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  • 1.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Learning about being well - not just about being ill.2000In: Medical Education, ISSN 0308-0110, E-ISSN 1365-2923, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 337-338Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2. Andersson, A
    et al.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Kjellman, Görel
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Ockander, Marlene
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society.
    Skargren, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Vad är en god arbetslivsinriktad rehabilitering? Slutsatser baserade på en litteratursammanställning2003Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Andersson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Hallberg, Nicklas
    FOI.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    A management information system-model for process-oriented health care2004In: Medinfo, IOS Press , 2004, p. 1008-1012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Arneson, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Health Promotion Priorities by Employees in the Swedich Public Sector2002In: Humans in a Complex Environment,2002, 2002, p. 43-49Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Balducci, C
    et al.
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Mnich, E
    Hamburg university, Germany.
    McKee, K
    University of Sheffield, United Kingdom.
    Lamura, G
    INRCA, Anacona, Italy.
    Beckmann, A
    Hamburg university, Germany.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy.
    Wojszel, B
    University of Bialystok, Poland.
    Noland, M
    University of Sheffield, United Kingdom.
    Prouskas, C
    Sextant Group, Athens, Greece.
    Bien, B
    University of Bialystok, Poland.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Negative impact and positive value in caregiving: Validation of the COPE index in a six-country sample of carers2008In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 276-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The present study attempts to further validate the COPE Index on a large sample of carers drawn from six European countries. Design and Methods: We used a cross-sectional survey, with approximately 1,000 carers recruited in each of six countries by means of a common standard evaluation protocol. Our saturation recruitment of a designated quota of carers occurred by means of several channels, in identified geographical zones within countries. Interviews were carried out with primary informal carers by use of a common assessment tool. We subjected items of the COPE Index to principal component analysis and we assessed emergent components through the use of Cronbach's alpha reliability procedures. We examined factor components as summative scales for confirmatory correlations with caregiving and psychological variables. Results: Three components emerged, which we identified as the negative impact of caregiving, the positive value of caregiving, and the quality of support for caregiving. Internal consistency was good for negative impact and satisfactory for positive value and quality of support. Negative value was most consistently and strongly correlated with caregiving and psychological variables, although we did find diverse associations between these variables and the COPE Index subscales. Implications: The COPE Index is a brief, first-stage assessment of some sophistication that can enable health and social care professionals to develop appropriately targeted interventions to enhance the positive aspects of the caregiving experience and quality of support, as well as reduce the negative impacts of caregiving. Copyright 2008 by The Gerontological Society of America.

  • 6.
    Barajas, Josefin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Nordqvist, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Intervention Elucidate Intra Organisational Hindrance to Employee Development2002In: Humans in a Complex Environment,2002, 2002, p. 67-70Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Hensing, G
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Ebeling, C
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Schedin, A
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    What are the qualities of dilemmas experienced when prescribing opioids in general practice? 1999In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 82, p. 89-96Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Hensing, G
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    McKenzie, L
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Stridsman, A-K
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Prescribing benzodiazepines - a critical incident study of a physician dilemma.  1999In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 49, p. 459-467Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Hultberg, J
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Carlsson, M
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Jones, A Wayne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry.
    Monitoring ethanol exposure in a clinical setting by analysis of blood, breath, saliva, and urine.1999In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 0145-6008, E-ISSN 1530-0277, Vol. 23, p. 1446-1451Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Jones, AW
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Forensic Medicine.
    Impact of water-induced diuresis on excretion profiles of ethanol, urin-creatinine, and urine-osmolality. 1999In: Journal of Analytical Toxicology, ISSN 0146-4760, E-ISSN 1945-2403, Vol. 23, p. 565-569Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Lejman Dahlström, M
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Bjurulf, P
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Sociodemographic gender differences in patients attending a community-based alcohol treatment centre2002In: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 21-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study included all individuals attending a community-based treatment centre during a 4-year period. Patients were referred to the treatment centre from the primary health care (17%), social insurance office (8%), social workers (19%), employers (7%), prisons and probation administration (3%), on their own initiative (25%), and by other means (21%). The participants, 355 men and 164 women, all between 18 and 64 years of age, were compared with the total population in the municipality with regards to gender differences in sociodemographic characteristics. Adult life circumstances such as legal problems, broken relationships, unemployment and lower social class, in both men and women, were clearly associated with an alcohol dependence or at least of seeking help for this problem. The study also emphasises important social consequences of alcohol dependence in women, such as legal problems and drunk driving, normally associated with male alcohol dependence. The study revealed that living with an abusing partner was associated with a higher frequency of alcohol dependence in women. The findings are important issues to address when offering treatment to women with alcohol dependence. ⌐ 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 12.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Acceptability of computerized self-report of alcohol habits: A patient perspective. 1999In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 34, p. 575-580Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Åkerlind, I
    FoU enheten Norrköping.
    Changes in attitudes and practice in primary health care with regard to early intervention for problem drinkers. 1999In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 34, p. 795-800Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Bernfort, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Nordlund, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Economic evaluation in a cluster randomized controlled study of work place intervention in south-east Sweden2006In: International workshop Economic Evaluations of Occupational Health Interventions,2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Bång, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Holm, Einar
    Nordin, Conny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Mobile phone computing for in-situ cognitive-behavioral therapy2007In: MedINFO 2007,2007, IOS Press, 2007, p. 1078-1082Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for psychological disorders is becoming increasingly popular on the Internet. However when using this workstation approach, components such as training and learning relaxation skills, problem solving, exposure exercises, and sleep management guidance must be done in the domestic environment. This paper describes design concepts for providing spatially explicit CBT with mobile phones. We reviewed and analyzed a set of treatment manuals to distinguish elements of CBT that can be improved and supported using mobile phone applications. The key advantage of mobile computing support in CBT is that multimedia can be applied to record, scale, and label anxiety-provoking situations where the need arises, which helps the CBT clients formulate and convey their thoughts and feelings to relatives and friends, as well as to therapists at subsequent treatment sessions.

  • 16.
    Cedergren, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Selbing, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Löfman, Owe
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Källen, Bengt A. J.
    Tornblad Institute, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Chlorination Byproducts and Nitrate in Drinking Water and Risk for Congenital Cardiac Defects2002In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 124-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drinking water disinfection byproducts have been associated with an increased risk for congenital defects including cardiac defects. Using Swedish health registers linked to information on municipal drinking water composition, individual data on drinking water characteristics were obtained for 58,669 women. Among the infants born, 753 had a cardiac defect. The risk for a cardiac defect was determined for ground water versus surface water, for different chlorination procedures, and for trihalomethane and nitrate concentrations. Ground water was associated with an increased risk for cardiac defect when crude rates were analyzed but after suitable adjustments this excess rate was found to be determined by chlorination procedures including chlorine dioxide. Chlorine dioxide appears itself as an independent risk factor for cardiac defects (adjusted odds ratio 1.61 (95%CI 1.00–2.59)). The risk for cardiac defects increased with increasing trihalomethane concentrations (P=0.0005). There was an indicated but statistically nonsignificant excess risk associated with nitrate concentration. The individual risk for congenital cardiac defect caused by chlorine dioxide and trihalomethanes is small but as a large population is exposed to public drinking water, the attributable risk for cardiac defects may not be negligible.

  • 17.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Hass, Ursula
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A simple method for heuristic modeling of expert knowledge in chronic disease: identification of prognostic subgroups in rheumatology2008In: eHealth Beyond the Horizon – Get IT There, IOS Press, 2008, Vol. 136, p. 157-162Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identification of prognostic subgroups is of key clinical interest at the early stages of chronic disease. The aim of this study is to examine whether representation of physicians' expert knowledge in a simple heuristic model can improve data mining methods in prognostic assessments of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Five rheumatology consultants' experiences of clinical data patterns among RA patients, as distinguished from healthy reference populations, were formally represented in a simple heuristic model. The model was used in K-mean-clustering to determine prognostic subgroups. Cross-sectional validation using physician's global assessment scores indicated that the simple heuristic model performed better than crude data made in identification of prognostic subgroups of RA patients. A simple heuristic model of experts' knowledge was found useful for semi-automatic data mining in the chronic disease setting. Further studies using categorical baseline data and prospective outcome variables are warranted and will be examined in the Swedish TIRA-program.

  • 18.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Rehabiliation and Health Promotion at the Work Place2002In: Humans in a Complex Environment,2002, 2002, p. 209-214Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Morin, Magnus
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, ASLAB - Application Systems Laboratory.
    Gursky, Elin
    Holm, Einar
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Ontology based modeling of pandemic simulation2007In: MedINFO 2007,2007, IOS Press, 2007, p. 755-759Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computer-based simulation of influenza outbreaks in local communities can help researchers, epidemiologists, and decision makers better understand the impact of the community structure on the reproduction rate of disease, and the relative benefits of different types of prevention and interventions. The goal of scenario modeling is to develop a description of scenario components, such us the disease, the community and interventions. An ontology-based representation of the scenario model together with a modeling tool, which is based on an extension to Protege assist scenario developers in formulating simulation specifications. This approach allows the exploration of new ideas by rapidly formulating and reconstructing scenarios from novel components.

  • 20. Faresjö, Åshild
    et al.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    A case-control study of irritable bowel syndrome in primary care - female patients are seriously affected by psychosocial problems in their every day life2006In: EUPHA 14th annual conference,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Garpenholt, Ö
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of health and environment.
    Fredlund, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of health and environment.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Immunization against Haemophilus influenzae type b in Sweden - A study of the introduction process2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 271-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To study the introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccination in Sweden, and to identify factors promoting and inhibiting the process. Methods. The introduction of general childhood vaccination against Hib in Sweden in 1992-93 was studied using the Cultural Historical Activity Theory as a theoretical framework. Results: Five activity systems were found to be involved in the introduction process, the systems of vaccine production, government administration, news distribution, science, and disease prevention. The critical factors for introduction of the programme were found to be the vaccine product, conception of the disease, government economy and public decision-making. Conclusions: The results show that a broad range of non-biomedical aspects must be considered when a public health intervention such as a general vaccination programme is introduced.

  • 22.
    Garvin, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Levels of circulating matrix metallo proteinase-9 is associated to psychosocial factors and lifestyle2006In: XIV International Symposium on Atherosclerosis,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Garvin, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Nijm, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Psychosocial factors in atherosclerosis2006In: XIV International Symposium on Atherosclerosis,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Graspemo, Gabriella
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Hassling, Linda
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Nordfeldt, Sam
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Design of interactive health drama built on social realism.2004In: MedInfo, IOS Publishing , 2004, Vol. 11, no Pt 2, p. 879-883Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are many psychosocial aspects of chronic diseases, such as diabetes. Educational multimedia can support patients with chronic diseases and their families by communicating narratives based on social realism. The production of such socio-realistic interactive health dramas requires systematic methods, especially for the identification of significant stories. The aim of this study is to explore the use of self-documentary video in the design of an Interactive Health Drama environment to support diabetic adolescents and their families. In particular, the potential of the self-documentary video for story development in combination with qualitative interviews were explored. The proposed approach, when further developed, is intended to enable all types of chronic disease patients to work with their specific psychosocial problems in a supportive and stimulating environment adapted to their personality and preferences.

  • 25.
    Hallberg, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosenqvist, A. M
    Department of Geriatrics, Ryhovs Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Kartous, L
    Department of Geriatrics, Ryhovs Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Löfman, Owe
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Health-related quality of life after osteoporotic fractures2004In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 15, no 10, p. 834-841Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To estimate the impact of osteoporosis fractures on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in postmenopausal women. Methods: To compare the impact on HRQOL of different osteoporotic fractures, 600 consecutive women 55-75 years old with a new fracture (inclusion fracture) were invited by mail. After exclusions by preset criteria (high-energy fractures, ongoing osteoporosis treatment, or unwillingness to participate), 303 women were included, 171 (56%) of whom had a forearm, 37 (12%) proximal humerus, 40 (13%) hip, and 55 (18%) vertebral fracture, respectively, and all were investigated and treated according to the current local consensus program for osteoporosis. In addition, HRQOL was evaluated by the SF-36 questionnaire and compared with local, age-matched reference material. Examinations were performed 82 days (median) after the fracture and 2 years later. Results: HRQOL was significantly reduced at baseline regarding all SF-36 domains after vertebral fractures and most after hip fractures, but only regarding some domains after forearm and humerus fracture. After 2 years, improvements had occurred after all types of fractures, and after forearm or humerus fracture, HRQOL was completely normalized in all domains. However, 2 years after hip fracture, HRQOL was still below normal regarding physical function, role-physical and social function, while after vertebral fracture, scores were still significantly lower for all domains, physical as well as mental. Patients with one or more previous fractures before the inclusion fracture had lower HRQOL at baseline and after 2 years, compared with those with no previous fracture. Patients with osteoporosis (T-score < - 2.5 in hip or spine) had lower HRQOL than those with normal BMD. Conclusion: Vertebral and hip fractures have a considerably greater and more prolonged impact on HRQOL than forearm and humerus fractures. The number of fractures was inversely correlated to HRQOL. These differences should be taken into account when making priorities in health care programs.

  • 26. Hallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Hallberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Towards second-generation smart card-based authentication in health information systems: the secure server model.2001In: Medinfo, ISSN 1569-6332, Vol. 10, no Pt 2, p. 1257-1261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conventional smart card-based authentication systems used in health care alleviate some of the security issues in user and system authentication. Existing models still do not cover all security aspects. To enable new protective measures to be developed, an extended model of the authentication process is presented. This model includes a new entity referred to as secure server. Assuming a secure server, a method where the smart card is aware of the status of the terminal integrity verification becomes feasible. The card can then act upon this knowledge and restrict the exposure of sensitive information to the terminal as required in order to minimize the risks. The secure server model can be used to illuminate the weaknesses of current approaches and the need for extensions which alleviate the resulting risks.

  • 27.
    Hallberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Johansson, M
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    A prototype computer network service for occupational therapists. 1999In: Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine, ISSN 0169-2607, E-ISSN 1872-7565, Vol. 59, p. 45-54Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Hammer, Ann
    et al.
    Rehab Örebro US.
    Nilsagård, Ylva
    Sjukgymnastik Örebro US.
    Forsberg, Anette
    Rehab Örebro US.
    Pepa, Helena
    Sjukgymnastik Örebro US.
    Skargren, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of therapeutic riding (Sweden)/hippotherapy (United States). A single-subject experimental design study replicated in eleven patients with multiple sclerosis2005In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 51-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether therapeutic riding (TR, Sweden) hippotherapy (HT, United States) may affect balance, gait, spasticity, functional strength, coordination, pain, self-rated level of muscle tension (SRLMT), activities of daily living (ADL), and health-related quality of life. Eleven patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) were studied in a single-subject experimental design (SSED) study, type A-B-A. The intervention comprised ten weekly TR/HT sessions of 30 minutes each. The subjects were measured a maximum of 13 times. Physical tests were: the Berg balance scale, walking a figure of eight, the timed up and go test, 10 m walking, the modified Ashworth scale, the Index of Muscle Function, the Birgitta Lindmark motor assessment, part B, and individual measurements. Self-rated measures were: the Visual Analog Scale for pain, a scale for SRLMT, the Patient-Specific Functional Scale for ADL, and the SF-36. Data were analyzed visually, semi-statistically and considering clinical significance. Results showed improvement for ten subjects in one or more of the variables, particularly balance, and some improvements were also seen in pain, muscle tension, and ADL. Changes in SF-36 were mostly positive, with an improvement in Role-Emotional seen in eight patients. Conclusively, balance and Role-Emotional were the variables most often improved, but TR/HT appeared to benefit the subjects differently.

  • 29.
    Hassling, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Graspemo, Gabriella
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Nordfeldt, Sam
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Health education technology: Experiences from the use of the cultural probe method2004In: Medinfo 2004,2004, Bethesda, MD: American Medical Informatics Association , 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Hassling, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Nordfeldt, Sam
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Use of cultural probes for representation of chronic disease experience: Exploration of an innovative method for design of supportive technologies2005In: Technology and Health Care, ISSN 0928-7329, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 87-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic diseases do not only manifest themselves as sets of pathophysiological factors. They bring about an equally important psychosocial impact. Unfortunately, it is difficult to account for this impact in the development of supportive technologies. This study describes and explores a method for elicitation of requirements on technologies supporting self-management including emotional aspects. The method takes advantage of a self-documentary media kit for collection of data from the everyday context of chronic disease. The resulting contextual data can contribute new insights to multi-disciplinary teams in the design of supporting technologies.

  • 31.
    Hermansson, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, PC - Psykiatricentrum, FMC - Flyktingmedicinskt centrum.
    Thyberg, M
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Survival with pain: an eight-year follow-up of war-wounded refugees.2001In: Medicine, conflict and survival, ISSN 1362-3699, E-ISSN 1743-9396, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 102-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of chronic pain in male war-wounded refugees and to examine the relationship between chronic pain and psychiatric symptoms. A culturally heterogeneous group of 44 war-wounded refugees were investigated during hospitalization, shortly after arrival, and followed up after two years. This study is an additional follow-up after eight years. The data collection methods used were structured interviews and physical examination. The measures of outcome were: Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) grading of pain, clinical categorization of pain into nociceptive or neurogenic, Hopkins Symptom Check List (HSCL-25), Post Traumatic Symptom Scale (PTSS-10). Chronic pain was found in 32 (73%) out of 44 subjects. The pain was purely nociceptive and neurogenic in 53% and 25%, respectively. The frequency of psychiatric symptoms was significantly related to the mean intensity of pain. War-wounded refugees display psychiatric symptoms and chronic pain in a complex pattern. Further research is needed as a basis for pain rehabilitation programmes suitable for this group.

  • 32.
    Hermansson, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, PC - Psykiatricentrum, FMC - Flyktingmedicinskt centrum.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    How do you feel? A self-rating scale for measuring well-being in refugees. 1999In: Transcultural Psychiatry, ISSN 1363-4615, E-ISSN 1461-7471, Vol. 36, p. 317-328Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Psychosocialfactors and healthrelated quality of life among middle-aged individuals with and without the metabolic syndrome2006In: International symposium on Atherosclerosis,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Holm, E
    et al.
    Umeå.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    A discrete time-space geography for epidemiology: from mixing groups to pockets of local order in pandemic simulations.2007In: MEDINFO 2007 - Proceedings of the 12th World Congress on Health (Medical) Informatics – Building Sustainable Health Systems / [ed] Klaus A. Kuhn, James R. Warren, Tze-Yun Leong, 2007, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 464-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Health Organization urges all nations to develop and maintain national influenza preparedness plans. Important components of such plans are forecasts of morbidity and mortality based on local social and geographic conditions. Most methodologies for simulations of epidemic outbreaks are implicitly based on the assumption that the frequency and duration of social contacts that lead to disease transmission is affected by geography, i.e. the spatial distribution of physical meeting places. In order to increase the effectiveness of the present methods for simulation of infectious disease outbreaks, the aim of this study is to examine two social geographic issues related to such models. We display how the social geographic characteristics of mixing networks, in particular when these significantly deviate from the random-mixing norm, can be represented in order to enhance the understanding and prediction of epidemic patterns in light of a possible future destructive influenza pandemic. We conclude that social geography, social networks and simulation models of directly transmitted infectious diseases are fundamentally linked.

  • 35.
    Irestig, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    The impact of participation in information system design2004In: PDC 2004,2004, Palo Alto: PDC , 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Irestig, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Niklas, Hallberg
    FOI.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Peer-to-peer computing in health-promoting voluntary organizations: A system design analysis2005In: Journal of medical systems, ISSN 0148-5598, E-ISSN 1573-689X, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 425-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large part of the health promotion in today's society is performed as peer-to-peer empowerment in voluntary organisations such as sports clubs, charities, and trade unions. In order to prevent work-related illness and long-term sickness absence, the aim of this study is to explore computer network services for empowerment of employees by peer-to-peer communication. The 'technique trade-off' method was used for the analysis of the system design. A Critical Incident Technique questionnaire was distributed to a representative sample of trade union shop stewards (n = 386), and focus-group seminars were arranged where a preliminary set of requirements was discussed. Seven basic requirements were identified and matched to a set of 12 design issues for computer network services, allocating a subset of design issues to each requirement. The conclusion is that the systems design displays an inexpensive and potentially feasible method for peer-to-peer computing in voluntary health-promoting organisations. © 2005 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  • 37.
    Jenvald, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, ASLAB - Application Systems Laboratory.
    Morin, Magnus
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, ASLAB - Application Systems Laboratory.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Simulation as decision support in pandemic influenza preparedness and response2007In: The Conference on Intelligent Human Computer Systems for Crisis Response and Management,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Kallings, L V
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiologi KI.
    Leijon, Matti
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Hellénius, M L
    Department of Neurobiologi Karolinska Institutet.
    Ståhle, A
    Department of Neurobiologi Karolinska Institutet.
    Physical activity on prescription in primary health care: a follow-up of physical activity level and quality of life.2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 39.
    Kjellman, Görel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    A randomized clinical trial comparing general exercise, McKenzie treatment and a control group in patients with neck pain2002In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 183-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seventy-seven patients with neck pain in the primary health care were included in a prospective, randomized clinical trial and randomly assigned to general exercise, McKenzie treatment, or a control group. Seventy patients completed the treatment, response rate 93% at 12-month follow-up. All three groups showed significant improvement regarding the main outcomes, pain intensity and Neck Disability Index, even at 12-month follow-up, but there was no significant difference between the groups. In all, 79% reported that they were better or completely restored after treatment, although 51% reported constant/daily pain. In the McKenzie group compared with the control group, a tendency toward greater improvement was noted for pain intensity at 3 weeks and at 6-month follow-up, and for post-treatment Neck Disability Index. Significant improvement in Distress and Risk Assessment Method scores was shown in the McKenzie group only. The three groups had similar recurrence rates, although after 12 months the McKenzie group showed a tendency toward fewer visits for additional health care. The study did not provide a definite evidence of treatment efficacy in patients with neck pain, however, there was a tendency toward a better outcome with the two active alternatives compared with the control group.

  • 40.
    Kjellman, Görel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Comparison of three disability questionnaries for low back and neck pain with focus on test-retest reliability and sensitivity of change2006In: The 8th Low Back Pain Forum,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Krevers, Barbro
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Närvänen, Anna Liisa
    ITUF Norrköping.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Patient evaluation of the care and rehabilitation process in geriatric hospital care2002In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 482-491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To gain a deeper understanding of how elderly persons experience and evaluate the care and rehabilitation process. Method: Qualitative interview data from elderly patients were analysed using a grounded theory approach. The patients were interviewed twice, at the beginning of geriatric hospital care and some weeks after discharge. Results: The patient-perceived outcome of the care and rehabilitation process reflected two dimensions, the effect on their health and the quality of the process, i.e. how their needs were met. The analysis revealed that the patients' needs differed during the care and rehabilitation process. It also indicated that patients perceived their needs and the care differently based on their previous experience of the care unit, their perceived trajectory of illness and their 'patient character' which represented the patient's definition of himself/herself and the situation. A hypothetical model of the patients' evaluation process has been derived. Conclusion: The results indicate the importance of using a process perspective in the assessment and the interpretation of patient-perceived outcome of care and rehabilitation, and that patient expectations, trajectories of illness and the patient character must be taken into consideration.

  • 42.
    Krevers, Barbro
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Närstående till äldre- deras behov och användning av stöd2007Report (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Eriksen, H R
    Biological and Medical Psychology University of Bergen.
    Sluiter, J K
    Academic Medical Center University of Amsterdam.
    Starke, D
    Medical Sociology University of Duesseldorf.
    Ursin, H
    Biological and Medical Psychology University of Bergen.
    Psychobiological mechanisms of socioeconomic differences in health2004In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 58, no 8, p. 1511-1522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The association between low socioeconomic status and poor health is well established. Empirical studies suggest that psychosocial factors are important mediators for these effects, and that the effects are mediated by psychobiological mechanisms related to stress physiology. The objective of this paper is to explore these psychobiological mechanisms. Psychobiological responses to environmental challenges depend on acquired expectancies (learning) of the relations between responses and stimuli. The stress response occurs whenever an individual is faced with a challenge. It is an essential element in the total adaptive system of the body, and necessary for adaptation, performance and survival. However, a period of recovery is necessary to rebalance and to manage new demands. Individuals with low social status report more environmental challenges and less psychosocial resources. This may lead to vicious circles of learning to expect negative outcomes, loss of coping ability, strain, hopelessness and chronic stress. This type of learning may interfere with the recovery processes, leading to sustained psychobiological activation and loss of dynamic capacity to respond to new challenges. Psychobiological responses and health effects in humans and animals depend on combinations of demands and expected outcomes (coping, control). In studies of humans with chronic psychosocial stress, and low SES, cortisol baseline levels were raised, and the cortisol response to acute stress attenuated. Low job control was associated with insufficient recovery of catecholamines and cortisol, and a range of negative health effects. Biological effects of choice of lifestyle, which also depends on the acquired outcome expectancies, reinforce these direct psychobiological effects on health. The paper concludes that sustained activation and loss of capacity to respond to a novel stressor could be a cause of the higher risk of illness and disease found among people with lower SES.

  • 44.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Nikku, Nina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Sociology.
    Ethics and opportunistic health promotion. The example of alcohol information at the emergency clinic1995In: Health Gain Measurements as a Tool for Hospital Management and Health Policy,1995, Linköping: Health Promoting Hospitals , 1995, p. 148-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kucinskiene, Zita
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Good self-rated health is related to psychosocial resources and a strong cortisol response to acute stress: The LiVicordia study of middle-aged men2005In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 153-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-rated health (SRH) is a strong predictor for disease and death. The relations among SRH, psychosocial factors, and cortisol dynamics were tested using pooled data from the LiVicordia study of 50-year-old men in Lithuania (n = 94) and Sweden (n = 89), controlling for effect of residence. SRH was assessed by " How would you assess your own health?" A standardized laboratory stress test included measures of cortisol in serum and saliva. Good SRH related to high scale scores of decision latitude, social support at work, coping, self-esteem, and sense of coherence, to low scores of overcommitment (all p < .01) and vital exhaustion (r = -0.40, p < 0.001), to low concentrations of saliva baseline cortisol (r = -.26, p = .001), and to a strong cortisol response to stress (r = .27, p = .001). Findings that good SRH related to favorable psychosocial characteristics and to a dynamic cortisol stress response indicate a possible explanation for observed lower risk for disease and death in this state. Copyright © 2005 by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

  • 46.
    Laslett, Mark
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Aprill, C N
    McDonald, B
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Clinical predictors of lumbar provocation discography: A study of clinical predictors of lumbar provocation discography2006In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 15, no 10, p. 1473-1484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Discography is the only available method of directly challenging the discs for pain sensitivity. However, it is invasive, expensive and there is a debate about its clinical value. There is a need to identify clinical signs that may indicate the need for a discography examination. Pain centralization (retreat of referred pain to towards the spinal midline) has been associated with positive discography and possesses specificity between 80 and 100% depending on levels of disablement and psychosocial distress. Less than half of positive discography patients reports centralization and there is a need to identify other potentially valuable predictors. This study estimated the diagnostic accuracy of clinical variables in relation to provocation discography. In a blinded, prospective reference standard design in a private interventional radiology clinic, chronic low back patients received a detailed clinical examination followed by discography. Patients were typically disabled with high levels of psychosocial distress. Logistic regression modelling identified potentially useful clinical variables, and sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios were calculated for promising specific variables and combinations of variables. Of 118 consecutive discography cases, 107 had unconfounded data on discography results. History of persistent pain between acute episodes, a significant loss of extension and a subjective report of 'vulnerability' in what is termed as the 'neutral zone' had specificities of 83-92% and likelihood ratios between 2.0 and 4.1. Two combinations of variables were highly specific to positive discography, but no suitable screening test useful for ruling out positive discography was established. Three clinical variables have modest predictive power in relation to lumbar discography results and two combinations of variables were highly specific to positive discography. © 2006 Springer-Verlag.

  • 47.
    Laslett, Mark
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    McDonald, B
    New Zealand.
    Aprill, C N
    USA.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Clinical predictors of screening lumbar zygapophyseal joint blocks: development of clinical prediction rules2006In: The spine journal, ISSN 1529-9430, E-ISSN 1878-1632, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 370-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Only controlled intra-articular zygapophyseal joint (ZJ) injections or medial branch blocks can diagnose ZJ-mediated low back pain. The low prevalence of ZJ pain implies that identification of clinical predictors of a positive response to a screening block is needed. Purpose: To estimate the predictive power of clinical findings in relation to pain reduction after screening ZJ blocks. Study design: As part of a wider prospective blinded study investigating diagnostic accuracy of clinical variables, a secondary analysis was carried out to seek evidence of variables potentially valuable as predictors of screening ZJ block outcomes. Patient sample: Chronic low back pain patients received screening ZJ blocks (n=151) with 120 patients included in the analysis after exclusions. Outcome measures: Pain intensity was measured using a 100-mm visual analog scale, and responses were categorized according to 75% through 95% or more pain reduction in 5% increments. Methods: Patients completed pain drawings, questionnaires, and a clinical examination before screening lumbar ZJ blocks. History, demographic and clinical variables were evaluated in cross tabulation and regression analyses with diagnostic accuracy values calculated for variables and variable clusters in relation to different pain reduction standards. Results: At the 75% pain reduction standard, 24.5% responded to screening ZJ blocks and 10.8% responded at the 95% standard. The centralization phenomenon is not associated with pain reduction using any standard. No variables were useful predictors of post-ZJ block pain reduction of less than 90%. Seven clinical findings were associated with 95% pain reduction after blocks. Five useful clinical prediction rules (CPRs) were found for ruling out a 95% pain reduction (100% sensitivity), and one CPR had a likelihood ratio of 9.7, producing a fivefold improvement in posttest probability. Conclusions: A negative extension rotation test, the centralization phenomenon, and four CPRs effectively rule out pain ablation after screening ZJ block. One CPR generates a fivefold improvement in posttest probability of a negative or positive response to ZJ block. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 48.
    Laslett, Mark
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    McDonald, B
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Aprill, C N
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Agreement between diagnoses reached by clinical examination and available reference standards: A prospective study of 216 patients with lumbopelvic pain2005In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The tissue origin of low back pain (LBP) or referred lower extremity symptoms (LES) may be identified in about 70% of cases using advanced imaging, discography and facet or sacroiliac joint blocks. These techniques are invasive and availability varies. A clinical examination is non-invasive and widely available but its validity is questioned. Diagnostic studies usually examine single tests in relation to single reference standards, yet in clinical practice, clinicians use multiple tests and select from a range of possible diagnoses. There is a need for studies that evaluate the diagnostic performance of clinical diagnoses against available reference standards. Methods: We compared blinded clinical diagnoses with diagnoses based on available reference standards for known causes of LBP or LES such as discography, facet, sacroiliac or hip joint blocks, epidurals injections, advanced imaging studies or any combination of these tests. A prospective, blinded validity design was employed. Physiotherapists examined consecutive patients with chronic lumbopelvic pain and/or referred LES scheduled to receive the reference standard examinations. When diagnoses were in complete agreement regardless of complexity, "exact" agreement was recorded. When the clinical diagnosis was included within the reference standard diagnoses, "clinical agreement" was recorded. The proportional chance criterion (PCC) statistic was used to estimate agreement on multiple diagnostic possibilities because it accounts for the prevalence of individual categories in the sample. The kappa statistic was used to estimate agreement on six pathoanatomic diagnoses. Results: In a sample of chronic LBP patients (n = 216) with high levels of disability and distress, 67% received a patho-anatomic diagnosis based on available reference standards, and 10% had more than one tissue origin of pain identified. For 27 diagnostic categories and combinations, chance clinical agreement (PCC) was estimated at 13%. "Exact" agreement between clinical and reference standard diagnoses was 32% and "clinical agreement" 51%. For six pathoanatomic categories (disc, facet joint, sacroiliac joint, hip joint, nerve root and spinal stenosis), PCC was 33% with actual agreement 56%. There was no overlap of 95% confidence intervals on any comparison. Diagnostic agreement on the six most common patho-anatomic categories produced a kappa of 0.31. Conclusion: Clinical diagnoses agree with reference standards diagnoses more often than chance. Using available reference standards, most patients can have a tissue source of pain identified. © 2005 Laslett et al, licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 49.
    Lindqvist, Kent
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Schelp, L
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Gender aspects of work-related injuries in a Swedish minicipality.2000In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 31, p. 183-196Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Lindqvist, Kent
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Schelp, L
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Home injuries in a Swedish municipality - consequences and costs. 1999In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 31, p. 19-29Article in journal (Refereed)
123 1 - 50 of 101
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