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  • 1.
    Antepohl, Wolfram
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Interleukin-8 is elevated in cerebrospinal fluid following high-voltage electrical injury with late-onset paraplegia suggesting neuronal damage at the microlevel as causative factor2010In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 36, no 3, p. e7-e9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The patient, a 31-year-old male, sustained an electric burn injury (16 kV, AC/DC) while working with electric power lines. He was acutely admitted to a national burn center in Southeast Sweden, where burns equalling 29% of the total body surface area were noted. The burns were located at the front of the abdomen, upper arms bilaterally, and the left hip region, and the lesions were estimated to be mainly of the dermal type, what was believed initially to be caused mainly by an electric flash. There were no obvious entry or exit sites of the electric current. However, myoglobin in plasma was elevated as a sign of muscular degradation, suggesting that at least some current had passed through the tissues. According to the paramedic report there was an episode of a few minutes of unconsciousness immediately after the injury, but the patient was fully awake and alert on admission. There was no concomitant trauma.

  • 2.
    Backstrom, D.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Al-Ayoubi, Fawzi
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Letter: Outcome of trauma patients2010In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 54, no 7, p. 902-903Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 3.
    Banck, M
    et al.
    Hallands Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Heller, Ute
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Samuelsson, C
    Hallands Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Wickerts, CJ
    Danderyd Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Women with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest are less likely to receive therapeutic hypothermia and more likely to die than men: Swedish nationwide cohort study2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Banck, M
    et al.
    Svenska Intensivvårdsregistret, Karlstad.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Karlström, G
    Svenska Intensivvårdsregistret, Karlstad.
    Nolin, T
    Svenska Intensivvårdsregistret, Kristianstad.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Samuelsson, C
    Svenska Intensivvårdsregistret, Karlstad.
    Är svensk intensivvård könsjämlik?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Banck, Malin
    et al.
    Hallands sjukhus, Halmstad.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Karlström, Göran
    Centralsjukhuset, Karlstad.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Samuelsson, Carolina
    Hallands sjukhus, Halmstad.
    Män intensivvårdas mer än kvinnor: Med det är ändå oklart om intensivvården i Sverige är könsojämlik2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 111, no 9-10, p. 388-390Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Bergstrand, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Källman, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Södra Älvsborgs Sjukhus, Borås, Sweden.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Lindberg, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pressure-induced vasodilation and reactive hyperemia at different depths in sacral tissue under clinically relevant conditions2014In: Microcirculation, ISSN 1073-9688, E-ISSN 1549-8719, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 761-771Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia at different sacral tissue depths in different populations under clinically relevant pressure exposure.

    METHODS: Forty-two subjects (< 65 years), 38 subjects (≥ 65 years), and 35 patients (≥ 65 years) participated. Interface pressure, skin temperature, and blood flow at tissue depths of 1 mm, 2 mm, and 10 mm (using laser Doppler flowmetry and photoplethysmography) were measured in the sacral tissue before, during, and after load in a supine position.

    RESULTS: pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia were observed at three tissue depths. At 10 mm depth, the proportion of subjects with a lack of pressure-induced vasodilatation was higher compared to superficial depths. The patients had higher interface pressure during load than the healthy individuals, but there were no significant differences in blood flow. Twenty-nine subjects in all three study groups were identified with a lack of pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia.

    CONCLUSIONS: pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia can be measured at different tissue depths. A lack of these responses was found in healthy individuals as well as in patients indicating an innate susceptibility in some individuals, and are potential important factors to evaluate in order to better understand the etiology of pressure ulcers.

  • 7.
    Berkius, J
    et al.
    Västervik, Sweden .
    Engerström, L
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    HEALTH RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE IN COPD PATIENTS FOLLOWED 24 MONTHS AFTER ICU CARE in INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, vol 36, issue , pp S228-S2282010In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, Springer Science Business Media , 2010, Vol. 36, p. S228-S228Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 8.
    Berkius, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Västervik County Hospital, Västervik, Sweden.
    Engerström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordlund, Peter
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping,.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten M
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A prospective longitudinal multicentre study of health related quality of life in ICU survivors with COPD2013In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 17, no 5, p. R211-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Mortality amongst COPD patients treated on the ICU is high. Health-related quality of life (HRQL) after intensive care is a relevant concern for COPD patients, their families and providers of health care. Still, there are few HRQL studies after intensive care of this patient group. Our hypothesis was that HRQL of COPD patients treated on the ICU declines rapidly with time.

    METHODS: Fifty-one COPD patients (COPD-ICU group) with an ICU stay longer than 24 hours received a questionnaire at 6, 12 and 24 months after discharge from ICU. HRQL was measured using two generic instruments: the EuroQoL instrument (EQ-5D and EQ-VAS) and the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). The results were compared to HRQL of two reference groups from the general population; an age- and sex-adjusted reference population (Non-COPD reference) and a reference group with COPD (COPD reference).

    RESULTS: HRQL of the COPD-ICU group at 6 months after discharge from ICU was lower compared to the COPD reference group: Median EQ-5D was 0.66 vs. 0.73, P=0.08 and median EQ-VAS was 50 vs.55, P<0.05. There were no significant differences in the SF-36 dimensions between the COPD-ICU and COPD-reference groups, although the difference in physical functioning (PF) approached statistical significance (P=0.059). Patients in the COPD-ICU group who were lost to follow-up after 6 months had low HRQL scores at 6 months. Scores for patients who died were generally lower compared to patients who failed to respond to the questionnaire. The PF and social functioning (SF) scores in those who died were significantly lower compared to patients with a complete follow up. HRQL of patients in the COPD-ICU group that survived a complete 24 months follow up was low but stable with no statistically significant decline from 6 to 24 months after ICU discharge. Their HRQL at 24 months was not significantly different from HRQL in the COPD reference group.

    CONCLUSIONS: HRQL in COPD survivors after intensive care was low but did not decline from 6 to 24 months after discharge from ICU. Furthermore, HRQL at 24 months was similar to patients with COPD who had not received ICU treatment.

  • 9.
    Bäckman, Carl G
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten M
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    A case-control study of the influence of the ICU-diary concept on mastery and hopelessness six months after critical illnessManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ICU-diary concept is associated with less post-traumatic stress syndrome and improved perceived health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) after critical illness, but little is known about its effect on the coping- mastery process, or whether it reduces hopelessness.

    Objective: To see if the ICU-diary concept improves the patient’s ability to master his/her situation after critical illness, and if it reduces the feeling of hopelessness.

    Design: Case control study (subgroup analysis of a multi-centre study on health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL).

    Setting: Non-academic 8-bed general ICU.

    Patients: Adults admitted between March 2002 and June 2004.

    Measurements: Mastery and hopelessness were determined using validated questionnaires (the Mastery-Coping scale and a consolidated 2–item hopelessness questionnaire) which were sent home to patients 6 months after critical illness. Responses were compared between patients that received (Cases: n=38) or did not receive an ICU-diary (Controls: n=76) . Diaries were used when a long and complicated stay on the ICU was expected. Controls were matched with diary patients by gender and age. The effect of the ICU-diary was also examined using a multiple regression model.

    Results: The ICU-diary concept group scored significantly higher than the No-diary group in mastery (22.1 vs. 20.4, P<0.05) and lower in hopelessness scores (1.3 vs. 1.6, P<0.05). The positive influence of the ICU-diary disappeared after adjustment for confounding factors in a multiple regression model.

    Conclusion: We were unable to verify any positive influence of the ICU-diary concept on mastery and hopelessness 6 months after critical illness.

  • 10.
    Bäckman, Carl
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Long-term effect of the ICU-diary concept on quality of life after critical illness2010In: ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, ISSN 0001-5172, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 736-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Critically ill patients often spend time in the intensive care unit (ICU) either unconscious or sedated. On recovery, they are often in a state of confusion with memory loss that may be associated with a longstanding reduction in health-related quality of life (QoL). We hypothesised that the ICU-diary concept could improve their QoL by filling in their memory gaps. Methods A non-randomised, prospective study in a non-academic eight-bedded general ICU. A group of patients (n=38) were selected to receive the ICU-diary concept (keeping a diary with photos while on the ICU plus a follow-up meeting) when a long and complicated course was expected. Health-related QoL at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months was compared with a group that did not receive the ICU-diary (n=224). The Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form (SF-36) was used to measure health-related QoL. Multiple regression models adjusted for age, sex, illness severity, pre-existing disease and diagnostic category was used to analyse the effects of the ICU-diary concept at 6 months, and changes over time were analysed using repeated measures MANOVA. Results Crude and adjusted scores for two dimensions of SF-36 (general health and vitality) and the physical component summary score were significantly higher at 6 months in the ICU-diary group (P andlt; 0.05) and some of the effects remained during the 3-year follow-up period (P andlt; 0.05). Conclusion The ICU-diary concept was associated with improved health-related QoL during the 3-year follow-up period after a critical illness. The effect of this intervention needs to be confirmed in a larger randomised study.

  • 11.
    Djerf, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Trinks, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abdiu, Avni
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Hallbeck, Anna-Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Walz, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    The pan-ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor canertinib promotes apoptosis of malignant melanoma in vitro and displays anti-tumor activity in vivo2011In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 414, no 3, p. 563-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ErbB receptor family has been suggested to constitute a therapeutic target for tumor-specific treatment of malignant melanoma. Here we investigate the effect of the pan-ErbB tyrosine kinase inhibitor canertinib on cell growth and survival in human melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Canertinib significantly inhibited growth of cultured melanoma cells, RaH3 and RaH5, in a dose-dependent manner as determined by cell counting. Half-maximum growth inhibitory dose (IC(50)) was approximately 0.8 mu M and by 5 mu M both cell lines were completely growth-arrested within 72 h of treatment. Incubation of exponentially growing RaH3 and RaH5 with 1 mu M canertinib accumulated the cells in the G(1)-phase of the cell cycle within 24 h of treatment without induction of apoptosis as determined by flow cytometry. Immunoblot analysis showed that 1 mu M canertinib inhibited ErbB1-3 receptor phosphorylation with a concomitant decrease of Akt-, Erk1/2- and Stat3 activity in both cell lines. In contrast to the cytostatic effect observed at doses less than= 5 mu M canertinib, higher concentrations induced apoptosis as demonstrated by the Annexin V method and Western blot analysis of PARP cleavage. Furthermore, canertinib significantly inhibited growth of RaH3 and RaH5 melanoma xenografts in nude mice. Pharmacological targeting of the ErbB receptors may prove successful in the treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma.

  • 12.
    Elawa, Sherif
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Intestinal obstruction following harvest of VRAM-flap for reconstruction of a large perineal defect2015In: Case Reports in Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2332-0885, Vol. 2, no 3-4, p. 88-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A patient with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum was operated with abdominoperineal resection and perineal reconstruction with a vertical rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. Six days postoperatively, there was herniation of the small bowel, between the anterior and posterior rectus sheaths, to a subcutaneous location.

  • 13.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt .
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Letter: "Is the length of time in acute burn surgery associated with poorer outcomes?"2014In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 772-773Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 14.
    Engstrand, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hand function and quality of life before and after fasciectomy for Dupuytren contracture2014In: Journal of Hand Surgery-American Volume, ISSN 0363-5023, E-ISSN 1531-6564, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 1333-1343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To describe changes in joint motion, sensibility, and scar pliability and to investigate the patients' expectations, self-reported recovery, and satisfaction with hand function, disability, and quality of life after surgery and hand therapy for Dupuytren disease.

    METHODS:

    This prospective cohort study collected measurements before surgery and 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery and hand therapy. Ninety patients with total active extension deficits of 60° or more from Dupuytren contracture were included. Outcomes measures were range of motion; sensibility; scar pliability; self-reported outcomes on expectations, recovery, and satisfaction with hand function; Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores; safety and social issues of hand function; physical activity habits; and quality of life with the Euroqol.

    RESULTS:

    The extension deficit decreased, and there was a transient decrease in active finger flexion during the first year after surgery. Sensibility remained unaffected. Generally, patients with surgery on multiple fingers had worse scar pliability. The majority of the patients had their expectations met, and at 6 months, 32% considered hand function as fully recovered, and 73% were satisfied with their hand function. Fear of hurting the hand and worry about not trusting the hand function were of greatest concern among safety and social issues. The Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score and the Euroqol improved over time.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    After surgery and hand therapy, disability decreased independent of single or multiple operated fingers. The total active finger extension improved enough for the patients to reach a functional range of motion despite an impairment of active finger flexion still present 12 months after treatment.

  • 15.
    Ericsson, Hans
    et al.
    AstraZeneca RandD, Sweden .
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Heijer, Maria
    AstraZeneca RandD, Sweden .
    Dorani, Hassan
    AstraZeneca RandD, Sweden .
    Johansson, Peter
    AstraZeneca RandD, Sweden .
    Wollbratt, Maria
    AstraZeneca RandD, Sweden .
    Norjavaara, Ensio
    AstraZeneca RandD, Sweden .
    The glucokinase activator AZD6370 decreases fasting and postprandial glucose in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with effects influenced by dosing regimen and food2012In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 436-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and safety of the glucokinase activator AZD6370 after 1 day of administration under fed and fasted conditions in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: This was a two-part study. In Part A, patients received a single oral dose of AZD6370 (20, 60 or 180 mg) or placebo in the fasted or fed states (both n = 8). In Part B, patients (n = 8) received placebo and a total dose of AZD6370 180 mg given in one, two or four divided doses. Plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide changes versus placebo were assessed. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: AZD6370 provided dose-dependent reductions in plasma glucose of up to 30% versus placebo in both fasted and fed patients (p andlt; 0.001 at 60 and 180 mg doses). Insulin secretion increased with dose, but absolute increases were relatively small in the fasted versus fed state (0-4 h). Dosing AZD6370 twice or four-times over 1 day gave a smoother 24-h glucose profile than single-dose. AZD6370 was rapidly absorbed. Pharmacokinetics of AZD6370 were dose-independent and unaffected by food. AZD6370 was generally well tolerated. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: AZD6370 produced dose-dependent glucose reductions and increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in patients with T2DM.

  • 16.
    Eriksson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Huljebrant, Inger
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nettelblad, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Functional impairment after treatment with pectoral muscle flaps because of deep sternal wound infection2011In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 174-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Pectoral muscle flaps (PMF) are effective in terminating protracted sternal wound infections (SWI) but long-term outcome remains uncertain. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate long-term outcome in patients treated with PMF. Design. Thirty-four of 263 patients revised because of deep SWI from 1991-2005 were treated with PMF. Of the 21 patients alive, 11 had left-sided, two right-sided and eight bilateral procedures. Sternal debridement without closure of the sternum was done in 17 patients. Nineteen of 21 patients responded to a questionnaire. Results. At follow-up on average 5.9 years (range 1.9-14.8 years) after surgery 63% (12/19) experienced unstable chest. Two thirds (12/18) reported problems carrying a grocery bag and 37% (7/19) had problems putting on a coat. Reduction of power and mobility was more common in the right arm and shoulder even in patients with left-sided PMF. Thirty-two percent (6/19) would have preferred alternative treatment if possible to avoid sternal instability even if healing had been substantially delayed. Conclusions. Surgery with PMF and sternal debridement was associated with long-term disability, which appeared to be significant in one third of the patients. The function of the right arm and shoulder was affected more often despite the majority of procedures being left-sided suggesting that loss of skeletal continuity of the chest wall is more disabling than loss of pectoral muscle function.

  • 17.
    Farnebo, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Samuelsson, A.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Henriksson, J.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol and Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlander, Lars-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Urea clearance: a new method to register local changes in blood flow in rat skeletal muscle based on microdialysis2010In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 57-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pgreater thanIncreasing evidence suggests that local blood flow should be monitored during microdialysis (MD) as the recovery of analytes is affected by local blood flow. At present ethanol clearance is the standard technique for this purpose, but it is not functional at very low perfusion velocities. Here, we introduce a technique for MD whereby local tissue blood flow is recorded by the use of urea clearance (changes inflow/outflow concentration), in conjunction with measurements of tissue metabolism (glucose, lactate and puruvate). MD probes were inserted into the gracilis muscle of 15 rats and perfused with a medium containing urea (20 mmol l-1). Changes in muscle blood flow were made by addition of noradrenaline (5 mu g ml-1) to the perfusion medium at two perfusion velocities (0 center dot 6 and 0 center dot 4 mu l min-1). The clearance of urea from the perfusion medium was then calculated and examined in relation to the dose of noradrenaline and to the coexisting changes in extracellular metabolites. The results showed reproducible and dose-dependent changes in blood flow that were induced by noradrenaline. These were characterized by dose-dependent changes in the urea clearance as well as blood-flow-specific changes in the MD metabolic markers (reduction in glucose and increase in lactate). The sensitivity for blood flow changes as assessed by urea clearance (MD) was increased at 0 center dot 4 compared with the 0 center dot 6 mu l min-1 perfusion speed. The results indicate that inclusion of urea to the perfusion medium may be used to monitor changes in skeletal muscle blood flow at low perfusion velocities and in parallel assess metabolic variables with a high recovery (greater than 90%).

  • 18.
    Farnebo, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Winbladh, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zettersten, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Gullstrand, P
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Urea Clearance: A New Technique Based on Microdialysis to Assess Liver Blood Flow Studied in a Pig Model of Ischemia/Reperfusion2010In: EUROPEAN SURGICAL RESEARCH, ISSN 0014-312X, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 105-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Delayed detection of ischemia is one of the most feared postoperative complications. Early detection of impaired blood flow and close monitoring of the organ-specific metabolic status may therefore be critical for the surgical outcome. Urea clearance is a new technique for continuous monitoring of alterations in blood flow and metabolic markers with acceptable temporal characteristics. We compare this new microdialysis technique with the established microdialysis ethanol technique to assess hepatic blood flow. Six pigs were used in a liver ischemia/reperfusion injury model. Microdialysis catheters were placed in liver segment IV and all circulation was stopped for 80 min, followed by reperfusion for 220 min. Urea and ethanol clearance was calculated from the dialysate and correlated with metabolic changes. A laser Doppler probe was used as reference of restoration of blood flow. Both urea and ethanol clearance reproducibly depicted changes in liver blood flow in relation to metabolic changes and laser Doppler measurements. The two techniques highly correlated both overall and during the reperfusion phase (r = 0.8) and the changes were paralleled by altered perfusion as recorded by laser Doppler.

  • 19.
    Farnebo, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zettersten, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Assessment of blood flow changes in human skin by microdialysis urea clearance2011In: Microcirculation, ISSN 1073-9688, E-ISSN 1549-8719, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 198-204Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the urea clearance technique for the measurement of drug-induced blood flow changes in human skin, and compare it with two non-invasive techniques: polarization light spectroscopy and laser Doppler perfusion imaging.

    Methods: Fifteen microdialysis catheters were placed intracutaneously on the volar aspect of the forearms of healthy human subjects, and were perfused with nitroglycerine, noradrenaline, and again nitroglycerine, to induce local tissue hyperaemia, hypoperfusion, and hyperaemia, respectively.

    Results: Urea clearance, but not the other techniques, detected the changes in blood flow during all three periods of altered flow.  The last hyperaemic response was detected by all three methods.

    Conclusion: Urea clearance can be used as a relatively simple method to estimate blood flow changes during microdialysis of vasoactive substances, in particular when the tissue is preconditioned in order to enhance the contrast between baseline and the responses to the provocations. Our results support that, in the model described, urea clearance was superior to the optical methods as it detected both the increases and decrease in blood flow, and the returns to baseline between these periods.

  • 20.
    Folkesson, Tchou
    et al.
    Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden,.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, B.
    Berzelius Clinical Research Center, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    A human vascular model based on microdialysis for the assessment of the vasoconstrictive dose-response effects of noradrenaline and vasopressin in skin: in JOURNAL OF VASCULAR RESEARCH, vol 48, pp 320-3202011In: JOURNAL OF VASCULAR RESEARCH, Karger , 2011, p. 320-320Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microdialysis is a well-established technique for continuous sampling of small, water-soluble molecules within the extracellular fluid space in vivo. It also allows the use of microdoses of drugs, and the simultaneous evaluation of their related effects at the site of action. The present study was an experimental, randomized microdose trial to develop a human vascular model of dose response. We aimed to evaluate a microdialysis dosing method using urea clearance as a marker of druginduced changes in dermal blood flow and metabolism (glucose and lactate) in 12 healthy volunteers. We found that asymptomatic vasoconstriction can be detected by continuous microdialysis measurements of urea clearance in dermal tissue. More importantly, dose-effect relations using the Emax model could be constructed using the corresponding data on drug doses and both the urea clearance-based flow estimates and the changes in concentrations of tissue metabolites. This in vivo human experimental skin model offers an interesting tool with which both the dose-response effects on blood flow and concentrations of tissue metabolites of potent vasoactive substances can be evaluated.

  • 21.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    et al.
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Professor Gösta Arturson (1927–2013): Obituary2013In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 1654-1655Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Hahn, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Li, Yuhong
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zdolsek, Joachim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Non-invasive monitoring of blood haemoglobin for analysis of fluid volume kinetics2010In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 54, no 10, p. 1233-1240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A commercially available pulse oximeter that reports blood haemoglobin (Hb) concentration is evaluated. This study considers whether this device can provide serial Hb data that would be sufficiently reliable for volume kinetic analysis of infusion fluids.

    Methods: Forty infusions of 5 or 10 ml/kg of acetated Ringer's solution were given over 15 min in 10 healthy volunteers. Hb was measured on 17 different occasions over 120 min using the Radical 7 pulse oximeter and compared with the result of invasive blood sampling (control). A one-volume kinetic model was applied to each data series. The pulse oximeter also reported the perfusion index (PI).

    Results: The median deviation between the 680 invasive and non-invasive Hb samples (the accuracy) was 1.6% and the absolute median deviation (precision) was 4.6%. Between-subject factors explained half of the variation in the difference between non-invasive vs. invasive sampling.

    Ten of the 40 non-invasive series of Hb values were discarded from kinetic analysis due to poor quality. The remaining 30 series showed a smaller distribution volume for the infused fluid when kinetic analysis was based on the non-invasive method (3.0 vs. 5.3 l; P<0.001). This was due to co-variance with the PI, which exaggerated the decrease in Hb caused by the infusions. The non-invasive method might provide useful kinetic data at the group level, but individual curves deviated too much from the invasive data to be reliable.

    Conclusions: Non-invasive measurement of the Hb concentration during volume loading could not provide useful kinetic data for individuals.

  • 23.
    Henricson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Baiat, Yashma
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Local Heating as a Predilatation Method for Measurement of Vasoconstrictor Responses with Laser-Doppler Flowmetry2011In: Microcirculation, ISSN 1073-9688, E-ISSN 1549-8719, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 214-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studying microvascular responses to iontophoresis of vasoconstricting drugs contributes to a better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of cutaneous vessels, but measuring these responses with laser-Doppler flowmetry at basal blood flow conditions is technically challenging. This study aimed to investigate whether the measurement of cutaneous vasoconstrictor responses to noradrenaline (NA) and phenylephrine (PE), delivered by iontophoresis, is facilitated by predilatation of the microvascular bed using local heating. We used different drug delivery rates (100 s x 0.12 mA, 200 s x 0.06 mA, 300 s x 0.04 mA) to investigate whether predilatation affects the local drug dynamics by an increased removal of drugs from the skin. In a predilatated vascular bed, iontophoresis of NA and PE resulted in a significant decrease in perfusion from the thermal plateau (p andlt; 0.001). The decrease was 25-33%, depending on drug delivery rate. In unheated skin, a significant vasoconstriction was observed (p andlt; 0.001), with 17% and 14% decrease from baseline for NA and PE, respectively. These results indicate that predilatating the cutaneous vascular bed by local heating facilitates measurement of vasoconstriction with laser-Doppler flowmetry and does not seem to significantly affect the result by an increased removal of drugs from the skin.

  • 24.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sarker, Saikat
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    The Microvascular Response to Transdermal Iontophoresis of Insulin is Mediated by Nitric Oxide2013In: Microcirculation, ISSN 1073-9688, E-ISSN 1549-8719, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 717-723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveInsulin has direct effects on blood flow in various tissues, most likely due to endothelial NO production. We investigated whether insulin delivered to the skin by iontophoresis increases microvascular perfusion and whether this effect is partly or completely mediated by the release of NO. MethodsIn healthy subjects, regular insulin and monomeric insulin were delivered to the skin by cathodal iontophoresis. The skin was pretreated either with L-NAME or control solution (PBS) using anodal iontophoresis. Microvascular responses were measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. ResultsA dose-dependent increase in perfusion was observed during iontophoresis of regular and monomeric insulin. The maximum perfusion was significantly elevated compared with control after PBS (regular insulin 53.6 (12.7-95.6) PU vs. 4.2 (3.4-4.8) PU, p = 0.002; monomeric insulin 32.6 (8.9-92.6) PU vs. 5.9 (3.4-56.0) PU, p = 0.03). The microvascular response to insulin was abolished after L-NAME (regular insulin: 25.6 (11.6-54.4) PU vs. control: 4.7 (2.9-11.5) PU, p = 0.15; monomeric insulin 10.9 (5.4-56.8) PU vs. control: 4.7 (2.9-11.5) PU, p = 0.22). ConclusionsThe main finding is that iontophoresis of insulin induces a dose-dependent vasodilation in the skin, which could be suppressed after pretreatment with a NO synthase inhibitor. This suggests that vasodilation in the skin after iontophoresis of insulin is mediated by the NO pathway.

  • 25.
    Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ghavami, Saeid
    University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Grabarek, Jerzy
    Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin, Poland.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Regenerative Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Wiechec, Emilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Regenerative Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Bengt-Arne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rao, Rama K.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cieślar-Pobuda, Artur
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Regenerative Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Panigrahi, Soumya
    Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH, USA.
    Łos, Marek
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Regenerative Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Salinomycin induces activation of autophagy, mitophagy and affects mitochondrial polarity: Differences between primary and cancer cells2013In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta. Molecular Cell Research, ISSN 0167-4889, E-ISSN 1879-2596, Vol. 1833, no 9, p. 2057-2069Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The molecular mechanism of Salinomycin's toxicity is not fully understood. Various studies reported that Ca2 +, cytochrome c, and caspase activation play a role in Salinomycin-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, Salinomycin may target Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway to promote differentiation and thus elimination of cancer stem cells. In this study, we show a massive autophagic response to Salinomycin (substantially stronger than to commonly used autophagic inducer Rapamycin) in prostrate-, breast cancer cells, and to lesser degree in human normal dermal fibroblasts. Interestingly, autophagy induced by Salinomycin is a cell protective mechanism in all tested cancer cell lines. Furthermore, Salinomycin induces mitophagy, mitoptosis and increased mitochondrial membrane potential (∆Ψ) in a subpopulation of cells. Salinomycin strongly, and in time-dependent manner decreases cellular ATP level. Contrastingly, human normal dermal fibroblasts treated with Salinomycin show some initial decrease in mitochondrial mass, however they are largely resistant to Salinomycin-triggered ATP-depletion. Our data provide new insight into the molecular mechanism of preferential toxicity of Salinomycin towards cancer cells, and suggest possible clinical application of Salinomycin in combination with autophagy inhibitors (i.e. clinically-used Chloroquine). Furthermore, we discuss preferential Salinomycins toxicity in the context of Warburg effect.

  • 26.
    Jeschke, Marc G.
    et al.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Kamolz, Lars-PeterMedizinische Universität Wien, Austria.Sjöberg, FolkeLinköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.Wolf, Steven E.University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, USA.
    Handbook of Burns: Acute Burn Care Volume 12012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Johansson, J
    et al.
    Ostersund Hospital, Sweden .
    Brattstrom, O
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Lindbom, L
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Herwald, H
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Weitzberg, E
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Oldner, A
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Heparin-binding protein (HBP): an early marker of respiratory failure after trauma?2013In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 57, no 5, p. 580-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Trauma and its complications contribute to morbidity and mortality in the general population. Trauma victims are susceptible to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and sepsis. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) are activated after trauma and there is substantial evidence of their involvement in the development of ARDS. Activated PMNs release heparin-binding protein (HBP), a granule protein previously shown to be involved in acute inflammatory reactions. We hypothesised that there is an increase in plasma HBP content after trauma and that the increased levels are related to the severity of the trauma or later development of severe sepsis and organ failure (ARDS). Methods and Material We investigated HBP in plasma samples within 36h from trauma in 47 patients admitted to a level one trauma centre with a mean injury severity score (ISS) of 26 (2134). ISS, admission sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scores were recorded at admission. ARDS and presence of severe sepsis were determined daily during intensive care. Results We found no correlation between individual maximal plasma HBP levels at admission and ISS, admission SOFA or APACHE II. We found, however, a correlation between HBP levels and development of ARDS (P=0.026, n=47), but not to severe sepsis. Conclusion HBP is a potential biomarker candidate for early detection of ARDS development after trauma. Further research is required to confirm a casual relationship between plasma HBP and the development of ARDS.

  • 28.
    Johansson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Urinary excretion of histamine and methylhistamine after burns2012In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 1005-1009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The increased vascular permeability seen after burn contribute to morbidity and mortality as it interferes with organ function and the healing process. Large efforts have been made to explore underlying pathophysiological mechanisms that generate increased vascular permeability after burns. Many different substances have been proposed as mediators of which histamine, serotonin and oxygen radicals are claimed most important. However, no specific blocker has convincingly been shown to be clinically effective. Early work has claimed increased histamine plasma-concentrations in humans after burn and data from animal models pointed at histamine as an important mediator. Modern human clinical studies investigating the role of histamine as a mediator of the generalized post burn increase in vascular permeability are lacking. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethod: We examined histamine turnover by measuring the urinary excretion of histamine and methyl histamine for 48 h after burns in 8 patients (mean total burn surface area 24%). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Over time, in this time frame and compared to healthy controls we found a small increase in the excretion of histamine, but no increase of its metabolite methylhistamine. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Our findings do not support that histamine is an important mediator of the increased systemic vascular permeability seen after burn.

  • 29.
    Johansson, Joakim
    et al.
    The research and development unit, Jämtland county council, Östersund, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Jonas
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Östersund hospital, Östersund, Sweden.
    Nordgren, Marie
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Östersund hospital, Östersund, Sweden.
    Sandström, Erik
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Östersund hospital, Östersund, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Zetterström, Henrik
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Prehospital analgesia using nasal administration of S-ketamine – a case series2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 21, no 38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pain is a problem that often has to be addressed in the prehospital setting. The delivery of analgesia may sometimes prove challenging due to problems establishing intravenous access or a harsh winter environment. To solve the problem of intravenous access, intranasal administration of drugs is used in some settings. In cases where vascular access was foreseen or proved hard to establish (one or two missed attempts) on the scene of the accident we use nasally administered S-Ketamine for prehospital analgesia. Here we describe the use of nasally administered S-Ketamine in 9 cases. The doses used were in the range of 0,45-1,25 mg/kg. 8 patients were treated in outdoor winter-conditions in Sweden. 1 patient was treated indoor. VAS-score decreased from a median of 10 (interquartile range 8-10) to 3 (interquartile range 2-4). Nasally administered S-Ketamine offers a possible last resource to be used in cases where establishing vascular access is difficult or impossible. Side-effects in these 9 cases were few and non serious. Nasally administered drugs offer a needleless approach that is advantageous for the patient as well as for health personnel in especially challenging selected cases. Nasal as opposed to intravenous analgesia may reduce the time spent on the scene of the accident and most likely reduces the need to expose the patient to the environment in especially challenging cases of prehospital analgesia. Nasal administration of S-ketamine is off label and as such we only use it as a last resource and propose that the effect and safety of the treatment should be further studied.

  • 30.
    Johansson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Sjögren, Florence
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Bodelsson, Mikael
    Lund University.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Dynamics of leukocyte receptors after severe burns: An exploratory study2011In: BURNS, ISSN 0305-4179, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 227-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with burns are susceptible to organ failure, and there is indirect evidence that leukocytes may contribute to this process. They may change the expression of cell-surface receptors after certain stimuli, for example, the burn. We therefore aimed to assess the changes induced by the burn in the expression of leukocyte cell-surface receptors CD11b, CD14, CD16, and CD62L on the surface of PMNs and monocytes. We also wanted to examine the dynamics of this activation during the first week after the burn, and to relate it to the size of the injury. Methods: Ten patients with burns of andgt;15% (TBSA) were included in the study. Blood samples were collected on arrival and every consecutive morning during the first week. Healthy volunteers acted as controls. Results: PMN CD11b expression was increased. The extent of PMN CD11b expression correlated negatively to the size of the full thickness burn. Monocyte CD14 expression increased initially but there was no relation to the size of the burn. PMN CD16 expression decreased initially during the first days and the decrease was related to burn size. CD62L did not vary depending on the burn in either PMN or monocytes during the first week after the burn. Conclusion: This study showed that specific receptors on the surface of leukocytes (PMN CD11b, monocyte CD14 and PMN CD16) are affected by the burn. Expression of PMN CD11b and CD16 are related to burn size. Burn-induced effects on the expression of PMN receptors, such as PMN CD11b and CD16, may contribute to burn-induced infection susceptibility.

  • 31.
    Johansson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Herwald, Heiko
    Lund University, Department Clin Science, Div Infect Med, Lund, Sweden .
    Lindbom, Lennart
    Karolinska Institute, Department Physiol and Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Sjoberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Dynamics of leucocytes correlate with increased pulmonary vascular permeability and decreased PaO2:FiO2 ratio early after major burns2009Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The lung is affected soon after a major burn as indicated by a decreased PaO2:FiO2 ratio. The exact mechanism underlying this is not known. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) are activated systemically and their numbers are largely increased soon after a burn followed by a rapid decline to low normal or subnormal numbers within 24 hours, possibly by increased extravasation. Experimental data have supported the hypothesis that an important target for this extravasation is the lungs. Other studies also show that when PMN adhere to endothelial cells they increase vascular permeability, and this effect is mediated, at least in part, by release of heparin binding protein (HBP, also known as CAP-37 and azurocidin). We hypothesised that there is a relation between early increased pulmonary vascular permeability or a decreased PaO2:FiO2 ratio and the dynamic change in blood leucocytes after a burn, possibly mediated by the local release of HBP.

    Material and methods: This is a prospective, descriptive, exploratory, singlecentre study at a national burn centre. We investigated the dynamic changes of leucocytes in blood, plasma concentrations of HBP, pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) by thermodilution, and PaO2:FiO2 ratios in 20 patients during the first 21 days after a major burn (20% >total burn surface area %).

    Results: Median total burn surface area was 40% (IQR 25-52) and full thickness burn 28% (IQR 2-39). There was a correlation between the early (<24 hours) alteration in circulating white blood cell count and both early increased vascular permeability in the lung (r=0.63, p=0.004) and the decreased oxygenation index defined as PaO2:FiO2 < 27 kPa (p=0.004). There were no associations between plasma concentrations of HBP and measured pulmonary vascular permeability or PaO2:FiO2 ratios.

    Conclusions: The results indicate that trapping of leucocytes in the lung may be an important factor in early increased pulmonary vascular permeability and decrease of the PaO2:FiO2 ratio. Our data do not support the idea that HBP, assessed by systemic plasma concentrations, mediate this effect.

  • 32.
    Junker, J P E
    et al.
    Harvard University.
    Lonnqvist, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, L K
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grenegard, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Endothelial differentiation of human dermal fibroblasts in JOURNAL OF TISSUE ENGINEERING AND REGENERATIVE MEDICINE, vol 6, issue SI, pp 149-1492012In: JOURNAL OF TISSUE ENGINEERING AND REGENERATIVE MEDICINE, John Wiley and Sons , 2012, Vol. 6, no SI, p. 149-149Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 33.
    Junker, J P
    et al.
    Harvard University.
    Lönnqvist, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, L K
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grenegård, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    ENDOTHELIAL DIFFERENTIATION OF HUMAN DERMAL FIBROBLASTS in WOUND REPAIR AND REGENERATION, vol 20, issue 2, pp A27-A272012In: WOUND REPAIR AND REGENERATION, Wiley-Blackwell , 2012, Vol. 20, no 2, p. A27-A27Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 34.
    Junker, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lönnqvist, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rakar, Jonathan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Lisa K.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grenegård, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Differentiation of human dermal fibroblasts towards endothelial cells2013In: Differentiation, ISSN 0301-4681, E-ISSN 1432-0436, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 67-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ultimate goal of vascular tissue engineering is the production of functional grafts for clinical use. Difficulties acquiring autologous endothelial cells have motivated the search for alternative cell sources. Differentiation of dermal fibroblasts towards several mesenchymal lineages as well as endothelial cells has been proposed. The aim of the present study was to investigate the endothelial differentiation capacity of human dermal fibroblasts on a gene expression, protein expression and functional physiological level. Endothelial differentiation of fibroblasts was induced by culturing cells in 30% human serum, but not in fetal calf serum. Expression of proteins and genes relevant for endothelial function and differentiation was increased after induction. Furthermore, fibroblasts exposed to 30% human serum displayed increased uptake of low-density lipoprotein and formation of capillary-like networks. The results of this study may have an impact on cell sourcing for vascular tissue engineering, and the development of methods for vascularization of autologous tissue engineered constructs.

  • 35.
    Junker, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rakar, Jonathan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johnson, Hans
    Department of Surgery, Section of Plastic Surgery and Burn Centre, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Gene Expression Analysis of Adipogenic, Chondrogenic and Osteogenic Induced Human Dermal FibroblastsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of adult stem cells in tissue engineering applications is a promising alternativewhen the possibility of acquiring autologous cells for transplantation is limited. Even so, theadult stem cell populations identified up to this point are far from optimal in aspects ofharvest and culture expansion. With the recent suggestion of stem cell plasticity inherent inhuman dermal fibroblasts, a new plausible candidate for use as cell source in tissuereconstruction has emerged. Fibroblast cultures can be induced to differentiate towardsadipocyte, chondrocyte and osteoblast-like cells in vitro, by the use of induction media. Thepresent works utilizes Affymetrix full expression micro array to identify if genes commonlyexpressed in stem cells differentiating towards the above-mentioned lineages also areexpressed in induced fibroblasts. Several genes important for differentiation andmaintenance of an adipose, cartilage or bone phenotype were found up-regulated in theinduced cultures. The results presented here provide further evidence for the plasticity ofhuman dermal fibroblasts, and their possible use in tissue engineering and reconstructivesurgery.

  • 36.
    Junker, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sommar, Pehr
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skog, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johnson, Hans
    Department of Surgery, Section of Plastic Surgery and Burn Center, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen , Norway.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Adipogenic, Chondrogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of ClonallyDerived Human Dermal Fibroblasts2010In: Cells Tissues Organs, ISSN 1422-6405, E-ISSN 1422-6421, Vol. 191, no 2, p. 105-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The apparent need of an autologous cell source for tissueengineering applications has led researchers to explore thepresence of cells with stem cell plasticity in several humantissues. Dermal fibroblasts (FBs) are easy to harvest, expandin vitro and store, rendering them plausible candidates forcell-based therapies. The aim of the present study was toobserve the effects of adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenicinduction media on the phenotype of human FBs.Human preadipocytes obtained from fat tissue have beenproposed as an adult stem cell source with suitable characteristics,and were used as control cells in regard to their differentiationpotential. Routine staining, immunohistochemicalanalysis and alkaline phosphatase assay were employed,in order to study the phenotypic shift. FBs were shown topossess multilineage potential, giving rise to fat-, cartilageandbone-like cells. To exclude contaminant progenitor cellsor cell fusion giving rise to tissue with adipocyte-, chondrocyte-and osteoblast-like cells, single-cell cloning was performed.Single-cell-cloned FBs (sccFBs) displayed a similardifferentiation potential as primary-culture FBs. The pres-ence of ‘stem-cell-specific’ surface antigens was analyzedusing flow cytometry. The results reveal that sccFBs haveseveral of the markers associated with cells exhibiting stemcell plasticity. The findings presented here are corroboratedby the findings of other groups, and suggest the use of humandermal FBs in cell-based therapies for the reconstructionof fat, cartilage and bone.

  • 37.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jarnhed-Andersson, Ingmarie
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Tarpila, Erkki
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Dressing the split-thickness skin graft donor site: a randomized clinical trial2014In: Advances in Skin & Wound Care, ISSN 1527-7941, E-ISSN 1538-8654, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 20-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The primary objective of this study was to compareAquacel (ConvaTec, Skillman, New Jersey), Allevyn (Smith &Nephew, St Petersburg, Florida), and Mediskin I (Mo¨ lnlycke, HealthCare AB, Gothenburg, Sweden) in the treatment of split-thicknessskin graft donor sites.

    DESIGN: This study was performed as a prospective randomized,3-arm, clinical study.

    SETTING: A clinical study performed at a hand and plastic surgerydepartment with burn unit.

    PARTICIPANTS: The study included 67 adults with a total of73 donor sites, which were on the thigh, not reharvested, andranged between 30- and 400-cm2 area.

    INTERVENTIONS: Subjects were randomly assigned to treatmentwith Aquacel, Allevyn, or Mediskin I.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The donor site was assessed onpostoperative days 3, 14, and 21 for healing, infection, pain,impact on everyday life, ease of use, and cost.

    MAIN RESULTS: The obtained results demonstrate significantlyfaster re-epithelialization for patients treated with Aquacel orMediskin I compared with Allevyn. Regarding infections, therewere no significant differences between the groups. Patientswearing Aquacel experienced significantly less pain changing thedressing and less impact on everyday life than the patientswearing Allevyn. Aquacel was shown to be significantly easier forthe caregiver to use than Allevyn and Mediskin I. There is asignificant difference in cost of treatment between the dressings,whereas Mediskin I is the most expensive.

    CONCLUSION: The authors’ results support the use of Aquacel in thetreatment of split-thickness skin graft donor sites. Aquacel has alow cost per unit, is user friendly, gives short healing time, andminimizes patient discomfort.

     

  • 38.
    Kjellman, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Glad Mattsson, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Huss, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Comparing ambient, air-convection, and fluid-convection heating techniques in treating hypothermic burn patients, a clinical RCT2011In: Annals of Surgical Innovation and Research, ISSN 1750-1164, Vol. 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hypothermia in burns is common and increases morbidity and mortality. Several methods are available to reach and maintain normal core body temperature, but have not yet been evaluated in critical care for burned patients. Our units ordinary technique for controlling body temperature (Bair Hugger®+ radiator ceiling + bed warmer + Hotline®) has many drawbacks e.g.; slow and the working environment is hampered.The aim of this study was to compare our ordinary heating technique with newly-developed methods: the Allon™2001 Thermowrap (a temperature regulating water-mattress), and Warmcloud (a temperature regulating air-mattress).Methods: Ten consecutive burned patients (andgt; 20% total burned surface area and a core temperature andlt; 36.0C) were included in this prospective, randomised, comparative study. Patients were randomly exposed to 3 heating methods. Each treatment/measuring-cycle lasted for 6 hours. Each heating method was assessed for 2 hours according to a randomised timetable. Core temperature was measured using an indwelling (bladder) thermistor. Paired t-tests were used to assess the significance of differences between the treatments within the patients. ANOVA was used to assess the differences in temperature from the first to the last measurement among all treatments. Three-way ANOVA with the Tukey HSD post hoc test and a repeated measures ANOVA was used in the same manner, but included information about patients and treatment/measuring-cycles to control for potential confounding. Data are presented as mean (SD) and (range). Probabilities of less than 0.05 were accepted as significant.Results: The mean increase, 1.4 (SD 0.6C; range 0.6-2.6C) in core temperature/treatment/measuring-cycle highly significantly favoured the Allon™2001 Thermowrap in contrast to the conventional method 0.2 (0.6)C (range -1.2 to 1.5C) and the Warmcloud 0.3 (0.4)C (range -0.4 to 0.9C). The procedures for using the Allon™2001 Thermowrap were experienced to be more comfortable and straightforward than the conventional method or the Warmcloud.Conclusions: The Allon™2001 Thermowrap was more effective than the Warmcloud or the conventional method in controlling patients temperatures. © 2011 Kjellman et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 39.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Asko-Seljavaara, Sirpa
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Töölö Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Plastic Surgery2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1457-4969, E-ISSN 1799-7267, Vol. 92, p. 239-239Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Li, Yuhong
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Shaoxing People's Hospital of Zhejiang University, China.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Borges, J. B.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Sao Paulo, Brazil .
    Böhm, S. H.
    Swisstom AG, Landquart, Switzerland.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, B.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hyperoxia affects the regional pulmonary ventilation/perfusion ratio: an electrical impedance tomography study2014In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 58, no 6, p. 716-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The way in which hyperoxia affects pulmonary ventilation and perfusion is not fully understood. We investigated how an increase in oxygen partial pressure in healthy young volunteers affects pulmonary ventilation and perfusion measured by thoracic electrical impedance tomography (EIT).

    METHODS:

    Twelve semi-supine healthy male volunteers aged 21-36 years were studied while breathing room air and air-oxygen mixtures (FiO2) that resulted in predetermined transcutaneous oxygen partial pressures (tcPO2) of 20, 40 and 60 kPa. The magnitude of ventilation (ΔZv) and perfusion (ΔZQ)-related changes in cyclic impedance variations, were determined using an EIT prototype equipped with 32 electrodes around the thorax. Regional changes in ventral and dorsal right lung ventilation (V) and perfusion (Q) were estimated, and V/Q ratios calculated.

    RESULTS:

    There were no significant changes in ΔZv with increasing tcPO2 levels. ΔZQ in the dorsal lung increased with increasing tcPO2 (P = 0.01), whereas no such change was seen in the ventral lung. There was a simultaneous decrease in V/Q ratio in the dorsal region during hyperoxia (P = 0.04). Two subjects did not reach a tcPO2 of 60 kPa despite breathing 100% oxygen.

    CONCLUSION:

    These results indicate that breathing increased concentrations of oxygen induces pulmonary vasodilatation in the dorsal lung even at small increases in FiO2. Ventilation remains unchanged. Local mismatch of ventilation and perfusion occurs in young healthy men, and the change in ventilation/perfusion ratio can be determined non-invasively by EIT.

  • 41.
    Lindahl, Andreas E
    et al.
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Low, Aili
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Plasma chromogranin A after severe burn trauma2013In: Neuropeptides, ISSN 0143-4179, E-ISSN 1532-2785, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 207-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chromogranin A (CgA) in plasma (P-CgA), a neuroendocrine marker of sympathetic stress, has been shown to predict mortality in medical intensive care. We hypothesized that the magnitude of CgA release would reflect stress load, and thereby injury severity in burn intensive care patients. Methods: Fifty-one consecutive patients with a burn area exceeding 10% were included. P-CgA was measured twice daily for seven days after injury. The point value at 24 h, the mean and maximum values and the AUC at days 1-7, were tested as possible predictors. Injury severity in the form of organ dysfunction was measured as SOFA score at day 7. Results: P-CgA could be classified into two types with respect to variability over time. Patients with high variability had more deep injuries and were older than those with low variability. All measures of CgA correlated with SOFA score at day 7, but not with total burn size. Univariate regressions showed that age, burn size and three of four measures of P-CgA predicted organ dysfunction. Multiple regressions showed that age, burn size, and either P-CgA at 24 h, the mean value up to day 7, or the maximum value up to day 7, were independent predictors for organ dysfunction. Significant organ dysfunction was best predicted by age, burn area and the CgA point value at 24 h with an AUC value of 0.91 in a ROC-analysis. Conclusions: The extent of neuroendocrine activation assessed as P-CgA after a major burn injury is independently related to organ dysfunction.

  • 42.
    Lindahl, Andreas E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Natriuretic peptide type B in burn intensive care2013In: JOURNAL OF TRAUMA AND ACUTE CARE SURGERY, ISSN 2163-0755, Vol. 74, no 3, p. 855-861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The plasma concentration of natriuretic peptide type B (BNP) or NT-proBNP (P-BNP or P-NT-proBNP) reflects cardiac load. In intensive care unit settings and in chronic inflammation, it is also affected by non-heart-related mechanisms. It has been suggested to be a marker of hydration after severe burns and to predict outcome in critically ill patients, but results are contradictory. We therefore measured P-NT-proBNP after severe burns and related it to injury related variables and to organ dysfunction. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS: Fifty consecutive patients with a burn size greater than 10% were studied for the first 2 weeks. P-NT-proBNP changes were analyzed in relation to burn size, age, changes in body weight, C-reactive protein in plasma, and organ function assessed as Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS: P-NT-proBNP showed large day-to-day and between patient variations. Daily change in body weight correlated with P-NT-proBNP only on Day 2, when maximum mobilization of edema occurred. Thereafter, P-NT-proBNP correlated with C-reactive protein in plasma as well as with SOFA scores. Burn size correlated with maximal weight change, which in turn correlated with both time for and value of maximum P-NT-proBNP. Maximal P-NT-proBNP was related to mortality and correlated better with SOFA score on Day 14 compared with age and burn size. In linear regressions, together with age at injury and total body surface area, P-NT-proBNP assessed on Days 3 to 8 was an independent predictor for every subsequent SOFA score measured one or more days later up to Day 14. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSION: P-NT-proBNP exhibited considerable interindividual and day-to-day variations. Values were related to mortality, burn size, water accumulation, posttraumatic response, and organ function. Maximum P-NT-proBNP correlated stronger with length of stay and with organ function on Day 14, compared with age and burn size. High values in Days 3 through 8 were also independent predictors of subsequent organ function up to 2 weeks after injury. (J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2013;74: 855-861.

  • 43.
    Lindahl, Filip
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Assessing paediatric scald injuries using Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging2013In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 662-666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The use of objective methods for assessment of burns is limited. Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI) is a non-invasive technique for instant measurement of tissue perfusion, making it potentially valuable for early prediction of burn wound outcome.

    Aim

    To evaluate the influence of technical factors on perfusion and to measure perfusion in burns 0–14 days post-burn and compare this with the outcome of the burn wound at 14 days after burn.

    Method

    The effect of room light, camera distance and camera angle was studied using a suspension of polystyrene particles. LSCI measurements were performed on 45 scald burns and 32 uninjured areas 0–14 days after burn.

    Result

    Technical factors had no clinically relevant effect on measured perfusion. Burns that healed within 14 days had a higher perfusion during the first week post-burn than burns that healed after 14 days or underwent surgery. The difference in perfusion was largest 4–7 days after burn.

    Conclusion

    LSCI allows for robust, instant measurement of burns and can easily be applied in a clinical setting. Differences in perfusion during the first week post-burn are related to the outcome after 14 days.

  • 44. Lindskog, M
    et al.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Karlström, G
    The Swedish Intensive Care Registry, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Nolin, T
    Mårdh, C
    The Swedish Intensive Care Registry, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, C
    Är svensk intensivvård könsjämlik?2012Report (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Lönnqvist, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Briheim, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Degradable gelatin microcarriers for cell delivery to cutaneous wounds and enhanced wound healing in JOURNAL OF TISSUE ENGINEERING AND REGENERATIVE MEDICINE, vol 6, issue SI, pp 94-942012In: JOURNAL OF TISSUE ENGINEERING AND REGENERATIVE MEDICINE, John Wiley and Sons , 2012, Vol. 6, no SI, p. 94-94Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 46.
    Mutalifu, Yalikun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Plastic surgery, Urumchi Friendship Hospital,Xinjiang, China.
    Holm, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ince, Can
    Erasmus Medical Center, Erasmus University of Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Multiple different laminar velocity profiles in separate veins in the microvascular network of brain cortex in rats2011In: International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, ISSN 1940-5901, E-ISSN 1940-5901, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 10-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The orthogonal polarisation spectral (OPS) imaging technique is a method that enables intravital microscopy of the tissue microvasculature particularly including the erythrocytes and leucocytes. As a new finding we here report multi flow, i.e, several different laminar velocity profiles in each and separate veins (diameters < 200 μm) of the microcirculation of the rat brain cortex. The phenomenon was present in all 20 preparations studied and these different laminar velocity profiles were regularly maintained in length beyond 20 times the diameter of parent vessel. In single veins up to 9 different laminar velocity profiles were discernible, each with a different red blood cell velocity. These multi flow profiles may theoretically be anticipated based on what is known in rheological physiology as the Fahreus - Lindqvist effect. It may also be predicted in tissues that have both high and heterogeneous blood flows in conjunction with large local variations in metabolic activity as are present in the cortex of the brain. The new information is that the extent and magnitude of this multi laminar flow phenomenon especially in the venular network of the brain exceeds what has previously been known. The physiological importance of these finding warrants further studies.

  • 47.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Grossmann, Benjamin
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Kullman, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Uustal, Eva
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Sedation during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: A randomised controlled study of patient-controlled propofol sedation and that given by a nurse anaesthetist2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 50, no 10, p. 1285-1292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Different regimens are used for sedation during ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography). Our objectives were to compare safety, ease of treatment, time to recovery and patients’ experiences using PCS (patient-controlled sedation) with propofol as well as sedation given by a nurse anaesthetist (ACS) with propofol or midazolam during ERCP.

    Material and methods: The study included 281 adults in 301 procedures. The PCS group (n=101) delivered bolus doses of 5 mg of propofol according to their need for sedation. The ACS group (n=100) had 2-8 mg/kg/hour of propofol infused, with the target for sedation being Level 3 of the Observer’s Assessment of Alertness/Sedation scale (OAA/S). The control group was given 2-3 mg of midazolam for induction and additional 1 mg if required.

    Results: PCS and ACS increased the ease of the procedure and reduced the numbers of sedation failures compared to midazolam sedation (ACS n=0; PCS n=4; midazolam n=20). The ACS group had more deeply sedated patients (OAA/S Level 2), desaturations and obstructed airways than the PCS and midazolam groups. Over 90% of all patients had recovered (Aldrete score≥9) by the time they returned to the ward. PCS resulted in the least fatigue and pain after the procedure. Patients’ preference for PCS and ACS were the same.

    Conclusion: PCS with propofol is superior to midazolam and comparable to ACS. PCS resulted in a rapid recovery, tended to be the safest and was almost as effective as ACS in ensuring a successful examination.

  • 48.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalman, Sigga
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Arvidsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Difficulties in Controlling Mobilization Pain Using a Standardized Patient-Controlled Analgesia Protocol in Burns2011In: JOURNAL OF BURN CARE and RESEARCH, ISSN 1559-047X, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 166-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate pain relief for patients with burns during rest and mobilization with morphine according to a standard protocol for patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Eighteen patients with a mean (SD) burned TBSA% of 26 (20) were studied for 10 days. Using a numeric rating scale (NRS, 0 = no pain and 10 = unbearable pain), patients were asked to estimate their acceptable and worst experienced pain by specifying a number on a scale and at what point they would like additional analgesics. Patients were allowed free access to morphine with a PCA pump device. Bolus doses were set according to age, (100 - age)/24 = bolus dose (mg), and 6 minutes lockout time. Degrees of pain, morphine requirements, doses delivered and demanded, oral intake of food, and antiemetics given were used as endpoints. Acceptable pain (mean [SD]) was estimated to be 3.8 (1.3) on the NRS, and additional treatment was considered necessary at scores of 4.3 (1.6) or more. NRS at rest was 2.7 (2.2) and during mobilization 4.7 (2.6). Required mean morphine per day was 81 (15) mg, and the number of doses requested increased during the first 6 days after the burn. The authors found no correlation between dose of morphine required and any other variables. Background pain can be controlled adequately with a standard PCA protocol. During mobilization, the pain experienced was too intense, despite having the already high doses of morphine increased. The present protocol must be refined further to provide analgesia adequate to cover mobilization as well.

  • 49.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Uustal, Eva
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Alfentanil and patient-controlled propofol sedation – facilitate gynaecological outpatient surgery with increased risk of respiratory events2012In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 56, no 9, p. 1123-1129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Widespread use of patient-controlled sedation (PCS) demands simplicity and a predictable outcome. We evaluated patients’ safety and ease of use of PCS for gynaecological outpatient procedures.

    Methods

    In a prospective double-blind study, 165 patients were randomized to use propofol or propofol with alfentanil as PCS combined with local anaesthetic for pain control. Data on cardiopulmonary function, consciousness, and need for interventions were collected at baseline and every fifth minute. The surgeons’ evaluation of the ease and the duration of the procedure were recorded.

    Results

    One hundred and fifty-five patients used PCS for the entire procedure, 76 patients propofol, and 79 patients propofol/alfentanil. Fifteen procedures in the propofol group were limited or could not be done, compared with four in the propofol/alfentanil group (P = 0.02). The duration of surgery was not affected. The addition of alfentanil affected respiratory function compared with the propofol group: five patients compared with none were manually ventilated (P = 0.03), and two thirds, compared with a quarter, were given supplementary oxygen as their saturation decreased below 90% (P <0.001). Overall cardiovascular stability was maintained. The propofol group had deeper conscious sedation as measured by the bispectral index (P  = 0.03), but all patients could be roused. In the propofol/alfentanil group, five patients became apnoeic and could not be roused.

    Conclusions

    PCS using propofol alone supports patients’ safety, as the addition of alfentanil increased the need for specific interventions to maintain respiratory stability. However, alfentanil increases the feasibility of the procedure, as complementary doses of propofol were not required.

  • 50.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Öster, Susanne
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Bek-Jensen, Hanne
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Lennmarken, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Patient-Controlled Sedation and Analgesia with Propofol and Alfentanil: A Preliminary Safety Evaluation Prior to Use of Non-Anaesthesiology Doctors2012In: Open Journal of Anesthesiology, ISSN 2164-5558, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 47-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim was to evaluate safety aspects of patient-controlled sedation and analgesia (PCS) for extracor-poreal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) and PCS to be handled by non-anaesthesiology doctors. Methods: Thirty-four ASA I-III patients used PCS with propofol and alfentanil for ESWL in this interventional study. Strict safety limits were defined regarding respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), oxygen saturation from pulse oximetry (SpO2), and transcutaneous partial pressures of oxygen (PtcO2) and carbon dioxide (PtcCO2). The pa-tients’ levels of consciousness was graded on a five-point scale and monitored with Bispectral Index (BIS). A nurse anaesthetist was supervising the procedure but was instructed to intervene only if safety limits were breached. No sup-plementary oxygen was given. Results: All patients responded to verbal stimuli during treatment. Cardiovascular sta-bility was maintained, but respiratory variables were affected. Two patients with SpO2 < 90% and two cases of RR ≤ 8 were diagnosed, and seven patients became hypercarbic (PtcCO2 ≥ 6.5 kPa). In 18 patients hypoxaemia was indicated as PtcO2 ≤ 8.0 kPa. All these 18 patients were given supplementary oxygen. There was no correlation between dose of drugs, age, weight or any vital variable. The 34 patients would use PCS again in the case of future treatment. Conclu-sions: During ESWL treatment PCS can be used with good patients’ satisfaction, and maintained cardiovascular stabil-ity, but PCS had an indisputable effect on pulmonary function with hypoxemia (resulting in need for supplementary oxygen) or hypercarbia. The person in charge of PCS must therefore be trained to perform according to the guidelines for sedation and/or analgesia by non-anaesthesiology doctors.

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