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  • 1.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Holmberg, Lars
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden Kings Coll London, England .
    Garmo, Hans
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden Kings Coll London, England .
    Rider, Jennifer R.
    Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA USA Harvard University, MA USA Harvard University, MA 02115 USA .
    Taari, Kimmo
    University of Helsinki, Finland .
    Busch, Christer
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Nordling, Stig
    University of Helsinki, Finland .
    Haggman, Michael
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Andersson, Swen-Olof
    University of Örebro, Sweden Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Spångberg, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Andren, Ove
    University of Örebro, Sweden Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Palmgren, Juni
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden .
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Harvard University, MA 02115 USA .
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    University of Örebro, Sweden Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Radical Prostatectomy or Watchful Waiting in Early Prostate Cancer2014In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 370, no 10, p. 932-942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundRadical prostatectomy reduces mortality among men with localized prostate cancer; however, important questions regarding long-term benefit remain. MethodsBetween 1989 and 1999, we randomly assigned 695 men with early prostate cancer to watchful waiting or radical prostatectomy and followed them through the end of 2012. The primary end points in the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group Study Number 4 (SPCG-4) were death from any cause, death from prostate cancer, and the risk of metastases. Secondary end points included the initiation of androgen-deprivation therapy. ResultsDuring 23.2 years of follow-up, 200 of 347 men in the surgery group and 247 of the 348 men in the watchful-waiting group died. Of the deaths, 63 in the surgery group and 99 in the watchful-waiting group were due to prostate cancer; the relative risk was 0.56 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41 to 0.77; P=0.001), and the absolute difference was 11.0 percentage points (95% CI, 4.5 to 17.5). The number needed to treat to prevent one death was 8. One man died after surgery in the radical-prostatectomy group. Androgen-deprivation therapy was used in fewer patients who underwent prostatectomy (a difference of 25.0 percentage points; 95% CI, 17.7 to 32.3). The benefit of surgery with respect to death from prostate cancer was largest in men younger than 65 years of age (relative risk, 0.45) and in those with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (relative risk, 0.38). However, radical prostatectomy was associated with a reduced risk of metastases among older men (relative risk, 0.68; P=0.04). ConclusionsExtended follow-up confirmed a substantial reduction in mortality after radical prostatectomy; the number needed to treat to prevent one death continued to decrease when the treatment was modified according to age at diagnosis and tumor risk. A large proportion of long-term survivors in the watchful-waiting group have not required any palliative treatment. (Funded by the Swedish Cancer Society and others.) The randomized Swedish trial of prostatectomy versus watchful waiting in disease detected mainly clinically (not by PSA screening) continues to show a benefit for early prostatectomy. The number of men younger than 65 needed to treat to prevent one death is now four. The Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group Study Number 4 (SPCG-4), a randomized trial of radical prostatectomy versus watchful waiting in men with localized prostate cancer diagnosed before the era of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, showed a survival benefit of radical prostatectomy as compared with observation at 15 years of follow-up.(1) By contrast, the Prostate Cancer Intervention versus Observation Trial (PIVOT), initiated in the early era of PSA testing, showed that radical prostatectomy did not significantly reduce prostate cancer-specific or overall mortality after 12 years.(2) PSA screening profoundly changes the clinical domain of study. Among other considerations, the substantial additional lead time ...

  • 2.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    et al.
    University Uppsala Hospital.
    Holmberg, Lars
    University Uppsala Hospital.
    Ruutu, Mirja
    University of Helsinki.
    Garmo, Hans
    University Uppsala Hospital.
    Stark, Jennifer R
    Brigham and Womens Hospital.
    Busch, Christer
    University Uppsala Hospital.
    Nordling, Stig
    University Helsinki.
    Haggman, Michael
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    Andersson, Swen-Olof
    Department Urol, Orebro.
    Bratell, Stefan
    Boras Hospital.
    Spångberg, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Palmgren, Juni
    Karolinska Institute.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institute.
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Karolinska Institute.
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Department Urol, Orebro.
    Radical Prostatectomy versus Watchful Waiting in Early Prostate Cancer2011In: NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE, ISSN 0028-4793, Vol. 364, no 18, p. 1708-1717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND In 2008, we reported that radical prostatectomy, as compared with watchful waiting, reduces the rate of death from prostate cancer. After an additional 3 years of follow-up, we now report estimated 15-year results. METHODS From October 1989 through February 1999, we randomly assigned 695 men with early prostate cancer to watchful waiting or radical prostatectomy. Follow-up was complete through December 2009, with histopathological review of biopsy and radical-prostatectomy specimens and blinded evaluation of causes of death. Relative risks, with 95% confidence intervals, were estimated with the use of a Cox proportional-hazards model. RESULTS During a median of 12.8 years, 166 of the 347 men in the radical-prostatectomy group and 201 of the 348 in the watchful-waiting group died (P=0.007). In the case of 55 men assigned to surgery and 81 men assigned to watchful waiting, death was due to prostate cancer. This yielded a cumulative incidence of death from prostate cancer at 15 years of 14.6% and 20.7%, respectively (a difference of 6.1 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.2 to 12.0), and a relative risk with surgery of 0.62 (95% CI, 0.44 to 0.87; P=0.01). The survival benefit was similar before and after 9 years of follow-up, was observed also among men with low-risk prostate cancer, and was confined to men younger than 65 years of age. The number needed to treat to avert one death was 15 overall and 7 for men younger than 65 years of age. Among men who underwent radical prostatectomy, those with extracapsular tumor growth had a risk of death from prostate cancer that was 7 times that of men without extracapsular tumor growth (relative risk, 6.9; 95% CI, 2.6 to 18.4). CONCLUSIONS Radical prostatectomy was associated with a reduction in the rate of death from prostate cancer. Men with extracapsular tumor growth may benefit from adjuvant local or systemic treatment.

  • 3.
    Davidsson, S.
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Fiorentino, M.
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Andren, O.
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Fang, F.
    Örebro University Hospital.
    A. Mucci, L.
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Fall, K.
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Stark, J.R.
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Focal Prostate Atrophic Lesions and Risk of Lethal Prostate Cancer in LABORATORY INVESTIGATION, vol 91, issue , pp 187A-187A2011In: LABORATORY INVESTIGATION, Nature Publishing Group , 2011, Vol. 91, p. 187A-187AConference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 4.
    Davidsson, Sabina
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Fiorentino, Michelangelo
    University of Bologna.
    Andren, Ove
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Fang, Fang
    Harvard University.
    Mucci, Lorelei A
    Harvard University.
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Fall, Katja
    Harvard University.
    Rider, Jennifer R
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Inflammation, Focal Atrophic Lesions, and Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia with Respect to Risk of Lethal Prostate Cancer2011In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 2280-2287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A challenge in prostate cancer (PCa) management is identifying potentially lethal disease at diagnosis. Inflammation, focal prostatic atrophy, and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) are common in prostate tumor specimens, but it is not clear whether these lesions have prognostic significance. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: We conducted a case-control study nested in a cohort of men diagnosed with stage T1a-b PCa through transurethral resection of the prostate in Sweden. Cases are men who died of PCa (n = 228). Controls are men who survived more than 10 years after PCa diagnosis without metastases (n = 387). Slides were assessed for Gleason grade, inflammation, PIN, and four subtypes of focal prostatic atrophy: simple atrophy (SA), postatrophic hyperplasia (PAH), simple atrophy with cyst formation, and partial atrophy. We estimated OR and 95% CI for odds of lethal PCa with multivariable logistic regression. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Chronic inflammation and PIN were more frequently observed in tumors with PAH, but not SA. No specific type of atrophy or inflammation was significantly associated with lethal PCa overall, but there was a suggestion of a positive association for chronic inflammation. Independent of age, Gleason score, year of diagnosis, inflammation, and atrophy type, men with PIN were 89% more likely to die of PCa (95% CI: 1.04-3.42). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Our data show that PIN, and perhaps presence of moderate or severe chronic inflammation, may have prognostic significance for PCa. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanImpact: Lesions in tumor adjacent tissue, and not just the tumor itself, may aid in identification of clinically relevant disease.

  • 5.
    Frisk, Jessica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Hjertberg, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Peterson, Björn
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Spetz, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    The effect of acupuncture on Health Related Quality of Life and sleepManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hot flushes are well-known, disturbing side effects of Androgen  Deprivation Therapy (ADT) in men with advanced prostate cancer, and the hot flushes negatively affect HRQoL and sleep. Acupuncture has been shown effective and without side effects, as treatment for hot flushes in men with (ADT). The effect on flushes lasts up to nine months after treatment has ended, but little is known about its effect on HRQoL and sleep. This study adds knowledge about the association between hot flushes, HRQoL and sleep. It shows that the number of hot flushes /night decrease significantly for up to 12 months. It concludes however, that there are many other factors that affect the patients general HRQoL, and perhaps that is one reason why we cannot show an improvement in general HRQoL.

    Objective:

    • To evaluate the effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) and traditional acupuncture (TA)on HRQoL and sleep in men with castrationally treated prostate cancer and hotflushes.

    Patients:

    • thirty-one men were randomized to traditional acupuncture (TA; n=16) or electrostimulated acupuncture (EA;n=15) for 12 weeks, with a study period of 12 months.

    Methods:

    • TA or EA was given for 30 minutes, twice a week for two weeks, and then once a week for 10 weeks. The patients were seen at the outpatient clinic before treatment, after 12 weeks of treatment, and at 6, 9, and 12 months follow up.
    • Log books , where the patients recorded number of and distress by hot flushes, tiredness, depressed mood, number of hours slept/night , and times woken up/night, were filled in before treatment, daily during the 12 weeks of treatment, and then one week before the 6, 9, and 12 months follow up visit.
    • Psychological and General Well-Being Index (PGWB) measured HRQoL at baseline, 12 weeks of treatment, and 6, 9 and 12 months follow up.
    • A six week waiting list with eight patients served as a control for changes in log-bookdata

    Results:

    • The number of hot flushes/night decreased significantly in both groups at all measuring points, except at nine months in the TA group.
    • No changes in hot flushes and times woken up/night during a six weeks pretreatment waiting list in eight patients, but significant changes in these patients after four weeks of treatment.
    • HRQoL, measured by log-book data and PGWB did neither improve nor deteriorate over 12 months. (A clinically significant change in PGWB was seen in 8/29 patients after 12 weeks of treatment, and a deterioration in 11/29).
    • The patients reported no change in hours slept/night, and times woken up/night decreased significantly only in the EA group after 12 weeks of treatment.
    • There is a strong association between numbers of hot flushes, sleep and HRQoL.

    Conclusion:

    • HF are associated with HRQoL and sleep, and EA/TA decrease hot flush numbers and distress, and thereby possibly increase sleep quality. This may sustain HRQoL.
    • HRQoL neither improved nor deteriorated during 12 months follow up, which may in this patient group, be explained by other factors, probably related to the advanced PCa, that have negative impact on HRQoL.
    • EA/TA merits further evaluation regarding the effects on HRQoL with a rigid measure of signs of disease progression, and also using a prostate cancer or hormone deprivation specific HRQoL questionnaire.
  • 6.
    Gudjonsson, Sigurdur
    et al.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Blackberg, Mats
    Helsingborg County Hospital, Sweden .
    Chebil, Gunilla
    Helsingborg County Hospital, Sweden .
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Olsson, Hans
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Bendahl, Par-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mansson, Wiking
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden Vaxjo County Hospital, Sweden .
    The value of bladder mapping and prostatic urethra biopsies for detection of carcinoma in situ (CIS)2012In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 110, no 2B, p. E41-E45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES To assess the value of bladder mapping and prostatic urethra biopsies for detection of urothelial carcinoma in situ (CIS). CIS of the urinary bladder is a flat high-grade lesion of the mucosa associated with a significant risk of progression to muscle-invasive disease. CIS is difficult to identify on cystoscopy, and definite diagnosis requires histopathology. Traditionally, if CIS is suspected, multiple cold-cup biopsies are taken from the bladder mucosa, and resection biopsies are obtained from the prostatic urethra in males. This approach is often called bladder mapping (BMAP). The accuracy of BMAP as a diagnostic tool is not known. PATIENTS AND METHODS Male patients with bladder cancer scheduled for cystectomy underwent cold-cup bladder biopsies (sidewalls, posterior wall, dome, trigone), and resection biopsies were taken from the prostatic urethra. After cystectomy, the surgical specimen was investigated in a standardised manner and subsequently compared with the BMAP biopsies for the presence of CIS. RESULTS The histopathology reports of 162 patients were analysed. CIS was detected in 46% of the cystoprostatectomy specimens, and multiple (greater than= 2) CIS lesions were found in 30%. BMAP (cold-cup bladder biopsies + resection biopsies from the prostatic urethra) provided sensitivity of 51% for any CIS, and 55% for multiple CIS lesions. The cold-cup biopsies for CIS in the bladder mucosa showed sensitivity and specificity of 46% and 89%, respectively. CONCLUSION Traditional cold-cup biopsies are unreliable for detecting CIS in bladder mucosa and negative findings must be interpreted with caution.

  • 7.
    Hedlund, Pe rOlov
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital Solna.
    Johansson, Robert
    Umeå University Hospital.
    Damber, Jan Erik
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Hagerman, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge.
    Henriksson, Peter
    Danderyd Hospital.
    Iversen, Peter
    Rigshosp, Copenhagen.
    Klarskov, Peter
    Herlev University Hospital.
    Mogensen, Peter
    Frederiksberg University Hospital.
    Rasmussen, Finn
    Herlev University Hospital.
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Significance of pretreatment cardiovascular morbidity as a risk factor during treatment with parenteral oestrogen or combined androgen deprivation of 915 patients with metastasized prostate cancer: Evaluation of cardiovascular events in a randomized trial2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 346-353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. This study aimed to evaluate prognostic risk factors for cardiovascular events during treatment of metastatic prostate cancer patients with high-dose parenteral polyoestradiol phosphate (PEP, Estradurin (R)) or combined androgen deprivation (CAD) with special emphasis on pretreatment cardiovascular disease. Material and methods. Nine-hundred and fifteen patients with T0-4, Nx, M1, G1-3, hormone- naive prostate cancer were randomized to treatment with PEP 240 mg i.m. twice a month for 2 months and thereafter monthly, or to flutamide (Eulexin (R)) 250 mg per os three times daily in combination with either triptorelin (Decapeptyl (R)) 3.75 mg i.m. per month or on an optional basis with bilateral orchidectomy. Pretreatment cardiovascular morbidity was recorded and cardiovascular events during treatment were assessed by an experienced cardiologist. A multivariate analysis was done using logistic regression. Results. There was a significant increase in cardiovascular events during treatment with PEP in patients with previous ischaemic heart disease (p = 0.008), ischaemic cerebral disease (p = 0.002), intermittent claudication (p = 0.031) and especially when the whole group of patients with pretreatment cardiovascular diseases was analysed together (p andlt; 0.001). In this group 33% of the patients had a cardiovascular event during PEP treatment. In the multivariate analysis PEP stood out as the most important risk factor for cardiac complications (p = 0.029). Even in the CAD group there was a significant increase in cardiovascular events in the group with all previous cardiovascular diseases taken together (p = 0.036). Conclusions. Patients with previous cardiovascular disease are at considerable risk of cardiovascular events during treatment with high-dose PEP and even during CAD therapy. Patients without pretreatment cardiovascular morbidity have a moderate cardiovascular risk during PEP treatment and could be considered for this treatment if the advantages of this therapy, e. g. avoidance of osteopenia and hot flushes and the low price, are given priority.

  • 8.
    Hemdan, Tammer
    et al.
    University Hospital Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansson, Robert
    Umeå University Hospital, Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Hellström, Pekka
    University Central Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
    Tasdemir, Ilker
    Central Hospital of Rogaland, Stavanger, Norway.
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    University Hospital Uppsala, Sweden.
    5-Year Outcome of a Randomized Prospective Study Comparing bacillus Calmette-Guerin with Epirubicin and Interferon-alpha 2b in Patients with T1 Bladder Cancer2014In: Journal of Urology, ISSN 0022-5347, E-ISSN 1527-3792, Vol. 191, no 5, p. 1244-1249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In a multicenter, prospectively randomized study we evaluated the 5-year outcomes of bacillus Calmette-Guerin alone compared to a combination of epirubicin and interferon-alpha 2b in the treatment of patients with T1 bladder cancer. Materials and Methods: Transurethral resection was followed by a second resection and bladder mapping. Stratification was for grade and carcinoma in situ. Followup entailed regular cystoscopy and cytology during the first 5 years. The end points assessed in this analysis were recurrence-free survival, time to treatment failure and progression, cancer specific survival and prognostic factors. Results: The study recruited 250 eligible patients. The 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was 38% in the combination arm and 59% in the bacillus Calmette-Guerin arm (p = 0.001). The corresponding rates for the other end points were not significantly different, as free of progression 78% and 77%, treatment failure 75% and 75%, and cancer specific survival 90% and 92%, respectively. The type of treatment, tumor size and tumor status at second resection were independent variables associated with recurrence. Concomitant carcinoma in situ was not predictive of failure of bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy. An independent factor for treatment failure was remaining T1 stage at second resection. Conclusions: Bacillus Calmette-Guerin was more effective than the tested combination therapy. The currently recommended management with second resection and 3-week maintenance bacillus Calmette-Guerin entails a low risk of cancer specific death. More aggressive treatment in patients with infiltrative tumors at second resection might improve these results. In particular, concomitant carcinoma in situ was not a predictive factor for poor outcome after bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy.

  • 9.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Hagberg, O
    University of Lund Hospital.
    Holmang, S
    Sahlgrens University.
    Liedberg, F
    Vaxjo County Hospital.
    Ljungberg, B
    No University Hospital, Umeå.
    U Malmstrom, P
    University of Uppsala Hospital.
    Wijkstrom, H
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Mansson, W
    Skåne University Hospital.
    Higher excess mortality rate in women than in men with invasive bladder cancer in EUROPEAN UROLOGY SUPPLEMENTS, vol 11, issue 1, pp E870-U8322012In: EUROPEAN UROLOGY SUPPLEMENTS, Elsevier , 2012, Vol. 11, no 1, p. E870-U832Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 10.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Sandblom, Dag
    Orebro University Hospital.
    Holmang, Sten
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    A Randomized Trial Comparing 2 Doses of Polidocanol Sclerotherapy for Hydrocele or Spermatocele2011In: Journal of Urology, ISSN 0022-5347, E-ISSN 1527-3792, Vol. 186, no 4, p. 1319-1323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Polidocanol sclerotherapy for hydrocele or spermatocele combines high efficiency with low morbidity, but the optimal dose is not known. We compared the efficacy and morbidity of 2 or 4 ml polidocanol sclerotherapy for hydrocele or spermatocele. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMaterials and Methods: From 1993 to 2005 a double-blind randomized clinical trial was conducted using 2 or 4 ml polidocanol (30 mg/ml) for sclerotherapy of hydrocele/spermatocele in 224 evaluable patients at 3 university hospitals. Fluid was evacuated and 2 or 4 ml polidocanol was administered by a nurse, with the amount injected concealed from others present. At 3-month followup morbidity was ascertained using a questionnaire completed by the patients. Fluid recurrence was determined clinically and generally re-treated. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: After the first treatment, cure was observed in 59% and 47% in the 4 and the 2 ml group, respectively (p = 0.04). More patients in the 4 ml group had complications (31% vs 18%, p = 0.04). Complications were mostly of low or moderate intensity and seldom required medication. After 1 to 4 treatments 200 of 224 patients (89%) were cured and another 10 (5%) had small amounts of residual fluid, with no difference between the groups. Of the patients with hydroceles/spermatoceles larger than 175 ml, 58% and 34% were cured after the first treatment in the 4 and 2 ml groups, respectively (p = 0.012), with no differences in complications between the groups. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: Polidocanol sclerotherapy was effective for the treatment of hydrocele or spermatocele in our patients, with 94% satisfactory results after 1 to 4 treatments. A dose of 4 ml was superior to 2 ml, particularly for larger hydroceles/spermatoceles.

  • 11.
    Jancke, Georg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Centre.
    Chebil, Gunilla
    County Hospital, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Bladder Wash Cytology at Diagnosis of Ta-T1 Bladder Cancer Is Predictive for Recurrence and Progression2012In: Urology, ISSN 0090-4295, E-ISSN 1527-9995, Vol. 80, no 3, p. 625-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of the bladder wash cytology finding at the primary diagnosis of Stage Ta-T1 urinary bladder cancer on recurrence and progression. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS The clinical and pathologic characteristics of all patients with primary Stage Ta-T1 urinary bladder cancer were prospectively registered. The data were divided according to the bladder wash cytology results at diagnosis. Multivariate analyses were performed to determine the influence of bladder wash cytology on recurrence and progression. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS The analysis included 768 evaluable patients with a mean follow-up of 60 months. Recurrence was observed in 478 patients (62%) and progression in 71 (9%). High-grade malignant bladder wash cytology was predictive for recurrence and progression (P andlt; .001 and P = .036, respectively). Other factors affecting recurrence were missing bladder wash cytology data, tumors size 16-30 mm and andgt;30 mm, Stage T1 tumor category, and multiplicity (P = .008, P = .006, P andlt; .001, P = .002, and P andlt; .001, respectively). Progression was also associated with T1 tumor category, local recurrence, and primary concomitant carcinoma in situ (P andlt; .001, P andlt; .001, and P = .024, respectively). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSION High-grade malignant bladder wash cytology at the primary diagnosis was predictive for recurrence and progression. This could be taken into account in designing future follow-up schedules.

  • 12.
    Jancke, Georg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Impact of surgical experience on recurrence and progression after transurethral resection of bladder tumour in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer2014In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF UROLOGY, ISSN 2168-1805, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 276-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: To evaluate the impact of experience in transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-BT) on recurrence and progression in primary Ta/T1 urinary bladder cancer.

    Methods: Clinical and pathological characteristics of patients with primary Ta/T1 urinary bladder cancer were recorded prospectively from 1992 to 2007 inclusive. Data on surgeons’ experience were categorized as follows: (a) experience by training status (residents or specialists); (b) number of TUR-BTs performed by each surgeon during the registration period, with cut-off levels at > 100, > 150, > 200, > median, and > third quartile of surgical volume; (c) lifetime high-volume surgeons (> 100 TUR-BTs). Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox regression with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in both univariate and multivariate analysis.

    Results: The analysis included 768 evaluable patients with a median follow-up of 60 months. Recurrence was observed in 478 patients (62%) and progression in 71 (9%). Surgery was performed by residents in 100 cases and specialists in 668, with recurrence in 75 (75%) and 403 (60%) patients, and progression in 9 (9%) and 62 (9%), respectively. Surgery performed by residents was statistically associated with recurrence (HR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.54-0.89) but not progression (HR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.35-1.48). Surgical volume (b and c) was not found to have a significant impact on recurrence or progression in any of the analyses at the chosen cut-offs.

    Conclusions: Surgical experience (specialist/resident) was a predictive factor for recurrence after TUR-BT for Ta/T1 bladder cancer. However, surgeon volume was not associated with recurrence at the chosen cut-off levels. Training programs, checklist

  • 13.
    Jancke, Georg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Impact of tumour size on recurrence and progression in Ta/T1 carcinoma of the urinary bladder2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 388-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of tumour size on recurrence and progression in a population-based series of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancers. Material and methods. Clinical and pathological characteristics of patients with primary Ta/bladder cancer were registered. The patients tumours were categorized by size into five size groups (1-10, 11-20, 21-30, 31-40 and andgt;40 mm) or three size groups (1-15, 16-30 and andgt;30 mm). Results. The analysis included 768 evaluable patients with a mean follow-up of 60 months. Recurrence was observed in 478 patients (62%) and progression in 71 (9%). Tumour size was associated with recurrence for tumours sized 21-30, 31-40 and andgt;40 mm (p = 0.03, p andlt; 0.001, p andlt; 0.001, respectively) in the five size group and for tumours sized 16-30 and andgt;30 mm (p = 0.003 and p andlt; 0.001) in the three size group. Other factors affecting recurrence were T1 tumour category, multiplicity and surgery performed by residents (p andlt; 0.001, p andlt; 0.001, p = 0.002, respectively). Considering progression, there was no significant association with tumour size, and T1 category and local recurrence were the only significant risk factors (both p andlt; 0.001). Conclusion. Tumour size andlt;= 15 mm is associated with a lower risk of recurrence but not progression. Dividing tumour size into three size groups gives additional information compared with two size groups with cut-off at 30 mm.

  • 14.
    Jancke, Georg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Centre.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Residual tumour in the marginal resection after a complete transurethral resection is associated with local recurrence in Ta/T1 urinary bladder cancer2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 343-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. This study investigated the presence of residual tumour in the marginal resection (MR) after a complete transurethral resection (TURB) of Ta/T1 transitional urinary bladder cancer. The association between positive MR and recurrence was analysed. Material and methods. After macroscopically complete TURB, a marginal resection of 7 mm (corresponding to the diameter of the resection loop) was removed around the entire resection area. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of residual disease on recurrence. Results. In all, 94 patients with a median follow-up time of 36 months were included, and residual tumour in the MR was present in 24 (26%). The recurrence rates for all cases, for those with a tumour-positive and a tumour-free MR were 60 (64%), 20 (83%) and 40 (57%), respectively. Local recurrence was found in 14 (58%) of the patients with tumour presence in the MR compared to 13 (19%) of those with a tumour-free margin. A positive MR was significantly associated with overall recurrence (p andlt; 0.001) and local recurrence (p = 0.001). Conclusion. Incomplete transurethral resection of bladder cancer is common, as demonstrated in 26% patients with positive MR. The presence of tumour in the MR may be a risk factor for recurrence, and particularly local recurrence.

  • 15.
    Jerlstrom, Tomas
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Gardmark, Truls
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden .
    Carringer, Malcolm
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Holmang, Sten
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Hosseini, Abolfazl
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Malmstrom, Per-Uno
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Ljungberg, Borje
    Norrlands University Hospital, Sweden .
    Hagberg, Oskar
    Regional Cancer Centre South, Lund, Sweden .
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Urinary bladder cancer treated with radical cystectomy: Perioperative parameters and early complications prospectively registered in a national population-based database2014In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 334-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Cystectomy combined with pelvic lymph-node dissection and urinary diversion entails high morbidity and mortality. Improvements are needed, and a first step is to collect information on the current situation. In 2011, this group took the initiative to start a population-based database in Sweden (population 9.5 million in 2011) with prospective registration of patients and complications until 90 days after cystectomy. This article reports findings from the first year of registration. Material and methods. Participation was voluntary, and data were reported by local urologists or research nurses. Perioperative parameters and early complications classified according to the modified Clavien system were registered, and selected variables of possible importance for complications were analysed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results. During 2011, 285 (65%) of 435 cystectomies performed in Sweden were registered in the database, the majority reported by the seven academic centres. Median blood loss was 1000 ml, operating time 318 min, and length of hospital stay 15 days. Any complications were registered for 103 patients (36%). Clavien grades 1-2 and 3-5 were noted in 19% and 15%, respectively. Thirty-seven patients (13%) were reoperated on at least once. In logistic regression analysis elevated risk of complications was significantly associated with operating time exceeding 318 min in both univariate and multivariate analysis, and with age 76-89 years only in multivariate analysis. Conclusions. It was feasible to start a national population-based registry of radical cystectomies for bladder cancer. The evaluation of the first year shows an increased risk of complications in patients with longer operating time and higher age. The results agree with some previously published series but should be interpreted with caution considering the relatively low coverage, which is expected to be higher in the future.

  • 16.
    Ladjevardi, Sam
    et al.
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Berglund, Anders
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Bratt, Ola
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University Hospital, Sweden .
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Treatment with curative intent and survival in men with high-risk prostate cancer. A population-based study of 11 380 men with serum PSA level 20-100 ng/mL2013In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 111, no 3, p. 381-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanTo investigate the influence of curative treatment on cause-specific mortality in men diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa) with serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels between 20 and 100 ng/mL. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMaterials and Methods less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanPatients with PCa (T1-4, N0/N1/NX, M0/MX), PSA 20-100 ng/mL and age andlt;= 75 years were identified in the National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanData on co-morbidity diagnoses were obtained from the National Patient Register and cause of death from the Cause of Death Register. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanFollowing adjustment for age at diagnosis, co-morbidity burden, Gleason score, T-category, PSA level and cause-specific mortality in relation to treatment were estimated using Cox regression analysis. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResult less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanA total of 11 380 men were diagnosed with PCa between 1996 and 2008 and fulfilled the inclusion criteria. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe cumulative 10-year PCa-specific mortality was 36% for patients receiving only palliative treatment and 13% for those treated with curative intent. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanFor the 8462 (74%) patients with PSA levels from 20 to 50 ng/mL at diagnosis, the hazard ratio for death from PCa was 0.23 (95% confidence interval 0.19-0.27) for those treated with curative intent compared with those given palliative treatment after adjusting for age, co-morbidity, T category, PSA level and Gleason score. The corresponding hazard ratio was 0.22 (95% confidence interval 0.17-0.30) for patients with PSA levels from 51 to 100 ng/mL. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanTreatment with curative intent for men with high-risk PCa was associated with reduced cause-specific mortality and should be considered even when serum PSA exceeds 20 ng/mL. Keywords prostate cancer, prostate-specific antigen, high-risk tumours, curative treatment, palliative treatment, population-based study

  • 17.
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    et al.
    Vaxjo County Hospital.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Holmang, Sten
    Department Surg and Perioperat Science, Umeå.
    Ljungberg, Borje
    Akad University Hospital.
    Malmstrom, Per-Uno
    University of Lund Hospital.
    Mansson, Wiking
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Nunez, Leyla
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Wessman, Catrin
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Wijkstrom, Hans
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Long-term follow-up after radical cystectomy with emphasis on complications and reoperations: A Swedish population-based survey2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 14-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate outcome after radical cystectomy for primary bladder cancer in a large population-based material. Material and methods. Between 1997 and 2002 all patients treated with radical cystectomy within 3 months after diagnosis of primary bladder cancer without distant metastasis were retrieved through the Swedish Bladder Cancer Registry. A follow-up questionnaire was distributed to all units where the primary registration of patients was performed. Follow-up data on recurrence date were retrieved from the patient charts and causes of death were obtained from the Swedish Cause of Death Registry until 2003. Results. During the study period radical cystectomy was performed in 39 units in Sweden, of which only five units were considered high-volume hospitals performing 10 or more procedures annually. Mean blood loss was 2300 ml (median 2000 ml) and the 90-day mortality rate was 5.7%. Blood loss was higher in high-volume units than in hospitals with lower hospital volumes, but the 90-day mortality rates were similar. During a median follow-up of 3.5 years, 24% of the patients were submitted to a reoperation. Reoperation rates were significantly higher in patients who received a continent urinary diversion (29%) compared with an ileal conduit (22%, p andlt; 0.015). Conclusions. Radical cystectomy was associated with a reoperation rate of 24% in Sweden during the study period. The reoperation rates were higher in patients receiving a continent cutaneous diversion or bladder substitution. Blood loss was higher in high-volume units; otherwise, surgical volume did not affect mortality rates, cancer-specific survival or reoperation rates.

  • 18.
    Marklund-Bau, Helén
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Spångberg, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sleep and partner-specific quality of life in partners of men with lower urinary tract symptoms compared with partners of men from the general population.2015In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 321-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to examine differences between partners of men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) suggestive of benign prostatic obstruction (BPO) and partners of men from the population regarding sleep and two aspects of quality of life, partner-specific quality of life and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and to identify factors related to the partner-specific quality of life and the parameter sleep efficiency. Materials and methods. The design was descriptive and comparative. The subjects were partners of men with LUTS suggestive of BPO (n = 126) and partners of randomly selected men from the general population (n = 131). Self-administered questionnaires about demography, comorbidity, sleep, sexuality, partner-specific quality of life and HRQoL were used. Results. Partners of men with LUTS suggestive of BPO were significantly more affected in all variables measuring partner-specific quality of life compared with partners from the population. The most impaired aspects were compassion and worry about an operation or cancer. In logistic regression, the only explanatory factors were having a partner belonging to the LUTS group for impaired partner-specific quality of life and having a bed partner for high sleep efficiency. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding the quantity and quality of sleep or the HRQoL. Conclusions. The partner-specific quality of life was impaired in partners of men with LUTS suggestive of BPO. Sleep and HRQoL did not differ between partners of men with LUTS and partners from the population.

  • 19.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Öster, Susanne
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Bek-Jensen, Hanne
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Lennmarken, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Patient-Controlled Sedation and Analgesia with Propofol and Alfentanil: A Preliminary Safety Evaluation Prior to Use of Non-Anaesthesiology Doctors2012In: Open Journal of Anesthesiology, ISSN 2164-5558, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 47-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim was to evaluate safety aspects of patient-controlled sedation and analgesia (PCS) for extracor-poreal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) and PCS to be handled by non-anaesthesiology doctors. Methods: Thirty-four ASA I-III patients used PCS with propofol and alfentanil for ESWL in this interventional study. Strict safety limits were defined regarding respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), oxygen saturation from pulse oximetry (SpO2), and transcutaneous partial pressures of oxygen (PtcO2) and carbon dioxide (PtcCO2). The pa-tients’ levels of consciousness was graded on a five-point scale and monitored with Bispectral Index (BIS). A nurse anaesthetist was supervising the procedure but was instructed to intervene only if safety limits were breached. No sup-plementary oxygen was given. Results: All patients responded to verbal stimuli during treatment. Cardiovascular sta-bility was maintained, but respiratory variables were affected. Two patients with SpO2 < 90% and two cases of RR ≤ 8 were diagnosed, and seven patients became hypercarbic (PtcCO2 ≥ 6.5 kPa). In 18 patients hypoxaemia was indicated as PtcO2 ≤ 8.0 kPa. All these 18 patients were given supplementary oxygen. There was no correlation between dose of drugs, age, weight or any vital variable. The 34 patients would use PCS again in the case of future treatment. Conclu-sions: During ESWL treatment PCS can be used with good patients’ satisfaction, and maintained cardiovascular stabil-ity, but PCS had an indisputable effect on pulmonary function with hypoxemia (resulting in need for supplementary oxygen) or hypercarbia. The person in charge of PCS must therefore be trained to perform according to the guidelines for sedation and/or analgesia by non-anaesthesiology doctors.

  • 20.
    Olsson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Fyhr, Ing-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    HER2 status in primary stage T1 urothelial cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 102-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The HER2 receptor is involved in pathways essential for cell proliferation, and is an important predictive and prognostic factor in breast cancer. HER2 probably plays a critical role in many types of cancer, including urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB). Stage T1 UCB exhibits heterogeneous clinical behaviour, and the frequency of HER2 expression in such disease has not been thoroughly examined. The aim of this study was to use an immunohistochemical technique to evaluate the frequency of HER2 expression in a defined population-based cohort of patients registered as having primary stage T1 UCB. Material and methods. The initial study population comprised 285 patients registered as having primary stage T1 UCB. The original histological specimens were re-evaluated with regard to T stage and World Health Organization grade. Hospital records provided information on tumour size, multiplicity, possible presence of histologically proven recurrence and progression. The patients were followed for at least 5 years or until death. In tumours still considered stage T1 after re-evaluation, HER2 was investigated by immunohistochemistry of paraffin-embedded material and scored according to the guidelines used in breast cancer. Results. After histopathological re-evaluation, 201 patients were still T1 UCB and could be investigated regarding HER2 expression. HER2 overexpression was observed in 25 of those patients (12.4%). HER2 status was not significantly associated with recurrence or progression. Conclusions. HER2 was overexpressed in 12.4% of the present cohort of patients with primary stage T1 UCB. There was no significant association between tumour HER2 status and prognosis.

  • 21.
    Olsson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Monsef, Nastaran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Johanson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Cell Cycle Regulators: Impact on Predicting Prognosis in Stage T1 Urinary Bladder Cancer2012In: ISRN Urology, ISSN 2090-5807, E-ISSN 2090-5815, Vol. 2012, article id 379081Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objective. The cell cycle is regulated by proteins at different checkpoints, and dysregulation of this cycle plays a role in carcinogenesis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are enzymes that degrade collagen and promote tumour infiltration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of various cell cycle regulators and MMPs, and to correlate such expression with progression and recurrence in patients with stage T1 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB).

    Patients and Methods. This population-based cohort study comprised 201 well-characterized patients with primary stage T1 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. Immunohistochemistry was performed on formalin-fixed material to quantify expression of cell cycle regulators and two MMPs.

    Results. Normal expression of p53 and abnormal expression of MMP9 were associated with greater risk of tumour recurrence. Also, normal p16 expression was related to a lower risk of tumour progression. MMP2, p21, cyclin D1, and pRb showed no significant results that could estimate progression or recurrence.

    Conclusions. Normal p16 expression is associated with a lower risk of tumour progression, but immunohistochemistry on cell cycle regulators and MMPs has little value in predicting the prognosis in stage T1 UCB.

  • 22.
    Olsson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Population-based study on prognostic factors for recurrence and progression in primary stage T1 bladder tumours2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 188-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Stage T1 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) exhibits heterogeneous clinical behaviour, and the treatment is controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate prognostic factors for UCB in a defined, population-based cohort comprising patients with a first time diagnosis of primary stage T1 UCB.

    Material and methods. The study population initially consisted of 285 patients with primary stage T1 UCB reported to the regional Bladder Cancer Registry in the Southeast Healthcare Region of Sweden from 1992 to 2001. The histological specimens were re-evaluated concerning stage, substaging of T1, World Health Organization (WHO) grade, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), tumour volume and total resected volume. Hospital records provided data on tumour size and multiplicity, occurrence of possible relapse and/or progression, death from UCB and whether treatment was given.

    Results. After re-evaluation, the study population comprised 211 patients. The median follow-up time was 60 months. LVI was a prognostic factor for UCB progression and recurrence. Tumour size larger than 30 mm and multiplicity increased the risk of recurrence. T1 substaging, tumour volume and total resected volume were not associated with recurrence or tumour progression.

    Conclusions. LVI is significantly correlated with progression and recurrence in patients with primary stage T1 UCB. Therefore, the presence of LVI should be evaluated in every new case of T1 UCB.

  • 23.
    Olsson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Centre.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    MDM2 SNP309 promoter polymorphism and p53 mutations in urinary bladder carcinoma stage T12013In: BMC Urology, ISSN 1471-2490, E-ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 13, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Urinary bladder carcinoma stage T1 is an unpredictable disease that in some cases has a good prognosis with only local or no recurrence, but in others can appear as a more aggressive tumor with progression to more advanced stages. The aim here was to investigate stage T1 tumors regarding MDM2 promoter SNP309 polymorphism, mutations in the p53 gene, and expression of p53 and p16 measured by immunohistochemistry, and subsequently relate these changes to tumor recurrence and progression. We examined a cohort of patients with primary stage T1 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder and their tumors.

    Methods: After re-evaluation of the original slides and exclusions, the study population comprised 141 patients, all with primary stage T1 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. The hospital records were screened for clinical parameters and information concerning presence of histologically proven recurrence and progression. The paraffin-embedded tumor material was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Any mutations found in the p53 gene were studied by single-strand conformation analysis and Sanger sequencing. The MDM2 SNP309 polymorphism was investigated by pyrosequencing. Multivariate analyses concerning association with prognosis were performed, and Kaplan-Meier analysis was conducted for a combination of changes and time to progression.

    Results: Of the 141 patients, 82 had at least one MDM2 SNP309 G allele, and 53 had a mutation in the p53 gene, but neither of those anomalies was associated with a worse prognosis. A mutation in the p53 gene was associated with immunohistochemically visualized p53 protein expression at a cut-off value of 50%. In the group with p53 mutation Kaplan-Meier analysis showed higher rate of progression and shorter time to progression in patients with immunohistochemically abnormal p16 expression compared to them with normal p16 expression (p = 0.038).

    Conclusions: MDM2 SNP309 promoter polymorphism and mutations in p53 were not associated with worse prognosis in this cohort of patients with primary stage T1 urinary bladder carcinoma. However, patients with abnormal p16 expression and a mutated p53 gene had a higher rate of and a shorter time to progression, and p53 gene mutation was associated with an abnormal immunohistochemistry for p53 at a cut-off of 50%.

  • 24.
    Sabir, Emad F.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmang, Sten
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Ljungberg, Borje
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Malmstrom, Per-Uno
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Mansson, Wiking
    SUS, Sweden .
    Wijkstrom, Hans
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Impact of hospital volume on local recurrence and distant metastasis in bladder cancer patients treated with radical cystectomy in Sweden2013In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF UROLOGY, ISSN 2168-1805, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 483-490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. This study evaluated the impact of hospital volume on local recurrence and distant metastasis in a population-based series of radical cystectomy patients in Sweden. Material and methods. All patients who underwent cystectomy for bladder cancer in 1997-2002 in Sweden and were reported to the National Bladder Cancer Registry were included. A high-volume hospital (HVH) was defined as one with greater than= 10 cystectomies/year and a low-volume hospital (LVH) as one with less than10 cystectomies/year. Information on preoperative tumour, node, metastasis (TNM) classification, operative procedure, postoperative course and follow-up was obtained from medical records. Results. Of the 1126 patients, 827 (74%) were males. The mean age was 66 years and median follow-up 47 months. Of the 610 (54%) HVH patients, 68 (11%) were pT0, 123 (20%) less thanpT2, 177 (29%) pT2, 242 (40%) greater thanpT2 and 69 (11%) were microscopic non-radical. Corresponding figures for the 516 (46%) LVH patients were 35 (7%), 68 (13%), 191 (37%), 222 (43%) and 96 (19%). Local recurrence was observed in 245 patients (22%): 113 (19%) at HVHs and 132 (26%) at LVHs. Distant metastasis was found in 363 (32%): 203 (33%) at HVHs and 160 (31%) at LVHs. Perioperative chemotherapy was given to 193 (17%). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis showed that local recurrence was associated with LVHs and non-organ-confined disease, whereas distant metastasis was correlated with non-organ-confined disease and lymph-node metastases. Conclusions. In this retrospective analysis, local tumour recurrence after cystectomy was common, particularly in patients with non-organ-confined disease. Furthermore, local recurrence was more frequent at LVHs than HVHs, and overall survival was better at HVHs. These findings suggest that concentrating cystectomies in HVHs may improve outcomes such as local recurrence and overall survival.

  • 25.
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Lofman, Owe
    Norwegian University Life Science.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Letter: PROSTATE CANCER SCREENING Authors reply2011In: BMJ. British Medical Journal, E-ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 342Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 26.
    Stattin, P
    et al.
    Umea University.
    Sandin, F
    University Uppsala Hospital.
    Ahlgren, G
    University Hospital Lund MAS.
    Bratt, O
    Helsingborg Hospital.
    E Damber, J
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Hugosson, J
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Robinson, D
    Eksjo Nassjo Hospital.
    Tornblom, M
    Soder Sjukhuset.
    Karlsson, S
    Karolinska Institute.
    Andren, O
    University Hospital Uppsala.
    Widmark, A
    Umea University.
    Egevad, L
    Karolinska Hospital.
    Ehrnstrom, R
    University Hospital Lund MAS.
    Adolfsson, J
    Karolinska Institute.
    Lambe, M
    University Uppsala Hospital.
    E Johansson, J
    University Hospital.
    NATION-WIDE POPULATION-BASED STUDY ON 15-YEAR MORTALITY IN PROSTATE CANCER ACCORDING TO RISK CATEGORIES IN THE NATIONAL PROSTATE CANCER REGISTER (NPCR) OF SWEDEN in EUROPEAN UROLOGY SUPPLEMENTS, vol 10, issue 2, pp 324-3252011In: EUROPEAN UROLOGY SUPPLEMENTS, ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS , 2011, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 324-325Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 27.
    Swärd, K
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Uvelius, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Caveolae-invaginations in the cell membrane with complex function. Defects in caveolae gene connected to severe congenital diseases2010In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 107, no 26-28, p. 1705-1708Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Thulin, Helena
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Karolinska Institute.
    Onelov, Erik
    Karolinska Institute.
    Ahlstrand, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Carringer, Malcolm
    Orebro University Hospital .
    Holmang, Sten
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Ljungberg, Borje
    Norrlands University Hospital.
    Malmstrom, Per-Uno
    Uppsala University.
    Robinsson, David
    Ryhov County Hospital.
    Wijkstrom, Hans
    Karolinska University.
    Wiklund, N. Peter
    Karolinska Institute.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institute.
    Henningsohn, Lars
    Karolinska Institute.
    Defecation disturbances after cystectomy for urinary bladder cancer2011In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 108, no 2, p. 196-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE To describe and compare long-term defecation disturbances in patients who had undergone a cystectomy due to urinary bladder cancer with non-continent urostomies, continent reservoirs and orthotopic neobladder urinary diversions. PATIENTS AND METHODS During their follow-up we attempted to contact all men and women aged 30-80 years who had undergone cystectomy and urinary diversion at seven Swedish hospitals. During a qualitative phase we identified defecation disturbances as a distressful symptom and included this item in a study-specific questionnaire together with freehand comments. The patients completed the questionnaire at home. Outcome variables were dichotomized and the results are presented as relative risks with 95% confidence interval. RESULTS The questionnaire was returned from 452 (92%) of 491 identified patients. Up to 30% reported problems with the physiological emptying process of stool (bowel movement, sensory rectal function, awareness of need for defecation, motoric rectal and anal function, straining ability). A sense of decreased straining capacity was reported by 20% of the men and women with non-continent urostomy and 14% and 8% of those with continent reservoirs and orthotopic neobladders, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Of the cystectomized individuals 30% reported problems with the physiological emptying process of stool (bowel movement, sensory rectal function, awareness of need for defecation, motoric rectal and anal function, straining ability). Those wanting to improve the situation for bladder cancer survivors may consider communicating before surgery the possibility of stool-emptying problems, and asking about them after surgery.

  • 29.
    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke
    et al.
    Kings Coll London, England .
    Wigertz, Annette
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Sandin, Fredrik
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Garmo, Hans
    Kings Coll London, England .
    Hellstrom, Karin
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Fransson, Per
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Lambe, Mats
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Adolfsson, Jan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Stattin, Par
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Cohort Profile: The National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden and Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden 2.02013In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 956-967Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1987, the first Regional Prostate Cancer Register was set up in the South-East health-care region of Sweden. Other health-care regions joined and since 1998 virtually all prostate cancer (PCa) cases are registered in the National Prostate Cancer Register (NPCR) of Sweden to provide data for quality assurance, bench marking and clinical research. NPCR includes data on tumour stage, Gleason score, serum level of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and primary treatment. In 2008, the NPCR was linked to a number of other population-based registers by use of the personal identity number. This database named Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden (PCBaSe) has now been extended with more cases, longer follow-up and a selection of two control series of men free of PCa at the time of sampling, as well as information on brothers of men diagnosed with PCa, resulting in PCBaSe 2.0. This extension allows for studies with case-control, cohort or longitudinal case-only design on aetiological factors, pharmaceutical prescriptions and assessment of long-term outcomes. The NPCR covers andgt; 96% of all incident PCa cases registered by the Swedish Cancer Register, which has an underreporting of andlt; 3.7%. The NPCR is used to assess trends in incidence, treatment and outcome of men with PCa. Since the national registers linked to PCBaSe are complete, studies from PCBaSe 2.0 are truly population based.

  • 30.
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Fransson, Sven-Göran
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Nierenarteriographie bei Makrohämaturie unklarer Genese: Analyse von 44 Fällen1983In: 20. bis 23. Oktober 1982, Hamburg / [ed] Joachim Kaufmann, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 1983, p. 325-326Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [de]

    In der urologischen Praxis ist die Hämaturie ein häufiges Symptom, dessen Genese Patient und Arzt geklärt haben möchten. Die üblichen diagnostischen Maßnahmen sind chemische und mikroskopische Untersuchung des Harns sowie Urinkultur, Zystoskopie mit Zytologie und Urographie evt. mit Tomographie. Im Rahmen dieser Untersuchungen werden bei etwa 22 Prozent der Patienten maligne Tumoren und in etwa 70 Prozent der Fälle andere Blutungsursachen in den Nieren oder Harnwegen gefunden. In 8 bis 10 Prozent der Fälle verbleibt die Diagnose dagegen unklar.

  • 31.
    Xu, A
    et al.
    University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Frederiksen, H
    University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Kanje, M
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Uvelius, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Partial urethral obstruction: ATF3 and p-c-Jun are involved in the growth of the detrusor muscle and its motor innervation.2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 30-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Infravesical obstruction leads to growth of urinary bladder smooth-muscle cells. The ganglion cells innervating the bladder muscle also increase in size. Stretch of detrusor muscle cells rapidly activates c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), which phosphorylates the transcription factor c-Jun, and stimulates the synthesis of the cotranscription factor ATF3. The aim of the study was to determine whether ATF3 and p-c-Jun were involved in growth of bladder smooth-muscle and ganglion cells. Material and methods. The urethra was partially obstructed in female rats. After 3 days or 10 weeks bladders were weighed, fixated and cut for immunohistochemistry to demonstrate ATF3 and p-c-Jun. Ganglia were processed separately. Unoperated and sham-operated rats were used as controls. Results. There was no ATF3 or p-c-Jun in control detrusor muscle. After 3 days of obstruction bladder weight had nearly doubled. Almost all nuclei in the detrusor showed immunofluorescence for ATF3 and p-c-Jun. After 10 weeks bladder weight had increased 10-fold. Almost all detrusor nuclei still showed p-c-Jun, but few had ATF3 activity. In control ganglia there was no ATF3 and only faint nuclear p-c-Jun activity. After 3 days of obstruction the ganglion cells had increased in size and many nuclei showed intense immunofluorescence for ATF3 and p-c-Jun. After 10 weeks the ganglion cell size had increased further. There was no ATF3 activity and no more p-c-Jun than in control ganglia. Conclusion. ATF3 and p-c-Jun seem to be involved in the growth of the detrusor muscle and its motor innervation following infravesical outlet obstruction.

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