deficiency in the elderly in nursing homes and the benefit of vitamin D supplementation should be evaluated in randomised clinical trials.

  • 36.
    Sjöblom, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Microalbuminuria, but not reduced eGFR, is associated with cardiovascular subclinical organ damage in type 2 diabetes2014In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This study explored the association between reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and microalbuminuria vs. subclinical organ damage in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    METHODS: Data from middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes (n=706) treated in primary care were analyzed for microalbuminura, defined as a urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (uACR)≥3.0mmol/mol, and reduced eGFR, defined as<60mL/min/1.73m(2), in relation to blood pressure, pulse wave velocity (PWV), left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and lumen diameter (LD).

    RESULTS: Patients with microalbuminuria had significantly higher 24-h ambulatory systolic blood pressure (ASBP) compared with subjects with uACR<3mg/mmol: 137 vs. 128mmHg (P<0.001). There were no differences in ASBP in patients with eGFR<60mL/min/1.73m(2). However, patients with vs. without microalbuminuria had increased PWV (11.4 vs. 10.1m/s; P<0.001), LVMI (134.4 vs. 118.6g/m(2); P<0.001), LD (7.01±0.93 vs. 6.46±0.74mm; P<0.001) and IMT (0.78 vs. 0.74mm; P=0.047), respectively. The associations between uACR vs. PWV and LVMI were more robust after adjusting for age, diabetes duration, ASBP, HbA1c, LDL-cholesterol, and antihypertensive and lipid-lowering therapy compared with uACR vs. IMT. There were no statistically significant differences in PWV, LVMI or IMT between patients with reduced (<60mL/min/1.73m(2)) vs. normal eGFR.

    CONCLUSION: Levels of urinary albumin excretion, but not reduced eGFR, were associated with increased arterial stiffness, left ventricular mass and atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  • 37.
    Sjöblom, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Norrköping.
    Tengblad, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Löfgren, Ulla-Britt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Lannering, Christina
    The Research and Development Department of Local Health Care, County Council of Jönköping, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Anderberg, Niklas
    Vråen Primary Health Care Centre, Värnamo, Sweden.
    Rosenqvist, Ulf
    Department of Internal Medicine, Motala Hospital, Motala, Sweden.
    Mölstad, Sigvard
    The Research and Development Department of Local Health Care, County Council of Jönköping, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Can diabetes medication be reduced in elderly patients?: An observational study of diabetes drug withdrawal in nursing home patients with tight glycaemic control2008In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 197-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore the feasibility of withdrawal of diabetes medication in elderly patients with HbA1c £ 6.0%.

    Methods: HbA1c was measured in 98 patients with known diabetes in 17 nursing homes in Sweden. 32 subjects with HbA1c £ 6.0% participated in the drug withdrawal study. After measuring plasma glucose on three consecutive days, diabetes drugs were reduced, i.e. complete withdrawal of oral anti-diabetic drugs (OADs), complete insulin withdrawal when doses were £ 20 units/day and reduced by half in patients on more than 20 units/day.

    Results: We identified 31 episodes of plasma glucose £ 4.4 mmol/l, most of them nocturnal (n=17). Mean HbA1c was 5.2 % ± 0.4 compared to 7.1 % ± 1.6 in the non-intervention group. Three months after the diabetes drug discontinuation, 24 patients (75%) remained in the intervention group and mean HbA1c was then 5.8 %. ± 0.9. Six months after baseline investigation mean HbA1c in the intervention group was 5.8 % ± 1.1 compared with 6.6 % ± 1.4 in the non-intervention group.

    Conclusions: Hypoglycaemic events are common among elderly patients with type 2 diabetes. The withdrawal of diabetes medication in elderly with tight glycaemic control is safe and may decrease the risk for hypoglycaemia.

  • 38.
    Stratelis, Georgios
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Fransson, Sven Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Schmekel, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Jakobsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pulmonary Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Respiratory Medicine UHL.
    Mölstad, Sigvard
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    High prevalence of emphysema and its association with BMI: A study of smokers with normal spirometry2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 241-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To evaluate to what extent emphysema was evident, as identified by High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT), in smokers with normal lung function and to relate age, gender, smoking history, and body mass index (BMI) to the HRCT results. A secondary aim was to study to what extent emphysema was present in smokers with lower normal values of lung function defined as FEV1/FVC ratio percentage of predicted value (89-93% of predicted value for males and 90-93% for females) or FEF50 60% of predicted compared with smokers without this definition.

    Methods: Fifty-nine smokers, with a mean age of 53 years and with normal lung function, were examined with HRCT.

    Results: Emphysema evidenced visually by HRCT was present in 43% of the subjects. Using a 0-5 grade scale (0=normal finding; 5=emphysema in most slices), the degree of emphysema was almost exclusively 3-4. The type of emphysema was distributed as centrilobular emphysema predominant in 43.5%, paraseptal emphysema predominant in 43.5%, and as an equal mixture of these types in 13%. The presence of emphysema did not differ between the group of smokers with lower normal values of lung function and the rest of the smokers. Smokers with emphysema had significantly lower BMI than those devoid of emphysema, 24 and 27 respectively (p0.0011).

    Conclusion: There was a high occurrence of visual emphysema in middle-aged smokers with normal lung function. The densitometric quantitative analysis method is inadequate for detecting mild emphysema. High prevalence of emphysema was associated with low BMI.

  • 39.
    Sundström, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Sheikhi, Reza
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Bodegård, Johan
    AstraZeneca Nordic, Södertälje, Sweden .
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden .
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Blood pressure levels and risk of cardiovascular events andmortality in type-2 diabetes: cohort study of 34 009 primary care patients2013In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 1603-1610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The optimal blood pressure (BP) in persons with type-2 diabetes is debated. We investigated shapes of the associations of SBP and DBP levels with risk of cardiovascular events and mortality in a large primary care-based sample of diabetic patients.

    METHODS:

    We investigated all 34 009 consecutive cardiovascular disease-free type-2 diabetes patients aged 35 years or older (mean age 64 years) at 84 primary care centers in central Sweden between 1999 and 2008. We followed this cohort until the end of 2009 in national registries for the incidence of major cardiovascular events (a composite endpoint of myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, or cardiovascular mortality) or total mortality.

    RESULTS:

    During up to 11 years of follow-up, 6344 patients (18.7%) had a first cardiovascular event, and 6235 died (18.3%). The associations of annually updated SBP and DBP with risk of major cardiovascular events were U-shaped. The lowest risk of cardiovascular events was observed at a SBP of 135-139 mmHg and a DBP of 74-76 mmHg, and the lowest mortality risk at a SBP of 142-150 mmHg and a DBP of 78-79 mmHg, in both antihypertensive drug-untreated and drug-treated persons.

    CONCLUSION:

    In a large primary care-based sample of patients with type-2 diabetes, associations of SBP and DBP with risk of major cardiovascular events and mortality were U-shaped. This may have implications for risk stratification of persons with diabetes.

  • 40.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Nystrom, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Masked nocturnal hypertension - a novel marker of risk in type 2 diabetes.2009In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 1258-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of masked nocturnal hypertension (MNHT) and its impact on arterial stiffness and central blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Middle-aged patients (n = 414) with type 2 diabetes underwent clinic and ambulatory BP measurements and applanation tonometry. RESULTS: MNHT (clinic BP < 130/80 mmHg and night-time BP > or = 120/70 mmHg) was found in 7.2% of patients (n = 30). Compared with patients with both clinical and nocturnal normotension (n = 70), patients with MNHT had higher aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) (10.2 +/- 1.8 m/s vs 9.4 +/- 1.7 m/s; p = 0.03) and higher central BP (117.6 +/- 13.9/74.0 +/- 9.1 mmHg vs 110.4 +/- 16.4/69.7 +/- 9.6 mmHg, p = 0.04). In patients with clinical normotension, night-time systolic BP correlated significantly with PWV. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Thirty per cent of patients with clinical normotension had nocturnal hypertension. This was accompanied by increased arterial stiffness and higher central BP. We conclude that in clinically normotensive patients with type 2 diabetes, ambulatory BP measurement may help clinicians to identify patients with increased cardiovascular risk.

  • 41.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Central pulse pressure elevation is common in patients with type 2 diabetes and office normotension, and is associated with markers of atherosclerosisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of elevated central pulsepressure (CPP) in patients with type 2 diabetes and office normotension, and to investigatewhether elevated CPP was associated with markers of atherosclerosis in these patients. Wedetermined office and central blood pressure, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and aorticpulse wave velocity (PWV) in 167 patients with type 2 diabetes and office normotension(<130/80 mmHg). Patients with office normotension and CPP ≥50 mmHg (n=32) hadsignificantly higher carotid IMT (0.76±0.2 mm vs 0.71±0.1 mm, p=0.041) and aortic PWV(11.0±2.5 m/s vs 9.5±1.8 m/s, p<0.01) than patients with office normotension and CPP <50mmHg (n=135). We conclude that almost one in five patients with type 2 diabetes and officenormotension had elevated CPP, and that this was associated with markers of both structuraland functional atherosclerosis.

  • 42.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    ß-blocker Treatment is Associated with High Augmentation Index and with High Aortic, but not Brachial, Pulse Pressure in Type 2 Diabetes2010In: The journal of clinical metabolism and diabetes, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 55-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To explore the associations between ß-blocker treatment and clinic, ambulatory, and central pulse pressure (PP) and central augmentation index (AIx), and left ventricular mass index (LVMI), respectively, in patients with type 2 diabetes.Methods: In 124 middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated in primary care and used at least one antihypertensive drug, we measured clinic PP (mean value of three nurse-recorded measurements in the sitting position) and ambulatory PP (24-hour ambulatory measurements with the Spacelab 90217 measurement device). Central PP was measured non-invasively, using applanation tonometry (SphygmoCor), which also yielded values of AIx. LVMI was determined echocardiographically in all patients.Results: Patients whose antihypertensive drug regimen included a ß-blocker (n=67) had significantly higher central PP compared with patients whose antihypertensive drug regimen did not include a ß-blocker (ß-blocker: 49.6±12.2 mmHg, no ß-blocker: 45.1±10.2 mmHg; p=0.03) despite having similar clinic PP (ß-blocker: 60.4±16.3 mmHg, no ß-blocker: 58.9±13.1 mmHg; p=0.59) and similar ambulatory PP (ß-blocker: 55.2±9.1 mmHg, no ß-blocker: 54.8±10.6 mmHg; p=0.40). Patients treated with ß-blockers also had significantly higher AIx (ß-blocker: 30.7±8.4%, no ß-blocker: 25.8±8.8%; p<0.01) and higher LVMI (ß-blocker: 129.5±29.7 g/m2, no ß-blocker: 117.4±27.4 g/m2; p=0.02) compared with patients who were not treated with ß-blockers.Conclusions: In our cohort, ß-blocker use was associated with high central but not brachial PP and with high central AIx and high LVMI. Non-invasive measurement of central hemodynamic parameters may improve the evaluation of antihypertensive treatment efficacy in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  • 43.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ambulatory systolic blood pressure predicts left ventricular mass in type 2 diabetes, independently of central systolic blood pressure2012In: Blood Pressure Monitoring, ISSN 1359-5237, E-ISSN 1473-5725, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 139-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Both ambulatory and central blood pressures have been reported to correlate more closely than office blood pressure with left ventricular mass index (LVMI). The aim of this study was to test whether ambulatory systolic blood pressure (SBP) predicts LVMI independently of central SBP in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Methods: We determined office, ambulatory and central blood pressures and performed echocardiography in 460 patients with type 2 diabetes, who participated in the CARDIPP (Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes – a Prospective study in Primary care) study (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT 01049737).

    Results: In separate multivariable regression models, both 24-hour ambulatory SBP, ambulatory day-time SBP, and ambulatory night-time SBP were significantly associated with LVMI, independently of central SBP, age, sex, BMI, ambulatory 24-hour heart rate, duration of known diabetes and presence or absence of any antihypertensive medications (r = 0.19, 0.17 and 0.18, respectively, P <0.01). All ambulatory SBP parameters, but not central SBP, were significantly associated with LVMI independently of office SBP.

    Conclusions: Ambulatory SBP predicted LVMI independently of central SBP in patients with type 2 diabetes. The use of ambulatory blood pressure measurements may be encouraged as a tool for refined risk stratification of patients with type 2 diabetes.

  • 44.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Age-specific direct health care costs attributable to diabetesin a Swedish population: a register-based analysis2008In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 732-737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim of this population-based study was to explore the age-specific additional direct healthcare cost for patients with diabetes compared with the non-diabetic population.

    Methods: In 1999-2005, patients with diabetes in the Swedish county of Östergötland (n = 20 876) were identified from an administrative database. Cost data on the healthcare expenditure in primary healthcare, out-patient hospital care and in-patient care for the entire county population (n = ∼415 000) in 2005 were extracted from a cost per patient (CPP) database, which includes information on all utilized healthcare resources in the county. Data on drug sales were obtained from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register.

    Results: The cost per person was 1.8 times higher in patients with diabetes than in the non-diabetic population, 7.7 times higher in children and 1.3 times higher in subjects aged > 75 years. The additional cost per person for diabetes was €1971; €3930 and €1367, respectively, for children and subjects aged > 75 years. The proportion of total additional diabetes costs attributable to in-patient care increased with age from 25 to 50%; in-patient care was the most expensive component at all ages except in children, for whom visiting a specialist was most expensive. The diabetes-related segment of the total healthcare cost was 6.6%, increasing from 2.0% in children to 10.3% in the age group 65-74 years, declining to 6.2% in the oldest age group.

    Conclusions: The direct medical cost of diabetes varies considerably by age. Knowledge about the influence of age on healthcare costs to society will be important in future planning of diabetes management.

  • 45.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Carstensen, John M.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Age and Gender Differences in the Impact of Diabetes on the Prevalence of Ischemic Heart Disease: a Population-Based Register Study2008In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 79, no 3, p. 497-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore age and gender differences in the impact of diabetes on the prevalence of ischemic heart disease (IHD) in a defined population.

    Methods: Data were obtained from an administrative health care register covering a population of about 415 000. The study included all patients aged 45-74 years diagnosed between 1999-2003 with IHD (n=11 311) and diabetes (n=10 364) by physicians at all primary health care centres (PHCs) and out- and inpatient clinics at all hospitals in the county of Östergötland, Sweden.

    Results: In the 45-54 year-old age group, diabetes was associated with an increase in IHD prevalence equivalent to ageing about 20 years in women and 10 years in men. The diabetes/nondiabetes IHD prevalence rate ratio (IPR) decreased with age in both men and women (trend p-values < 0.001). The IPR was higher among women than men in each age group, though the female relative excess decreased from 75% higher in the 45-54 year-old age group to 33% higher in the 65-74 year-old age group (trend p-value = 0.018).

    Conclusions: The relative gender difference in the impact of diabetes on IHD in younger middle-aged patients remained up to the age of 65 years, decreasing considerably thereafter.

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