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  • 1. Andreasson, Sten
    et al.
    Breuer, Debra K
    Eksandh, Louise
    Ponjavic, Vesna
    Frennesson, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Hiriyanna, Suja
    Filippova, Elena
    Yashar, Beverly M
    Swaroop, Anand
    Clinical studies of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa in three Swedish families with newly identified mutations in the RP2 and RPGR-ORF15 genes2003In: Ophthalmic Genetics, ISSN 1381-6810, E-ISSN 1744-5094, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 215-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To describe new disease-causing RP2 and RPGR-ORF15 mutations and their corresponding clinical phenotypes in Swedish families with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) and to establish genotype-phenotype correlations by studying the clinical spectrum of disease in families with a known molecular defect. Methods: Seventeen unrelated families with RP and an apparent X-linked pattern of disease inheritance were identified from the Swedish RP registry and screened for mutations in the RP2 and RPGR (for the RP3 disease) genes. These families had been previously screened for the RPGR exons 1-19, and disease-causing mutations were identified in four of them. In the remaining 13 families, we sequenced the RP2 gene and the newly discovered RPGR-ORF exon. Detailed clinical evaluations were then obtained from individuals in the three families with identified mutations. Results: Mutations in RP2 and RPGR-ORF15 were identified in three of the 13 families. Clinical evaluations of affected males and carrier females demonstrated varying degrees of retinal dysfunction and visual handicap, with early onset and severe disease in the families with mutations in the ORF15 exon of the RPGR gene. Conclusions: A total of seven mutations in the RP2 and RPGR genes have been discovered so far in Swedish XLRP families. All affected individuals express a severe form of retinal degeneration with visual handicap early in life, although the degree of retinal dysfunction varies both in hemizygous male patients and in heterozygous carrier females. Retinal disease phenotypes in patients with mutations in the RPGR-ORF15 were more severe than in patients with mutations in RP2 or other regions of the RPGR.

  • 2.
    Bourghardt Peebo, Beatrice
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Gan, Lisha
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Knutsen Holmqvist, Annica
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Rearden, Ann
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Expression of the focal adhesion protein PINCH in normal and alkali-injured corneas and the role of PMNs2007In: Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica, ISSN 1395-3907, E-ISSN 1600-0420, Vol. 85, no 4, p. 395-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of particularly interesting new cysteine-histidine-rich protein (PINCH) in corneal wound healing and early neovascularization and to assess the influence of granulocytes. Methods: A standardized corneal alkali wound was inflicted under general anaesthesia to the right eye of 14 New Zealand White rabbits. Seven of the rabbits received i.v. 5 mg/kg fucoidin every 2 hours to prevent granulocytes from entering the wound area. After 36 hours, the rabbits were killed, the corneas excised, fixed in 4% formaldehyde and embedded in paraffin. The sections were double-stained with antibodies against PINCH and with haematoxylin. Results: In the normal cornea and limbus, PINCH was weakly expressed in the corneal epithelium and in a wedge of the conjunctival stroma. In the wounded corneas, PINCH expression was seen in the frontline of repopulating endothelial and epithelial cells, and in active keratocytes. The vascular endothelium and the granulocytes expressed PINCH, as did the conjunctival epithelium. In the fucoidin-treated rabbits, PINCH expression was markedly reduced. The vascular endothelial cells and the few granulocytes did not express PINCH in these rabbits. Conclusions: PINCH is only slightly expressed in the normal cornea. A corneal wound induces PINCH expression in the repopulating cells, in the vascular endothelial cells of the limbus, in the limbal epithelium and in the granulocytes. Exclusion of granulocytes reduces expression of PINCH and there is no expression at all in the vascular endothelium. © 2007 The Authors Journal compilation 2007 Acta Ophthalmol Scand.

  • 3.
    Bourghardt Peebo, Beatrice
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Koulikovska, Marina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    The suppression of early angiogenic markers by the antiangiogenic aptamer Macugen R is dose dependent2007In: European Association for Vision and Eye Research,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4. Bourghardt Peebo, Beatrice
    et al.
    Peebo, Marcus
    Frennesson, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Relapsing polychondritis: A rare disease with varying symptoms2004In: Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica, ISSN 1395-3907, E-ISSN 1600-0420, Vol. 82, no 4, p. 472-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Relapsing polychondritis (RPC) is a rare systemic disease affecting primarily cartilaginous and proteoglycan-rich structures. It is a potentially fatal disease with unknown aetiology. There are no specific tests for RPC. The diagnosis is dependant on clinical criteria, which include chondritis of both auricles, non-erosive inflammatory polyarthritis, nasal chondritis, ocular inflammation, respiratory tract chondritis and cochlear and/or vestibular damage. Ocular symptoms will occur in approximately 60% of RPC patients. As an example, a patient with signs of RPC is described. Methods/Result: A 30-year-old woman was referred to our department for evaluation of a central corneal ulcer in the left eye. She had a history of recurrent pain in both her auricles and was also found to have a nasal septum perforation. Relapsing polychondritis was suspected. Conclusion: Non-healing corneal ulcers should alert the ophthalmologist to look for unusual reasons for this condition. RPC is one possible cause.

  • 5. Chong, Victor N H
    et al.
    Keonin, Jason
    Luthert, Phil J
    Frennesson, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Weingeist, David M
    Wolf, Rachel L
    Mullins, Robert F
    Hageman, Gregory S
    Decreased thickness and integrity of the macular elastic layer of Bruch's membrane correspond to the distribution of lesions associated with age-related macular degeneration2005In: American Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0002-9440, E-ISSN 1525-2191, Vol. 166, no 1, p. 241-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in the elderly. In its severest form, choroidal neovessels breach the macular Bruch's membrane, an extracellular matrix compartment comprised of elastin and collagen laminae, and grow into the retina. We sought to determine whether structural properties of the elastic lamina (EL) correspond to the region of the macula that is predilected toward degeneration in AMD. Morphometric assessment of the macular and extramacular regions of 121 human donor eyes, with and without AMD, revealed a statistically significant difference in both the integrity (P < 0.0001) and thickness (P < 0.0001) of the EL between the macular and extramacular regions in donors of all ages. The EL was three to six times thinner and two to five times less abundant in the macula than in the periphery. The integrity of the macular EL was significantly lower in donors with early-stage AMD (P = 0.028), active choroidal neovascularization (P = 0.020), and disciform scars (P = 0.003), as compared to unaffected, age-matched controls. EL thickness was significantly lower only in individuals with disciform scars (P = 0.008). The largest gaps in macular EL integrity were significantly larger in all categories of AMD (each P < 0.0001), as compared to controls. EL integrity, thickness, and gap length in donors with geographic atrophy did not differ from those of controls. These structural properties of the macular EL correspond spatially to the distribution of macular lesions associated with AMD and may help to explain why the macula is more susceptible to degenerative events that occur in this disease.

  • 6.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    An update on the synthetic collagenous artificial cornea2007In: European Association for Vision and Eye Research,2007, 2007, p. 4315-4315Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Cornearelaterade sjukdomar och förändringar2004Report (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Laser eye surgery for the correction of refractive errors2007Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Operation vid brytningsfel i ögat2007Report (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Fagerholm, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Dellby, Anette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology.
    Bäckman, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology VHN.
    Inherited corneal opacifications with an unusual distribution2007In: Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica, ISSN 1395-3907, E-ISSN 1600-0420, Vol. 85, no 1, p. 103-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To describe corneal opacities of a new type and distribution in a small family. Methods: Family members were interviewed and examined to establish a pedigree and to detect any corneal abnormalities. Results: Two family members presented with corneal opacities. Both had, in the very peripheral cornea, flat, greyish, rounded opacities, 20-200μm in diameter, on the Descemet's membrane. In addition, the mother had the same type of opacities over the central cornea just inside the Bowman's layer. The remaining parts of the corneas were clear. Vision was unaffected and the opacities caused no discomfort. There was no other corneal pathology. The subjects' general health was good. Conclusions: To our knowledge, these types and distribution of corneal opacities have not been described previously. Although the mode of inheritance at this point is uncertain, we believe the changes are of a dystrophic nature. © 2007 Acta Ophthalmol Scand.

  • 11.
    Fagerholm, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Eckerlund, Ingemar
    Statens beredning för medicinsk utvärdering Stockholm.
    Refractive surgery. An Allert report from SBU2008In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 105, no 26-27, p. 1926-1928Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Fagerholm, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Gan, Lisha
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology.
    Palmblad, Jan
    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor VEGFR-2 in the regulation of corneal neovascularization and wound healing2004In: Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica, ISSN 1395-3907, E-ISSN 1600-0420, Vol. 82, no 5, p. 557-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To study the change in expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor VEGFR-2 in the rabbit cornea and limbus following a penetrating, central corneal alkali burn. The influence of different cells on VEGF and VEGFR-2 expression was studied by excluding granulocytes from the wound area. Methods: Fourteen New Zealand white rabbits were subjected to a penetrating, 5-mm diameter, central corneal alkali burn in one eye under general anaesthesia. Seven of the rabbits were given injections of fucoidin for 36 hours. The rabbits were killed after 36 hours and the corneas were excised with a sclera rim and prepared for immunohistochemistry. Results: Both VEGF and VEGFR-2 are strongly expressed in the frontline of repopulating epithetial, stromal and endothelial cells during wound healing, irrespective of granulocyte presence. Vascular endothelial cells express VEGF strongly after injury, but only in the presence of granulocytes. Conclusion: Corneal neovascularization requires the presence of granulocytes to stimulate vascular endothelial cells. During wound healing in this area, VEGF is a factor that stimulates proliferation and migration and that is not influenced by granulocytes.

  • 13.
    Finnström, Orvar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Giordano, Luisa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Nelson, Nina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jakobsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Komplikationer i nyföddhetsperioden kan ge synhandikapp senare i livet.2004In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 101, no 34, p. 2560-2562Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Frennesson, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Photodynamic therapy with verteporfin in patients with age-related macular degeneration and juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularization2004In: Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica, ISSN 1395-3907, E-ISSN 1600-0420, Vol. 82, no 6, p. 651-655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) on juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in a clinical patient material. Methods: Thirty eyes in 30 consecutive patients with AMD and a juxtafoveal CNV underwent PDT with verteporfin with standard parameters. The patients were followed up for 12 months and retreated every 12 weeks in the event of leakage from CNV. Nineteen patients (63.3%) had a predominantly classic CNV, eight (26.7%) had a 100% occult CNV and three (10%) had a minimally classic lesion. In 27 patients (90%) the lesion was ≤ 3 MPS (Macular Photocoagulation Study) disc diameters and ≤ 3 MPS disc areas. Results: There was a positive correlation between duration of symptoms and loss of visual acuity at 12 months (p < 0.02). For predominantly classic lesions, there was a positive correlation between duration of symptoms and lesion size (p < 0.005). At 12 months, leakage had stopped after 3.3 ± 0.9 treatments in 80% of the patients. Visual acuity remained stable in 63.3% of the patients. Conclusion: Photodynamic therapy appears to be beneficial in patients with AMD and juxtafoveal CNV. Copyright © Acta Ophthalmol Scand 2004.

  • 15.
    Frennesson, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Ranibizumab--effective, but expensive in macular degeneration2008In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 105, no 32-33, p. 2161-2161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 16.
    Frennesson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Nilsson, Sven Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology.
    Angiogeneshämmare vid neovaskulär åldersrelaterad makuladegeneration - lovande terapi eller risk för oönskade effekter?2005In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 102, p. 1969-1969Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Frennesson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Nilsson, Sven Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology.
    Encouraging results of photodynamic therapy with Visudyne in a clinical patient material of age-related macular degeneration2004In: Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica, ISSN 1395-3907, E-ISSN 1600-0420, Vol. 82, no 6, p. 645-650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) on subfoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in a Swedish patient material with smaller lesions than those investigated in the TAP (Treatment of Age-related Macular Degeneration with Photodynamic Therapy) and VIP (Verteporfin in Photodynamic Therapy) Studies. Methods: Photodynamic therapy with verteporfin was performed according to the results and recommendations of the TAP and VIP Studies. The patients were followed up for 12 months and retreatment was performed every 12 weeks when leakage from CNV was present. Of the 100 eyes in the first 100 patients with a follow-up period of 12 months, 59% had a predominantly classic lesion, 36% had an occult-only lesion and 5% had a minimally classic lesion. The greatest linear dimension (GLD) was ≤3 NIPS (Macular Photocoagulation Study) disc diameters (DD) in 73%, 39% and 20% of lesions, respectively, for the three groups. The actual lesion area was ≤3 MPS disc areas (DA) in 85%, 50% and 40% of lesions, respectively. There was a positive correlation (p < 0.05) between the duration of symptoms and GLD, as well as between the duration of symptoms and the lesion area (p < 0.02). Results: At 12 months, visual acuity had remained stable or increased by ≥3 lines (ETDRS) in 61% of patients with predominantly classic lesions, in 61% of patients with occult-only lesions and in 60% of patients with minimally classic lesions. Leakage had stopped after 2.9 ± 0.9 treatments in 77% of the total group of patients. Conclusion: The visual outcome was comparable to those of the TAP and VIP Studies (p > 0.3). Regarding the effect on leakage, however, our results are far better than those of the TAP and VIP Studies. The proportion of patients in which leakage had stopped was almost three times that of the TAP (27%) and VIP (26%) Studies. It seems likely that this difference was caused by the fact that the lesions in our study were much smaller, on average, than those in the TAP and VIP Studies.

  • 18.
    Frennesson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Nilsson, Sven Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology.
    In eccentric viewing, reading performance is better when using the upper compared to the lower retina2007In: ARVO E-abstract 3551 Invest ophthalmol vis sci,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Gan, Lisha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Palmblad, Jan
    Expression of basic fibroblast growth factor in rabbit corneal alkali wounds in the presence and absence of granulocytes2005In: Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica, ISSN 1395-3907, E-ISSN 1600-0420, Vol. 83, no 3, p. 374-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To study the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in the early phases of corneal wound healing in the presence or absence of granulocytes. Methods: A central penetrating corneal alkali wound was inflicted to one eye in each of 14 rabbits under general anaesthesia. Subsequently, seven of the rabbits were given fucoidin i.v. for 36 hours in order to block the selectins on the vascular endothelium, thus preventing blood granulocytes from entering the tissues. Then, corneas were prepared, stained for bFGF and evaluated by light microscopy. Results: Whereas normal corneal epithelium expressed bFGF weakly, conjunctival epithelium did so strongly, particularly the goblet cells. The corneal endothelium showed medium staining, while keratocytes and vascular endothelial cells did not consistently express bFGF. After 36 hours of wound healing, a marked upregulation of bFGF expression was observed in the corneal epithelial and endothelial cells, as well as in the keratocytes, that were migrating into the wound. No other changes were noted. None of these features were modulated when granulocyte emigration was prevented by fucoidin administration. Conclusions: The difference in bFGF expression between the corneal and conjunctival epithelium suggests a role for this growth factor in the barrier function at the limbus. Moreover, the specific presence of bFGF in cells migrating into the wound indicates the participation of bFGF in corneal wound healing. Expression of bFGF was independent of granulocytes. Copyright © Acta Ophthalmol Scand 2005.

  • 20.
    Hammar, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Autosomal dominant recurrent erosions - from non-existing to being everywhere2007In: European Association for Vision and Eye Research,2007, 2007, p. 2426-2426Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Koulikovska, Marina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Podskochy, Alexander
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    The expression pattern of the subunit of chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide 1 and its substrate, α-smooth muscle actin, during corneal wound healing2005In: Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica, ISSN 1395-3907, E-ISSN 1600-0420, Vol. 83, no 5, p. 543-548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study was designed to demonstrate the expression of the chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide 1 (CCT) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), in normal corneas and corneas treated with ultraviolet radiation (UVR). The wound model chosen is previously characterized, the injury is mild and the cornea heals to transparency. Methods: Rabbit corneas were exposed to UVR at the dose producing keratitis. The corneas were allowed to heal for up to 5 days and the paraffin-embedded tissue specimens were double stained and examined morphologically and immunohistochemically. Expression of CCT and α-SMA genes was investigated by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: There was a front of repopulating keratocytes that showed positive staining for α-SMA after 3 days. The α-SMA mRNA was already strongly expressed after 1 day, whereas the expression level of CCT was increased after 2 days. After 5 days the levels were decreased. By this time the stroma was partly repopulated by keratocytes. Conclusion: In a mild wound, the expression of α-SMA mRNA is followed by expression of mRNA of at least one subunit of the complex folding α-SMA. At protein level, α-SMA is detected in the front line of repopulating keratocytes. Expression levels for both mRNAs decline as the stroma repopulation process progresses. Copyright © Acta Ophthalmol Scand 2005.

  • 22.
    Koulikovska, Marina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Sharipo, A
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Interleukin1-Induced apoptosis of keratocytes: effect of biglycan2007In: European Association for Vision and Eye Research,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 23.
    Kvarnström, Gun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jakobsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lennerstrand, Gunnar
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    Preventable vision loss in children: a public health concern?2006In: American Orthoptic Journal, ISSN 0065-955X, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 3-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose: Does screening/treatment reduce amblyopia and is it worth doing it?

    Materials: All children (3126) born in 1982 have been followed from birth to ten years. The second study was an investigation of four Low Vision Centers to see how many persons become visual handicapped due to amblyopia.

    Methods: Up to the age of 4, inspection of the eyes and ocular alignment is performed at the Child Health Care Centers. At the age of 4 years, visual acuity is measured at the centers and at school at the ages of 7 and 10 years. All patients at four Low Vision Centers have been investigated with regard to amblyopia. These patients have not been screened or treated for amblyopia. From these two studies, we compare the costs of screening and no screening.

    Results: The prevalence of ametropia in the population was 7.7%, and strabismus 3.1%. The prevalence of deep amblyopia (visual acuity ≤ 0.3) has been reduced from 2% to 0.2%. Results from the four Swedish Low Vision Centers showed that amblyopia was the main cause of decreased visual acuity in one eye in at least 1.72% of the patients. The cost for these people is higher then the cost for screening and treatment.

    Conclusion: Visual screening is effective in detecting visual and ocular disorders. The prevalence of amblyopia is greatly reduced with screening. The benefits greatly outweighs the economical disadvantages of screening and treating amblyopic children.

  • 24.
    Lagali, Neil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL/MH.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Corneal injury by formic acid: one-year clinical course and in-vivo confocal microscopic evaluation2008In: Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology, ISSN 1442-6404, E-ISSN 1442-9071, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 692-694Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Liu, Wenguang
    et al.
    Deptartment of Cellular and Molecular Medicine University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Merrett, Kimberley
    University of Ottawa Eye Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H8L6, Canada.
    Griffith, May
    Deptartment of Cellular and Molecular Medicine University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Dravida, Subhadra
    Dravida.
    Heyne, Belinda
    Deptartment of Chemistry University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Scaiano, Juan C.
    Deptartment of Chemistry University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Watsky, Mitchell A.
    Deptartment of Physiology University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, USA.
    Shinozaki, Naoshi
    Cornea Centre and Eye Bank Tokyo Dental College, Chiba, Japan.
    Lagali, Neil
    University of Ottawa Eye Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H8L6, Canada.
    Munger, Rejean
    University of Ottawa Eye Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H8L6, Canada.
    Li, Fengfu
    University of Ottawa Eye Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H8L6, Canada.
    Recombinant human collagen for tissue engineered corneal substitutes2008In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 1147-1158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We successfully fabricated transparent, robust hydrogels as corneal substitutes from concentrated recombinant human type I and type III collagen solutions crosslinked with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). White light transmission through these gels is comparable or superior to that of human corneas. Hydrogels from both type I and type III collagens supported in vitro epithelium and nerve over-growth. While both these biocompatible hydrogels have adequate tensile strength and elasticity for surgical manipulation, type III collagen hydrogels tended to be mechanically superior. Twelve-month post-implantation results of type I recombinant collagen-based corneal substitutes into mini-pigs showed retention of optical clarity, along with regeneration of corneal cells, nerves and tear film. For clinical use, implants based on fully characterized, recombinant human collagen eliminate the risk of pathogen transfer or xenogeneic immuno-responses posed by animal collagens. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 26. Liu, Yuwen
    et al.
    Gan, Lisha
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology.
    Carlsson, David J
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Lagali, Neil
    University of Ottawa.
    Watsky, Mitchell A
    Munger, Rejean
    Hodge, William G
    Priest, David
    Griffith, May
    A simple, cross-linked collagen tissue substitute for corneal implantation2006In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 1869-1875Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE. To develop a simple corneal substitute from crosslinked collagen. METHODS. Porcine type I collagen (10%, pH 5), was mixed with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). The final homogenous solution was molded to corneal dimensions, cured, and then implanted into rabbits and minipigs by lamellar keratoplasty. The implants were followed for up to 6 months after surgery. Clinical examinations of the cornea included detailed slit lamp biomicroscopy, in vivo confocal microscopy, topography and esthesiometry for nerve function. Histopathologic examinations were also performed on rabbit corneas harvested after 6 months. RESULTS. Cross-linked collagen (refractive index, 1.35) had optical clarity superior to human corneas. Implanted into rabbit and porcine corneas, only 1 of 24 of the surgical corneas showed a slight haze at 6 months after surgery. All other implants showed no adverse reactions and remained optically clear. Topography showed a smooth surface and a profile similar to that of the contralateral nonsurgical eye. The implanted matrices promoted regeneration of corneal cells, tear film, and nerves. Touch sensitivity was restored, indicating some restoration of function. The corneas with implants showed no significant loss of thickness and demonstrated stable host- graft integration. CONCLUSIONS. Collagen can be adequately stabilized, using water soluble carbodiimides as protein cross-linking reagents, in the fabrication of corneal matrix substitutes for implantation. The simple cross-linking methodology would allow for easy fabrication of matrices for transplantation in centers where there is a shortage of corneas, or where there is need for temporary patches to repair perforations in emergency situations. Copyright © Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

  • 27. Lundström, Mats
    et al.
    Brege, Klas Göran
    Florén, Ingrid
    Lundh, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Stenevi, Ulf
    Thorburn, William
    Postoperative aphakia in modern cataract surgery - Part 1: Analysis of incidence and risks based on 5-year data from the Swedish National Cataract Register2004In: Journal of cataract and refractive surgery, ISSN 0886-3350, E-ISSN 1873-4502, Vol. 30, no 10, p. 2105-2110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To study the incidence of aphakia after cataract extraction and evaluate the relative risk for this outcome in subgroups of patients based on preoperative conditions. Setting: Sixty-two community-run or private clinics participating in the Swedish National Cataract Register. Methods: Data on cataract extractions were collected prospectively from 1997 through 2001. The set of data also covered type of surgery and type of intraocular lens (IOL), including a "no lens implanted" option. All data were stored in a database. Database calculations were made of frequencies and risk ratios of postoperative aphakia in the subgroups of patients based on preoperative conditions. Results: For the entire study period, postoperative aphakia was reported in 1410 of 287951 surgeries for which complete IOL data were available, corresponding to an overall frequency of 0.49%. The occurrence of ocular comorbidity and poor preoperative visual acuity (≤0.1) in the eye to be operated on was significantly related to postoperative aphakia for each year of the study (P<.001). Glaucoma and poor visual acuity (≤0.1) in the surgical eye meant a 12.8 higher risk for aphakia after surgery than a better visual acuity (>0.1) and no ocular comorbidity. Conclusions: This national 5-year survey showed that in routine cataract surgery performed during the study, 1 of every 200 operations ended in postoperative aphakia. Poor visual acuity (≤0.1) in the eye to be operated on combined with ocular comorbidity was the highest risk factor for postoperative aphakia. © 2004 ASCRS and ESCRS.

  • 28. Lundström, Mats
    et al.
    Brege, Klas Göran
    Florén, Ingrid
    Lundh, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Stenevi, Ulf
    Thorburn, William
    Postoperative aphakia in modern cataract surgery - Part 2: Detailed analysis of the cause of aphakia and the visual outcome2004In: Journal of cataract and refractive surgery, ISSN 0886-3350, E-ISSN 1873-4502, Vol. 30, no 10, p. 2111-2115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To study the incidence of aphakia after cataract surgery, the surgical complications that can lead to it, and the visual outcome. Setting: Six community-run eye clinics participating in the Swedish National Cataract Register. Methods: Data on cataract extractions were collected prospectively from 1997 through 2001. The data also covered the type of surgery and type of intraocular lens, including a "no lens implanted" option. All data were stored in a database. These data were supplemented with data on the intended type of surgery, type of complications, possible second surgery, and visual outcome. Results: The overall incidence of postoperative aphakia was 0.65%. In 87.1% of cases, the aphakia was not planned, corresponding to an incidence of 0.48%. Unplanned aphakia was significantly related to poor preoperative vision, old age, and the presence of ocular comorbidity. The most frequent reasons for unplanned aphakia were intraoperative capsule problems and vitreous loss. In two thirds of cases, a second operation was performed. In 41% of all cases, the final visual acuity was 0.5 or better and in 27.7%, worse than 0.1. Conclusions: During the study period, 1 of every 200 routine cataract surgeries ended in unplanned aphakia. The incidence of surgical complications leading to unplanned aphakia and a final visual acuity worse than 0.1 (20/200) was 7.8 per 10000 operations in cases with no ocular comorbidity and 27.6 per 10000 operations in cases with ocular comorbidity. © 2004 ASCRS and ESCRS.

  • 29.
    McLaughlin, Christopher
    et al.
    University of Ottawa Eye Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Muzakare, Lea
    University of Ottawa Eye Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Lagali, Neil
    University of Ottawa Eye Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Forrester, John
    Department of Ophthalmology University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Scotland, United Kingdom.
    Kuffova, Lucia
    Department of Ophthalmology University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Scotland, United Kingdom.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    University of Ottawa Eye Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Liu, Yuwen
    National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Shinozaki, Naoshi
    Tokyo Dental College-Ichikawa General Hospital Cornea Centre, Ichikawa, Chiba, Japan.
    Vascotto, Sandy
    University of Ottawa Eye Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Munger, Rejean
    University of Ottawa Eye Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Griffith, May
    University of Ottawa Eye Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Regeneration of Corneal Cells and Nerves in an Implanted Collagen Corneal Substitute2008In: Cornea, ISSN 0277-3740, E-ISSN 1536-4798, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 580-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Our objective was to evaluate promotion of tissue regeneration by extracellular matrix (ECM) mimics, by using corneal implantation as a model system.

    METHODS: Carbodiimide cross-linked porcine type I collagen was molded into appropriate corneal dimensions to serve as substitutes for natural corneal ECM. These were implanted into corneas of mini-pigs after removal of the host tissue, and tracked over 12 months, by clinical examination, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, in vivo confocal microscopy, topography, and esthesiometry. Histopathology and tensile strength testing were performed at the end of 12 months. Other samples were biotin labeled and implanted into mice to evaluate matrix remodeling.

    RESULTS: The implants promoted regeneration of corneal cells, nerves, and the tear film while retaining optical clarity. Mechanical testing data were consistent with stable, seamless host-graft integration in regenerated corneas, which were as robust as the untreated fellow corneas. Biotin conjugation is an effective method for tracking the implant within the host tissue.

    CONCLUSIONS: We show that a simple ECM mimetic can promote regeneration of corneal cells and nerves. Gradual turnover of matrix material as part of the natural remodeling process allowed for stable integration with host tissue and restoration of mechanical properties of the organ. The simplicity in fabrication and shown functionality shows potential for ECM   

  • 30. Narfström, Kristina
    et al.
    Wrigstad, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Ekesten, B
    Berg, A-L
    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis: Clinical and morphologic findings in nine affected Polish Owczarek Nizinny (PON) dogs2007In: Veterinary Ophthalmology, ISSN 1463-5216, E-ISSN 1463-5224, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 111-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical and morphologic features of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) in the Polish Owczarek Nizinny (PON) breed of dog. Animals: Nine Swedish PON dogs of both sexes were included in the study. Procedure: All dogs underwent a detailed clinical evaluation, with emphasis on ophthalmic exams. Histopathology and electron microscopy were performed on the eyes, brain and various internal organs. Immunohistochemical staining for detection of sphingolipid activator proteins (SAPs) and mitochondrial ATP synthase (SCMAS) was performed on the eyes and brain. Results: The dogs showed behavioral abnormalities, motor disturbances and visual impairment or blindness. Pupillary responses were abnormal while fundus changes varied from normal to severe retinal atrophy. Electroretinography (ERG) showed variable changes, from slight alterations in the process of dark adaptation to severely reduced or nonrecordable ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes. Histopathology revealed intracytoplasmic storage bodies within neurons of the brain and in retinal cells, especially the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Round to oval granular type of inclusion bodies, known as granular osmiophilic dense deposits (GRODS), were found in neuronal cells in the brain and in the retina. Immunohistochemistry identified the storage material in the brain and retina as consisting of SAPs. Conclusion: The presently described NCL disease in PON dogs shows similarities to previously recorded cases in the Miniature Schnauzer. The closest human equivalent to this disease is infantile NCL (CLN1), in which the major stored proteins are SAPs and the ultrastructure of the inclusion bodies of neuronal cells is granular. © 2007 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  • 31. Nielsen, Kim
    et al.
    Vorum, Henrik
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin
    Honoré, Bent
    Ehlers, Niels
    Orntoft, Torben F
    Proteome profiling of corneal epithelium and identification of marker proteins for keratoconus, a pilot study2006In: Experimental Eye Research, ISSN 0014-4835, E-ISSN 1096-0007, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 201-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to identify corneal proteins differentially expressed between keratoconus and normal epithelial samples. Proteins from the corneal epithelium were isolated from 6 keratoconus and 6 myopia patients (controls) and separated by 2D-gel electrophoresis. Six % and 12% SDS-PAGE gels were used to separate low and high molecular weight proteins. Gels were silver stained and protein spots were defined by Melanie II software. The proteins that were most altered in expression comparing keratoconus and controls were extracted, trypsin-digested, and identified by mass spectroscopy. Approximately 200-500 protein spots were detected on each gel. Nineteen spots were identified as differentially expressed between keratoconus and reference epithelium including cytokeratin 3 (<7.8 fold), gelsolin (1.6 fold), S100A4 (1.9 fold), and enolase 1 (0.72 fold). Another identified protein found at very high levels was cytokeratin 12. Gelsolin, cytokeratin 3, and cytokeratin 12 have previously been described to be involved in other corneal diseases. Three proteins, gelsolin, alpha enolase, and S100A4 were identified to be differentially expressed in keratoconus compared to reference epithelium and thus may be involved in the pathogenesis. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 32.
    Nilsson, Sven Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology .
    Frennesson, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Antioxidants and macular degeneration2008In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 105, no 11, p. 836-836Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 33.
    Petersson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    ABC om Åldersrelaterad katarakt2006In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 103, p. 2393-2395Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

      

  • 34.
    Podskochy, Alexander
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Protective role of corneal epithelium against ultraviolet radiation damage2004In: Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica, ISSN 1395-3907, E-ISSN 1600-0420, Vol. 82, no 6, p. 714-717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: It is known that the corneal epithelium strongly absorbs ultraviolet radiation (UVR). The aim of the present study was to examine the protective role of corneal epithelium against UVR damage by comparing the biological effect of UVR exposure on whole corneas with that on de-epithelialized corneas. Methods: Six New Zealand albino rabbit corneas were exposed to UVR centred around 280 nm at a dose that causes biomicroscopically significant keratitis (012J/cm2). Three corneas underwent manual de-epithelialization prior to UVR exposure. A control group of three rabbits underwent only manual de-epithelialization. The animals were killed 76 hours after treatment. The corneas were stained with haematoxylin and evaluated by light microscopy. Results: Corneas that underwent only the exposure to UVR showed a loss of epithelial cells in the treated area. No damage to keratocytes or the stroma was detected. Corneas that underwent manual de-epithelialization showed a loss of epithelial cells, and also keratocytes in the anterior quarter of the corneal stroma. However, corneas that were exposed to UVR after manual de-epithelialization showed very deep stromal damage. The keratocytes disappeared through the entire thickness of the stroma in the UVR-exposed area. Conclusion: Exposure to UVR at 280 nm alone does not result in any deep damage to the corneal stroma and keratocytes. Manual de-epithelialization causes the disappearance of anterior keratocytes. However, the stromal damage caused by UVR in the de-epithelialized corneas was very deep. The corneal epithelium serves to protect the deeper corneal structures against UVR damage, probably by absorbing a substantial amount of the UVR energy applied to the eye. Copyright © Acta Ophthalmol Scand 2004.

  • 35.
    Podskochy, Alexander
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Koulikovska, Marina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    van der Ploeg, Ingeborg
    Biglycan gene expression in UVR-exposed rabbit corneas2004In: Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica, ISSN 1395-3907, E-ISSN 1600-0420, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 200-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: It is known that stromal proteoglycans play an important role in the hydration and transparency of the mammalian cornea. Proteoglycans have been described as a pathological deposit in climatic proteoglycan stromal keratopathy, which is associated with chronic ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. The expression of dermatan sulfate proteoglycan biglycan in the cornea was thus studied after exposure of rabbit eyes to UVR. Methods: New Zealand albino rabbit corneas were exposed to UVR at 310 nm at the dose producing biomicroscopically significant keratitis (0.47 J/cm2 ). Animals were killed 3, 7 and 28 days after exposure (five rabbits in each group). Five rabbits were used as controls and did not receive any UVR treatment. Expression of biglycan mRNA in the corneas was investigated by competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: There was no expression of biglycan mRNA in the control group. In the UVR-exposed groups, biglycan mRNA had still not been expressed 3 days after exposure. The expression of biglycan mRNA was observed in all UVR-treated corneas 7 days after exposure (p < 0.05). By 28 days after UVR exposure the expression of biglycan mRNA had decreased (not statistically significant). Conclusions: There is no detectable biglycan gene expression in the normal rabbit cornea. Ultraviolet radiation exposure leads to a distinct expression of biglycan mRNA in the rabbit cornea that decreases 4 weeks after exposure, indicating the involvement of biglycan in the corneal repair process. Biglycan appears to be a novel marker of corneal wound healing.

  • 36.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    et al.
    Department of Chemical Engineering University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5, Canada.
    Li, Fengfu
    University of Ottawa Eye Institute, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6, Canada.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Lagali, Neil S.
    University of Ottawa Eye Institute, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6, Canada.
    Watsky, Mitchell A.
    University of Tennessee Health Center, Memphis, TN, USA.
    Munger, Rejean
    University of Ottawa Eye Institute, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6, Canada.
    Matsuura, Takeshi
    Department of Chemical Engineering University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5, Canada.
    Griffith, May
    University of Ottawa Eye Institute, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6, Canada.
    PEG-stabilized carbodiimide crosslinked collagen-chitosan hydrogels for corneal tissue engineering2008In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 29, no 29, p. 3960-3972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implantable biomaterials that mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) in key physical and physiological functions require components and microarchitectures that are carefully designed to maintain the correct balance between biofunctional and physical properties. Our goal was to develop hybrid polymer networks (HPN) that combine the bioactive features of natural materials and physical characteristics of synthetic ones to achieve synergy between the desirable mechanical properties of some components with the biological compatibility and physiological relevance of others. In this study, we developed collagen-chitosan composite hydrogels as corneal implants stabilized by either a simple carbodiimide cross-linker or a hybrid cross-linking system comprised of a long-range bi-functional cross-linker (e.g. poly(ethylene glycol) dibutyraldehyde (PEG-DBA)), and short-range amide-type cross-linkers (e.g. 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC), and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)). Optimum hybrid hydrogel demonstrated significantly enhanced mechanical strength and elasticity by 100 and 20%, respectively, compared to its non-hybrid counterpart. It demonstrated excellent optical properties, optimum mechanical properties and suturability, and good permeability to glucose and albumin. It had excellent biocompatibility and when implanted into pig corneas for 12 months, allowed seamless host-graft integration with successful regeneration of host corneal epithelium, stroma, and nerves. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 37.
    Wrigstad, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Algvere, Peep
    Arteriovenous adventitial sheathotomy for branch retinal vein occlusion: Report of a case with longterm follow-up2006In: Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica, ISSN 1395-3907, E-ISSN 1600-0420, Vol. 84, no 5, p. 699-702Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To report the longterm follow-up of a case of branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) treated with vitrectomy and adventitial sheathotomy. Methods: A three-port vitrectomy was performed in a 55-year-old man with symptoms of BRVO of about 3months' duration. After a core vitrectomy, the adventitial sheath of the affected arteriovenous crossing was dissected so that the anterior surface of the arteriole was freely exposed. Results: On the second postoperative day, visual acuity (VA) in the affected left eye had increased from preoperative 0.3 to 0.6. Within 6months the fundus had almost normalized and vision improved to 1.0. Cataract surgery was performed about 2years after the vitrectomy. At a follow-up 4years and 11months after the sheathotomy, VA was 1.0 and no signs of recurrence were seen. Conclusions: Adventitial sheathotomy may improve vision in selected cases of BRVO. Further studies are necessary to determine the role of sheathotomy in the management of cases with BRVO. © 2006 Acta Ophthalmol Scand.

  • 38.
    Wrigstad, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Hanitzsch, Renate
    Pigment epithelial changes in a strain of pigmented rabbits with low ERG b-wave amplitudes2004In: Vision Research, ISSN 0042-6989, E-ISSN 1878-5646, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 99-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Retinas from a strain of rabbits with low dark-adapted electroretinographic (ERG) b-wave amplitudes, and declining ERG responses with time, were examined by light and electron microscopy. Seven rabbits from the affected strain (13 months to 5 years old) and six control animals (6-26 months old) were included in the study. Small inclusions with an electron dense border, about 0.2-1.5 μm in diameter, were significantly (p<0.01) more numerous within the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in the affected rabbits than in the control animals. No morphological evidence of retinal degeneration was found. Further studies are needed to establish the functional defect in this strain of rabbits.

1 - 38 of 38
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