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  • 1.
    Agholme, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Geriatrics.
    Lindström, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    An In Vitro Model for Neuroscience: Differentiation of SH-SY5Y Cells into Cells with Morphological and Biochemical Characteristics of Mature Neurons2010In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 1069-1082Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuroscience, including research on Alzheimers disease, is hampered by the lack of suitable in vitro models to study the human nervous system. To counteract this, many attempts to differentiate cell lines into more neuron-like cells have been performed, resulting in partial expression of neuronal features. Furthermore, it has been reported that neuroblastoma cell lines lack mature isoforms of tau. Our aim was to develop an improved in vitro model, generating sustainable cells with morphology and biochemistry of human, mature neurons. To obtain cells with neuronal differentiation and function, we investigated the effect of combining three-dimensional culturing of SH-SY5Y cells in extracellular matrix (ECM) gel with several factors reported to have neuro-differentiating effects. This resulted in cells with apparent neuronal morphology with long, extensively branched neurites. Further investigation revealed expression of several neurospecific markers including synapse protein Sv2 and nuclear marker NeuN, as well as the presence of synapses and axonal vesicle transport. In addition, these cells expressed mature tau isoforms, and tau protein expression was significantly increased compared to undifferentiated cells, reaching levels found in adult human brain. In conclusion, we found that pre-treatment with retinoic acid followed by ECM gel culturing in combination with brain derived neurotrophic factor, neuregulin beta(1), nerve growth factor, and vitamin D-3 treatment generated sustainable cells with unambiguous resemblance to adult neurons. These cells also expresses adult splicing forms of tau with neuronal localization, making this cellular in vitro model useful in many areas of neuroscience research, particularly the Alzheimers disease field.

  • 2.
    Agholme, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    Nath, Sangeeta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Domert, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Proteasome Inhibition Induces Stress Kinase Dependent Transport Deficits – Implications for Alzheimer’s Disease2014In: Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, ISSN 1044-7431, E-ISSN 1095-9327, Vol. 58, p. 29-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation of two misfolded and aggregated proteins, β-amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau. Both cellular systems responsible for clearance of misfolded and aggregated proteins, the lysosomal and the proteasomal, have been shown to be malfunctioning in the aged brain and more so in AD patients. This malfunction could be the cause of β-amyloid and tau accumulation, eventually aggregating in plaques and tangles. We have investigated how decreased proteasome activity affects AD related pathophysiological changes of microtubule transport and stability, as well as tau phosphorylation. To do this, we used our recently developed neuronal model where human SH-SY5Y cells obtain neuronal morphology and function through differentiation. We found that exposure to low doses of the proteasome inhibitor MG-115 caused disturbed neuritic transport, together with microtubule destabilization and tau phosphorylation. Furthermore, reduced proteasome activity activated several kinases implicated in AD pathology, including JNK, c-Jun and ERK 1/2. Restoration of the microtubule transport was achieved by inhibiting ERK 1/2 activation, and simultaneous inhibition of both ERK 1/2 and c-Jun reversed the proteasome inhibition-induced tau phosphorylation. Taken together, this study suggests that a decrease in proteasome activity can, through activation of c-Jun and ERK 1/2, result in several events contributing to AD pathology. Restoring proteasome function or inhibiting ERK 1/2 and c-Jun could therefore be used as novel treatments against AD.

  • 3.
    Albinsson, L.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Centre of Competence in Palliative Care.
    Strang, P.
    Karolinska Institutet, FoUU, Stockholms Sjukhem, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Staff opinions about the leadership and organisation of municipal dementia care2002In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 313-322Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study describes the opinions of experienced staff providing direct care to patients with dementia in municipal units in Sweden. The focus is mainly on leadership and other organisational factors. A purposeful sample of 31 staff members employed in municipal dementia care in both urban and rural areas in mid-Sweden were selected. Data were collected within a qualitative paradigm using semi-structured interviews which were tape-recorded and analysed using a modified phenomenographical approach. The nearly unanimous opinions of the interviewees indicated that there was a great lack of daily leadership in the units. Thus, few units had clearly formulated goals and few had regular care planning for their residents. Poorly developed teamwork was reported in the care of people with dementia especially regarding doctors, whose visits to the unit were too infrequent and too short, and did not include a direct exchange of information with other staff. In addition, little or no staff education and guidance/supervision was provided on a regular basis. In conclusion, without any unreasonable increase in cost, measures such as introducing clear leadership at the care unit level, concentrating on multi-professional teamwork, and providing education and guidance/supervision to the staff would probably result in better care for patients with dementia and their families.

  • 4.
    Bjälke, Christer
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Norrköping.
    Widén, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Norrköping.
    BOF (Barnorienterad familjeterapi): symtomens arena?1999Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Barnorienterad familjeterapi - BOF, en terapiform där barn och föräldrar leker tillsammans i en sandlåda med ett material av dockor, djur, träd, staket, etc. I studien undersöker vi om man med ledning av det som sker i leken, samhandlingen, kan se och förstå barnets problem, dvs det symtom familjen sökte till BUP för.

    Vi valde att dela in symtomen i tre huvudgrupper; externaliserande, dvs. utagerande symtom, internaliserande symtom, dvs mer inåtvända symtom som oro, ledsenhet samt somatiserande, där symtomen tar sig kroppsliga uttryck.

    Nio familjer som inledde en BOF-terapi vid BUP, Vrinnevisjukhuset under 1997-98 kom att ingå i undersökningen.

    Innan terapin påbörjades fyllde föräldrarna i ett CBCL -formulär om barnets symtom. BOF-terapin utfördes på vanligt sätt med filmning av sessionerna och samtal i familjen om filmerna. Därefter fick vi tillgång till filmerna. Vi fick ej veta något om symtom eller problematik. I ett fall kände vi anmälningsorsaken. Familjesammansättningen var också okänd för oss.

    Vi har studerat den första terapiomgången med barn, föräldrar och terapeut vid sandlådan. Filmen har transkriberats vilket innebär att varje  sammanhållen handling och verbal tur, dvs. yttrande, har dikterats in på band. Ex, Pojke gör: Tar bilen, Mamma säger: "Kom hit" Transkriptionen har skrivits ut och analyserats. Vi har sorterat och räknat antal handlingar och yttranden och för varje aktör. För att få veta intensiteten i leken har vi sedan delat antalet med lekens längd. Vi antog att intensivare lek kan tyda på utagerande problematik.

    Vi har läst materialet och försökt beskriva terapiomgångarna globalt avseende innehåll och teman i leken, gränser och aktivitet i sandlådan samt terapeutens agerande.

    I utskrifterna har vi även försökt finna handlingar och yttranden som visar på gränsergränssättning, aggressivitet, omsorg, oro-ängslan, sjukdom-skada, ledsenhet, att bli sedd etc. Vi har även försökt se till samspelet ur olika aspekter.

    De olika kategorierna har markerats i skriften, förts in i ett protokoll och räknats samman. Vi har jämfört de olika resultaten och ställt en hypotes om barnets symtom.

    Våra antaganden om varje barns symtom har jämförts med resultatet av CBCL-skattningen. Vi fann, att vi vid åtta av nio barn hamnat inom samma huvudgrupp av symtom som CBCL. Pojken som avvek hade, liksom flertalet av barnen, en dubbel problematik med både internaliserande och externaliserande symtom. I gruppen ingick inget barn med starka somatiserande symtom varför vi ej kan uttala oss om giltigheten för den gruppen.

    Vår slutsats är att barnets symtom syns i samleken och att BOF-sandlådan verkligen är symtomets arena.

  • 5.
    Carlsson, Noomi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, AnnaKarin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hermansson, Göran
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Children Health Service in Östergötland. Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Andersson Gäre, Boel
    Akademin för hälsa och vård, Landstinget i Jönköpings län.
    En nollversion av barns tobaksexponering - för jämlik hälsa2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Cherma Yeste, Maria Dolores
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Löfgren, Ulla-Britt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Almkvist, Göran
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland.
    Bengtsson, Finn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Prescription of antidepressant drugs in elderly nursing home patients.: A Follow-up investigation with focus on enantioselective citalopram analysis2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Chermá Yeste, Maria Dolores
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Löfgren, Ulla-Britt
    n/a.
    Almkvist, Göran
    n/a.
    Hallert, Claes
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bengtsson, Finn
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Assessment of the prescription of antidepressant drugs in elderly nursing home patients2008In: Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0271-0749, E-ISSN 1533-712X, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 424-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to investigate the use of antidepressant drugs among elderly people in nursing homes. Elderly residents who where found to have been prescribed at least one antidepressant drug according to the specific medication dispensing system were identified in 8 nursing homes in the county of Östergötland, Sweden. Data were collected from the medical record forms at the nursing home. Blood samples were drawn for the assessment of drug concentration, blood chemistry parameters and cytochrome P450 expression. At least one antidepressant drug was prescribed to 38% of elderly people in the nursing home studied. A total of 71 patients were evaluated, 80% women and 20% men. The median age was 84 years (range, 71-100 years). Indications for antidepressant drug treatment were found on 96% of medical record forms (depression, 60%); however, information relating to when treatment was initiated could not be found on 34% of medical record forms and a clear time schedule for how long this drug treatment was planned to continue could not be found either. A possible adverse effect of antidepressant drug treatment was retrieved in at least 77% of patients. Polypharmacotherapy was common; median number of drugs per patient was 11. Concentrations of drugs were higher than expected in 73%. Most patients were medicated with citalopram (n = 44). A clear interindividual variability of concentrations at each dose level was found for citalopram and for the metabolites desmethylcitalopram and didesmethylcitalopram. A significant correlation was found between the estimation of creatinine clearance and concentration-dose ratio of citalopram. Poor metabolizers, who had been prescribed an antidepressant drug that are substrate for the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme examined, have higher concentrations of prescribed antidepressant drug than do non-poor metabolizers in relation to dose. An increase in quality contribution to follow-up at antidepressant medications is needed. A more frequent clinical use of therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacogenetic tests in addition to therapeutic drug monitoring may be one important tool in this process.

  • 8.
    Christina, Snöbohm
    et al.
    KI, sjukgymnastik.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of LAH/Linnéa.
    Heiwe, Sussanne
    KI, sjukgymnastik.
    Experiencing one's body after a diagnosis of cancer-a phenomenological study of young adults.2010In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 19, no 8, p. 863-869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Young adults with cancer are still in the process of shaping their lives and are therefore at a vulnerable stage. Altered body image may change how patients cope with the disease and impact rehabilitation capacity.Objective: To describe the essence of how young adults with cancer experience their bodies.Methods: Interviews (12 informants), transcribed verbatim. Analysis: Giorgi's phenomenological method.Results: Identified themes: experience of 'physical body change', 'discomfort', 'the body at the moment without reflecting on the disease and treatment', 'body image' and 'grasping the illness'. Essences: The body as the bearer of life; conflict between age and disease; manifest changes in appearance, physically and mentally; the body no longer a whole; the body as influenceable and able to recover and heal.Conclusions: These patients undergo physical and mental changes that affect their self-image and health-related life quality. Thus, future studies need to explore interventions that may enhance the individualś perception of their body.

  • 9.
    Cronfalk, Berit
    et al.
    Inst. onk-pat. Karolinska Inst.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Äldre - vård - civilsamhälle (ÄVC) . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatrics and Hospital based homecare VHN.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Äldre - vård - civilsamhälle (ÄVC) . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric and Hospital Based Homecare UHL.
    Strang, Peter
    Ints.för onkologi-patologi Karolinska institutet.
    A one-day education in soft tissue massage: Experiences and opinions as evaluated by nursing staff in palliative care2008In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 141-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Increasing awareness of well-being aspects of physical touch has spurred the appreciation for soft tissue massage (STM) as part of palliative care. Educational programs are available but with no specific focus on utilization for this kind of care. The aim was to study the feasibility of a 1-day course in STM in clarifying nursing staff's experiences and opinions, but also to shed light on their motivation and ability to employ STM in the care of dying cancer patients. Method: In all, 135 nursing staff participated. The course consisted of theory and hands-on training (hand-foot-, back massage). Focus-groups with 30/135 randomly chosen participants were conducted 4 weeks after the intervention. This study engaged a qualitative approach using content analysis. Results: The overall opinion of the 1-day course was positive. The majority experienced the contents of the course to be adequate and sufficient for clinical care. They emphasized the pedagogical expertise as valuable for the learning process. The majority of nurses shared the opinion that their extended knowledge clarified their attitudes on STM as a complement in palliative care. Still, a few found it to be too basic and/or intimate. Three categories emerged during the analysis: experiences of and attitudes toward the education, experiences of implementing the skills in every-day care situations, and attitudes to the physical body in nursing care. Significance of results: The approach to learning and the pedagogical skills of the teacher proved to be of importance for how new knowledge was perceived among nurses. The findings may encourage hospital organizations to introduce short courses in STM as an alternative to more extensive education. Copyright © 2008 Cambridge University Press 2008.

  • 10.
    Cronfalk, B.S.
    et al.
    Department of Oncology–Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Strang, P.
    Department of Oncology–Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Ternestedt, B.-M.
    Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatrics and Hospital based homecare VHN.
    The existential experiences of receiving soft tissue massage in palliative home care - An intervention2009In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, Vol. 17, no 9, p. 1203-1211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Soft tissue massage is currently used in palliative care for the relief of anxiety and pain. Only few studies have focused on patients deeper experience of receiving the massage. Aim: The purpose of this study was to explore how patients with cancer in palliative home care experienced soft tissue massage. Materials and methods: Twenty-two patients received soft tissue massage (hand or foot) nine times over a period of 2 weeks. Each session lasted for 25 min. Following the last massage session, a qualitative interview was conducted. The analysis was performed using a hermeneutic approach. Findings: Soft tissue massage generated feelings of existential respite with perceptions of being released from illness for a while. Two categories constituted the basis of the experiences: (1) "an experience of thoughtful attention" and (2) "a sensation of complete tranquility" resulting in the overarching theme "A time of existential respite." Conclusion: The patients experienced the massage to give meaning and to be important as it generated feelings of an inner respite. Relevance to clinical practice: Soft tissue massage appears to be an appreciated source of support to dying patients in palliative home care. The method is easy to comprehend and relatively short (25 min) which may imply that it is a suitable complement in nursing care for this patient group.

  • 11.
    Davidson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindelof, Ann
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Wallen, Torbjorn
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Vastervik Hospital, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland.
    Point-of-care monitoring of warfarin treatment in community dwelling elderly - A randomised controlled study2015In: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, ISSN 1357-633X, E-ISSN 1758-1109, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 298-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to assess clinical effectiveness and costs of launching point-of-care monitoring of warfarin treatment in community dwelling frail elderly patients. A prospective multicentre controlled randomised study over 12 months comparing a point-of-care strategy with usual monitoring routines was carried out in primary healthcare centres and anticoagulation clinics in southeast Sweden. The subjects were community dwelling elderly across rural southeast Sweden on chronic warfarin treatment. Main outcome measures were time in therapeutic range (TTR), rate of treatment-related adverse events and costs. The study comprised 103 elderly people (61% women) mean age 86 yrs (range 75-98) treated with warfarin for median 9 yrs (range 1-18). Patients randomised to start point-of-care monitoring (n = 55) showed 75.9% in TTR before trial vs. 72.6% during trial (ns). The patients randomised to continue on usual monitoring routines (n = 48) showed 75.2% in TTR prior to trial vs. 72.9% during trial (ns). The point-of-care monitoring showed potential savings of SEK 624 per patient annually (based partly on effects that were not statistically significant). The study shows that point-of-care monitoring of warfarin treatment in community dwelling elderly in rural areas is as effective as usual monitoring routines and that it may offer savings to society.

  • 12.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    Andersson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    They do what they think is the best for me: Frail elderly patients' preferences for participation in their care during hospitalization.2010In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 80, no 2, p. 233-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To deepen the knowledge of frail elderly patients' preferences for participation in medical decision making during hospitalization. METHODS: Qualitative study using content analysis of semi-structured interviews.

    RESULTS: Patient participation to frail elderly means information, not the wish to take part in decisions about their medical treatments. They view the hospital care system as an institution of power with which they cannot argue. Participation is complicated by barriers such as the numerous persons involved in their care who do not know them and their preferences, differing treatment strategies among doctors, fast patient turnover in hospitals, stressed personnel and linguistic problems due to doctors not always speaking the patient's own language.

    CONCLUSION: The results of the study show that, to frail elderly patients, participation in medical decision making is primarily a question of good communication and information, not participation in decisions about medical treatments.

    PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: More time should be given to thorough information and as few people as possible should be involved in the care of frail elderly. Linguistic problems should be identified to make it possible to take the necessary precautions to prevent negative impact on patient participation.

  • 13.
    Ekdahl, Anne W
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    Andersson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Are elderly people with co-morbidities involved adequately in medical decision making when hospitalised?: A cross-sectional survey2011In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 11, no 46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Medical decision making has long been in focus, but little is known of the preferences and conditions for elderly people with co-morbidities to participate in medical decision making. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the preferred and the actual degree of control, i.e. the role elderly people with co-morbidities wish to assume and actually had with regard to information and participation in medical decision making during their last stay in hospital.This study was a cross-sectional survey including three Swedish hospitals with acute admittance. The participants were patients aged 75 years and above with three or more diagnoses according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) and three or more hospitalisations during the last year.

    METHODS:

    We used a questionnaire combined with a telephone interview, using the Control Preference Scale to measure each participant's preferred and actual role in medical decision making during their last stay in hospital. Additional questions were asked about barriers to participation in decision making and preferred information seeking role. The results are presented with descriptive statistics with kappa weights.

    RESULTS:

    Of the 297 elderly patients identified, 52.5% responded (n = 156, 46.5% male). Mean age was 83.1 years. Of the respondents, 42 of 153 patients said that they were not asked for their opinion (i.e. no shared decision making). Among the other 111 patients, 49 had their exact preferred level of participation, 37 had less participation than they would have preferred, and 23 had more responsibility than they would have preferred. Kappa statistics showed a moderate agreement between preferred and actual role (κw = 0.57; 95% CI: 0.45-0.69). Most patients wanted to be given more information without having to ask. There was no correlation between age, gender, or education and preferred role. 35% of the patients agreed that they experienced some of the various barriers to decision making that they were asked about: 1) the severity of their illness, 2) doctors with different treatment strategies, 3) difficulty understanding the medical information, and 4) difficulty understanding doctors who did not speak the patient's own language.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Physicians are not fully responsive to patient preferences regarding either the degree of communication or the patient's participation in decision making. Barriers to participation can be a problem, and should be taken into account more often when dealing with hospitalised elderly people.

  • 14.
    Erichsén, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care.
    Hadd Danielsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatrics and Hospital based homecare VHN.
    A phenomenological study of nurse´s understanding of honesty in palliative care2010In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 39-50Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Honesty is essential for the care of seriously ill and dying patients. The current study aimed to describe how

    nurses experience honesty in their work with patients receiving palliative care at home. The interviews in

    this phenomenological study were conducted with 16 nurses working with children and adults in palliative

    home-based care. Three categories emerged from analyses of the interviews: the meaning of honesty, the

    reason for being honest and, finally, moral conflict when dealing with honesty. The essence of these

    descriptions was that honesty is seen as a virtue, a good quality that a nurse should have. The nurses’ ethical

    standpoint was shown in the moral character they show in their work and in their intention to do good. This

    study could help nurses to identify different ways of looking at honesty to promote more consciousness and

    openness in ethical discussions between colleagues and other staff members.

  • 15.
    Eriksson, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Gisela
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Olsson, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Ethical Dilemmas Around the Dying Patient With Stroke: A Qualitative Interview Study With Team Members on Stroke Units in Sweden2014In: Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, ISSN 0888-0395, E-ISSN 1945-2810, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 162-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, individuals affected by severe stroke are treated in specialized stroke units. In these units, patients are attended by a multiprofessional team with a focus on care in the acute phase of stroke, rehabilitation phase, and palliative phase. Caring for patients with such a large variety in condition and symptoms might be an extra challenge for the team. Today, there is a lack of knowledge in team experiences of the dilemmas that appear and the consequences that emerge. Therefore, the purpose of this article was to study ethical dilemmas, different approaches, and what consequences they had among healthcare professionals working with the dying patients with stroke in acute stroke units. Forty-one healthcare professionals working in a stroke team were interviewed either in focus groups or individually. The data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis. The ethical dilemmas that appeared were depending on nondecisions about palliative care or discontinuation of treatments. The lack of decision made the team members act based on their own individual skills, because of the absence of common communication tools. When a decision was made, the healthcare professionals had problems holding to the decision. The devised and applied plans could be revalued, which was described as a setback to nondecisions again. The underlying problem and theme was communication barriers, a consequence related to the absence of common skills and consensus among the value system. This study highlights the importance of palliative care knowledge and skills, even for patients experiencing severe stroke. To make a decision and to hold on to that is a presupposition in creating a credible care plan. However, implementing a common set of values based on palliative care with symptom control and quality of life might minimize the risk of the communication barrier that may arise and increases the ability to create a healthcare that is meaningful and dignified.

  • 16.
    Faergeman, Ole
    et al.
    Arhus University Hospital.
    Holme, Ingar
    Ullevaal University Hospital.
    Fayyad, Rana
    Pfizer Inc.
    Bhatia, Sonal
    Pfizer Inc.
    Grundy, Scott M
    University of Texas.
    Kastelein, John J P
    University of Amsterdam.
    LaRosa, John C
    SUNY Hlth Science Centre.
    Lytken Larsen, Mogens
    Arhus University Hospital.
    Lindahl, Christina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Olsson, Anders G
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Tikkanen, Matti J
    University of Helsinki.
    Waters, David D
    San Francisco General Hospital.
    Pedersen, Terje R
    Ullevaal University Hospital.
    Plasma Triglycerides and Cardiovascular Events in the Treating to New Targets and Incremental Decrease in End-Points Through Aggressive Lipid Lowering Trials of Statins in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease2009In: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY, ISSN 0002-9149, Vol. 104, no 4, p. 459-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We determined the ability of in-trial measurements of triglycerides (TGs) to predict new cardiovascular events (CVEs) using data from the Incremental Decrease in End Points through Aggressive Lipid Lowering (IDEAL) and Treating to New Targets (TNT) trials. The trials compared atorvastatin 80 mg/day with moderate-dose statin therapy (simvastatin 20 to 40 mg/day in IDEAL and atorvastatin 10 mg/day in TNT) in patients with clinically evident coronary heart disease or a history of myocardial infarction. The outcome measurement in the present research was CVE occurring after the first year of the trial. After adjusting for age, gender, and study, risk of CVEs increased with increasing TGs (p andlt;0.001 for trend across quintiles of TGs). Patients in the highest quintile had a 63% higher rate of CVEs than patients in the lowest quintile (hazard ratio 1.63, 95% confidence interval 1.46 to 1.81) and the relation of TGs to risk was apparent even within the normal range of TGs. The ability of TG measurements to predict risk decreased when high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein B:apolipoprotein A-I were included in the statistical analysis, and it was abolished with inclusion of further variables (diabetes, body mass index, glucose, hypertension, and smoking; (p = 0.044 and 0.621, respectively, for trend across quintiles of TGs). Similar results were obtained in patients in whom low-density lipoprotein cholesterol had been lowered to guideline-recommended levels. In conclusion, even slightly increased TG levels are associated with higher risk of recurrence of CVEs in statin-treated patients and should be considered a useful marker of risk.

  • 17.
    Faresjö, Åshild
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Saga
    Astra Zeneca R&D, Mölndal .
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roos, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Sex differences in dietary coping with gastrointestinal symptoms2010In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY and HEPATOLOGY, ISSN 0954-691X, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 327-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim Nutritional changes are often considered first-line treatment in public health diseases that apply to many gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, as different food and beverages may modulate GI motor and sensory functions, and may provoke GI symptoms. The aim of this study was to examine dietary coping and possible changes in food and beverage intake in relation to GI symptoms reported by identified irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients compared with healthy controls, and whether any sex differences were observed in these respects. Methods A population-based case-control design was used. Three primary healthcare centres were selected in the city of Linko ping in Sweden. The IBS patients were recruited from the studied primary healthcare centers on the basis of diagnoses from computerized medical records. The controls were randomly selected from the general population in the same region. A questionnaire was used with specific questions about self-reported food and beverage increase or decrease of GI symptoms and self-reported changes in dietary habits. Results Female IBS patients seem to be more willing to change dietary habits because of their GI problems than men. Effects of these nutritional behaviour changes were reported for almost all participants that had made dietary adjustments. Fatty food, certain vegetables, dairy products and eggs were significantly more reported to cause GI complaints among IBS patients compared with their controls. Conclusion Female IBS patients reported more changes in their dietary habits because of GI problems than men with the disease. The majority of both women and men who changed their dietary habits because of GI problems experienced improvement in their symptoms.

  • 18.
    Flook, Nigel
    et al.
    University of Alberta .
    Unge, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Agreus, Lars
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Karlson, Bjoern W
    AstraZeneca Research and Development .
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, East County Primary Health Care.
    Approach to managing undiagnosed chest pain - Could gastroesophageal reflux disease be the cause?2007In: Canadian family physician, ISSN 0008-350X, E-ISSN 1715-5258, Vol. 53, p. 261-266Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE To highlight gastroesophageal reflux disease as a common cause of undiagnosed chest pain. SOURCES OF INFORMATION Diagnostic considerations are based on information in peer-reviewed articles retrieved from MEDLINE. Studies had to be in English and involve at least 30 subjects. Population-based studies had to have a sample size of at least 300 and a response rate of at least 60%. Thirty-seven relevant articles were found. MAIN MESSAGE Clinical management of patients presenting with diagnostically challenging chest pain starts with a careful search for coronary artery disease and other potentially life-threatening causes. Investigations must continue until the underlying disease is identified and symptoms have been effectively controlled. Ongoing symptoms of undiagnosed chest pain cause considerable suffering, impair quality of life, and add unnecessary costs to the health care system. In more than half the patients with undiagnosed chest pain, symptoms are caused by gastroesophageal disease. Empirical acid-suppressive therapy with a proton pump inhibitor can assist clinicians in identifying patients whose symptoms are acid-related. CONCLUSION Many patients with undiagnosed chest pain can be managed in primary care, minimizing the need for referrals and costly investigations.

  • 19.
    Frid, Marianne
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Strang, Peter
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatrics and Hospital based homecare VHN.
    Johansson, Karin
    Lund .
    lower limb lymphedema: experiences and perceptions of cancer patients in the late palliative stage2006In: Journal of Palliative Care, ISSN 0825-8597, Vol. 22, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Äldre - vård - civilsamhälle (ÄVC) . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatrics and Hospital based homecare VHN.
    Commentary: Does a prompt list help patients and caregivers to ask questions about cancer prognosis and care?: in Clayton JM et al. (2007) Randomized controlled trial of a prompt list to help advanced cancer patients and their caregivers to ask questions about prognosis and end-of-life care. J Clin Oncol 25: 715–7232007In: Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology, ISSN 1759-4774, E-ISSN 1759-4782, Vol. 4, no 10, p. 563-563Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [Abstract not available]

  • 21.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of LAH/Linnéa.
    Crossing the border: Different ways cancer patients, family members and physicians experience information in the transition to the late palliative phase2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Information in the transition to the late palliative phase is not a well-studied area, especially not from the perspective of patients and family members. The aim of this thesis was to describe how cancer patients, family members and physicians experience information during the transition from a curative or early palliative phase to a late palliative phase, i.e. when tumour-specific treatment could not be offered. Cancer patients (n=30) admitted to palliative hospital based home care, family members (n=20) of cancer patients, and physicians (n=30) working with cancer patients in different settings were included in order to create a maximum variation sampling.

    Tape-recorded, semi-structured interviews and qualitative, phenomenographic analyses were done in all the studies.

    Patients described the physician as an expert (study I), an important person during this event, despite characterising him/her in different ways ranging from the empathetic professional to the rough and ready expert. Their relationship with the physician was also stressed. Their own resources, i.e. a sense of well being, a sense of security and individual strength, and their previous knowledge, were important components regarding their ability to take part in the communication (study II). Patients interpret words and phrases carefully and can perceive them as forewarnings, as being emotionally trying, and as fortifying and strengthening (study III). The overall message could be interpreted as either focused on quality if life, on treatment or on death and threat.

    Family members wanted to protect the patient during this period and could be very active and prominent in their protective role (study IV). However, other family members described themselves as being in the background more or less involuntarily. Family members also felt that there were expectations regarding their behaviour, either that they should take over in terms of communication, or that they should restrict their participation. When giving information, the physicians had a clear goal - to make the patient understand while being as considerate toward the patient as possible. However, the strategies for reaching this goal differed and included: explaining and convincing, softening the impact and vaguely suggesting, preparing and adapting. Some physicians had a main strategy while others mixed different strategies depending on the context.

    The experience of receiving and providing information about discontinuing tumour specific treatment is like crossing a border, where patients experience the behaviour of the physician and the words they express of great significance. Family members assume the role of protectors. Physicians use different strategies in order to help patients cross the border.

    List of papers
    1. Breaking bad news in the transition from curative to palliative cancer care-patient's view of the doctor giving the information
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breaking bad news in the transition from curative to palliative cancer care-patient's view of the doctor giving the information
    2000 (English)In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 472-478Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In the transition from curative to palliative cancer care, communication is of special importance. The aim of this study was to explore how patients with a disseminated cancer disease experienced the information about their incurable state, focusing on the physician. The persons taking part were 30 patients admitted to a hospital-based home care unit in Sweden. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using a qualitative method. All patients described their doctors as experts, despite different qualities. Six subcategories were identified: (1) the inexperienced messenger, (2) the emotionally burdened, (3) the rough and ready expert (4) the benevolent but tactless expert, (5) the "distanced" doctor and (6), the empathic professional. The relationship was described as very important to the patients' capacity to handle the information and was felt to have been built up during earlier meetings. The relationship was described in four subcategories: personal between well-acquainted individuals, impersonal between unacquainted individuals, personal between unacquainted individuals and impersonal between well-acquainted individuals. Both the character of the physician and his or her ability to create personal relationships influence patients' capacity to cope with this specific situation. Education and guidance are needed both in clinical practice and in medical schools.

    Keywords
    Doctor - patient communication, Palliative care, Behaviour, Patient's opinion
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13723 (URN)10.1007/s005200000147 (DOI)
    Available from: 2002-05-24 Created: 2002-05-24 Last updated: 2015-06-10
    2. Cancer patients' perceptions of their own participation and own resources after receiving information about discontinuation of active tumour treatment
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cancer patients' perceptions of their own participation and own resources after receiving information about discontinuation of active tumour treatment
    2000 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0001-6381, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 919-925Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of most studies on informational needs has been on primary cancer diagnosis. The aim of this study was to explore how cancer patients in a palliative care setting perceived their own participation and resources after receiving information about the discontinuation of active tumour treatment. Thirty cancer patients admitted to a hospital-based home-care unit participated in the study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using a phenomenographic method. The patients described their own participation as being either verbally passive or active, in order to receive more information or to avoid information. Furthermore, previous knowledge, at different levels, was described as important: 1) Unsuspecting naive, 2) apprehensive suspicious, 3) well prepared. Patients' own resources included a sense of wellbeing, a sense of security and individual strength. In conclusion, patients' previous knowledge and own resources are important components for their capacity to take part in the dialogue when receiving information.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13724 (URN)10.1080/02841860050215882 (DOI)
    Available from: 2002-05-24 Created: 2002-05-24 Last updated: 2015-06-10
    3. Cancer patients' interpretations of verbal expressions when given information about ending cancer treatment
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cancer patients' interpretations of verbal expressions when given information about ending cancer treatment
    2002 (English)In: Palliative Medicine, ISSN 0269-2163, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 323-330Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cancer patients' interpretations of the meaning of words used when given bad news are not well studied in medical settings. The aim of this study was to ascertain what significance verbal expressions had for cancer patients when they were given information about ending active tumour treatment, and what message they felt they received.

    METHODS: Tape-recorded semi-structured interviews were performed and analysed using a qualitative phenomenographical approach.

    RESULTS: Thirty patients with incurable cancer admitted to hospital-based home care unit in Sweden participated. Three main categories about the significance of words emerged: 1) words could indicate indirect warnings as being forewarnings, evasive or ambiguous; 2) words could also be perceived as emotionally trying, as threats or abandoning; 3) other words were fortifying and strengthened the patient in this situation. The overall message given during the information could be interpreted differently: either focused on treatment, on quality of life, or on threat and death.

    CONCLUSION: The understanding of the significance of words to tailor the information to patients helps the physician to use forewarnings and fortifying words and to identify and avoid the use of threatening words.

    Keywords
    communication, neoplasms, palliative care, patient perception, phenomenography
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13725 (URN)10.1191/0269216302pm543oa (DOI)
    Available from: 2002-05-24 Created: 2002-05-24 Last updated: 2015-06-10
    4. Receiving bad news- experiences of family members
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Receiving bad news- experiences of family members
    2001 (English)In: Journal of Palliative Care, ISSN 0825-8597, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 241-247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about how next-of-kin experience receiving bad news. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of family members when receiving information about ending tumour treatment, with a focus on their role in this context.

    METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were performed and analyzed using a qualitative phenomenographic method.

    RESULTS: Twenty family members of patients with incurable progressive cancer admitted to hospital-based home care were included in the study. Data showed that family members want to protect, represent, or act on behalf of the patient. Some described themselves as assuming prominent roles: the demander-of-truth role, the secret-keeper role, and the controller role. Others assumed more passive roles: the surrendering role, the considerate listener role, and the excluded outsider role.

    CONCLUSION: This study has revealed possible-explanations as to why family members are dissatisfied with information. The results of this study may help doctors in clinical practice recognize the different types of behaviour family members exhibit when receiving bad news.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Montreal, Canada: Centre for Bioethics, 2001
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13726 (URN)000173319900004 ()
    Available from: 2002-05-24 Created: 2002-05-24 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    5. Doctors' strategies when breaking bad news to terminally ill cancer patients
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Doctors' strategies when breaking bad news to terminally ill cancer patients
    2003 (English)In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, ISSN 1096-6218, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 565-574Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Breaking bad news to patients with a terminal disease is a difficult task for physicians. The aim of this study was to study how doctors perceive their strategies when giving information to cancer patients about discontinuing active tumour treatment. Thirty doctors with different demographic characteristics working with patients with cancer in Sweden participated. Semistructured interviews were conducted and analyzed using a qualitative phenomenographic method. The goal when giving this information was described as making the patient understands while being as considerate as possible. However, the strategies for reaching this goal were different: (1) explaining and convincing information, (i.e., giving a long explanation about why treatment has to be discontinued); (2) softening the impact of the information, with the doctor recommending discontinuation of treatment; (3) and preparing either the patient or the physician himself/herself for the information; (4) adapting or tailoring the information to the patient, with the doctor actively seeking knowledge about the patient in order to be able to adapt the information to the patient's level, or with the doctor briefly describing the situation and then remaining silent, allowing room for the patient's reactions and questions (i.e., letting the patient take an active part). When giving information, the doctors' goal was to make patients understand, but the strategies differed depending on the context.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13727 (URN)10.1089/109662103768253678 (DOI)
    Available from: 2002-05-24 Created: 2002-05-24 Last updated: 2015-06-10
  • 22.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Språkets och samtalets betydelse2013In: Palliativ vård: begrepp och perspektiv i teori och praktik / [ed] Birgitta Andershed, Britt-Marie Ternestedt, Cecilia Håkanson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1, p. 431-439Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Hajradinovic, Yvonne
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Jakobsson, Maria
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Sundberg, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Axmacher Jonsson, Monica
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Prolonged grievers: A qualitative evaluation of a support group intervention2014In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 299-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this project was to study prolonged grievers psychosocial processes and experience during participation in a group intervention and 6–8 weeks after discontinuation. The intervention in this study was a group therapy with the aim of getting in contact with their pain and loss and confronting and working with this loss.

    Methods: Data was collected by using diaries and tape-recorded interviews, analyzed with grounded theory. The participants were 11 females between the ages of 33 and 71.

    Results: The main process that was found in the qualitative data was: Ambivalence when struggling and learning through work and rest towards a balance. Sub-processes were: To share and be confirmed in the group through sense of cohesion; To dare/venture to discover problems and solutions; To react when you get emotionally involved, and to compare and discover.

    Significance of results: This study gives insight into prolonged grievers' thinking, which is valuable knowledge. Rather than assuming that all individuals suffering from prolonged grief need the same treatment, we suggest that there should be a range of different therapies.

  • 24.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Vrinnevi Hospital, Sweden .
    Heedman, Per-Anders
    Vrinnevi Hospital, Sweden .
    Astradsson, Eva
    Vrinnevi Hospital, Sweden .
    Jakobsson, Maria
    Vrinnevi Hospital, Sweden .
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Vrinnevi Hospital, Sweden .
    Does a Half-Day Course about Palliative Care Matter? A Quantitative and Qualitative Evaluation among Health Care Practitioners2013In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, ISSN 1096-6218, E-ISSN 1557-7740, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 496-501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To date there has been a paucity of research examining whether a course in palliative care influences the clinical work. Therefore a half-day course was started for different professionals. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjectives: The aims of this study were to quantitatively and qualitatively explore professionals experience of the usefulness and importance of such a course. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign: An evaluation study was used with two measurement points in the quantitative part; qualitative focus group interviews were conducted three times. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSetting and Subjects: Data was collected in Sweden through structured and open-ended questions (n = 355) and in focus group discussions (n = 40). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: The majority of participants were allied professionals (86%). Course evaluation immediately after the intervention showed high scores. At three months, 78% of the 86 participants who had cared for a dying patient since the course claimed that the course had been useful in their work. In addition, there were improvements regarding symptom management (37%), support to family members (36%), more frequent break point conversations (31%), and improved cooperation in the teams (26%). The qualitative analysis showed that the course made participants start to compare their own working experiences with the new knowledge. When returning to work, the participants feel strengthened by the the newly acquired knowledge, but the will to improve the care also led to frustration, as some of the participants described that they wanted to change routines in the care of the dying, but felt hindered. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: The course was appreciated and useful in the professionals work, but it also created problems.

  • 25.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of LAH/Linnéa.
    Lindholm, Ann
    Stockholms sjukhem.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Experiences of truth disclosure in terminally ill cancer patients in palliative home care2011In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 173-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and preferences of terminally ill cancer patients regarding truth telling in the communication of poor prognoses.

    Method: We recorded and transcribed interviews with 45 patients who knew their cancer was terminal, and analyzed their responses hermeneutically.

    Results: Patients identified three different modes of truth: (1) the absolute objective truth that they are dying; (2) the partial truth about their condition including some facts but not all of the details; and (3) the desired truth, originating in the patient's own beliefs about a healthy or better life. Coping strategies were related to patients’ preferred mode of truth: (1) facing the truth in order to take action; (2) facing some parts of the truth in order to maintain hope; and (3) hovering between facing and avoiding the truth. In their struggle for existential survival, patients used different coping strategies, changing from one to another depending upon the circumstances.

    Significance of results: Varying use of different coping strategies impacts on patient preferences concerning communication about bad news with their doctors. Truth-telling entails more than merely providing information related to the forthcoming death. It also concerns how physicians or other healthcare staff can support the patient's existential survival by fine-tuning the communication of “truth” according to the individuals’ preferences.

  • 26.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatrics and Hospital based homecare VHN.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Concerns about losing control when breaking bad news to terminally ill patients with cancer: Physicians' perspective2006In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, ISSN 1096-6218, E-ISSN 1557-7740, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 673-682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study and explore problems perceived by physicians when breaking bad news to advanced cancer patients about discontinuing or not offering tumor-specific treatment due to incurable cancer. Design: A qualitative phenomenographic interview study. Setting: The county of Östergötland in Sweden. Participants: Thirty physicians with different demographic characteristics. Results: According to the physicians' answers breaking bad news was perceived as involving a risk of losing control in different ways, regarding emotions, oneself, confidence, professionalism and patient trust. Four different main categories described as problems were identified, perceptions focusing on existential thoughts, relationships, knowledge, and perceptions related to time and environmental disturbances. Conclusion: Physicians perceived that breaking bad news to dying patients with cancer involved a risk of losing control. Existential thoughts and a lack of knowledge contribute to this risk. Theoretical education in existentiality/spirituality and clinical practice in a palliative context may help maintaining control. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  • 27.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of LAH/Linnéa.
    Strang, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Doctors' strategies when breaking bad news to terminally ill cancer patients2003In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, ISSN 1096-6218, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 565-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breaking bad news to patients with a terminal disease is a difficult task for physicians. The aim of this study was to study how doctors perceive their strategies when giving information to cancer patients about discontinuing active tumour treatment. Thirty doctors with different demographic characteristics working with patients with cancer in Sweden participated. Semistructured interviews were conducted and analyzed using a qualitative phenomenographic method. The goal when giving this information was described as making the patient understands while being as considerate as possible. However, the strategies for reaching this goal were different: (1) explaining and convincing information, (i.e., giving a long explanation about why treatment has to be discontinued); (2) softening the impact of the information, with the doctor recommending discontinuation of treatment; (3) and preparing either the patient or the physician himself/herself for the information; (4) adapting or tailoring the information to the patient, with the doctor actively seeking knowledge about the patient in order to be able to adapt the information to the patient's level, or with the doctor briefly describing the situation and then remaining silent, allowing room for the patient's reactions and questions (i.e., letting the patient take an active part). When giving information, the doctors' goal was to make patients understand, but the strategies differed depending on the context.

  • 28.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    Strang, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Maria
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Breaking bad news in the transition from curative to palliative cancer care-patient's view of the doctor giving the information2000In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 472-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the transition from curative to palliative cancer care, communication is of special importance. The aim of this study was to explore how patients with a disseminated cancer disease experienced the information about their incurable state, focusing on the physician. The persons taking part were 30 patients admitted to a hospital-based home care unit in Sweden. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using a qualitative method. All patients described their doctors as experts, despite different qualities. Six subcategories were identified: (1) the inexperienced messenger, (2) the emotionally burdened, (3) the rough and ready expert (4) the benevolent but tactless expert, (5) the "distanced" doctor and (6), the empathic professional. The relationship was described as very important to the patients' capacity to handle the information and was felt to have been built up during earlier meetings. The relationship was described in four subcategories: personal between well-acquainted individuals, impersonal between unacquainted individuals, personal between unacquainted individuals and impersonal between well-acquainted individuals. Both the character of the physician and his or her ability to create personal relationships influence patients' capacity to cope with this specific situation. Education and guidance are needed both in clinical practice and in medical schools.

  • 29.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Strang, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet, FOUU, Stockholms Sjukhem, Stockholm .
    Carlsson, Maria
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Cancer patients' interpretations of verbal expressions when given information about ending cancer treatment2002In: Palliative Medicine, ISSN 0269-2163, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 323-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cancer patients' interpretations of the meaning of words used when given bad news are not well studied in medical settings. The aim of this study was to ascertain what significance verbal expressions had for cancer patients when they were given information about ending active tumour treatment, and what message they felt they received.

    METHODS: Tape-recorded semi-structured interviews were performed and analysed using a qualitative phenomenographical approach.

    RESULTS: Thirty patients with incurable cancer admitted to hospital-based home care unit in Sweden participated. Three main categories about the significance of words emerged: 1) words could indicate indirect warnings as being forewarnings, evasive or ambiguous; 2) words could also be perceived as emotionally trying, as threats or abandoning; 3) other words were fortifying and strengthened the patient in this situation. The overall message given during the information could be interpreted differently: either focused on treatment, on quality of life, or on threat and death.

    CONCLUSION: The understanding of the significance of words to tailor the information to patients helps the physician to use forewarnings and fortifying words and to identify and avoid the use of threatening words.

  • 30.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Strang, Peter
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Carlsson, Maria
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Cancer patients' perceptions of their own participation and own resources after receiving information about discontinuation of active tumour treatment2000In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0001-6381, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 919-925Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of most studies on informational needs has been on primary cancer diagnosis. The aim of this study was to explore how cancer patients in a palliative care setting perceived their own participation and resources after receiving information about the discontinuation of active tumour treatment. Thirty cancer patients admitted to a hospital-based home-care unit participated in the study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using a phenomenographic method. The patients described their own participation as being either verbally passive or active, in order to receive more information or to avoid information. Furthermore, previous knowledge, at different levels, was described as important: 1) Unsuspecting naive, 2) apprehensive suspicious, 3) well prepared. Patients' own resources included a sense of wellbeing, a sense of security and individual strength. In conclusion, patients' previous knowledge and own resources are important components for their capacity to take part in the dialogue when receiving information.

  • 31.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    Strang, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Receiving bad news- experiences of family members2001In: Journal of Palliative Care, ISSN 0825-8597, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 241-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about how next-of-kin experience receiving bad news. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of family members when receiving information about ending tumour treatment, with a focus on their role in this context.

    METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were performed and analyzed using a qualitative phenomenographic method.

    RESULTS: Twenty family members of patients with incurable progressive cancer admitted to hospital-based home care were included in the study. Data showed that family members want to protect, represent, or act on behalf of the patient. Some described themselves as assuming prominent roles: the demander-of-truth role, the secret-keeper role, and the controller role. Others assumed more passive roles: the surrendering role, the considerate listener role, and the excluded outsider role.

    CONCLUSION: This study has revealed possible-explanations as to why family members are dissatisfied with information. The results of this study may help doctors in clinical practice recognize the different types of behaviour family members exhibit when receiving bad news.

  • 32. Grehn, Susanne
    et al.
    Fridell, Karin
    Lilliecreutz, Margaretha
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Dietary habits of Swedish adult coeliac patients treated by a gluten-free diet for 10 years2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Nutrition/Næringsforskning, ISSN 1102-6480, E-ISSN 1651-2359, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 178-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Uncertainty still exists whether coeliac patients living on a gluten-free diet for several years are ensured a nutritionally balanced diet. Objective: To evaluate the dietary habits of adults with longstanding coeliac disease Design: The intake of nutrients and foods was assessed in 49 Swedish coeliac patients (32 women) aged 45-64 years treated for 8-12 years using 4-day dietary record. Compliance with the diet was ascertained by showing a villous intestinal structure at repeat biopsy or normal serological tests. The control group (n:498) consisted of a general population sample of same age. Results: The coeliac patients showing the same energy intake as controls had a lower intake of fibre, niacin equivalents, folate, vitamin B12, calcium, phosphorus and zinc. In relation to recommended intakes, low levels of fibres, folate, vitamin E and selenium were seen in both coeliacs and controls. Significant differences between coeliac patients and controls were seen for half of the food groups under study and this was particularly true for women. Conclusions: The results suggest that Swedish coeliac patients living on a gluten-free diet for several years need to improve their dietary habits. To this end, regularly visiting a dietitian could be helpful to introduce oat-based options and increase the intake of fresh fruits and greens.

  • 33.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bergfors, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Olsen Faresjö, Åshild
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Could gastrointestinal disorders differ in two close but divergent social environments?2012In: International Journal of Health Geographics, ISSN 1476-072X, E-ISSN 1476-072X, Vol. 11, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many public health problems in modern society affect the gastrointestinal area. Knowledge of the disease occurrence in populations is better understood if viewed in a psychosocial context including indicators of the social environment where people spend their lives. The general aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence in the population and between sexes of common gastrointestinal conditions in two neighborhood cities representing two different social environments defined as a "white-collar" and a "blue-collar" city. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: We conducted a retrospective register study using data of diagnosed gastrointestinal disorders (cumulative incidence rates) derived from an administrative health care register based on medical records assigned by the physicians at hospitals and primary care. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Functional gastrointestinal diseases and peptic ulcers were more frequent in the white-collar city, while diagnoses in the gallbladder area were significantly more frequent in the blue-collar city. Functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome, and unspecified functional bowel diseases, and celiac disease, were more frequent among women while esophageal reflux, peptic ulcers, gastric and rectal cancers were more frequent among men regardless of social environment. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: Knowledge of the occurrence of gastrointestinal problems in populations is better understood if viewed in a context were the social environment is included. Indicators of the social environment should therefore also be considered in future studies of the occurrence of gastrointestinal problems.

  • 34.
    Grönlund, V.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Carlsson, A.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kärner, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The desire for a good life - patients beliefs of self-care after a coronary event2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

         

    Introduction: After a first coronary event there is an increased risk for a recurrent event. Despite that risk, 1/5 of the patients continue to smoke, 1/3 is obese and more than half of the patients have elevated blood pressure and total cholesterol. Secondary preventive self-care activities are needed to improve outcomes and the belief of patients plays a vital role in changing behavior.                         

    Aim: To examine patients’ beliefs of self-care 6-12 months after a coronary event.                         

    Method: The study design was qualitative. Twenty-five patients, including 10 women, mean age 65 years with stable coronary artery disease participated in four focus group interviews. Data were taped, transcribed and analyzed according to the conventional content analysis.                         

    Findings: Patients’ belief of self-care is influenced by their desire of a good life even though life seems fragile. Patients try to live up to the standard of health care prescription and advices. However, these achievements require behavior change and conscious boundaries, which are challenged by various obstacles such as fear of, overstrain and stress. Physical activity is considered as both a source to well-being and a necessity, but patients are uncertain and afraid for overstraining. A healthy diet is seen as important but the advices given are sometimes contradictory and create confusion. Medication is found important but not at the cost of all the side-effects. Patients also report that in order to believe in their ability and to be responsible for self-care, support from health care providers is expected. But at the same time the invaluable support and information is often not provided, creating uncertainty.                         

    Discussion: The study highlights the patients’ perspective of self-care and what they view as important in self-care after an event of coronary artery disease. The patients’ expectations on health services comprise information, support and continuous follow-up. This is necessary to facilitate the patient’s responsibility for their own care.                         

    Conclusion: Patients’ beliefs about the concept of self-care after an event of coronary artery disease are multifaceted and voluminous compared to the health care definition. The findings of the study challenge health care policies approach to self-care. There is a need to reconsider and assess what and how secondary preventive patient education should be performed after an event of coronary artery disease.  

                        

  • 35.
    Grönlund, V.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Rudenas, A.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Appel, M.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland.
    Ednarsson, T.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Norrköping.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kärner Köhler, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Problem-based learning after Coronary artery disease - how do patients experience it?2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Gunhardsson, Inger
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Centre of Competence in Palliative Care.
    Svensson, Anna
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Centre of Competence in Palliative Care.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Documentation in palliative care: Nursing documentation in a palliative care unit - A pilot study2008In: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HOSPICE & PALLIATIVE MEDICINE, ISSN 1049-9091, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 45-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Palliative care seeks to enhance quality of life in the face of death by addressing the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs of patients with advanced disease. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether palliative patients needs, nursing actions, and evaluation can be identified in the nursing documentation. Data consisted of reviews of patients' case records in a palliative care unit. Data were analyzed using content analysis and counting frequency of keywords used from the Well-being Integrity Prevention and Safety (VIPS) model, followed by an inductive analysis of the case record documentation aiming to identify palliative care components. The result shows that the documentation revealed physical care, especially pain, more frequently than other needs. Nursing documentation focuses on identification more than on nursing actions and evaluation.

  • 37.
    Haasenritter, Joerg
    et al.
    University of Marburg, Germany .
    Aerts, Marc
    University of Louvain, Belgium .
    Boesner, Stefan
    University of Marburg, Germany .
    Buntinx, Frank
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium .
    Burnand, Bernard
    University of Lausanne Hospital, Switzerland .
    Herzig, Lilli
    University of Lausanne, Switzerland .
    Andre Knottnerus, J
    University of Maastricht, Netherlands .
    Minalu, Girma
    University of Louvain, Belgium .
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, East County Primary Health Care.
    Renier, Walter
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium .
    Sox, Carol
    Dartmouth Medical Sch, NH USA .
    Sox, Harold
    Dartmouth Medical Sch, NH USA .
    Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert
    University of Marburg, Germany .
    Coronary heart disease in primary care: accuracy of medical history and physical findings in patients with chest pain - a study protocol for a systematic review with individual patient data2012In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 13, no 81Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chest pain is a common complaint in primary care, with coronary heart disease (CHD) being the most concerning of many potential causes. Systematic reviews on the sensitivity and specificity of symptoms and signs summarize the evidence about which of them are most useful in making a diagnosis. Previous meta-analyses are dominated by studies of patients referred to specialists. Moreover, as the analysis is typically based on study-level data, the statistical analyses in these reviews are limited while meta-analyses based on individual patient data can provide additional information. Our patient-level meta-analysis has three unique aims. First, we strive to determine the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms and signs for myocardial ischemia in primary care. Second, we investigate associations between study-or patient-level characteristics and measures of diagnostic accuracy. Third, we aim to validate existing clinical prediction rules for diagnosing myocardial ischemia in primary care. This article describes the methods of our study and six prospective studies of primary care patients with chest pain. Later articles will describe the main results. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods/Design: We will conduct a systematic review and IPD meta-analysis of studies evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms and signs for diagnosing coronary heart disease in primary care. We will perform bivariate analyses to determine the sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios of individual symptoms and signs and multivariate analyses to explore the diagnostic value of an optimal combination of all symptoms and signs based on all data of all studies. We will validate existing clinical prediction rules from each of the included studies by calculating measures of diagnostic accuracy separately by study. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDiscussion: Our study will face several methodological challenges. First, the number of studies will be limited. Second, the investigators of original studies defined some outcomes and predictors differently. Third, the studies did not collect the same standard clinical data set. Fourth, missing data, varying from partly missing to fully missing, will have to be dealt with. Despite these limitations, we aim to summarize the available evidence regarding the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms and signs for diagnosing CHD in patients presenting with chest pain in primary care. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanReview registration: Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (University of York): CRD42011001170

  • 38.
    Hadimeri, Henrik
    et al.
    Kärnsjukhuset, Skövde, Sweden.
    Frisenette-Fich, Carsten
    Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Deurell, Sven-Ingemar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Svensson, Lars
    Höglandssjukhuset, Eksjö, Sweden.
    Carlsson-Bjering, Lena
    Höglandssjukhuset, Eksjö, Sweden.
    Fernström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Melander, Stefan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Haarhaus, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Andersson, Per-Olof
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Cassel, Agneta
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Mauritz, Nils-Johan
    Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ståhl-Nilsson, Agneta
    Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wilske, Jan
    Värnamo Sjukhus, Sweden .
    Nordström, Kataryna
    Värnamo Sjukhus, Sweden .
    Oruda, Pavel
    Värnamo Sjukhus, Sweden .
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Inghilesi Larsson, Annelie
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Stegmayr, Bernd
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    A fixed protocol for outpatient clinic routines in the care of patients with severe renal failure2013In: Renal failure, ISSN 0886-022X, E-ISSN 1525-6049, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 845-854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The primary aim of this study was to assess whether a fixed protocol, using a specially trained team, for intermediate follow-up to fulfillment of guideline targets is non-inferior to conventional follow-up in the care of uraemic patients. A secondary aim was to investigate possible impact on patient outcome.

    METHODS:

    The cohort comprised 424 patients from seven centers. Inclusion criteria were either serum creatinine exceeding 200 µmol/l or calculated clearance below 30 ml/min, representing CKD 4 or 5a. Six centers followed a standardized protocol (group 1). One center provided controls (group 2). The study design was prospective and interventional. The variables measured were blood hemoglobin, bicarbonate, calcium, phosphate, intact parathyroid hormone, albumin, renal function variables, blood pressure and RAAS blockade. The number of patients achieving the set goals was analyzed as a time trend to determine if the intervention resulted in an improvement.

    RESULTS:

    At baseline, group 1 had significantly lower GFR and higher serum creatinine, calcium, phosphate, calcium × phosphate product and bicarbonate, lower mean arterial pressure (MAP), systolic blood pressures and less use of RAAS. During the intervention, group 1 improved in the direction of guidelines for blood hemoglobin, albumin, bicarbonate and MAP. Outcome of secondary endpoints gave a risk of death of 30% in both groups, while the risk of renal replacement therapy was higher in group 1.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    However, the time to renal replacement therapy was significantly shorter in the intervention group, indicating that other variables than guideline achievements are important for the patient.

  • 39.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Swedish oats is superior to usual diet in maintaining ulcerative colitis patients in remission2010In: J Crohn’s & Colitis, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Women with coeliac disease living on a gluten-free diet for years continue to seek more health-care2009In: Gut 2009;58 (suppl II) A262., 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Hallert, Claes
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Björck, Inger
    Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Chemical Center, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nyman, Margareta
    Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Chemical Center, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Pousette, Anneli
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Grännö, Christer
    Departments of Internal Medicine, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping.
    Svensson, Hans
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Increasing Fecal Butyrate in Ulcerative Colitis Patients by Diet: Controlled Pilot Study2003In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 116-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Topical butyrate has been shown to be effective in the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC). Butyrate is derived from colonic fermentation of dietary fiber, and our aim was to study whether UC patients could safely increase the fecal butyrate level by dietary means. We enrolled 22 patients with quiescent UC (mean age, 44 years; 45% women; median time from last relapse, 1 year) in a controlled pilot trial lasting 3 months. The patients were instructed to add 60 g oat bran (corresponding to 20 g dietary fiber) to the daily diet, mainly as bread slices. Fecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) including butyrate, disease activity, and gastrointestinal symptoms were recorded every 4 weeks. During the oat bran intervention the fecal butyrate concentration increased by 36% at 4 weeks (from 11 +/- 2 (mean +/- SEM) to 15 +/- 2 mumol/g feces) (p < 0.01). The mean butyrate concentration over the entire test period was 14 +/-1 &mu;mol/g feces (p < 0.05). Remaining fecal SCFA levels were unchanged. No patient showed signs of colitis relapse. Unlike controls, the patients showed no increase in gastrointestinal complaints during the trial. Yet patients reporting abdominal pain and reflux complaints at entry showed significant improvement at 12 weeks that returned to baseline 3 months later. This pilot study shows that patients with quiescent UC can safely take a diet rich in oat bran specifically to increase the fecal butyrate level. This may have clinical implications and warrants studies of the long-term benefits of using oat bran in the maintenance therapy in UC.

  • 42.
    Hallert, Claes
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Roos, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    On treatment outcomes in coeliac disease diagnosed in adulthood2012In: Celiac Disease - From Pathophysiology to Advanced Therapies / [ed] Peter Kruzliak and Govind Bhagat, InTech, 2012, p. 159-184Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing grains (including wheat, rye and barley) in genetically susceptible individuals. CD can manifest itself with a previously unappreciated range of clinical presentations, including the typical malabsorption syndrome and a spectrum of symptoms potentially affecting any organ system. Since CD often presents in an atypical or even silent manner, many cases remain undiagnosed and carry the risk of long-term complications, including anemia and other hematological complications, osteoporosis, neurological complications or cancer. The high prevalence of the disease and its variety of clinical outcomes raise several interesting questions. This book covers most of the aforementioned controversial and yet unresolved topics by including the contributions of experts in CD.What the reader will surely find stimulating about this book is not only its exhaustive coverage of our current knowledge of CD, but also provocative new concepts in disease pathogenesis and  treatment.

  • 43.
    Hallert, Claes
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Sandlund, Olga
    Broqvist, Mari
    Perceptions of health-related quality of life of men and women living with coeliac disease2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 301-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women with long-standing coeliac disease express poorer health-related quality of life (HRQoL) than men do for unclear reasons. This led us to explore differences in their understanding of HRQoL using a phenomenographic approach. We interviewed 10 coeliac subjects (mean age 57 years, range 35-73) who had been on a gluten-free diet for 10 years and had scored either high or low in the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) General Health and Vitality scales. Three dimensions were revealed that pertained to their perception of HRQoL: bodily sensations, social consequences and coping strategies. Within these, the women experienced more bowel symptoms than men did, despite keeping to a strict diet. This item was the only one predicting the SF-36 scores. The women also described more distress caused by the restrictions in daily life, closely related to their controlling of food contents. The coeliac men took advantage of using a problem-oriented coping approach while the women seeking an emotionally oriented strategy showed less satisfaction with the outcome. We conclude that the intriguing difference in HRQoL between coeliac men and women may have some of its origin in the way living with the disorder is conceptualized and coped with. The results imply that in the management of coeliac patients, gender-related aspects need to be taken into account to improve treatment outcome.

  • 44.
    Hallert, Claes
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Grehn, Susanne
    Celiakiboken om glutenintolerans2005In: Celiakiboken om glutenintoerans / [ed] Claes Hallert, Lars Stenhammar, Susanne Grehn, Stockholm: Förlagshuset Gothia , 2005, 1, p. 11-125Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Celiakiboken vänder sig i första hand till personer med celiaki (glutenintolerans) och deras närstående men också till andra som kommer i kontakt med celiaki. Innehållet är vetenskapligt granskat och kan användas vid utbildning och fortbildning av vårdpersonal på alla nivåer. Boken förmedlar tio unika nycklar till ett gott, glutenfritt liv med hög livskvalitet. Den tar upp olika typer av celiaki, hur gluten påverkar tarmen, olika symtom hos både vuxna och barn samt de senaste resultaten inom aktuell forskning. Ett stort utrymme ägnas åt själva behandlingen med mat utan gluten.

     

  • 45.
    Hallert, Claes
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Svensson, M.
    Värnamo Hospital.
    Tholstrup, J.
    Eksjö Hospital .
    Hultberg, B.
    Lund University Hospital.
    B vitamins improve health in patients with coeliac disease living on a gluten-free diet2009In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 811-816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Patients with coeliac disease living on a gluten-free diet show vitamin deficiency and reduced subjective health status.

    Aim To study the biochemical and clinical effects of B vitamin supplementation in adults with longstanding coeliac disease.

    Methods In a double blind placebo controlled multicentre trial, 65 coeliac patients (61% women) aged 45–64 years on a strict gluten-free diet for several years were randomized to a daily dose of 0.8 mg folic acid,0.5 mg cyanocobalamin and 3 mg pyridoxine or placebo for 6 months. The outcome measures were psychological general well-being (PGWB) and the plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) level, marker of B vitamin status.

    Results Fifty-seven patients (88%) completed the trial. The tHcy level was baseline median 11.7 μmol/L (7.4–23.0), significantly higher than in matched population controls [10.2 μmol/L (6.7–22.6) (P < 0.01)]. Following vitamin supplementation, tHcy dropped a median of 34% (P < 0.001), accompanied by significant improvement in well-being (P < 0.01), notably Anxiety (P < 0.05) and Depressed Mood (P < 0.05) for patients with poor well-being.

    Conclusions Adults with longstanding coeliac disease taking extra B vitamins for 6 months showed normalized tHcy and significant improvement in general well-being, suggesting that B vitamins should be considered in people advised to follow a gluten-free diet.

  • 46.
    Hallert, Claes
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Sverker, Annette
    Nordiska folkhälsohögskolan, Göteborg.
    Fridell, Karin
    Må bra med glutenintolerans: fakta, råd, recept2009 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Må bra med glutenintolerans är för dig som inte tål gluten, oavsett om du varit glutenintolerant under en lång tid eller om du nyligen fått diagnosen celiaki. Skriften är författad av docent Claes Hallert som är en av Sveriges mest namnkunniga läkare inom området. Claes ger en pedagogisk förklaring av sjukdomen, orsak, symtom och behandling samt aktuell forskning.Aukt socionom Annette Sverker, verksam på Nordiska folkhälsohögskolan i Göteborg, ger tips och råd hur du kan hantera vardagen som glutenintolerant, när du ska handla glutenfritt, äta på restaurang, fika på arbetet, äta middag hos vänner eller åka på utlandssemester.Dietisten Karin Fridell berättar vad man kan äta och vad man måste undvika som glutenintolerant. Karin redogör även för de nya EU-reglerna kring livsmedelsmärkning, ger baktips och en rad nya glutenfria recept.Skriften är rikligt illustrerad med inspirerande foton. Den är faktagranskad av leg. dietist Carina Lunneryd, Lunds universitetssjukhus, Iréne Jonson, Svenska celiakiförbundet och leg. läkare Ann Österman som själv är

  • 47.
    Hjelmfors, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Communicating prognosis and end-of-life care to heart failure patients: a survey of heart failure nurses' perspectives2014In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 152-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Many heart failure (HF) patients have palliative care needs, but communication about prognosis and end-of-life care is lacking. HF nurses can play an important role in such communication, but their views on this have rarely been sought.

    AIMS:

    This study aims to describe HF nurses' perspectives on, and daily practice regarding, discussing prognosis and end-of-life care with HF patients in outpatient care. It further aims to explore barriers, facilitators and related factors for discussing these issues.

    METHODS:

    A national survey including nurses from outpatient clinics and primary health care centres was performed. Data was collected using a questionnaire on communication with HF patients about prognosis and end-of-life care.

    RESULTS:

    In total, 111 (82%) of the HF nurses completed the questionnaire. Most of them reported that physicians should have the main responsibility for discussing prognosis (69%) and end-of-life care (67%). Most nurses felt knowledgeable to have these discussions, but 91% reported a need for further training in at least one of the areas. Barriers for communication about prognosis and end-of-life care included the unpredictable trajectory of HF, patients' comorbidities and the opinion that patients in NYHA class II-III are not in the end-of-life.

    CONCLUSION:

    Although HF nurses feel competent discussing prognosis and end-of-life care with the HF patient, they are hesitant to have these conversations. This might be partly explained by the fact that they consider the physician to be responsible for such conversations, and by perceived barriers to communication. This implies a need for clinical policy and education for HF nurses to expand their knowledge and awareness of the patients' possible needs for palliative care.

  • 48.
    Holmberg, M
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Norrköping.
    Steins, Krisjanis
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Does high ICU occupancy have adverse effects on patient outcomes? An obeservational multicentre study of the relationship between occupancy, length-of-stay and mortality2013In: Intensive Care Medicine, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Hultberg, Josabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Norrköping.
    Rudebeck, Carl Edvard
    Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsoe, Norway.
    Clinical Gaze in Risk-Factor Haze: Swedish GPs' Perceptions of Prescribing Cardiovascular Preventive Drugs2012In: International Journal of Family Medicine, ISSN 2090-2042, E-ISSN 2090-2050, Vol. 2012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims. To explore general practitioners' (GPs') descriptions of their thoughts and action when prescribing cardiovascular preventive drugs. Methods. Qualitative content analysis of transcribed group interviews with 14 participants from two primary health care centres in the southeast of Sweden. Results. GPs' prescribing of cardiovascular preventive drugs, from their own descriptions, involved "the patient as calculated" and "the inclination to prescribe," which were negotiated in the interaction with "the patient in front of me." In situations with high cardiovascular risk, the GPs reported a tendency to adopt a directive consultation style. In situations with low cardiovascular risk and great uncertainty about the net benefit of preventive drugs, the GPs described a preference for an informed patient choice. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that GPs mainly involve patients at low and uncertain risk of cardiovascular disease in treatment decisions, whereas patient involvement tends to decrease when GPs judge the cardiovascular risk as high. Our findings may serve as a memento for clinicians, and we suggest them to be considered in training in communication skills.

  • 50.
    Johnsson, F
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Surg, S-22100 Lund, Sweden Ostfold Cty Hosp, Dept Med, Sarpsborg, Norway Holbaek Cty Hosp, Dept Med, Holbaek, Denmark Linkoping Cty Hosp, Dept Med, Linkoping, Sweden Wyeth Lederle Nordiska, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Moum, B
    Lund Univ, Dept Surg, S-22100 Lund, Sweden Ostfold Cty Hosp, Dept Med, Sarpsborg, Norway Holbaek Cty Hosp, Dept Med, Holbaek, Denmark Linkoping Cty Hosp, Dept Med, Linkoping, Sweden Wyeth Lederle Nordiska, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vilien, M
    Lund Univ, Dept Surg, S-22100 Lund, Sweden Ostfold Cty Hosp, Dept Med, Sarpsborg, Norway Holbaek Cty Hosp, Dept Med, Holbaek, Denmark Linkoping Cty Hosp, Dept Med, Linkoping, Sweden Wyeth Lederle Nordiska, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grove, O
    Lund Univ, Dept Surg, S-22100 Lund, Sweden Ostfold Cty Hosp, Dept Med, Sarpsborg, Norway Holbaek Cty Hosp, Dept Med, Holbaek, Denmark Linkoping Cty Hosp, Dept Med, Linkoping, Sweden Wyeth Lederle Nordiska, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Simren, M
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine VHN.
    Thoring, M
    Lund Univ, Dept Surg, S-22100 Lund, Sweden Ostfold Cty Hosp, Dept Med, Sarpsborg, Norway Holbaek Cty Hosp, Dept Med, Holbaek, Denmark Linkoping Cty Hosp, Dept Med, Linkoping, Sweden Wyeth Lederle Nordiska, Stockholm, Sweden.
    On-demand treatment in patients with oesophagitis and reflux symptoms: Comparison of lansoprazole and omeprazole2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 642-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are few data on how patients on maintenance treatment of reflux oesophagitis take their medication. This study was designed to investigate the dosing patterns of patients on on-demand treatment and to compare lansoprazole with omeprazole in this regard. Methods: Patients with reflux oesophagitis, initially treated until absence of symptoms, took capsules of either lansoprazole (30 mg) or omeprazole (20 mg) for 6 months, they were instructed to take the medication only when reflux symptoms occurred. In order to document dosing patterns, the medication was dispensed in bottles supplied with a Medication Event Monitoring System recording date and time the bottles were opened. There were regular follow-up visits with assessment of symptoms. Results: Three-hundred patients were eligible for analysis according to 'all patients treated'. A dosing pattern was found of an increased intake mornings and evenings and constant intervals between intakes. Although there was no correlation between oesophagitis grade or initial symptoms and the amount of medication consumed, the patients had significantly fewer reflux symptoms the more medication they consumed. There was no difference in the number of capsules consumed between the lansoprazole (0.73 capsules/day) and omeprazole groups (0.71 capsules/day). Nor was there any difference between the groups in reflux symptoms during the course of the study. Conclusion: Despite rigorous instructions to take medication on demand, the results suggest that it is patient habits more so than symptoms that determine the frequency and interval of medication intake. Symptoms are not therefore decisive for the amount of medication consumed.

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