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  • 1.
    Abednazari, Hossin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. PEAS Institute, Linköping.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Nilsson, Ingela
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Nayeri, Fariba
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Hepatocyte growth factor is a reliable marker for efficient anti-bacterial therapy within the first day of treatment2014In: Advances in Bioscience and Biotechnology, ISSN 2156-8456, E-ISSN 2156-8502, Vol. 5, no 10, p. 823-830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid diagnosis and choice of appropriate antibiotic treatment might be life-saving in serious infectious diseases. Still the available markers that can evaluate and monitor the diagnosis and treatment are few. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has been studied as a potent regenerative factor produced and released during injuries such as infectious diseases. Monitoring of HGF levels might predict therapy results better than C-reactive protein (CRP) within the first day of treatment in pneumonia. For further investigation of previous observations we aimed to study HGF as a first-day marker in over-representing infectious diseases in comparison to procalcitonin (PCT), CRP and body temperature. Fifty-one patients with community acquired infectious diseases were included consequently at admittance and the serum samples were collected before and within 18 - 24 hours of treatment. HGF levels decreased significantly in case of efficient antibiotic therapy and HGF was shown to be better than PCT, CRP and body temperature to evaluate treatment. In patients with pneumonia, monitoring of HGF was most reasonable. HGF might be used as a therapeutic marker within the first day of empiric antibiotic treatment during infection.

  • 2.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kircher, Katja
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kircher, Albert
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    A Gaze-Based Driver Distraction Warning System and Its Effect on Visual Behavior2013In: IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), ISSN 1524-9050, E-ISSN 1558-0016, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 965-973Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Driver distraction is a contributing factor to many crashes; therefore, a real-time distraction warning system should have the potential to mitigate or circumvent many of these crashes. The objective of this paper is to investigate the usefulness of a real-time distraction detection algorithm called AttenD. The evaluation is based on data from an extended field study comprising seven drivers who drove on an average of 4351 +/- 2181 km in a naturalistic setting. Visual behavior was investigated both on a global scale and on a local scale in the surroundings of each warning. An increase in the percentage of glances at the rear-view mirror and a decrease in the amount of glances at the center console were found. The results also show that visual time sharing decreased in duration from 9.94 to 9.20 s due to the warnings, that the time from fully attentive to warning decreased from 3.20 to 3.03 s, and that the time from warning to full attentiveness decreased from 6.02 to 5.46 s. The limited number of participants does not allow any generalizable conclusions, but a trend toward improved visual behavior could be observed. This is a promising start for further improvements of the algorithm and the warning strategy.

  • 3.
    Ahn, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nielsen, Niels-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Wallby, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    TAVI without concomitant balloon dilatation2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Ambarki, K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Lindqvist, T.
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Wahlin, A.
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Petterson, E.
    SyntheticMR ABE, Linköping, Sweden .
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Birgander, R.
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Malm, J.
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Eklund, A.
    Umeå University, Sweden Umeå University, Sweden .
    Evaluation of Automatic Measurement of the Intracranial Volume Based on Quantitative MR Imaging2012In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 1951-1956Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Brain size is commonly described in relation to ICV, whereby accurate assessment of this quantity is fundamental. Recently, an optimized MR sequence (QRAPMASTER) was developed for simultaneous quantification of T1, T2, and proton density. ICV can be measured automatically within minutes from QRAPMASTER outputs and a dedicated software, SyMRI. Automatic estimations of ICV were evaluated against the manual segmentation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 19 healthy subjects, manual segmentation of ICV was performed by 2 neuroradiologists (Obs1, Obs2) by using QBrain software and conventional T2-weighted images. The automatic segmentation from the QRAPMASTER output was performed by using SyMRI. Manual corrections of the automatic segmentation were performed (corrected-automatic) by Obs1 and Obs2, who were blinded from each other. Finally, the repeatability of the automatic method was evaluated in 6 additional healthy subjects, each having 6 repeated QRAPMASTER scans. The time required to measure ICV was recorded. RESULTS: No significant difference was found between reference and automatic (and corrected-automatic) ICV (P greater than .25). The mean difference between the reference and automatic measurement was -4.84 +/- 19.57 mL (or 0.31 +/- 1.35%). Mean differences between the reference and the corrected-automatic measurements were -0.47 +/- 17.95 mL (-0.01 +/- 1.24%) and -1.26 +/- 17.68 mL (-0.06 +/- 1.22%) for Obs1 and Obs2, respectively. The repeatability errors of the automatic and the corrected-automatic method were less than1%. The automatic method required 1 minute 11 seconds (SD = 12 seconds) of processing. Adding manual corrections required another 1 minute 32 seconds (SD = 38 seconds). CONCLUSIONS: Automatic and corrected-automatic quantification of ICV showed good agreement with the reference method. SyMRI software provided a fast and reproducible measure of ICV.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Quantitative Assessment of Turbulence and Flow Eccentricity in an Aortic Coarctation - Impact of Virtual Interventions2015In: Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology, ISSN 1869-408X, E-ISSN 1869-4098, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 281-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turbulence and flow eccentricity can be measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, we propose quantitative techniques to assess turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and flow eccentricity that could assist in the evaluation and treatment of stenotic severities. These hemodynamic parameters were studied in a pre-treated aortic coarctation (CoA) and after several virtual interventions using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), to demonstrate the effect of different dilatation options on the flow field. Patient-specific geometry and flow conditions were derived from MRI data. The unsteady pulsatile flow was resolved by large eddy simulation (LES) including non-Newtonian blood rheology. Results showed an inverse asymptotic relationship between the total amount of TKE and degree of dilatation of the stenosis, where turbulent flow proximal the constriction limits the possible improvement by treating the CoA alone. Spatiotemporal maps of TKE and flow eccentricity could be linked to the characteristics of the jet, where improved flow conditions were favored by an eccentric dilatation of the CoA. By including these flow markers into a combined MRI-CFD intervention framework, CoA therapy has not only the possibility to produce predictions via simulation, but can also be validated pre- and immediate post treatment, as well as during follow-up studies.

  • 6.
    Aneq Åström, Meriam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Evaluation of Right and Left Ventricular Function Using Speckle Tracking Echocardiography in Patients with Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy and Their First Degree RelativesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and aim: The identification of right ventricular abnormalities in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) in early stages is still difficult. The aim of this study was to investigate if longitudinal strain based on speckle tracking can detect subtle right (RV) or left ventricular (LV) dysfunction as an early sign of ARVC.

    Methods and results: Seventeen male patients, fulfilling Task force criteria for ARVC, 49 (32-70) years old, nineteen male first degree relatives 29 (19-73) y.o. and twenty-two healthy male volunteers 36 (24-66) y.o participated in the study. Twelve-lead and signal-averaged electrocardiograms were recorded. All subjects underwent echocardiography. LV and RV diameters, peak systolic velocity from tissue Doppler and longitudinal strain based on speckle tracking were measured from the basal and mid segments in both ventricles. RV longitudinal strain measurement was successful in first degree relatives and controls (95 resp. 86%) but less feasible in patients (59%). Results were not systematically different between first degree relatives and controls. Using discriminant analysis, we then developed an index based on echocardiographic parameters. All normal controls had an index <l while patients with abnormal ventricles had an index between 1-4. Some of the first degree relatives deviated from the normal pattern.

    Conclusion: Longitudinal strain of LV and RV segments was significantly lower in patients than in relatives and controls. An index was developed incorporating dimensional and functional echocardiographic parameters. In combination with genetic testing this index might help to detect early phenotype expression in mutation carriers.

  • 7.
    Aneq Åström, Meriam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Fluur, Christina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Rehnberg, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Novel plakophilin2 mutation. Three generation family with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy2012In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 72-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The autosomal dominant form of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC)has been linked to mutations in desmosomal proteins. Different studies have shown that amutation in plakophilin-2 (PKP 2) is a frequent genetic cause for ARVC. We describe a newmutation in the PKP2 gene, the genotype-phenotype variation in this mutation and its clinicalconsequences.

    Design: Individuals in a three generation family were investigated after the sudden cardiac death of a young male. Clinical evaluation, electrocardiography, echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, endomyocardial biopsy and genetic testing were performed.

    Results: A novel heterozygote mutation, a c.368G>A transition, located in exon 3 of the PKP2 gene was found (p.Trp123X). The phenotype was characterized by arrhythmia at an early age in some individuals, with mild abnormalities on imaging. However a relative carrying this mutation, with positive findings on endomyocardial biopsy had an otherwise normal phenotype, for 16 years, whereas a relative fulfilling the modified Task Force Criteria for ARVC turned out to be a non-carrier.

    Conclusions: This shows the variable penetrance and phenotypic expression in ARVC and highlights the need of genetic testing as well as a thorough phenotype examination as a part of the investigations in ARVC pedigrees.

  • 8.
    Aneq Åström, Meriam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Determination of right ventricular volume and function using multiple axially rotated MRI slices2011In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 233-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pandgt;Background: The conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method for right ventricular (RV) volume and motion, using short-axis (SA) orientation, is limited by RV anatomy and shape. We suggest an orientation based on six slices rotated around the long axis of the RV, rotated long axis (RLA). Materials and methods: Three phantoms were investigated in SA and RLA using cine balanced steady-state free precession MRI. Volumes were calculated based on segmentation and checked against true volumes. In 23 healthy male volunteers, we used six long-axis planes from the middle of the tricuspid valve to the RV apex, rotated in 30 degrees increments. For comparison, short-axis slices were acquired. Imaging parameters were identical in both acquisitions. Results: Right ventricular end-diastolic (EDV), end-systolic (ESV) and stroke volumes (SV) determined in the RLA 179 center dot 1 +/- 29 center dot 3; 80 center dot 1 +/- 17 center dot 1; 99 center dot 3 +/- 16 center dot 9 ml and in the SA were 174 center dot 0 +/- 21 center dot 1; 78 center dot 8 +/- 13 center dot 6; 95 center dot 3 +/- 14 center dot 5 ml with P-values for the difference from 0 center dot 17 to 0 center dot 64 (ns). Interobserver variability ranged between 3 center dot 2% and 6 center dot 6% and intraobserver variability between 2 center dot 8% and 6 center dot 8%. In SA views, consensus for the definition of the basal slice was necessary in 39% of the volunteers for whom the average volume change was 20% in ESV and 10% in EDV. Conclusions: The RLA method results in better visualization and definition of the RV inflow, outflow and apex. Accurate measurement of RV volumes for diagnosis and follow-up of cardiac diseases are enhanced by the RLA orientation, even though additional acquisition time is required.

  • 9.
    Appel, Carl-Fredrik
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultkvist, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Ahn, Henrik Casimir
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Freter, Wolfgang
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vánky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Transcatheter versus surgical treatment for aortic stenosis: Patient selection and early outcome2012In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 301-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. To describe short-term clinical and echocardiography outcomes in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). To explore patient selection criteria for treatment with TAVI. Design. TAVI patients (n = 45) were matched to SAVR patients (n = 45) with respect to age within +/- 10 years, sex and systolic left ventricular function. Results. TAVI patients were older, 82 +/- 8 versus 78 +/- 5 years (p = 0.005) and they had higher logEuroSCORE, 16 +/- 11% versus 8 +/- 4% (p andlt; 0.001). There were no significant differences in 30 days mortality, stroke and myocardial infarction. TAVI patients received less erythrocyte (53% vs. 78%, p = 0.03) and thrombocyte (7% vs. 27%, p = 0.02) transfusions. Postoperative atrial fibrillation was less common (18% vs. 60%, p andlt; 0.001) in the TAVI group. Paravalvular regurgitation was more common in TAVI patients (87% vs. 0%, p andlt; 0.001) and 27% had access site complications. Aortic transvalvular velocity was 2.3 +/- 0.4 m/s versus 2.6 +/- 0.5 m/s (p = 0.002) and mean valve pressure gradient was 12 +/- 4 mmHg versus 15 +/- 5 mmHg (p = 0.01) in the TAVI and SAVR groups, respectively. Twenty-nine (64%) of the TAVI patients had logEuroSCORE andlt; 15%. Conclusions. Both TAVI and SAVR have good short term clinical outcome with excellent hemodynamic result. In clinical practice, factors other than high logEuroSCORE play an important role in patient selection for TAVI.

  • 10.
    Arbring, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Chaireti, Roza
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Uppugunduri, Srinivas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Jansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    First experience of structured introduction of new oral anticoagulants in a Swedish health care district: dabigatran as an alternative to warfarin in atrial fibrillation2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Ask, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    ENGVALL, J
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL-ANALYSIS OF AORTIC COARCTATION1989In: IMAGES OF THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY, PTS 1-6, 1989, Vol. 11, p. 103-103Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aortic coarctation, which could severely influence the haemodynamic conditions of the body, is discussed. A theory has been developed which relates the pressure drop over the coarctation to the flow. This theory indicates that the pressure drop across the actual coarctation is related to the flow squared. For the collateral flow the expected pressure drop is either linearly or quadratically related to the flow. Model experiments and patient data support the present theoretical model

  • 12.
    Ask, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fjallbrant, T
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Bioacoustic techniques is applicable to primary health care2001In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 23RD ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE IEEE ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY SOCIETY, VOLS 1-4: BUILDING NEW BRIDGES AT THE FRONTIERS OF ENGINEERING AND MEDICINE, 2001, Vol. 23, p. 1911-1914Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The stethoscope has been used diagnostically for nearly two hundred years to assess the heart function. We can envision the intelligent stethoscope which combines the advantages of the traditional instrument with advanced functionality for analysis of the signal and other information support. The bioacoustic technique is basically simple and robust and fits therefore into a scenario where investigations are performed in a distributed health care system as in primary health care or even home health care. We have focused on detection of respiratory sounds and third heart sounds. The later is performed with a new wavelet technique which makes it possible to automatically detect and identify the sounds and possibly relate them to myocardial insufficiency.

  • 13.
    Ask, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Regurgitant flow through heart valves: a hydraulic model applicable to ultrasound Doppler measurements.1986In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 643-646Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Baranowska, Irena
    et al.
    Silesian Technical University, Gliwice, Poland.
    Magiera, Sylwia
    Silesian Technical University, Gliwice, Poland.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    UHPLC Method for the Simultaneous Determination of beta-Blockers, Isoflavones, and Flavonoids in Human Urine2011In: Journal of Chromatographic Science, ISSN 0021-9665, E-ISSN 1945-239X, Vol. 49, no 10, p. 764-773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simple method using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) for the simultaneous determination of β-blockers, isoflavones, and flavonoids in human urine is developed. A statistical central composite design and response surface analysis is used to optimize the separation of the analytes. These multivariate procedures are efficient in determining the optimal separation condition using resolutions and retention time as responses. A gradient elution using a mobile phase consisting of 0.05% trifluoroacetic acid in water and acetonitrile is applied on a Hypersil GOLD column within a short analysis time of 4.5 min. UV detection was used to monitor the analytes. The suggested method was linear in a concentration range from 0.04-20.00 μg/mL, depending on the compound. The limits of detection ranged from 8.9 to 66.2 ng/mL. The precision was lower than 2.74%, and the accuracy was between 0.01-3.65%. The Oasis HLB column, with the highest recoveries, is selected for the pre-concentration step. This present paper reports, for the first time, a method for the simultaneous determination of β-blockers, isoflavones, and flavonoids in human urine samples. Furthermore, the developed method can also be applied to the routine determination of examined compounds concentrations in human urine.

  • 15.
    Baranowska, Irena
    et al.
    Silesian Tech University.
    Magiera, Sylwia
    Silesian Tech University.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    UHPLC method for the simultaneous determination of beta-blockers, isoflavones and their metabolites in human urine2011In: JOURNAL OF CHROMATOGRAPHY B-ANALYTICAL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE BIOMEDICAL AND LIFE SCIENCES, ISSN 1570-0232, Vol. 879, no 9-10, p. 615-626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A rapid-resolution ultra high-performance liquid chromatography separation method (UHPLC) for the simultaneous determination of the following beta-blockers: milrinone, sotalol, metoprolol, propranolol and carvedilol, and their metabolites: 5-hydroxylphenyl-carvedilol, O-desmethylcarvedilol, 4-hydroxypropranolol, alpha-hydroxy-metoprolol, O-desmethyl-metoprolol; the following isoflavones: genistein, daidzein, glycitin, glycitein, puerarin and biochanin A; as well as their metabolites: dihydrogenistein, desmethylglycitein, 8-hydroxygenistein, daidzein-7,4-diglucoside, 8-hydroxydaidzein, dihydrobiochanin A in human urine was optimized. The analysed compounds were extracted from human urine by means of solid phase extraction (SPE). The effective UHPLC separation of the examined compounds was applied on a Hypersil GOLD (TM) (50 mm x 2.1 mm, 1.9 mu m) column with a gradient mobile phase system and a UV detector. The complete separation of all analytes was achieved within 8.0 min. The method was validated for the determination of the aforementioned substances in human urine. The linear ranges, limits of detection CLOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) for beta-blockers, isoflavones and their metabolites were determined. The intra- and inter-day precision (%C.V.) was less than 4.48%, and the intra-day and inter-day accuracy was less than 4.74%. The tested SPE sorbent proved that appropriate absolute recoveries can be obtained for Oasis HLB (Waters). The mean recovery of the analytes, using the new SPE procedure, amounted from 70.14% to 99.85%. The present paper reports, for the first time, the method for the determination of beta-blockers, isoflavones and their metabolites in human urine samples. The newly developed method was suitably validated and successfully applied for the analysis of the certain of the aforementioned analytes in human urine samples obtained from the patients suffering cardiovascular disease.

  • 16.
    Baranowska, Irena
    et al.
    Silesian Tech University.
    Magiera, Sylwia
    Silesian Tech University.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    ULTRA HPLC METHOD FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS ANALYSIS OF DRUGS AND FLAVONOIDS IN HUMAN URINE2011In: JOURNAL OF LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY and RELATED TECHNOLOGIES, ISSN 1082-6076, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 421-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A validated reverse-phase Ultra HPLC method for the simultaneous determination of drugs sotalol, metoprolol, propranolol, carvedilol, salicylic acid, dexamethasone, prednisolone, and ketoprofen and flavonoids: (+/-)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, rutin, hesperidin, neohesperidin, quercitrin, (+/-)-naringenin, hesperetin in human urine has been developed. Urine samples were pretreated by solid-phase extraction using SDB and C18 cartridges. The extraction efficiencies of each analyte from urine ranged from 76.21% to 101.29%. Gradient separation is achieved by using a Chromolith (R) Fast Gradient Monolithic C18e (50mmx2mm) column and Hypersil Gold (50mmx2.1mm, 1.9 mu m) column, using UV detection to monitor the analytes at 227, 240, 254, and 280nm. The mobile phase consists of mixed 0.05% trifluoroacetic acid in water and acetonitrile in the gradient elution. All sixteen compounds were analyzed within 4min. The LOD and LOQ of drugs and flavonoids are 0.01 mu g/mL and 0.03 mu g/mL; 0.02 mu g/mL and 0.07 mu g/mL, respectively. The developed procedure allows the determination of drugs in urine in concentrations from 0.2 to 40 mu g/mL. The following concentrations of the examined drugs in human urine, belonging to people treated with -blockes, were detected. What is more, an amount of flavonoids occur in urine in higher concentrations than calculated LOD and LOQ. The method has been proved to be precise, accurate, and well suited to the routine determination of all these flavonoid and drug concentrations in human urine samples.

  • 17.
    Baranowska, Irena
    et al.
    Silesian Technical University, Gliwice, Poland.
    Magiera, Sylwia
    Silesian Technical University, Gliwice, Poland.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Use of multivariate statistical techniques to optimize the separation of isoflavones by liquid chromatography2011In: Central European Journal of Chemistry, ISSN 1895-1066, E-ISSN 1644-3624, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 972-981Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to optimize and validate a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for separation and quantification of five isoflavones. A statistical central composite design was used to separate all peaks. These multivariate procedures were efficient in determining the optimal separation condition using resolution, capacity factor, asymmetry and number of theoretical plates. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe effective separation of the examined compounds was applied on a Develosil RP Aqueous AR 5 RP-30 column with a gradient mobile phase system and a DAD detector. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe isolation and preconcentration of the isoflavones from urine and plasma samples were conducted by means of the solid-phase extraction (SPE). For optimize SPE conditions various sorbents were tested. Furthermore, high recoveries and good relative standard deviations were obtained when the samples were passed through the Oasis HLB column. The developed method was validated and successfully applied for determination of isoflavones in urine and plasma.

  • 18.
    Baranowska, Irena
    et al.
    Silesian Tech Univ, Fac Chem, Dept Analyt & Gen Chem, PL-44100 Gliwice, Poland.
    Markowski, Piotr
    Silesian Tech Univ, Fac Chem, Dept Analyt & Gen Chem, PL-44100 Gliwice, Poland.
    Gerle, Anna
    Silesian Tech Univ, Fac Chem, Dept Analyt & Gen Chem, PL-44100 Gliwice, Poland.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Determination of selected drugs in human urine by differential pulse voltammetry technique2008In: Bioelectrochemistry, ISSN 1567-5394, E-ISSN 1878-562X, Vol. 73, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new, simple and selective differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) method for the simultaneous determination of selected drugs in model solutions and spiked human urine samples with prior extraction was developed and validated. The objects of analysis were paracetamol, furosemide, dipyrone, cefazolin and dexamethasone belonging to four different therapeutic groups (antibiotics, analgesic, demulcent and diuretic). Analytical methods for the preparation of urine samples for voltammetric analysis (liquid-liquid extraction - LLE and solid-phase extraction - SPE) were worked out and optimized. Hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) and graphite electrode were used as working electrodes. Reference electrode was Ag vertical bar AgCl vertical bar KCI(sat.), whereas auxiliary electrode - platinum electrode. The optimal conditions for quantitative determination were obtained in a Britton-Robinson (BR) buffer at pH 2.4. Quantification was performed by means of calibration curve and standard addition methods. The calibration curves of analysed drugs are linear within the range of concentration: 6.61-66.10, 6.05-54.42, 6.00-65.00, 4.20-33.58 and 0.51-3.06 mu M for paracetamol, furosemide, dipyrone, cefazolin and dexamethasone, respectively. The levels of analysed compounds in human urine can be successfully determined using this developed method with no matrix effect. (C) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 19.
    Baranowska, Irena
    et al.
    Silesian Technical University, Poland .
    Wilczek, Andrzej
    Silesian Technical University, Poland .
    Michal, Kwiatkowski
    Silesian Technical University, Poland .
    Baranowski, Jacek
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF RP-HPLC-DAD METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF NINE DRUGS AND THEIR ELEVEN METABOLITES IN PLASMA AND URINE: PLASMA SAMPLES MEASUREMENTS2013In: Journal of Liquid Chromatography & Related Technologies, ISSN 1082-6076, E-ISSN 1520-572X, Vol. 36, no 12, p. 1597-1615Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new RP-HPLC-DAD method for determination of nine drugs and eleven metabolites in body fluids was developed. The separation of drugs and metabolites (PAR, SOT, MET, ASP, PRO, NIF, CAR, DEX, KET, PAR-S, PAR-G, MET-H, D-MET, SAL, GENT, PRO-S, D-NIF, ODMC, O-DEX, and KET-G) was achieved using Develosil RP-AQUEOUS-AR5 C30 column in 30min. The obtained MQL values (0.02 mu g/mL0.23 mu g/mL) are suitable for urine/plasma measurements. Correlation coefficient (r(2)) was higher than 0.98 for all analytes. The recoveries ranged from 72.1% to 115.2% (RSD andlt;6.4%). Chromatographic data were obtained with accuracy in the range from 0.3 to 5.6%.

  • 20.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Catheter based valve interventions2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Freter, Wolfgang
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nielsen, Niels-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Sandborg, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Wallby, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Echo-guided presentation of the aortic valve minimises contrast exposure in transcatheter valve recipients2011In: Catheterization and cardiovascular interventions, ISSN 1522-1946, E-ISSN 1522-726X, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 272-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    We have developed a method using transthoracic echocardiography in establishing optimal visualization of the aortic root, to reduce the amount of contrast medium used in each patient.

    BACKGROUND:

    During transcatheter aortic valve implantation, it is necessary to obtain an optimal fluoroscopic projection for deployment of the valve showing the aortic ostium with the three cusps aligned in the beam direction. This may require repeat aortic root angiograms at this stage of the procedure with a high amount of contrast medium with a risk of detrimental influence on renal function.

    METHODS:

    We studied the conventional way and an echo guided way to optimize visualisation of the aortic root. Echocardiography was used initially allowing easier alignment of the image intensifier with the transducer's direction.

    RESULTS:

    Contrast volumes, radiation/fluoroscopy exposure times, and postoperative creatinine levels were significantly less in patients having the echo-guided orientation of the optimal fluoroscopic angles compared with patients treated with the conventional approach.

    CONCLUSION:

    We present a user-friendly echo-guided method to facilitate fluoroscopy adjustment during transcatheter aortic valve implantation. In our series, the amounts of contrast medium and radiation have been significantly reduced, with a concomitant reduction in detrimental effects on renal function in the early postoperative phase.

  • 22.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nielsen, Niels-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Wallby, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation without prior balloon dilatation - a non-randomized single centre experience2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Myasnikova, Irina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Implanterbar trycksensor för monitorering av hjärtsvikt-första humanapplikation.2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24. Baranowski, Jacek
    et al.
    Wallby, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lindgren, B
    Freter, W
    Johansson, M
    Nielsen, Niels-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    TAVI without balloon predilation. A ramdomized single centre study.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Wallby, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Boano, Gabriella
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vanky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Löfström, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Johansson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nielsen, Nils-Erik
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    MitraClip efter hjärtinfarkt med akut papillarmuskelruptur och som behandling vid SAM efter mitralisplastik - 2 fallbeskrivningar2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26. Baranowski, Jacek
    et al.
    Wallby, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Boano, Gabriella
    Vanky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Löfstöm, Lars
    Johansson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nielsen, Niels-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    MitraClip after myocardial infarction with papillary muscle rupture and as treatment of systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27. Barclay, Susan A
    et al.
    Eidenvall, Lars
    Karlsson, Matts
    Andersson, Gunnar
    Xiong, Changsheng
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    The shape of the proximal isovelocity surface area varies with regurgitant orifice size and distance from orifice: computer simulation and model experiments with color M-mode technique.1993In: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, ISSN 0894-7317, E-ISSN 1097-6795, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 433-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hemispheric proximal isovelocity surface area method for quantification of mitral regurgitant flow (i.e., Qc = 2 pi r2v), where 2 pi r2 is the surface area and v is the velocity at radius r, was investigated as distance from the orifice was increased. Computer simulations and steady flow model experiments were performed for orifices of 4, 6, and 8 mm. Flow rates derived from the centerline velocity and hemispheric assumption were compared with true flow rates. Proximal isovelocity surface area shape varied as distance from each orifice was increased and could only be approximated from the hemispheric equation when a certain distance was exceeded: > 7, > 10, and > 12 mm for the 4, 6, and 8 mm orifices, respectively. Prediction of relative error showed that the best radial zone at which to make measurements was 5 to 9, 6 to 14 and 7 to 17 mm for the 4, 6, and 8 mm orifices, respectively. Although effects of a nonhemispheric shape could be compensated for by use of a correction factor, a radius of 8 to 9 mm can be recommended without the use of a correction factor over all orifices studied if a deviation in calculated as compared with true flow of 15% is considered acceptable. These measurements therefore have implications for the technique in clinical practice.

  • 28. Bech-Hanssen, O
    et al.
    Caidahl, K
    Wallentin, I
    Brandberg, J
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Aortic prosthetic valve design and size: relation to Doppler echocardiographic findings and pressure recovery- an in vitro study.2000In: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, ISSN 0894-7317, E-ISSN 1097-6795, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 39-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extent to which Doppler echocardiography information can be used in the assessment of prosthesis hemodynamic performance is still controversial. The goals of our study were to assess the importance of valve design and size both on Doppler echocardiography findings and on pressure recovery in a fluid mechanics model. We performed Doppler and catheter measurements in the different orifices of the bileaflet St Jude (central and side orifices), the monoleaflet Omnicarbon (major and minor orifices), and the stented Biocor porcine prosthesis. Net pressure gradients were predicted from Doppler flow velocities, assuming either independence or dependence of valve size. The peak Doppler estimated gradients (mean +/- SD for sizes 21 to 27) were 21 +/- 10.3 mm Hg for St Jude, 18 +/- 9.3 mm Hg for Omnicarbon, and 37 +/- 14.5 mm Hg for Biocor (P <.05 for St Jude and Omnicarbon vs Biocor). The pressure recovery (proportion of peak catheter pressure) was 53% +/- 8.6% for central-St Jude, 29% +/- 8. 9% for side-St Jude, 20% +/- 5.6% for major-Omnicarbon, 23% +/- 7.4% for minor-Omnicarbon, and 18% +/- 3.6% for Biocor (P <.05 for central-St Jude and side-St Jude vs Omnicarbon and Biocor). Valve sizes (x) significantly influenced pressure recovery (y in percentage) (central-St Jude: y = 3.7x - 35.9, r = 0.88, P =.0001; major-Omnicarbon: y = 2.1x - 30.3, r = 0.85, P =.0001). By assuming dependence of valve size, Doppler was able to predict net pressure gradients in St Jude with a mean difference between net catheter and Doppler-predicted gradient of -3.8 +/- 2.5 mm Hg. In conclusion, prosthetic valve design and size influence the degree of pressure recovery, making Doppler gradients potentially misleading in both the assessment of hemodynamic performance and the comparison of one design with another. The preliminary results indicate that net gradient can be predicted from Doppler gradients.

  • 29.
    Bertus Warntjes, Marcel Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Blystad, Ida
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Obtaining Double Inversion Recovery and Phase Sensitive Inversion Recovery Images without additional Scan Time2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Björck, Hanna M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Renner, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Maleki, Shohreh
    Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Center for Molecular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Siv F.E.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Folkersen, Lasse
    Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Center for Molecular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Eriksson, Per
    Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Center for Molecular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Characterization of Shear-Sensitive Genes in the NormalRat Aorta Identifies Hand2 as a Major Flow-ResponsiveTranscription Factor2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Shear forces play a key role in the maintenance of vessel wall integrity. Current understanding regarding shear-dependent gene expression is mainly based on in vitro or in vivo observations with experimentally deranged shear, hence reflecting acute molecular events in relation to flow. Our objective was to determine wall shear stress (WSS) in the rat aorta and study flow-dependent vessel wall biology under physiological conditions.

    Methods and Results: Animal-specific aortic WSS magnitude and vector direction were estimated using computational fluid dynamic simulation based on aortic geometry and flow information acquired by MRI. Two distinct flow pattern regions were identified in the normal rat aorta; the distal part of the inner curvature being exposed to low WSS and a non-uniform vector direction, and a region along the outer curvature being subjected to markedly higher levels of WSS and a uniform vector direction. Microarray analysis revealed a strong differential expression between the flow regions, particularly associated with transcriptional regulation. In particular, several genes related to Ca2+-signalling, inflammation, proliferation and oxidative stress were among the most highly differentially expressed.

    Conclusions: Microarray analysis validated the CFD-defined WSS regions in the rat aorta, and several novel flow-dependent genes were identified. The importance of these genes in relation to atherosusceptibility needs further investigation.

  • 31.
    Blomstrand, Peter
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden .
    Ekedahl, Susanne
    Rosenlund Primary Care Unit, Sweden .
    Schmekel, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Bronchial Responsiveness to Dry Air Hyperventilation in Smokers May Predict Decline in Airway Status Using Indirect Methods2013In: Lung, ISSN 0341-2040, E-ISSN 1432-1750, Vol. 191, no 2, p. 183-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disabling respiratory symptoms and rapid decline of lung function may occur in susceptible tobacco smokers. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) elicited by direct challenge methods predicts worse lung function outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether BHR to isocapnic hyperventilation of dry air (IHDA) was associated with rapid deterioration in airway status and respiratory symptoms. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanOne hundred twenty-eight smokers and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals with no history of smoking were investigated. All subjects completed a questionnaire. Spirometry and impulse oscillometry (IOS) measurements were recorded before and after 4 min of IHDA. The tests were repeated after 3 years in 102 smokers and 11 controls. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanEighty-five smokers (66 %) responded to the challenge with a a parts per thousand yen2.4-Hz increase in resonant frequency (F (res)), the cutoff limit defining BHR, as recorded by IOS. They had higher F (res) at baseline compared to nonresponding smokers [12.8 +/- A 3.2 vs. 11.5 +/- A 3.4 Hz (p andlt; 0.05)] and lower FEV1 [83 +/- A 13 vs. 89 +/- A 13 % predicted (p andlt; 0.05)]. Multivariable logistic regression analysis indicated that wheezing (odds ratio = 3.7, p andlt; 0.01) and coughing (odds ratio = 8.1, p andlt; 0.05) were significantly associated with hyperresponsiveness. An increase in F (res) was recorded after 3 years in responding smokers but not in nonresponders or controls. The difference remained when subjects with COPD were excluded. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe proportion of hyperresponsive smokers was unexpectedly high and there was a close association between wheezing and coughing and BHR. Only BHR could discriminate smokers with rapid deterioration of airway status from others.

  • 32.
    Blomstrand, Peter
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Engvall, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Maret, Eva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Maret-Ouda, John
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Left ventricular diastolic function, assessed by echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging, is a strong predictor of cardiovascular events, superior to global left ventricular longitudinal strain, in patients with type 2 diabetes.2015In: European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 1000-1007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim of the study was to determine whether left ventricular systolic function, in terms of global left ventricular longitudinal strain (GLS), and diastolic function, expressed as the ratio between early diastolic transmitral flow and mitral annular motion velocities (E/e'), can predict cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: We prospectively investigated 406 consecutive patients, aged 55-65 years, with diabetes mellitus, who participated in the CARDIPP study. Echocardiography, pulse pressure (pp), and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were analysed. Twelve cases of myocardial infarction and seven cases of stroke were identified during the follow-up period of 67 ± 17 months. Univariate Cox regression analysis showed that E/e' was a strong predictor of cardiovascular events (hazards ratio 1.12; 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.18, P < 0.001). E/e' was prospectively associated with cardiovascular events independent of age, sex, GLS, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), pp, and HbA1c in multivariate analysis. Receiver operating characteristic curves showed that E/e' and HbA1c were the strongest predictors for cardiovascular events, both having an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.71 followed by LVEF with an AUC of 0.65 and GLS of 0.61. In a Kaplan-Meyer analysis, the cumulative probability of an event during the follow-up period was 8.6% for patients with an E/e' ratio >15 compared with 2.6% for patients with E/e' ≤15, P = 0.011.

    CONCLUSION: In middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes, E/e' is a strong predictor of myocardial infarction and stroke, comparable with HbA1c and superior to GLS and LVEF.

  • 33.
    Blystad, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Warntjes, Jan Bertus Marcel
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    SyntheticMRI compared with conventional MRI of the brain in a clinical setting: a pilot study, ESMRMB 2012, Lisbon, Portugal.2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Blystad, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Warntjes, Jan Bertus Marcel
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Synthetic MRI of the brain in a clinical setting2012In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 53, no 10, p. 1158-1163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has relatively long scan times for routine examinations, and the signal intensity of the images is related to the specific MR scanner settings. Due to scanner imperfections and automatic optimizations, it is impossible to compare images in terms of absolute image intensity. Synthetic MRI, a method to generate conventional images based on MR quantification, potentially both decreases examination time and enables quantitative measurements.

    PURPOSE:

    To evaluate synthetic MRI of the brain in a clinical setting by assessment of the contrast, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and the diagnostic quality compared with conventional MR images.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS:

    Twenty-two patients had synthetic imaging added to their clinical MR examination. In each patient, 12 regions of interest were placed in the brain images to measure contrast and CNR. Furthermore, general image quality, probable diagnosis, and lesion conspicuity were investigated.

    RESULTS:

    Synthetic T1-weighted turbo spin echo and T2-weighted turbo spin echo images had higher contrast but also a higher level of noise, resulting in a similar CNR compared with conventional images. Synthetic T2-weighted FLAIR images had lower contrast and a higher level of noise, which led to a lower CNR. Synthetic images were generally assessed to be of inferior image quality, but agreed with the clinical diagnosis to the same extent as the conventional images. Lesion conspicuity was higher in the synthetic T1-weighted images, which also had a better agreement with the clinical diagnoses than the conventional T1-weighted images.

    CONCLUSION:

    Synthetic MR can potentially shorten the MR examination time. Even though the image quality is perceived to be inferior, synthetic images agreed with the clinical diagnosis to the same extent as the conventional images in this study.

  • 35.
    Blystad, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology.
    Warntjes, Marcel
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Helmersson, Teresa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Contrast assessment of Synthetic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in clinical practice2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36. Bolger, A F
    et al.
    Eidenvall, L
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Understanding continuous-wave Doppler signal intensity as a measure of regurgitant severity.1997In: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, ISSN 0894-7317, E-ISSN 1097-6795, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 613-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continuous-wave Doppler signal intensity is commonly expected to reflect the severity of mitral regurgitation. Physical principles predict that alignment of the imaging beam, flow velocity, and turbulence can also be important or even dominant determinants of continuous-wave Doppler signal intensity. The reliability of tracking regurgitant severity with continuous-wave Doppler signal intensity was assessed in vitro with varying volume, velocity, turbulence, and beam alignment. The conditions wherein continuous-wave Doppler signal intensity increased with regurgitant volume were specific but poorly predictable combinations of orifice size, flow volume, and perfect beam alignment. Under other conditions flow velocity and turbulence effects dominated, and continuous-wave Doppler signal intensity did not reflect changing regurgitant volume. Continuous-wave Doppler signal intensity-based impressions of regurgitant severity may be unreliable and even misleading under some circumstances.

  • 37.
    Bolger, Ann F
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Eidenvall, Lars
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    THE MULTIPLE DETERMINANTS OF CONTINUOUS WAVE SIGNAL INTENSITY1992In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 86, no 4, SArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Bothe, Wolfgang
    et al.
    Stanford University School of Medicine, USA.
    Ennis, Daniel
    Stanford University School of Medicine, USA.
    Carlhäll, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Stanford University School of Medicine, USA.
    Nguyen, Tom
    Stanford University School of Medicine, USA.
    Timek, Tomasz
    Stanford University School of Medicine, USA.
    Lai, David
    Stanford University School of Medicine, USA.
    Itoh, Akinobu
    Stanford University School of Medicine, USA.
    Ingels, Neil
    Stanford University School of Medicine & Research Institute of the Palo Alto Medical Foundation, California, USA.
    Miller, Craig
    Stanford University School of Medicine, USA.
    Regional Mitral Leaflet Opening During Acute Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation2009In: Journal of Heart Valve Disease, ISSN 0966-8519, E-ISSN 2053-2644, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 586-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim of the study

    Diastolic mitral valve (MV) opening characteristics during ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) are poorly characterized. The diastolic MV opening dynamics was quantified along the entire valvular coaptation line in an ovine model of acute IMR.

    Methods

    Ten radiopaque markers were sutured in pairs on the anterior (A1-E1) and corresponding posterior (A2-E2) leaflet edges from the anterior (A1/A2) to the posterior (E1/E2) commissure in 11 adult sheep. Immediately after surgery, 4-D marker coordinates were obtained before and during occlusion of the proximal left circumflex coronary artery. Distances between marker pairs were calculated throughout the cardiac cycle every 16.7 ms. Leaflet opening was defined as the time after end-systole (ES) when the first derivative of the distance between marker pairs was greater than a threshold value of 3 cm/s. Valve opening velocity was defined as the maximum slope of marker pair tracings.

    Results

    Hemodynamics were consistent with acute ischemia, as reflected by increased MR grade (0.5 ± 0.3 versus 2.3 ± 0.7, p <0.05), decreased contractility (dP/dtmax: 1,948 ± 598 versus 1,119 ± 293 mmHg/s, p <0.05), and slower left ventricular relaxation rate (dP/dtmin: −1,079 ± 188 versus −538 ± 147 mmHg/s, p <0.05). During ischemia, valve opening occurred earlier (A1/A2: 112 ± 28 versus 83 ± 43 ms, B1/B2: 105 ± 32 versus 68 ± 35 ms, C1/C2: 126 ± 25 versus 74 ± 37 ms, D1/D2: 114 ± 28 versus 71 ± 34 ms, E1/E2: 125 ± 29 versus 105 ± 33 ms; all p <0.05) and was slower (A1/A2: 16.8 ± 9.6 versus 14.2 ± 9.4 cm/s, B1/B2: 40.4 ± 9.9 versus 32.2 ± 10.0 cm/s, C1/C2: 59.0 ± 14.9 versus 50.4 ± 18.1 cm/s, D1/D2: 34.4 ± 10.4 versus 25.5 ± 10.9 cm/s; all p <0.05), except at the posterior edge (E1/E2: 13.3 ± 8.7 versus 10.6 ± 7.2 cm/s). The sequence of regional mitral leaflet separation along the line of coaptation did not change with ischemia.

    Conclusion

    Acute posterolateral left ventricular ischemia causes earlier leaflet opening, probably due to a MR-related elevation in left-atrial pressure; reduces leaflet opening velocity, potentially reflecting an impaired left ventricular relaxation rate; and does not perturb the homogeneous temporal pattern of regional valve opening along the line of coaptation. Future studies will confirm whether these findings are apparent in patients with chronic IMR, and may help to refine the current strategies used to treat IMR.

  • 39.
    Bothe, Wolfgang
    et al.
    Stanford University.
    Nguyen, Tom C
    Stanford University.
    Ennis, Daniel B
    Stanford University.
    Itoh, Akinobu
    Stanford University.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Stanford University School of Medicine.
    Lai, David T
    Stanford University.
    Ingels, Neil B
    Stanford University.
    Miller, D. Craig
    Stanford University.
    Effects of acute ischemic mitral regurgitation on three-dimensional mitral leaflet edge geometry2008In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 33, p. 191-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Improved quantitative understanding of in vivo leaflet geometry in ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is needed to improve reparative techniques, yet few data are available due to current imaging limitations. Using marker technology we tested the hypotheses that IMR (1) occurs chiefly during early systole; (2) affects primarily the valve region contiguous with the myocardial ischemic insult; and (3) results in systolic leaflet edge restriction. Methods: Eleven sheep had radiopaque markers sutured as five opposing pairs along the anterior (A1–E1) and posterior (A2–E2) mitral leaflet free edges from the anterior commissure (A1–A2) to the posterior commissure (E1–E2). Immediately postoperatively, biplane videofluoroscopy was used to obtain 4D marker coordinates before and during acute proximal left circumflex artery occlusion. Regional mitral orifice area (MOA) was calculated in the anterior (Ant-MOA), middle (Mid-MOA), and posterior (Post-MOA) mitral orifice segments during early systole (EarlyS), mid systole (MidS), and end systole (EndS). MOA was normalized to zero (minimum orifice opening) at baseline EndS. Tenting height was the distance of the midpoint of paired markers to the mitral annular plane at EndS. Results: Acute ischemia increased echocardiographic MR grade (0.5 ± 0.3 vs 2.3 ± 0.7, p < 0.01) and MOA in all regions at EarlyS, MidS, and EndS: Ant-MOA (7 ± 10 vs 22 ± 19 mm2, 1 ± 2 vs18 ± 16 mm2, 0 vs 17 ± 15 mm2); Mid-MOA (9 ± 13 vs 25 ± 17 mm2, 3 ± 6 vs 21 ± 19 mm2, 0 vs 25 ± 17 mm2); and Post-MOA (8 ± 10 vs 25 ± 16, 2 ± 4 vs 22 ± 13 mm2, 0 vs 23 ± 13 mm2), all p < 0.05. There was no change in MOA throughout systole (EarlyS vs MidS vs EndS) during baseline conditions or ischemia. Tenting height increased with ischemia near the central and the anterior commissure leaflet edges (B1–B2: 7.1 ± 1.8 mm vs 7.9 ± 1.7 mm, C1–C2: 6.9 ± 1.3 mm vs 8.0 ± 1.5 mm, both p < 0.05). Conclusions: MOA during ischemia was larger throughout systole, indicating that acute IMR in this setting is a holosystolic phenomenon. Despite discrete postero-lateral myocardial ischemia, Post-MOA was not disproportionately larger. Acute ovine IMR was associated with leaflet restriction near the central and the anterior commissure leaflet edges. This entire constellation of annular, valvular, and subvalvular ischemic alterations should be considered in the approach to mitral repair for IMR.

  • 40.
    Brolin, Gustav
    et al.
    Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, Sweden.
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Olsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Edenbrandt, Lars
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ljungberg, Michael
    Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, Sweden.
    A new Method for Monte Carlo Simulations of Dynamic Scintillation Camera Imaging: 99mTc MAG3 Renography Studies2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Carhall, C
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Jonatan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Bolger, A
    University of California San Francisco.
    Pre-systolic preparation for left ventricular ejection is impaired in heart failure in EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, vol 31, issue , pp 726-7272010In: EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, Oxford University Press , 2010, Vol. 31, p. 726-727Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 42.
    Davidsson, Anette
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Georgiopoulos, C
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Gustafsson, Agnetha
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Evaluation and comparison of quantification tools for early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease with DaTSCAN SPECT.2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Davidsson, Anette
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Georgiopoulos, C
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Gustafsson, Agnetha
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Utvärdering och jämförelse av kvantifieringsverktyg för tidig diagnostik av Parkinsons sjukdom med DaTSCAN SPECT2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Davidsson, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Georgiopoulos, Charalampos
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dizdar (Dizdar Segrell), Nil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Comparison between visual assessment of dopaminergic degeneration pattern and semi-quantitative ratio calculations in patients with Parkinsons disease and Atypical Parkinsonian syndromes using DaTSCAN (R) SPECT2014In: Annals of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0914-7187, E-ISSN 1864-6433, Vol. 28, no 9, p. 851-859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To verify if I-123-FP-CIT, DaTSCAN (R) can differentiate early stages of Parkinsons disease (PD) as well as patients with Atypical Parkinsonian syndromes (APS) from manifest Parkinsons disease. Methods 128 consecutive patients were investigated with I-123-FP-CIT SPECT during a 4-year period. All patients were diagnosed according to the established consensus criteria for diagnosis of PD (n = 53) and APS (n = 19). Remaining patients were grouped early PD (before onset of L-DOPA medication), (n = 20), vascular PD (n = 6), and non-PD syndromes (n = 30) and SWEDD (n = 1). SPECT images were analyzed visually according to a predefined ranking scale of dopaminergic nerve cell degeneration, distinguishing a posterior-anterior degeneration pattern (egg shape) from a more global and severe degeneration pattern (burst striatum). Striatum uptake ratios were quantitatively analyzed with the 3D software, EXINI. Results In the group of APS patients, the burst striatum pattern was most frequent and found in 61 % (11/18 patients). In PD patients, the egg shape pattern was dominating, especially in early PD where it was present in 95 % (19/20 patients). The positive predictive value for the egg shape pattern to diagnose PD was 92 % in this material (APS and all PD patients) and the specificity 90 % for the burst striatum pattern to exclude APS. The uptake ratios were reduced in both PD and APS patients and closely related to the image ranking. Conclusion In this study, we found that in more than half of the patients it was possible to differentiate between PD and APS by visual interpretation only. Similar results were obtained using semi-quantitative uptake ratios. Combining visual assessment with uptake ratios did not add to the discriminating power of DaTSCAN (R) SPECT in this material.

  • 45.
    Davidsson, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Georgiopoulos, Charalampos
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dizdar Segrell, Nil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Comparison between visual assessment of dopaminergic degeneration pattern and semi-quantitative ratio calculations in patients with Parkinson's disease and Atypical Parkinsonian snydromes using DaTSCAN SPECT2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a degenerative disorder characterized by the progressive degeneration of dopamine-containing cells in substantia nigra, and it is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder worldwide. It can be difficult to differentiate between idiopathic PD and Atypical Parkinsonian syndromes (APS). In a high percentage of APS patients, the right diagnosis is not established even during late stages of the disease. Currently there is no specific test to verify PD, especially in the early stages of the disease.

    The aim was to verify if 123I-FP-CIT, DaTSCAN ® can differentiate early stages of Parkinson's disease as well as patients with Atypical Parkinsonian syndromes from manifest Parkinson's disease.

    Materials and methods: 121 consecutive patients were investigated with 123I-FP-CIT SPECT, during a four year period. All patients were diagnosed according to the established consensus criteria for diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD), (n=53), Atypical Parkinsonian syndromes (APS) (n=18). Remaining patients were grouped early PD (before onset the of L-dopa medication), (n=20), and non-PD syndromes (n=30). SPECT images were analysed visually according to a predefined ranking scale of dopaminergic degeneration, distinguishing a posterior-anterior degeneration pattern (egg shape) to a more global and severe degeneration pattern (burst striatum). Striatum ratios were quantitatively analysed with the 3D software, EXINI.

    Results: In the group of APS patients the burst striatum pattern was most frequent and found in 61% (11/18 patients). In PD patients the egg shape pattern was dominating, especially in early PD where it was present in 95% (19/20 patients). The sensitivity of burst striatum degeneration pattern was 61% (95%-CI 36-83%), specificity 90% (95%-CI 81-96%). The sensitivity of egg shape pattern was 74% (95%-CI 62-84%), specificity 90% (95%-CI 47-90%). The uptake ratios were reduced in both PD and APS patients and closely related to the image pattern. The lowest putamen/caudate ratio was found in early PD.

    Conclusion: In this study we found that in more than half of the patients it was possible to differentiate between PD and APS by visual interpretation only. Similar results were obtained using semi-quantitative uptake ratios, but combining visual assessment with uptake ratios did not add to the discriminating power of DATSCAN ® SPECT in this material

    References: Kahraman D, Eggers C, Schicha H, Timmermann L, Schmidt M. Visual assessment of dopaminergic degeneration pattern in 123I-FP-CIT SPECT differentiates patients with atypical parkinsonian syndromes and idiopathic Parkinson's disease. J Neurol. 2012;259:251-60

  • 46.
    Davidsson, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Olsson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Holmberg, Bengt
    Gustafsson, Agnetha
    Karolinska University.
    Left ventricle ejection fraction with gated myocardial perfusion SPECT: a comparison between a conventional scintillation detector gamma camera and cadmium-zinc-telluride dectector camera2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    De Geer, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Gjerde, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Physiology in Kalmar, Linköping University, County Council of Kalmar, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Olsson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Large variation in blood flow between left ventricular segments, as detected by adenosine stress dynamic CT perfusion.2015In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 291-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Dynamic cardiac CT perfusion (CTP) is based on repeated imaging during the first-pass contrast agent inflow. It is a relatively new method that still needs validation.

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the variation in adenosine stress dynamic CTP blood flow as compared to (99m) Tc SPECT. Secondarily, to compare manual and automatic segmentation.

    METHODS: Seventeen patients with manifest coronary artery disease were included. Nine were excluded from evaluation for various reasons. All patients were examined with dynamic stress CTP and stress/rest SPECT. CTP blood flow was compared with SPECT on a per segment basis. Results for manual and automated AHA segmentation were compared.

    RESULTS: CTP showed a positive correlation with SPECT, with correlation coefficients of 0·38 and 0·41 for manual and automatic segmentation, respectively (P<0·0001). There was no significant difference between the correlation coefficients of the manual and automated segmentation procedures (P = 0·75). The average per individual global CTP blood flow value for normal segments varied by a factor of 1·9 (manual and automatic segmentation). For the whole patient group, the CTP blood flow value in normal segments varied by a factor of 2·9/2·7 (manual/automatic segmentation). Within each patient, the average per segment blood flow in normal segments varied by a factor of 1·3-2·0/1·2-2·1 (manual/automatic segmentation).

    CONCLUSION: A positive but rather weak correlation was found between CTP and (99m) Tc SPECT. Large variations in CTP blood flow suggest that a cut-off value for stress myocardial blood flow is inadequate to detect ischaemic segments. Dynamic CTP is hampered by a limited coverage.

  • 48.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Pulse wave velocity with 4D flow MRI: Systematic differences and age-related regional vascular stiffness2014In: Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 0730-725X, E-ISSN 1873-5894, Vol. 32, no 10, p. 1266-1271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare multiple methods for estimation of PWV from 4D flow MRI velocity data and to investigate if 4D flow MRI-based PWV estimation with piecewise linear regression modeling of travel-distance vs. travel time is sufficient to discern age-related regional differences in PWV. Methods: 4D flow MRI velocity data were acquired in 8 young and Solder (age: 23 +/- 2 vs. 58 +/- 2 years old) normal volunteers. Travel-time and travel-distance were measured throughout the aorta and piecewise linear regression was used to measure global PWV in the descending aorta and regional PWV in three equally sized segments between the top of the aortic arch and the renal arteries. Six different methods for extracting travel-time were compared. Results: Methods for estimation of travel-time that use information about the whole flow waveform systematically overestimate PWV when compared to methods restricted to the upslope-portion of the waveforms (p less than 0.05). In terms of regional PWV, a significant interaction was found between age and location (p less than 0.05). The age-related differences in regional PWV were greater in the proximal compared to distal descending aorta. Conclusion: Care must be taken as different classes of methods for the estimation of travel-time produce different results. 4D flow MRI-based PWV estimation with piecewise linear regression modeling of travel-distance vs. travel time can discern age-related differences in regional PWV well in line with previously reported data.

  • 49.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    A Novel MRI Framework for the Quantification of Any Moment of Arbitrary Velocity Distributions.2010In: Proc. Intl. Soc. Mag. Reson. Med. 18 (2010), ISMRM , 2010, p. 1359-1359Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Under the assumption that the intravoxel velocity distribution is symmetric about its mean, the well-known MRI phase-difference method permits an estimation of the mean velocity of a voxel. The mean velocity corresponds to the first moment of the velocity distribution. Here, a novel framework for the quantification of any moment of arbitrary spin velocity distributions is presented. Simulations on realistic velocity distributions demonstrate its application. The presented moment framework may assist in improving the understanding of existing MRI methods for the quantification of flow and motion and serve as a basis for the development of new methods.

  • 50.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    MR flow imaging beyond the mean velocity: Estimation of the skew  and kurtosis of intravoxel velocity distributions2011In: ISMRM 2011, International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine ( ISMRM ) , 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
12345 1 - 50 of 208
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