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  • 1.
    Aboyans, Victor
    et al.
    Dupuytren University Hospital.
    Criqui, Michael
    University of California, USA.
    Abraham, Pierre
    University Hospital of Angers, France.
    Allison, Matthew
    University of California, USA.
    Creager, Mark
    Brigham and Women’s Hospital, USA.
    Diehm, Curt
    Karlsbad Clinic/University of Heidelberg, Germany.
    Fowkes, Gerry
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Hiatt, William
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Jönsson, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Lacroix, Philippe
    Limoges University, France.
    Marin, Benoit
    Limoges Teaching Hospital, France.
    McDermott, Mary
    Northwestern University,USA.
    Norgren, Lars
    University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Pande, Reena
    Brigham and Women’s Hospital, USA.
    Preux, Pierre-Marie
    University of Limoges, France.
    Stoffers, H.E.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Treat-Jacobsson, Diane
    University of Minnesota, USA.
    Measurement and interpretation of the ankle-brachial index: a scientific statement from the Ammerican Heart Association2012In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Ahlberg, M
    et al.
    Bäckman, Carl
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jones, C
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Group communication confirm feelings among partners of former intensive care patients2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Ahlgren, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Cederholm, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Gårdelöf, B
    Hübbert, Laila
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Josefsson, A
    Planerat kejsarsnitt på en kvinna med uttalat hypertrof obstruktiv kardiomyopati2011In: Svensk Förening för Anestesi och Intensivvård, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 40-41Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Jideus, Lena
    Uppsala University Hospital .
    Albåge, Anders
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Källner, Göran
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Holmgren, Anders
    Umeå University Hospital .
    Boano, Gabriella
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Hermansson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Kimblad, Per-Ola
    Lund University Hospital.
    Schersten, Henrik
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Sjögren, Johan
    Lund University Hospital .
    Ståhle, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    Åberg, Bengt
    Blekinge Hospital, Karskrona, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Berglin, Eva
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    A Swedish consensus on the surgical treatment of concomitant atrial fibrillation2012In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 212-218Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia among patients scheduled for open heart surgery and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. According to international guidelines, symptomatic and selected asymptomatic patients should be offered concomitant surgical AF ablation in conjunction with valvular or coronary surgery. The gold standard in AF surgery is the Cox Maze III ("cut-and-sew") procedure, with surgical incisions in both atria according to a specified pattern, in order to prevent AF reentry circuits from developing. Over 90% of patients treated with the Cox Maze III procedure are free of AF after 1 year. Recent developments in ablation technology have introduced several energy sources capable of creating nonconducting atrial wall lesions. In addition, simplified lesion patterns have been suggested, but results with these techniques have been unsatisfactory. There is a clear need for standardization in AF surgery. The Swedish Arrhythmia Surgery Group, represented by surgeons from all Swedish units for cardiothoracic surgery, has therefore reached a consensus on surgical treatment of concomitant AF. This consensus emphasizes adherence to the lesion pattern in the Cox Maze III procedure and the use of biatrial lesions in nonparoxysmal AF.

  • 5.
    Ahn, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nielsen, Niels-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Wallby, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    TAVI without concomitant balloon dilatation2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Ahn, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    Myasnikova, Irina
    Rahgozar, Mohammad
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Delshad, Baz
    First in man: wireless pressure sensors in left heart rooms'2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Ahn, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Granfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Hübbert, Laila
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Peterzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiothoracic Anaesthesia and Intensive care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Long-term mechanical circulatory support in patients with a prosthetic aortic valve2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Alstrom, U
    et al.
    University of Uppsala Hospital.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stahle, E
    University of Uppsala Hospital.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Friberg, O
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Cost analysis of re-exploration for bleeding after coronary artery bypass graft surgery2012In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 108, no 2, p. 216-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Re-exploration for bleeding after cardiac surgery is an indicator of substantial haemorrhage and is associated with increased hospital resource utilization. This study aimed to analyse the costs of re-exploration and estimate the costs of haemostatic prophylaxis. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. A total of 4232 patients underwent isolated, first-time, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery during 2005-8. Each patient re-explored for bleeding (n = 127) was matched with two controls not requiring re-exploration (n = 254). Cost analysis was based on resource utilization from completion of CABG until discharge. A mean cost per patient for re-exploration was calculated. Based on this, the net cost of prophylactic treatment with haemostatic drugs for preventing re-exploration was calculated. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. Patients undergoing re-exploration had higher exposure to clopidogrel before operation, prolonged stays in the intensive care unit, and more blood transfusions than controls. The mean incremental cost for re-exploration was (sic)6290 [95% confidence interval (CI) (sic)3408-(sic)9173] per patient, of which 48% [(sic)3001 (95% CI (sic)249-(sic)2147)] was due to prolonged stay, 31% [(sic)1928 (95% CI (sic)1710-(sic)2147)] to the cost of surgery/anaesthesia, 20% [(sic)1261 (95% CI (sic)1145-(sic)1378)] to the increased number of blood transfusions, and andlt;2% [(sic)100 (95% CI (sic)39-(sic)161)] to the cost of haemostatic drugs. A cost model, at an estimated 50% efficacy for recombinant activated clotting factor VIIa and a 50% expected risk for re-exploration without prophylaxis, demonstrated that to be cost neutral, prophylaxis of four patients needed to result in one avoided re-exploration. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions. The resource utilization costs were substantially higher in patients requiring re-exploration for bleeding. From a strict cost-effectiveness perspective, clinical interventions to prevent haemorrhage might be underutilized.

  • 9.
    Alvsaker, Kristin
    et al.
    University of Oslo.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Kleffelgard, Ingerid
    University of Oslo.
    Mongs, Malin
    University of Oslo.
    Aas Draegebo, Randi
    University of Oslo.
    Keller, Anne
    University of Oslo.
    INTER-RATER RELIABILITY OF THE EARLY FUNCTIONAL ABILITIES SCALE2011In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 892-899Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the inter-rater reliability of the Early Functional Abilities (EFA) scale. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign: An observational study of inter-rater reliability in an open cohort. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanPatients: Twenty-four patients with traumatic brain injury in need of medical or surgical intervention in the early rehabilitation section of the intensive care unit. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: The EFA was assessed by 4 different professions in the rehabilitation team. Inter-rater reliability was assessed using linear weighted kappa statistics. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: The overall weighted kappa values of the different EFA items varied from 0.27 to 0.60. The items in the sensorimotor functional area had the highest pairwise agreement, with a mean kappa range of 0.68-0.76. The vegetative stability, position tolerance and wakefulness items had the lowest mean kappa values (0.49, 0.33 and 0.49, respectively). Agreement was good to excellent between the occupational therapist and physiotherapist across the majority of the items, whereas the physician and nurse agreed less with one another. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: The inter-rater reliability of the EFA scale was good for most items among all the raters. The scale may be used by all members of the interdisciplinary team after training in administration and scoring. A reduction in the number of items in the vegetative functional domain is recommended.

  • 10.
    Appel, Carl-Fredrik
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultkvist, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Ahn, Henrik Casimir
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Freter, Wolfgang
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vánky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Transcatheter versus surgical treatment for aortic stenosis: Patient selection and early outcome2012In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 301-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. To describe short-term clinical and echocardiography outcomes in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). To explore patient selection criteria for treatment with TAVI. Design. TAVI patients (n = 45) were matched to SAVR patients (n = 45) with respect to age within +/- 10 years, sex and systolic left ventricular function. Results. TAVI patients were older, 82 +/- 8 versus 78 +/- 5 years (p = 0.005) and they had higher logEuroSCORE, 16 +/- 11% versus 8 +/- 4% (p andlt; 0.001). There were no significant differences in 30 days mortality, stroke and myocardial infarction. TAVI patients received less erythrocyte (53% vs. 78%, p = 0.03) and thrombocyte (7% vs. 27%, p = 0.02) transfusions. Postoperative atrial fibrillation was less common (18% vs. 60%, p andlt; 0.001) in the TAVI group. Paravalvular regurgitation was more common in TAVI patients (87% vs. 0%, p andlt; 0.001) and 27% had access site complications. Aortic transvalvular velocity was 2.3 +/- 0.4 m/s versus 2.6 +/- 0.5 m/s (p = 0.002) and mean valve pressure gradient was 12 +/- 4 mmHg versus 15 +/- 5 mmHg (p = 0.01) in the TAVI and SAVR groups, respectively. Twenty-nine (64%) of the TAVI patients had logEuroSCORE andlt; 15%. Conclusions. Both TAVI and SAVR have good short term clinical outcome with excellent hemodynamic result. In clinical practice, factors other than high logEuroSCORE play an important role in patient selection for TAVI.

  • 11.
    Babic, Ankica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Bergen, Norway.
    Peterzen, Bengt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center.
    Lönn, Urban
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center.
    Casimir Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Case Based Reasoning in a Web Based Decision Support System for Thoracic Surgery2013In: IFMBE Proceedings 41 / [ed] L.M. Roa Romero, Springer, 2013, p. 1413-1416Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Case Based Reasoning (CBR) methodology provides means of collecting patients cases and retrieving them following the clinical criteria. By studying previously treated patients with similar backgrounds, the physician can get a better base for deciding on treatment for a current patient and be better prepared for complications that might occur during and after surgery. This could be taken advantage of when there is not enough data for a statistical analysis, but electronic patient records that provide all the relevant information to assure a timely and accurate clinical insight into a patient particular situation.

    We have developed and implemented a CBR engine using the Nearest Neighbor algorithm. A patient case is represented as a combination of perioperative variable values and operation reports. Physicians could review a selected number of cases by browsing through the electronic patient record and operational narratives which provides an exhaustive insight into the previously treated cases. An evaluation of the search algorithm suggests a very good functionality.

  • 12.
    Banck, M
    et al.
    Hallands Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Heller, Ute
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Samuelsson, C
    Hallands Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Wickerts, CJ
    Danderyd Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Women with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest are less likely to receive therapeutic hypothermia and more likely to die than men: Swedish nationwide cohort study2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Banck, M
    et al.
    Svenska Intensivvårdsregistret, Karlstad.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Karlström, G
    Svenska Intensivvårdsregistret, Karlstad.
    Nolin, T
    Svenska Intensivvårdsregistret, Kristianstad.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Samuelsson, C
    Svenska Intensivvårdsregistret, Karlstad.
    Är svensk intensivvård könsjämlik?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Banck, Malin
    et al.
    Hallands sjukhus, Halmstad.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Karlström, Göran
    Centralsjukhuset, Karlstad.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Samuelsson, Carolina
    Hallands sjukhus, Halmstad.
    Män intensivvårdas mer än kvinnor: Med det är ändå oklart om intensivvården i Sverige är könsojämlik2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 111, no 9-10, p. 388-390Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Freter, Wolfgang
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nielsen, Niels-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Sandborg, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Wallby, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Echo-guided presentation of the aortic valve minimises contrast exposure in transcatheter valve recipients2011In: Catheterization and cardiovascular interventions, ISSN 1522-1946, E-ISSN 1522-726X, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 272-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    We have developed a method using transthoracic echocardiography in establishing optimal visualization of the aortic root, to reduce the amount of contrast medium used in each patient.

    BACKGROUND:

    During transcatheter aortic valve implantation, it is necessary to obtain an optimal fluoroscopic projection for deployment of the valve showing the aortic ostium with the three cusps aligned in the beam direction. This may require repeat aortic root angiograms at this stage of the procedure with a high amount of contrast medium with a risk of detrimental influence on renal function.

    METHODS:

    We studied the conventional way and an echo guided way to optimize visualisation of the aortic root. Echocardiography was used initially allowing easier alignment of the image intensifier with the transducer's direction.

    RESULTS:

    Contrast volumes, radiation/fluoroscopy exposure times, and postoperative creatinine levels were significantly less in patients having the echo-guided orientation of the optimal fluoroscopic angles compared with patients treated with the conventional approach.

    CONCLUSION:

    We present a user-friendly echo-guided method to facilitate fluoroscopy adjustment during transcatheter aortic valve implantation. In our series, the amounts of contrast medium and radiation have been significantly reduced, with a concomitant reduction in detrimental effects on renal function in the early postoperative phase.

  • 16.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nielsen, Niels-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Wallby, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation without prior balloon dilatation - a non-randomized single centre experience2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Myasnikova, Irina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Implanterbar trycksensor för monitorering av hjärtsvikt-första humanapplikation.2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18. Baranowski, Jacek
    et al.
    Nielsen, Niels-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Total percutaneuous transcatheter valve implantation in native mitral stenosis in a patient with previous transapical TAVI2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19. Baranowski, Jacek
    et al.
    Wallby, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Ahn, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Dahlin, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lindgren, B
    Freter, W
    Johansson, M
    Nielsen, Niels-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    TAVI without balloon predilation. A ramdomized single centre study.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Baranowski, Jacek
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Wallby, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Boano, Gabriella
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vanky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Löfström, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Johansson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nielsen, Nils-Erik
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    MitraClip efter hjärtinfarkt med akut papillarmuskelruptur och som behandling vid SAM efter mitralisplastik - 2 fallbeskrivningar2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21. Baranowski, Jacek
    et al.
    Wallby, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Boano, Gabriella
    Vanky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Löfstöm, Lars
    Johansson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nielsen, Niels-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    MitraClip after myocardial infarction with papillary muscle rupture and as treatment of systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Berg, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Akut handläggning av svår sepsis och septisk chock2013In: Sepsis på akuten & IVA: diagnostik och antibiotikaterapi / [ed] Håkan Hanberger, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2013, 2, p. 14-25Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Bergqvist, Davis
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Säwe, Juliette
    SBU, Stockholm.
    Wahlberg, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Vascular surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Benartärsjukdom – inget nytt sedan SBU-rapporten2011In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 108, no 8, p. 403-405Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2007 a report on leg ischemia was published by SBU (Board of Health Technology Assessment in Sweden). This paper summarizes the results of this report and analyzes further investigations of interest. No new open surgical or endovascular methods have been reported. Cilostazol has been approved to increase the walking distance in claudicants. Ongoing trials are evaluating the effect of stem cells and angiogenic factors to treat critical limb ischaemia.

  • 24.
    Berkius, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Västervik County Hospital, Västervik, Sweden.
    Engerström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordlund, Peter
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping,.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten M
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A prospective longitudinal multicentre study of health related quality of life in ICU survivors with COPD2013In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 17, no 5, p. R211-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Mortality amongst COPD patients treated on the ICU is high. Health-related quality of life (HRQL) after intensive care is a relevant concern for COPD patients, their families and providers of health care. Still, there are few HRQL studies after intensive care of this patient group. Our hypothesis was that HRQL of COPD patients treated on the ICU declines rapidly with time.

    METHODS: Fifty-one COPD patients (COPD-ICU group) with an ICU stay longer than 24 hours received a questionnaire at 6, 12 and 24 months after discharge from ICU. HRQL was measured using two generic instruments: the EuroQoL instrument (EQ-5D and EQ-VAS) and the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). The results were compared to HRQL of two reference groups from the general population; an age- and sex-adjusted reference population (Non-COPD reference) and a reference group with COPD (COPD reference).

    RESULTS: HRQL of the COPD-ICU group at 6 months after discharge from ICU was lower compared to the COPD reference group: Median EQ-5D was 0.66 vs. 0.73, P=0.08 and median EQ-VAS was 50 vs.55, P<0.05. There were no significant differences in the SF-36 dimensions between the COPD-ICU and COPD-reference groups, although the difference in physical functioning (PF) approached statistical significance (P=0.059). Patients in the COPD-ICU group who were lost to follow-up after 6 months had low HRQL scores at 6 months. Scores for patients who died were generally lower compared to patients who failed to respond to the questionnaire. The PF and social functioning (SF) scores in those who died were significantly lower compared to patients with a complete follow up. HRQL of patients in the COPD-ICU group that survived a complete 24 months follow up was low but stable with no statistically significant decline from 6 to 24 months after ICU discharge. Their HRQL at 24 months was not significantly different from HRQL in the COPD reference group.

    CONCLUSIONS: HRQL in COPD survivors after intensive care was low but did not decline from 6 to 24 months after discharge from ICU. Furthermore, HRQL at 24 months was similar to patients with COPD who had not received ICU treatment.

  • 25.
    Berkius, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sundh, J
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Nilholm, L
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    What determines immediate use of invasive ventilation in patients with COPD?2013In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 312-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The choice between non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and invasive ventilation in patients with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) may be irrational. The aim of this study was to examine those patient characteristics, and circumstances deemed important in the choice made between NIV and invasive ventilation in the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods We first examined 95 admissions of AECOPD patients on nine ICUs and identified variables associated with invasive ventilation. Thereafter, a questionnaire was sent to ICU personnel to study the relative importance of different factors with a possible influence on the decision to use invasive ventilation at once. Results Univariable analysis showed that increasing age [odds ratio (OR) 1.06 per year] and increasing body mass index (BMI) (OR 1.11 per kg/m2) were associated with immediate invasive ventilation, while there was no such association with arterial blood gases or breath rate. BMI was the only factor that remained associated with immediate invasive ventilation in the multivariable analysis [OR 1.12 (95% confidence interval 1.031.23) kg/m2]. Ranking of responses to the questionnaire showed that consciousness, respiratory symptoms and blood gases were powerful factors determining invasive ventilation, whereas high BMI and age were ranked low. Non-patient-related factors were also deemed important (physician in charge, presence of guidelines, ICU workload). Conclusion Factors other than those deemed most important in guidelines appear to have an inappropriate influence on the choice between NIV and immediate intubation in AECOPD in the ICU. These factors must be identified to further increase the appropriate use of NIV.

  • 26.
    Bjarnegård, Niclas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Morsing, E
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Cinthio, M
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Brodszki, J
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Cardiovascular function in adulthood following intrauterine growth restriction with abnormal fetal blood flow2013In: Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0960-7692, E-ISSN 1469-0705, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 177-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To examine whether intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk later in life. Methods We examined 19 young adults (aged 2225 years) who were born at term after IUGR, along with 18 controls. All had been examined previously with fetal Doppler, and in the present follow-up with echocardiography, carotid echo-tracking ultrasound, applanation tonometry, blood pressure and laser Doppler, in order to characterize their cardiac and vascular geometry and/or function. Results The diameter of the ascending aorta and the left ventricular diameter were smaller in the IUGR group, but only ascending aortic diameter remained significantly smaller after adjustment for body surface area (Pandlt;0.05). The aortic pressure augmentation index was higher in the IUGR group (Pandlt;0.05). The common carotid artery diameter, intimamedia thickness and distensibility as well as left ventricular mass and function were similar in the two groups. IUGR status was found to be an independent predictor of ascending aortic diameter. Conclusions IUGR due to placental dysfunction seems to contribute to the higher systolic blood pressure augmentation and the smaller aortic dimensions that are observed in adults more than 20 years later, with possible negative consequences for future left ventricular performance due to increased aortic impedance.

  • 27.
    Björck, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Per
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Debasso, Rachel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ljungberg, Liza
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Gender-Specific Association of the Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 4G/5G Polymorphism With Central Arterial Blood Pressure2011In: American Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0895-7061, E-ISSN 1941-7225, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 802-808Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND The functional plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) 4G/5G polymorphism has previously been associated with hypertension. In recent years, central blood pressure, rather than brachial has been argued a better measure of cardiovascular damage and clinical outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible influence of the 4G/5G polymorphism on central arterial blood pressure in a cohort of elderly individuals. METHODS We studied 410 individuals, 216 men and 194 women, aged 70-88. Central pressures and pulse waveforms were calculated from the radial artery pressure waveform by the use of the SphygmoCor system and a generalized transfer function. Brachial pressure was recorded using oscillometric technique (Dinamap, Critikon, Tampa, FL). PAI-1 antigen was determined in plasma. RESULTS The results showed that central pressures were higher in women carrying the PAI-1 4G/4G genotype compared to female carriers of the 5G/5G genotype, (P = 0.025, P = 0.002, and P = 0.002 for central systolic-, diastolic-, and mean arterial pressure, respectively). The association remained after adjustment for potentially confounding factors related to hypertension. No association of the PAI-1 genotype with blood pressure was found in men. Multiple regression analysis revealed an association between PAI-1 genotype and plasma PAI-1 levels (P = 0.048). CONCLUSIONS Our findings show a gender-specific association of the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism with central arterial blood pressure. The genotype effect was independent of other risk factors related to hypertension, suggesting that impaired fibrinolytic potential may play an important role in the development of central hypertension in women.

  • 28.
    Björck, Hanna M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Renner, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Maleki, Shohreh
    Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Center for Molecular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Siv F.E.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Folkersen, Lasse
    Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Center for Molecular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Eriksson, Per
    Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Center for Molecular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Characterization of Shear-Sensitive Genes in the NormalRat Aorta Identifies Hand2 as a Major Flow-ResponsiveTranscription Factor2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Shear forces play a key role in the maintenance of vessel wall integrity. Current understanding regarding shear-dependent gene expression is mainly based on in vitro or in vivo observations with experimentally deranged shear, hence reflecting acute molecular events in relation to flow. Our objective was to determine wall shear stress (WSS) in the rat aorta and study flow-dependent vessel wall biology under physiological conditions.

    Methods and Results: Animal-specific aortic WSS magnitude and vector direction were estimated using computational fluid dynamic simulation based on aortic geometry and flow information acquired by MRI. Two distinct flow pattern regions were identified in the normal rat aorta; the distal part of the inner curvature being exposed to low WSS and a non-uniform vector direction, and a region along the outer curvature being subjected to markedly higher levels of WSS and a uniform vector direction. Microarray analysis revealed a strong differential expression between the flow regions, particularly associated with transcriptional regulation. In particular, several genes related to Ca2+-signalling, inflammation, proliferation and oxidative stress were among the most highly differentially expressed.

    Conclusions: Microarray analysis validated the CFD-defined WSS regions in the rat aorta, and several novel flow-dependent genes were identified. The importance of these genes in relation to atherosusceptibility needs further investigation.

  • 29.
    Blomstrand, Peter
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Engvall, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Maret, Eva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Maret-Ouda, John
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Left ventricular diastolic function, assessed by echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging, is a strong predictor of cardiovascular events, superior to global left ventricular longitudinal strain, in patients with type 2 diabetes.2015In: European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 1000-1007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim of the study was to determine whether left ventricular systolic function, in terms of global left ventricular longitudinal strain (GLS), and diastolic function, expressed as the ratio between early diastolic transmitral flow and mitral annular motion velocities (E/e'), can predict cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: We prospectively investigated 406 consecutive patients, aged 55-65 years, with diabetes mellitus, who participated in the CARDIPP study. Echocardiography, pulse pressure (pp), and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were analysed. Twelve cases of myocardial infarction and seven cases of stroke were identified during the follow-up period of 67 ± 17 months. Univariate Cox regression analysis showed that E/e' was a strong predictor of cardiovascular events (hazards ratio 1.12; 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.18, P < 0.001). E/e' was prospectively associated with cardiovascular events independent of age, sex, GLS, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), pp, and HbA1c in multivariate analysis. Receiver operating characteristic curves showed that E/e' and HbA1c were the strongest predictors for cardiovascular events, both having an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.71 followed by LVEF with an AUC of 0.65 and GLS of 0.61. In a Kaplan-Meyer analysis, the cumulative probability of an event during the follow-up period was 8.6% for patients with an E/e' ratio >15 compared with 2.6% for patients with E/e' ≤15, P = 0.011.

    CONCLUSION: In middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes, E/e' is a strong predictor of myocardial infarction and stroke, comparable with HbA1c and superior to GLS and LVEF.

  • 30.
    Bothe, Wolfgang
    et al.
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif.
    Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Stephens, Elisabeth H.
    Rice University, Houston, Tex.
    Swanson, Julia C.
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif.
    Liang, David H.
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif.
    Ingels, Niel B.
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif.
    Miller, D. Craig
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif.
    Effects of different annuloplasty ring types on mitral leaflet tenting area during acute myocardial ischemia2011In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, ISSN 0022-5223, E-ISSN 1097-685X, Vol. 141, no 2, p. 345-353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The study objective was to quantify the effects of different annuloplasty rings on mitral leaflet septal-lateral tenting areas during acute myocardial ischemia.

    Methods

    Radiopaque markers were implanted along the central septal-lateral meridian of the mitral valve in 30 sheep: 1 each to the septal and lateral aspects of the mitral annulus and 4 and 2 along the anterior and posterior mitral leaflets, respectively. Ten true-sized Carpentier-Edwards Physio, Edwards IMR ETLogix, and GeoForm annuloplasty rings (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, Calif) were inserted in a releasable fashion. Marker coordinates were obtained using biplane videofluoroscopy with ring inserted at baseline (RING_BL) and after 90 seconds of left circumflex artery occlusion (RING_ISCH). After ring release, another dataset was acquired before (No_Ring_BL) and after left circumflex artery occlusion (No_Ring_ISCH). Anterior and posterior mitral leaflet tenting areas were computed at mid-systole from sums of marker triangles with the midpoint between the annular markers being the vertex for all triangles.

    Results

    Compared with No_Ring_BL, mitral regurgitation grades and all tenting areas significantly increased with No_Ring_ISCH. Compared with No_Ring_ISCH, (1) all rings significantly prevented mitral regurgitation and reduced all tenting areas; (2) Edwards IMR ETLogix and GeoForm rings reduced posterior mitral leaflet area, but not anterior mitral leaflet tenting area, to a significantly greater extent than the Carpentier-Edwards Physio ring; and (3) Edwards IMR ETLogix and GeoForm rings affected tenting areas similarly.

    Conclusions

    In response to acute left ventricular ischemia, disease-specific functional/ischemic mitral regurgitation rings (Edwards IMR ETLogix, GeoForm) more effectively reduced posterior mitral leaflet area, but not anterior mitral leaflet tenting area, compared with true-sized physiologic rings (Carpentier-Edwards Physio). Despite its radical 3-dimensional shape and greater amount of mitral annular septal-lateral downsizing, the GeoForm ring did not reduce tenting areas more than the Edwards IMR ETLogix ring, suggesting that further reduction in tenting areas in patients with FMR/IMR may not be effectively achieved on an annular level.

  • 31.
    Bäckman, Carl
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ahlberg, M
    Jones, C
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Group conversations after a long stay in the intensive care2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Bäckman, Carl G
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten M
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    A case-control study of the influence of the ICU-diary concept on mastery and hopelessness six months after critical illnessManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ICU-diary concept is associated with less post-traumatic stress syndrome and improved perceived health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) after critical illness, but little is known about its effect on the coping- mastery process, or whether it reduces hopelessness.

    Objective: To see if the ICU-diary concept improves the patient’s ability to master his/her situation after critical illness, and if it reduces the feeling of hopelessness.

    Design: Case control study (subgroup analysis of a multi-centre study on health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL).

    Setting: Non-academic 8-bed general ICU.

    Patients: Adults admitted between March 2002 and June 2004.

    Measurements: Mastery and hopelessness were determined using validated questionnaires (the Mastery-Coping scale and a consolidated 2–item hopelessness questionnaire) which were sent home to patients 6 months after critical illness. Responses were compared between patients that received (Cases: n=38) or did not receive an ICU-diary (Controls: n=76) . Diaries were used when a long and complicated stay on the ICU was expected. Controls were matched with diary patients by gender and age. The effect of the ICU-diary was also examined using a multiple regression model.

    Results: The ICU-diary concept group scored significantly higher than the No-diary group in mastery (22.1 vs. 20.4, P<0.05) and lower in hopelessness scores (1.3 vs. 1.6, P<0.05). The positive influence of the ICU-diary disappeared after adjustment for confounding factors in a multiple regression model.

    Conclusion: We were unable to verify any positive influence of the ICU-diary concept on mastery and hopelessness 6 months after critical illness.

  • 33.
    Bäckman, Carl G
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten M
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Use of a personal diary written on the ICU during critical illness2001In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 426-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore the use of a diary as an aid in debriefing patients and relatives following critical illness. Design: Observation study. Setting: Intensive care unit of a 500-bed hospital. Patients and participants: Fifty-one critically ill patients and their relatives. Method: A daily account of the patient's progress was written in everyday language by nursing staff, photographs were added as necessary. The booklet was given to the patient or a relative at a follow-up appointment 2 weeks after discharge from the unit. A standard questionnaire was mailed 6 months later, responses were analyzed by an independent observer. Measurements and results: All diaries had been read by survivors (n=41) or relatives (n=10), 51% of the diaries had been read more than 10 times. Comments in the questionnaires were graded as very positive (39%), positive (28%) and neutral (33%). Conclusions: A detailed narrative of the patient's stay is a useful tool in the debriefing process following intensive care.

  • 34.
    Casimir Ahn, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Granfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hübbert, Laila
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Peterzén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Long-term left ventricular support in patients with a mechanical aortic valve2013In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 236-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The presence of a mechanical prosthesis has been regarded as an increased risk of thromboembolic complications and as a relative contraindication for a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Five patients in our center had a mechanical aortic valve at the time of device implantation and were studied regarding thromboembolic complications. Design. Five patients operated upon with an LVAD (1 HeartMate I (TM), 4 HeartMate II (TM)) between 2002 and 2011 had a mechanical aortic valve at the time of implantation. The first patient had a patch closure of the aortic valve. In four patients, the prosthesis was left in place. Anticoagulants included aspirin, warfarin, and clopidogrel. Results. The average and accumulated treatment times were 150 and 752 days, respectively. Three of the five patients showed early signs of valve thrombosis on echo with concomitant valve dysfunction. Four patients were transplanted without thromboembolic events during pump treatment. One patient died from a hemorrhagic stroke after 90 days on the LVAD. Conclusions. The strategy of leaving a mechanical heart valve in place at the time of LVAD implantation in five patients led to valvular thrombosis in three but did not provoke embolic events. It increased the complexity of postoperative anticoagulation.

  • 35.
    Dahl Jensen, Lasse
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cao, Ziquan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nakamura, Masaki
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Yang, Yunlong
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Brautigam, Lars
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Andersson, Patrik
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Zhang, Yin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Wahlberg, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Vascular surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hosaka, Kayoko
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Cao, Yihai
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Opposing Effects of Circadian Clock Genes Bmal1 and Period2 in Regulation of VEGF-Dependent Angiogenesis in Developing Zebrafish2012In: Cell Reports, ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 231-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular mechanisms underlying circadian-regulated physiological processes remain largely unknown. Here, we show that disruption of the circadian clock by both constant exposure to light and genetic manipulation of key genes in zebrafish led to impaired developmental angiogenesis. A bmal1-specific morpholino inhibited developmental angiogenesis in zebrafish embryos without causing obvious nonvascular phenotypes. Conversely, a period2 morpholino accelerated angiogenic vessel growth, suggesting that Bmal1 and Period2 display opposing angiogenic effects. Using a promoter-reporter system consisting of various deleted vegf-promoter mutants, we show that Bmal1 directly binds to and activates the vegf promoter via E-boxes. Additionally, we provide evidence that knockdown of Bmal1 leads to impaired Notch-inhibition-induced vascular sprouting. These results shed mechanistic insight on the role of the circadian clock in regulation of developmental angiogenesis, and our findings may be reasonably extended to other types of physiological or pathological angiogenesis.

  • 36.
    Dahl Jensen, Lasse
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rouhi, Pegah
    Karolinska Institute.
    Cao, Ziquan
    Karolinska Institute.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Wahlberg, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Vascular surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Institute.
    Zebrafish Models to Study Hypoxia-Induced Pathological Angiogenesis in Malignant and Nonmalignant Diseases2011In: Birth Defects Research. Part C: Embryo Today Reviews, ISSN 1542-975X, Vol. 93, no 2, p. 182-193Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most in vivo preclinical disease models are based on mouse and other mammalian systems. However, these rodent-based model systems have considerable limitations to recapitulate clinical situations in human patients. Zebrafish have been widely used to study embryonic development, behavior, tissue regeneration, and genetic defects. Additionally, zebrafish also provides an opportunity to screen chemical compounds that target a specific cell population for drug development. Owing to the availability of various genetically manipulated strains of zebrafish, immune privilege during early embryonic development, transparency of the embryos, and easy and precise setup of hypoxia equipment, we have developed several disease models in both embryonic and adult zebrafish, focusing on studying the role of angiogenesis in pathological settings. These zebrafish disease models are complementary to the existing mouse models, allowing us to study clinically relevant processes in cancer and nonmalignant diseases, which otherwise would be difficult to study in mice. For example, dissemination and invasion of single human or mouse tumor cells from the primary site in association with tumor angiogenesis can be studied under normoxia or hypoxia in zebrafish embryos. Hypoxia-induced retinopathy in the adult zebrafish recapitulates the clinical situation of retinopathy development in diabetic patients or age-related macular degeneration. These zebrafish disease models offer exciting opportunities to understand the mechanisms of disease development, progression, and development of more effective drugs for therapeutic intervention.

  • 37.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andreasson, Thomas
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg.
    Cinthio, Magnus
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Is there an underestimation of intima-media thickness based on M-mode ultrasound technique in the abdominal aorta?2012In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measuring intima-media thickness (IMT) in the common carotid artery (CCA) is a valuable resource for the evaluation of subclinical atherosclerosis. The main objective of this study was to explore whether a B-mode ultrasound technique, Philips ATL, and an M-mode ultrasound technique, Wall Track System (WTS), show interchangeable results when measured in CCA and the abdominal aorta (AA). A total of 24 healthy, young subjects were examined. IMT and lumen diameter (LD) of the AA and the CCA were measured twice by two skilled ultrasonographers with two different ultrasound equipment B-mode: (Philips, ATL and M-mode: WTS).The intra-observer variability of IMT in CCA and AA using B-mode showed a coefficient of variation 8% and 9%, and with M-mode 11% and 15%, respectively. Interobserver variability of IMT in CCA and AA using B-mode was 6% and 12%, and with M-mode 11% and 18%, respectively. CCA IMT was 0·53 ± 0·07 and 0·53 ± 0·09 mm using B-mode and M-mode, respectively. However, in AA, IMT was 0·61 ± 0·5 and 0·54 ± 0·10 mm using B-mode and M-mode, respectively. Thus, AA IMT was 11·5% thicker using B-mode (P<0·01). We received adequate IMT readings from the carotid artery as well as the AA using two commonly used B-mode and M-mode techniques. B-mode technique seems to show less variability, especially in the AA. More importantly, the two techniques measured different IMT thickness in the aorta, emphasizing the importance of using similar technique when comparing the impact of absolute values of IMT on cardiovascular disease.

  • 38.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Bjarnegård, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Sagittal abdominal diameter is a more independent measure compared with waist circumference to predict arterial stiffness in subjects with type 2 diabetes - a prospective observational cohort study2013In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Anthropometric measurements are useful in clinical practice since they are non-invasive and cheap. Previous studies suggest that sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) may be a better measure of visceral fat depots. The aim of this study was to prospectively explore and compare how laboratory and anthropometric risk markers predicted subclinical organ damage in 255 patients, with type 2 diabetes, after four years.

    Methods

    Baseline investigations were performed in 2006 and were repeated at follow-up in 2010. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) was evaluated by ultrasonography and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry over the carotid and femoral arteries at baseline and at follow-up in a cohort of subjects with type 2 diabetes aged 55–65 years old.

    Results

    There were significant correlations between apolipoprotein B (apoB) (r = 0.144, p = 0.03), C - reactive protein (CRP) (r = 0.172, p = 0.009) at baseline and IMT measured at follow-up. After adjustment for sex, age, treatment with statins and Hba1c, the associations remained statistically significant. HbA1c, total cholesterol or LDL-cholesterol did not correlate to IMT at follow-up. Baseline body mass index (BMI) (r = 0.130, p = 0.049), waist circumference (WC) (r = 0.147, p = 0.027) and sagittal Abdominal Diameter (SAD) (r = 0.184, p = 0.007) correlated to PWV at follow-up. Challenged with sex, SBP and HbA1c, the association between SAD, not WC nor BMI, and PWV remained statistically significant (p = 0.036). In a stepwise linear regression, entering both SAD and WC, the association between SAD and PWV was stronger than the association between WC and PWV.

    Conclusions

    We conclude that apoB and CRP, but not LDL-cholesterol predicted subclinical atherosclerosis. Furthermore, SAD was more independent in predicting arterial stiffness over time, compared with WC, in middle-aged men and women with type 2 diabetes.

  • 39.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Clinchy, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Abdominal Obesity and low grade Systemic Inflammation as Markers for Subclinical Organ Damage in type 2 diabetes2014In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 76-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore associations between abdominal obesity, inflammatory markers, and subclinical organ damage in 740 patients with type 2 diabetes. Waist circumference (WC) and sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) was measured. Blood samples were analyzed for; C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL) -1β and IL-6. Carotid intimamedia thickness (IMT) was evaluated by ultrasonography. Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry.

    Abdominal obesity were significantly correlated with; IL-6, CRP (both p= <0.001, WC and SAD, respectively), IMT (WC p=0.012, SAD p=0.003) and PWV (p<0.001, for WC and SAD, respectively). In multiple linear regressions with IMT as dependent variable and age, sex, statins, systolic blood pressure (SBP), Body Mass Index (BMI), CRP and HbA1c, as independent variables, SAD (p=0.047) but not WC, remained associated with IMT. In stepwise linear regression, entering both SAD and WC, the association between SAD and PWV was stronger than the association between WC and PWV.

    We conclude that SAD and WC are feasible measures of obesity that provides information on inflammation, atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness in type 2 diabetes. However, SAD was slightly more robustly associated to subclinical organ damage, compared with WC.

  • 40.
    De Basso, Rachel
    et al.
    Jonköping Hospital, Sweden .
    Astrand, Hakan
    Jonköping Hospital, Sweden .
    Ryden Ahlgren, Asa
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Sandgren, Thomas
    Capio Lundby Hospital, Sweden .
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Low wall stress in the popliteal artery: Other mechanisms responsible for the predilection of aneurysmal dilatation?2014In: Vascular Medicine, ISSN 1358-863X, E-ISSN 1477-0377, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 131-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The popliteal artery (PA) is, after aorta, the most common site for aneurysm formation. Why the PA is more susceptible than other peripheral muscular arteries is unknown. We hypothesized that the wall composition, which in turn affects wall properties, as well as the circumferential wall stress (WS) imposed on the arterial wall, might differ compared to other muscular arteries. The aim was to study the WS of the PA in healthy subjects with the adjacent, muscular, common femoral artery (CFA) as a comparison. Ninety-four healthy subjects were included in this study (45 males, aged 10-78 years and 49 females, aged 10-83 years). The diameter and intima-media thickness (IMT) in the PA and CFA were investigated with ultrasound. Together with blood pressure the WS was defined according to the law of Laplace adjusted for IMT. The diameter increased with age in both PA and CFA (pless than0.001), with males having a larger diameter than females (pless than0.001). IMT increased with age in both PA and CFA (pless than0.001), with higher IMT values in males only in PA (pless than0.001). The calculated WS was unchanged with age in both arteries, but lower in PA than in CFA in both sexes (pless than0.001). In conclusion, this study shows that the PA and CFA WS is maintained during aging, probably due to a compensatory remodelling response with an increase in arterial wall thickness. However, the stress imposed on the PA wall is quite low, indicating that mechanisms other than WS contribute to the process of pathological arterial dilatation in the PA.

  • 41.
    De Basso, Rachel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hedblad, Bo
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Carlson, Joyce
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Persson, Margaretha
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Östling, Gerd
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Increased carotid plaque burden in men with the Fibrillin-1 2/3 genotype2014In: Clinical and experimental pharmacology & physiology, ISSN 0305-1870, E-ISSN 1440-1681, Vol. 41, no 9, p. 637-642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Fibrillin-1 is an important constituent of the vascular wall and earlier studies have indicated an effect of the Fibrillin-1 (FBN1) 2/3 genotype on blood pressure as well as aortic stiffness in men. The aim was to determine if the FBN1 2/3 genotype was associated with presence of carotid plaque and incident cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in middle-aged subjects.

    Material and Method: The FBN1 genotype was characterized in 5765 subjects (2424 men, 3341 women; aged 45-69 years) recruited from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study Cardiovascular Cohort, Sweden. Plaque occurrence and intima media thickness (IMT) of the carotid artery were assessed by ultrasound. Incidence of first cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction and stroke) and cause-specific mortality was monitored during a mean of 13.2 years follow-up.

    Results: The most common FBN1 genotypes were 2/2, 2/3 and 2/4 which accounted for 92.2% (n=5317) of the subjects. There were no differences between the three genotypes regarding age, blood pressure, glucose, lipids, smoking habits, CCA diameter and IMT in men and women. Presence of plaque in the carotid artery was higher in men with genotype 2/3 as compared to the 2/2 and 2/4 genotypes, (55% vs. 46% and 50%, p=0.007). No similar difference was observed in women. No significant relationship was observed between FBN1 genotypes and incidence of CVD or all-cause mortality.

    Conclusions: The increased prevalence of plaque in the carotid artery of middle-aged men with FBN1 2/3 genotype indicates a pathological arterial wall remodeling with a more pronounced atherosclerotic burden. 

  • 42.
    De Basso, Rachel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åstrand, Håkan
    Department of Vascular Surgery, Jönköping Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Rydén Ahlgren, Åsa
    Clinical Physiology and Nuclearmedicine Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sandgren, Thomas
    Department of Surgery, Capio Lundby Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Low wall stress in popliteal artery – other mechanisms responsible for the predilection of aneurysmal dilatation?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The popliteal artery (PA) is, after aorta, the most common site for aneurysm formation. Why the PA is more susceptible than other peripheral muscular arteries is unknown. We hypothesised that the wall composition, which in turn affects wall properties, as well as the circumferential wall stress imposed on the arterial wall, might differ compared to other muscular arteries. The aim was to study the circumferential wall stress of the PA in healthy subjects with the adjacent muscular common femoral artery (CFA) as a comparison.

    Material and Methods: Ninety-four healthy subjects were included in this study (45 males, range 10-78 years and 49 females, range 10-83 years). The lumen diameter (LD) and intima-media thickness (IMT) in the PA and CFA were investigated with a Philips P700 ultrasound device. Together with blood pressure the circumferential wall stress was defined according to the law of Laplace adjusted for IMT.

    Results: The diameter increased with age in both PA and CFA (P<.001), with males having larger diameter than females (P<.001). IMT increased with age in both PA and CFA (P<.001), with higher IMT values in males only in PA (P<0.001). The calculated wall stress was unchanged with age in both arteries, but lower in PA than in CFA in both male and female subjects (P<0.001).

    Conclusion: This study shows that the popliteal and common femoral artery wall stress is maintained during ageing, probably due to compensatory remodeling response with an increase in arterial wall thickness. However, the stress imposed on the popliteal artery wall is quite low, indicating that other mechanisms than wall stress contribute to the process of pathological arterial dilatation in the popliteal artery.

  • 43.
    De Geer, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Oscarsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Cardiac mortality after septic shock.2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Dong, Mei
    et al.
    Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Yang, Xiaoyan
    Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Lim, Sharon
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Cao, Ziquan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Honek, Jennifer
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Lu, Huixia
    Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Zhang, Cheng
    Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Seki, Takahiro
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Hosaka, Kayoko
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Wahlberg, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Yang, Jianmin
    Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Zhang, Lei
    Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sun, Baocun
    Tianjin Medical University, Peoples R China .
    Li, Xuri
    Sun Yat Sen University, Peoples R China .
    Liu, Yizhi
    Sun Yat Sen University, Peoples R China .
    Zhang, Yun
    Shandong University, Peoples R China .
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Cold Exposure Promotes Atherosclerotic Plaque Growth and Instability via UCP1-Dependent Lipolysis2013In: Cell Metabolism, ISSN 1550-4131, E-ISSN 1932-7420, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 118-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular mechanisms underlying the cold-associated high cardiovascular risk remain unknown. Here, we show that the cold-triggered food-intake-independent lipolysis significantly increased plasma levels of small low-density lipoprotein (LDL) remnants, leading to accelerated development of atherosclerotic lesions in mice. In two genetic mouse knockout models (apolipoprotein E-/- [ApoE(-/-)] and LDL receptor(-/-) [Ldlr(-/-)] mice), persistent cold exposure stimulated atherosclerotic plaque growth by increasing lipid deposition. Furthermore, marked increase of inflammatory cells and plaque-associated microvessels were detected in the cold-acclimated ApoE(-/-) and Ldlr(-/-) mice, leading to plaque instability. Deletion of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), a key mitochondrial protein involved in thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), in the ApoE(-/-) strain completely protected mice from the cold-induced atherosclerotic lesions. Cold acclimation markedly reduced plasma levels of adiponectin, and systemic delivery of adiponectin protected ApoE(-/-) mice from plaque development. These findings provide mechanistic insights on low-temperature-associated cardiovascular risks.

  • 45.
    Doupi, Persephone
    et al.
    National Institute Health and Welf, Finland.
    Svaar, Helge
    Svaar Konsult, Norway.
    Bjorn, Brian
    Danish Soc Patient Safety, Denmark.
    Deilkas, Ellen
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway; Norwegian Directorate Heatlh, Norway.
    Nylen, Urban
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ruthberg, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Use of the Global Trigger Tool in patient safety improvement efforts: Nordic experiences2015In: Cognition, Technology & Work, ISSN 1435-5558, E-ISSN 1435-5566, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 45-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Global Trigger Tool (GTT) developed by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement is a method for retrospective patient record review based on the use of triggers-signals of potential adverse events that have caused patient harm. The method has the purpose of patient safety measurement and monitoring among adult inpatient populations and has been increasingly popular among Nordic countries. Use of the GTT in the Nordic area has been part of broader legal and policy actions and initiatives supportive of patient safety promotion and is being used to establish also national level estimates of patient safety incidents. Limitations of the method are its dependency on quality of documentation and the varying inter-rater reliability observed in many studies. Strengths of the GTT are its ability to detect larger numbers, as well as different types of adverse events when compared to other incident detection methods, hence it is a good addition to the palette of means for organizational patient safety monitoring. Research on reliability, usefulness and implementation approaches of the GTT, including its automation, is ongoing in the Nordic countries and is expected to generate useful input for the international patient safety community.

  • 46.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Pulse wave velocity with 4D flow MRI: Systematic differences and age-related regional vascular stiffness2014In: Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 0730-725X, E-ISSN 1873-5894, Vol. 32, no 10, p. 1266-1271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare multiple methods for estimation of PWV from 4D flow MRI velocity data and to investigate if 4D flow MRI-based PWV estimation with piecewise linear regression modeling of travel-distance vs. travel time is sufficient to discern age-related regional differences in PWV. Methods: 4D flow MRI velocity data were acquired in 8 young and Solder (age: 23 +/- 2 vs. 58 +/- 2 years old) normal volunteers. Travel-time and travel-distance were measured throughout the aorta and piecewise linear regression was used to measure global PWV in the descending aorta and regional PWV in three equally sized segments between the top of the aortic arch and the renal arteries. Six different methods for extracting travel-time were compared. Results: Methods for estimation of travel-time that use information about the whole flow waveform systematically overestimate PWV when compared to methods restricted to the upslope-portion of the waveforms (p less than 0.05). In terms of regional PWV, a significant interaction was found between age and location (p less than 0.05). The age-related differences in regional PWV were greater in the proximal compared to distal descending aorta. Conclusion: Care must be taken as different classes of methods for the estimation of travel-time produce different results. 4D flow MRI-based PWV estimation with piecewise linear regression modeling of travel-distance vs. travel time can discern age-related differences in regional PWV well in line with previously reported data.

  • 47.
    Engerström, Lars
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Svensson, Robert
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Riskjusterad mortalitet i intensivvården: Egen analys behövs för att dra rätt slutsatser från nationella register2012In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 109, no 23, p. 1160-1163Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) based on risk-adjusted survival 30 days after admission to ICU is a quality indicator promoted by the Swedish Intensive Care Registry. We examined changes in SMR from 2007 to 2008 in our ICU. Since the numbers of deaths were about 100 per year, SMR had a fairly wide confidence limit and hence of limited value for comparison over time or between ICUs. However, analysis of performance using variable life adjusted displays based on risk adjusted survival and analysis of adverse events using the Global Trigger Tool technique were found useful.

  • 48.
    Engström, A E
    et al.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Granfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Seybold-Epting, W
    Westpfalz Klinikum, Germany .
    Dahm, M
    Westpfalz Klinikum, Germany .
    Cocchieri, R
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Driessen, A H G
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Sjauw, K D
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Vis, M M
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Baan, J
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Koch, K T
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    De Jong, M
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Lagrand, W K
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Van Der Sloot, J A P
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Tijssen, J G P
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    De Winter, R J
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    De Mol, B A J M
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Piek, J J
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Henriques, J P S
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Mechanical circulatory support with the Impella 5.0 device for postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock: a three-center experience2013In: Minerva Cardioangiologica: Journal on Cardiovascular Pathophysiology, Clinical Medicine and Therapy, ISSN 0026-4725, E-ISSN 1827-1618, Vol. 61, no 5, p. 539-546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    Postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock (PCCS) is associated with high mortality rates, despite full conventional treatment. Although the results of treatment with surgically implantable ventricular assist devices have been encouraging, the invasiveness of this treatment limits its applicability. Several less invasive devices have been developed, including the Impella system. The objective of this study was to describe our three-center experience with the Impella 5.0 device in the setting of PCCS.

    METHODS:

    From January 2004 through December 2010, a total of 46 patients were diagnosed with treatment-refractory PCCS and treated with the Impella 5.0 percutaneous left ventricular assist device at three european heart centers. Baseline and follow-up characteristics were collected retrospectively and entered into a dedicated database.

    RESULTS:

    Within the study cohort of 46 patients, mean logistic and additive EuroSCORES were 24 ± 19 and 10 ± 4. The majority of patients underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (48%) or combined surgery (33%). Half of all patients had been treated with an intra-aortic balloon pump before 5.0-implantation, 1 patient had been treated with an Impella 2.5 device. All patients were on mechanical ventilation and intravenous inotropes. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of overall 30-day survival was 39.5%.

    CONCLUSION:

    Thirty-day survival rates for patients with PCCS, refractory to aggressive conventional treatment and treated with the Impella 5.0 device, are comparable to those reported in studies evaluating surgically implantable VADs, whereas the Impella system is much less invasive. Therefore, mechanical circulatory support with the Impella 5.0 device is a suitable treatment modality for patients with severe PCCS.

  • 49.
    Eriksson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Huljebrant, Inger
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nettelblad, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Functional impairment after treatment with pectoral muscle flaps because of deep sternal wound infection2011In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 174-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Pectoral muscle flaps (PMF) are effective in terminating protracted sternal wound infections (SWI) but long-term outcome remains uncertain. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate long-term outcome in patients treated with PMF. Design. Thirty-four of 263 patients revised because of deep SWI from 1991-2005 were treated with PMF. Of the 21 patients alive, 11 had left-sided, two right-sided and eight bilateral procedures. Sternal debridement without closure of the sternum was done in 17 patients. Nineteen of 21 patients responded to a questionnaire. Results. At follow-up on average 5.9 years (range 1.9-14.8 years) after surgery 63% (12/19) experienced unstable chest. Two thirds (12/18) reported problems carrying a grocery bag and 37% (7/19) had problems putting on a coat. Reduction of power and mobility was more common in the right arm and shoulder even in patients with left-sided PMF. Thirty-two percent (6/19) would have preferred alternative treatment if possible to avoid sternal instability even if healing had been substantially delayed. Conclusions. Surgery with PMF and sternal debridement was associated with long-term disability, which appeared to be significant in one third of the patients. The function of the right arm and shoulder was affected more often despite the majority of procedures being left-sided suggesting that loss of skeletal continuity of the chest wall is more disabling than loss of pectoral muscle function.

  • 50.
    Forsberg, Lena M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Tamés, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Exercise echocardiography predicts postoperative left ventricular remodeling in aortic regurgitation2014In: SCANDINAVIAN CARDIOVASCULAR JOURNAL, ISSN 1401-7431, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 4-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. We aimed to investigate if preoperative left ventricular (LV) function assessed by exercise echocardiography could predict late postoperative LV function in aortic regurgitation (AR) patients and to evaluate how LV long-axis function is affected late after aortic valve surgery. Design. A total of 21 male chronic AR patients, aged 49 (12) years, accepted for surgery were examined preoperatively, 6 months-, and 4 years postoperatively, at rest and during exercise. Besides conventional echocardiographic parameters, the atrioventricular plane displacement (AVPD) by M-mode and peak systolic velocity (s) in the basal LV by color tissue Doppler were measured. Results. Preoperatively EFrest and EFexercise, were 55(7)% and 54(9)%, respectively, and Delta EF 0(8)%. LV dimensions and volumes indexed to BSA had decreased at the 6-month follow-up and were stable at late follow-up. s(rest), s(exercise), AVPD(rest), and AVPD(exercise) were unchanged at both the postoperative examinations (all P >= 0.05). Preoperative EFexercise and AVPD(exercise) showed inverse correlation to late postoperative indexed LV enddiastolic volume (r = -0.68, p < 0.004 and r = -0.86, P < 0.001) and indexed LV endsystolic volume (r = -0.68, P = 0.004 and r = -0.81, P < 0.001), while there was no correlation to preoperative EFrest and AVPD(rest) (all r < 0.2). Conclusions. Preoperative exercise echocardiography can detect AR patients with suboptimal LV remodeling late postoperatively.

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