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  • 1.
    Cardell, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Infectious Diseases UHL.
    Frydén, Aril
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Infectious Diseases UHL.
    Normann, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Intradermal hepatitis B vaccination in health care workers. Response rate and experiences from vaccination in clinical practise1999In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 197-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health care workers at risk for hepatitis B virus infection are recommended for vaccination. Low-dose intradermal (i.d.) administration of vaccine has been suggested as a less expensive alternative to intramuscular (i.m.) inoculation. To evaluate the i.d. vaccination route, health care workers were included in a prospective study. The subjects were vaccinated with 0.1 ml (= 2 microg) recombinant vaccine (Engerix B, SmithKline Beecham) i.d. at 0, 1 and 6 months. Two months after the third vaccination, measurement of the anti-HBs level was conducted. An anti-HBs level > or =10 IU/l was considered protective. Those with an anti-HBs level <10 IU/l were given a fourth dose with new serological control after another 2 months. The results are based on the 1406 subjects that it was possible to evaluate. The seroconversion rate to protective anti-HBs level after 3 doses was 68% and after 3 or 4 doses 89%. Factors associated with a lower response rate were increasing age (p<0.05) and smoking (p<0.001). Sex or body mass index had no influence on the results. Vaccination technique seems to be of utmost importance when the i.d. route is used. Well instructed and experienced nurses are required and quality control with follow-up of overall seroconversion rate within each centre is needed.

  • 2.
    Cardell, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Infectious Diseases UHL.
    Lindblom, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Forensic Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Frydén, Aril
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Infectious Diseases UHL.
    Hepatitis B vaccination in relatives to known non-responders: A family studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hepatitis B can be prevented by hepatitis B vaccine in most individuals. However about 5 –10% of all individuals fail to produce a protective antibody level to hepatitis B surface antigen(anti-HBs), after standard vaccination procedure with three vaccine doses. The mechanismsfor non-response are multi-factorial and not clearly understood. Non-response in this studywas defined as anti-HBs < 10 mIU/ml after at least 4 doses of intradermal hepatitis B vaccine.In this study we vaccinated relatives to known non-responders to hepatitis B vaccine. Thestudy subjects were chosen among relatives to non-responders with known HLA class IIhaplotypes. Recombinant hepatitis B vaccine was administered intradermally at 0, 1 and 6months. For those with anti-HBs <10 mIU/ml after three doses an additional dose was givenfollowed by new anti-HBs measurement. A total of 8 probands and 26 relatives wereincluded. Of the 26 relatives 15/26 (58%) responded to the vaccination schedule compared tothe expected 90-95%. This data therefore support the theory that genetic factors play animportant role in the antibody response to hepatitis B vaccine. The study population wasthough too small to conclude the role of specific genetic factors related to response and nonresponse.

  • 3.
    Cardell, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Åkerlind, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Sällberg, Matti
    Division of Clinical Virology, Karolinska Institute at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Frydén, Aril
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Infectious Diseases UHL.
    Excellent response rate to a double dose of the combined hepatitis A and B vaccine in previous nonresponders to hepatitis B vaccine2008In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0022-1899, E-ISSN 1537-6613, Vol. 198, no 3, p. 299-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis B vaccine has been shown to be highly efficient in preventing hepatitis B. However, 5%-10% of individuals fail to develop protective levels (>or=10 mIU/mL) of antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) and are considered to be nonresponders.

    METHODS: A total of 48 nonresponders and 20 subjects naive to the HBV vaccine received a double dose of combined hepatitis A and B vaccine (Twinrix) at 0, 1, and 6 months. The levels of anti-HBs and antibodies to hepatitis A virus (anti-HAV) were determined before vaccination and 1 month after each dose.

    RESULTS: Among 44 nonresponders, protective anti-HBs levels were found in 26 (59%) after the first dose and in 42 (95%) after the third dose. Among the control subjects, the corresponding figures were 10% and 100%, respectively. All subjects seroconverted to anti-HAV. The titers of both anti-HBs and anti-HAV were lower in the previously nonresponsive subjects (P< .01).

    CONCLUSION: Revaccination of nonresponders to the standard hepatitis B vaccine regimen with a double dose of the combined hepatitis A and B vaccine was highly effective. This is most likely explained by the increased dose, a positive bystander effect conferred by the hepatitis A vaccine, or both.

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