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  • 1.
    Anttila, Heidi
    et al.
    National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Injuries and Functional Capacity Unit, Assistive Technology, Helsinki, Finland.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Salminen, Anna-Liisa
    Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki, Finland.
    Brandt, Åse
    Danish Centre for Assistive Technology, Department of Research & Development, Århus, Denmark.
    Quality of evidence of assistive technology interventions for people with disability: An overview of systematic reviews2012In: Technology and Disability, ISSN 1055-4181, E-ISSN 1878-643X, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 9-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This overview summarizes the available evidence from systematic reviews of outcomes studies on various assistive technologies (AT) for persons with disabilities. Systematic reviews published between January 2000 and April 2010 were identified by comprehensive literature searches. Study selection, data extraction and methodological quality evaluation were done by two authors independently. The quality of evidence was summarized by explicit methods. Types of disabilities, settings, and AT interventions were recorded. Outcomes were mapped according to the Taxonomy of Assistive Technology Device Outcomes. Forty-four systematic reviews were included in this overview. High-quality evidence was found in single AT (positive effects of providing AT in connection with home assessment and hearing aids, no effects of hip protectors) for limited populations (older people at home, people with hearing loss, and older people in institutional care, respectively). Low-quality or unclear evidence was found for the effectiveness of the other evaluated AT interventions. Current gaps in AT outcomes research were identified. Many frequently used devices have not been systematically reviewed. Well-designed outcomes research to inform clinical decision-making is urgently needed. The systematic review methodology seems to be feasible for summarising AT outcomes research, but methodological development for grading and for primary studies is warranted.

  • 2.
    Gunnarsson, Stina
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patient experiences with intrathecal baclofen as a treatment for spatsticity - a pilot study2015In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 10, p. 834-841Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study describes how patients experience intrathecal baclofen (ITB) treatment. Methods: Data were collected from interviews with 14 patients (19–76 years old) who were diagnosed with spinal cord injury (SCI), multiple sclerosis (MS), or cerebral palsy (CP). Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Result: The analysis resulted in 16 subcategories arranged into five main categories: procedures before treatment, the effect of ITB on daily life and activities, continuous follow-up, expected and unexpected consequences of ITB, and overall level of satisfaction with ITB. Together these categories described the patients' experiences with ITB treatment. When the patients were asked whether they would undergo ITB again, they all stated that they would. Conclusion: Patients stated that they were highly satisfied with the ITB treatment. However, the patients identified several areas that could be improved. Specifically, the patients wanted more information about the different steps in the treatment process and what to expect from ITB treatment.Implications for Rehabilitation

    • An overall satisfaction with the effect from ITB treatment was shown, but some areas still need to be improved.

    • Complications following ITB treatment still remain a major concern for the patient group.

    • Future clinical practice, should address how to take into account patients' expectations and define relevant goals with respect to ITB treatment as well as how to supply professional information.

  • 3.
    Ivarsson, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Blom, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Enderby, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nordberg, Rebecca
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Guided internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder: A randomized controlled trial2014In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 33-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effects of guided internet-based cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Sixty-two participants with chronic PTSD, as assessed by the Clinician-administered PTSD Scale, were recruited via nationwide advertising and randomized to either treatment (n= 31) or delayed treatment attention control (n= 31). The ICBT treatment consisted of 8 weekly text-based modules containing psychoeducation, breathing retraining, imaginal and in vivo exposure, cognitive restructuring, and relapse prevention. Therapist support and feedback on homework assignment were given weekly via an online contact handling system. Assessments were made at baseline, post-treatment, and at 1-year follow-up. Main outcome measures were the Impact of Events Scale - Revised (IES-R) and the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale (PDS). Results showed significant reductions of PTSD symptoms (between group effect on the IES-R Cohens d= 1.25, and d= 1.24 for the PDS) compared to the control group. There were also effects on depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and quality of life. The results at one-year follow-up showed that treatment gains were maintained. In sum, these results suggest that ICBT with therapist support can reduce PTSD symptoms significantly. © 2014 The Authors.

  • 4. Lilliecreutz Huitema, Eva
    et al.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    Lifestyle changes with help from Health Profile Assessment in combination with support in individual interventions for persons with aquired brain injury - a pilot study2014In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 151-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about how to support a lifestyle change for persons with acquired brain injury (ABI), who have poor health compared with the rest of the population. This study investigates whether the Health Profile Assessment (HPA) combined with individual support in individually adjusted interventions could affect the lifestyle of persons with ABI. This longitudinal prospective and quasi-experimental study has a before and after design. HPA aims to improve health habits, perceived health and physiological measurements. In addition, this study includes interventions based on individual goals and actions decided on by the participants. The intervention process was supported through various communication methods such as Motivational Interviewing (MI) and Transactional Analyses (TA). The studied group (n = 25) included persons with cognitive impairments due to ABI who were considered for outpatient rehabilitation at a specialized facility at a university hospital in south-eastern Sweden. Results at follow-up showed significant improvements in physical activity, perceived health and diet. Significant improvements were also shown in sagittal abdominal diameter, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI) and physical fitness. Consequently, this study describes a method that successfully supported lifestyle changes in persons with ABI.Read

  • 5.
    Lundqvist, Anna
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Grundström, Kerstin
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Computerized training of working memory in a group of patients suffering from acquired brain injury2012In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 26, no 4-5, p. 423-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Study short- and long-term transfer effects of a computerized working memory (WM) training program for patients suffering from working memory deficits after acquired brain injury.

    Methods: (Research design: A controlled experimental study with a crossover design.) The study group included a consecutive sample of 21 subjects. Mean age 43.2 years, time since injury/illness onset 37 months (median). The subjects were randomly selected into two groups where one group served as controls. All subjects trained five days a week for five weeks in a computer WM task program. They were followed-up at four and 20 weeks after the training.

    Results: The study results showed a significant improvement in the trained WM tasks (p < 0.001), significant improvements in neuropsychological WM-test results at four and twenty weeks after training compared to baseline (p< 0.05). Results also showed a significant improvement in the subjects' rated level of occupational performance and satisfaction with performance in individually pre-defined occupational problems (p<0.05 for occupational performance versus p < 0.001 for satisfaction with performance) . Rated health-related quality of life did not change. However, rated overall health had significantly increased twenty weeks after training (p<0.05).

    Conclusions: Structured and intense computerized WM training improves subjects' cognitive functioning as measured by neuropsychological WM-demanding tests, rated occupational performance, satisfaction with performance and rated overall health. The training probably has an impact on the rehabilitation outcome, returning to work, as well as on daily activities for individuals with verified WM impairments. We propose further research with a larger study group, including subgroups with different diagnoses, to confirm our current findings and select for whom this cognitive rehabilitation programme is most suitable.

     

  • 6.
    Lundqvist, Anna
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Return to work after acquired brain injury: A patient perspective2012In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 26, no 13-14, p. 1574-1585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Primary objective: To study significant factors supporting vocational rehabilitation after acquired brain injury from a patient perspective. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: Two focus group interviews were accomplished with former patients. One focus group interview with professional rehabilitation personnel was performed to review the correspondence between patients and professionals opinion. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSubjects: Fourteen informants with acquired brain injury (ABI) were interviewed. All were working at the time of the focus group interviews. Three occupational therapists and two psychologists participated in the professional group. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Two themes were identified as significant for returning to work: Personal and Society factors. Identified meaningful units could be categorized into sub-categories, which were grouped into six main-and 14 sub-categories. The main categories were: Self-continuity, Coping, Social factors, Rehabilitation intervention, Professionalism and Health insurance. Length of treatment time was described as crucial for the rehabilitation process and for utilizing individual resources. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: The effects of various synergies and processes form the basis for a successful return to work, which are dependent on, influence and reinforce each other. Society factors support personal factors to be used for returning to work after acquired brain injury. The impact of individual resources and rehabilitation highlights that vocational rehabilitation is inseparable from the individuals capacity, society and the context in which the individual lives.

  • 7.
    McAllister, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Aanstoot, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundeborg Hammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johannesson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Berglind, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Learning in the tutorial group: A balance between individual freedom and institutional control2014In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 28, no 1-2, p. 47-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study investigates factors in problem-based learning tutorial groups which promote or inhibit learning. The informants were tutors and students from speech-language pathology and physiotherapy programmes. Semi-structured focus-group interviews and individual interviews were used. Results revealed three themes: Responsibility, Time and Support. Under responsibility, the delicate balance between individual and institutional responsibility and control was shown. Time included short and long-term perspectives on learning. Under support, supporting documents, activities and personnel resources were mentioned. In summary, an increased control by the program and tutors decreases students motivation to assume responsibility for learning. Support in tutorial groups needs to adapt to student progression and to be well aligned to tutorial work to have the intended effect. A lifelong learning perspective may help students develop a meta-awareness regarding learning that could make tutorial work more meaningful.

  • 8.
    McAllister, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Ferreira, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    LundeborgHammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johannesson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Berglind, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Learning in the tutorial group – a challenge between freedom and control2011In: The Third International Conference on Problem Based Learning in Speech Language Pathology and Audiology / [ed] Tara Whitehill & Susan Bridges, Hong Kong: University of Hong Kong , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In order to improve and clarify the demands within tutorial groups in the speech and language pathology (SLP) and physiotherapy (PT) programs a joint study was conducted exploring problem areas in the tutorial groups.

    The aim was to investigate and further develop the requirements for a passing grade in the tutorial group. A long term goal was that the results could form a base for future changes regarding instructions and requirements in tutorial groups.

    Methodology:  Focus-group interviews were used to collect data. Three different groups were interviewed, two consisting of tutors from the SLP and PT programs and one consisting of last year student tutors from the SLP-program.  This data was also augmented by individual interviews of four SLP-students and five PT-students on different levels in the education.  A semi structured interview guide was used.  The interviews were analyzed using content analyses.

    Results: The analyses revealed three important themes for work in tutorial groups: Responsibility, Time and Support. Within these themes, several categories were also identified. Responsibility: Within this theme the main category was the importance of balance between individual and institutional responsibility. The students, the tutorial group, the tutor and the program all need to assume their part of the responsibility in order to clarify requirements. Time: Here different aspects of time management and work in the tutorial group were identified. These categories also related to aspects of support and continuous or lifelong learning. Support: Within this theme different support functions were identified such as documents, activities and personnel resources in the tutorial groups.  No suggestions were made in the interviews regarding the requirements for a passing grade in the tutorial groups. 

    Discussion/Conclusion: The main finding was the delicate balance between institutional control and the students own responsibility for the work within the tutorial groups.  An increased control decreases the students’ motivation to assume responsibility for their own learning. Also, study programs should adapt requirements in tutorial groups depending on years in the education.  Different support functions need to be closely coupled to tutorial work in order to have the intended effect.   

  • 9.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Carlberg, Ulla
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hesselstrand, Malin
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ölander, Elisabet
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Patient-Reported Outcome of a Multidisciplinary Pain Management Program, Focusing on Occupational Performance and Satisfaction with Performance2011In: The Open Rehabilitation Journal, ISSN 1874-9437, E-ISSN 1874-9437, Vol. 4, p. 42-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim was to describe the effect of a multidisciplinary pain management program, in terms of patientreported occupational performance and satisfaction with performance.

    Methods: The study is a retrospective, case series study. Data from interviews documented routinely in patient medical records were used. Interviews were made at introduction, on conclusion and six months after a pain management program. Data from all participants (n=85) introduced during one year, were analysed. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) was used as the main outcome measure.

    Results: Estimated occupational performance as well as satisfaction with performance improved between measures (occupational performance p<0.001; satisfaction with performance p<0.001). The percentage of participants, who improved two or more points on the COPM ten-point scale between baseline and the 6-month follow up, was 27% for occupational performance and 40% for satisfaction with performance.

    Conclusion: The findings raise questions regarding what the team might learn from different ways of scrutinizing results; the relevant level of MID in this program; and the overall objective in terms of the proportion of clients who reported a ‘successful’ outcome in occupational performance and satisfaction with performance, based on the identified MID. These questions need to be further analysed and discussed within the professional team.

  • 10.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Toytari, Outi
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland .
    Salminen, Anna-Liisa
    Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki, Finland .
    Brandt, Ase
    Danish Centre for Assistive Technology, Aarhus C, Denmark .
    Effects of lower limb prosthesis on activity, participation, and quality of life: a systematic review2012In: Prosthetics and orthotics international, ISSN 0309-3646, E-ISSN 1746-1553, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 145-158Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Effects presented on the use of assistive devices such as prosthesis are often based on laboratory findings (i.e. efficacy). Objectives: To summarise and evaluate findings from studies on effectiveness of lower limb prostheses for adults in real life contexts, primarily in terms of activity, participation, and quality of life (QoL) and secondarily in terms of user satisfaction, use/non-use, and/or cost-effectiveness. Study Design: Systematic review. Methods: We included controlled studies and non-controlled follow-up studies including both baseline and follow-up data. Using 14 different databases supplemented with manual searches, we searched for studies published from 1998 until June 2009. Results: Out of an initial 818 identified publications, eight met the inclusion criteria. Four studies reported on the effectiveness of a microprocessor-controlled knee (MP-knee) compared to a non-microprocessor-controlled knee (NMP-knee). Results were inconsistent except for quality of life and use/non-use, where the authors reported an improvement with the MP-knee compared to the NMP-knee. The remaining four studies included a diversity of prosthetic intervention measures and types of endpoints. Conclusions: Overall, there was an inconsistency in results and study quality. This review highlights the need for high-quality research studies that reflect the effectiveness of different prosthesis interventions in terms of users daily living and QoL.

  • 11.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Tropp, Maria
    Lundqvist, Anna
    Vocational rehabilitation after aquired brain injury: a pilot study on benefits and costs.2014In: Open journal of therapy and rehabilitation, no 2, p. 133-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To examine the benefits from a vocational rehabilitation program for patients suffering from Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) in terms of quality of life, and overall health. In addition, to examine the direct societal costs of healthcare interventions related to vocational rehabilitation and indirect societal costs related to production loss. Method: Identified interventions in 45 patients with ABI who were discharged from a vocational rehabilitation program between 2010 and 2011 were documented, classified and translated into costs. Expenses associated with production loss were calculated by comparing sick leave production loss at first contact with the team, with sick leave production loss at discharge. Health related QoL and overall health, was measured at first contact and at discharge by using the EQ5D. Results: For vocational rehabilitation interventions, mean costs were €6303/individual/month. At first contact with the team, mean production loss was estimated to be €4409/individual/month compared; at discharge to be €2446. QoL-ratings increased from first contact to discharge, although estimated health did not change. At discharge, significant correlations were found between QoL ratings and estimated health and the extent of production loss (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Healthcare interventions that help ABI patients resume work are cost effective for society as well as for patients.

  • 12.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Powered wheelchairs and scooters for outdoor mobility: a pilot study on costs and benefits2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 330-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study evaluates the effect of electric powered wheelchairs/scooters (PWC/S) on occupational performance, social participation, health, and life satisfaction. In addition, this study estimates the costs and benefits of PWC/S and describes users’ experiences with the delivery process.

    Methods: This prospective study has a before-and-after design. Postal questionnaires were sent to 24 first-time PWC/S users before delivery of the PWC/S and four months after delivery. The participants used their PWC/S for outdoor mobility.

    Results: PWC/S improved the users’ daily lives, their ability to engage in mobility-related activities, and their social participation. For a majority of the users, estimated independence, feelings of safety, and self-esteem increased although overall health and life satisfaction were not significantly affected. All users thought that the therapist had considered their needs during the providing process. Most participants (73%) were satisfied with their device at follow-up. For the 12 users who reported no change in health status between measures, the mean societal savings based on calculated costs for assistance was € 6 227 per person per year.

    Conclusions: PWC/S seems to improve occupational performance, social participation, and life satisfaction for users. Moreover, these improvements seem to have an economic advantage for both users and society.

  • 13.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Turning evidence into practice: Barriers to research use among occupational therapists2015In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 175-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Research has demonstrated that occupational therapists generally have a positive attitude regarding the use of evidence in their daily practice and decision-making. In addition, occupational therapists are expected to implement evidencebased practice, which is often understood as equivalent to research. However, evidence-based practice might be difficult to reconcile with occupational therapy from a client-centred focus. This study examines what occupational therapists perceive as barriers to research use and discusses the challenge of clinical implementation.

    Method: This study uses a descriptive cross-sectional design. The Barriers to Research Utilization Scale questionnaire was mailed to 807 randomly selected Swedish occupational therapists. The response rate was 59%.

    Findings: The occupational therapists identified three main barriers to the use of research: insufficient facilities (82%); lack of time to read research (77%); difficulty understanding statistical analyses (75%). Degree of education was shown to affect results; occupational therapists with higher education levels indicated a higher use of research.

    Conclusion: Implementing research in clinical practice is a challenge. Occupational therapists are interested but they lack the optimal prerequisites and time.

  • 14.
    Ward, Anthony B.
    et al.
    Haywood Hospital, Burslem, Stoke on Trent, UK.
    Wissel, Jörg
    Vivantes Klinikum Spandau, Berlin, Germany.
    Borg, Jörgen
    Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Ertzgaard, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Herrmann, Christoph
    Asklepios Clinics Schildautal, Seesen, Germany.
    Kulkarni, Jai
    Manchester Royal Infirmary, UK.
    Lindgren, Kristina
    Central Hospital, Karlstad, Sweden .
    Reuter, Iris
    Justus-Liebig University, Giessen, Germany.
    Sakel, Mohamed
    Kent and Canterbury Hospital, UK.
    Säterö, Patrik
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Sharma, Satyendra
    Sunnybrook Health Science Centre,Toronto, Canada .
    Wein, Theodore
    Montreal General Hospital, Canada .
    Wright, Nicola
    Allergan Ltd, Marlow International, Buckinghamshire, UK.
    Fulford-Smith, Antony
    Allergan Ltd, Marlow International, Buckinghamshire, UK.
    Functional goal achievement in post-stroke spasticity patients: The BOTOX® Economic Spasticity Trial (BEST)2014In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 504-513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    Evaluate changes in active and passive function with onabotulinumtoxinA + standard of care within goal-oriented rehabilitation programmes in adults with focal post-stroke spasticity.

    METHODS:

    Prospective, 24-week double-blind study with an open-label extension. Subjects were randomized to onabotulinumtoxinA + standard of care or placebo + standard of care, at baseline and at 12 weeks, if judged appropriate, with follow-up to 52 weeks. The primary endpoint was the number of patients achieving their principal active functional goal at 24 weeks (or 10 weeks after an optional second injection). Secondary endpoints included achievement of a different active or a passive goal at this timepoint.

    RESULTS:

    The intent-to-treat population comprised 273 patients. The proportion of patients achieving their principal active functional goal and secondary active functional goal with onabotulinumtoxinA + standard of care was not statistically different from placebo + standard of care. Significantly more patients achieved their secondary passive goal with onabotulinumtoxinA + standard of care (60.0%) vs. placebo + standard of care (38.6%) (odds ratio, 2.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-5.14) as well as higher Goal Attainment Scaling levels for upper limb and ankle flexor subgroups.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Addition of onabotulinumtoxinA to standard of care as part of goal-oriented rehabilitation in post-stroke spasticity patients significantly increased passive goal achievement and was associated with higher levels of active function.

  • 15.
    Wissel, J
    et al.
    Kliniken Beelitz.
    Ward, A B
    Haywood Hospital.
    Borg, J
    Danderyd Hospital.
    Reuter, I
    University of Giessen.
    Kulkarni, J
    Withington Hospital.
    Ertzgaard, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Sharma, S
    Sunnybrook Health Science Centre.
    Sakel, M
    E Kent University.
    Wright, N
    Allergan Ltd.
    GOAL SETTING PERTAINING TO UPPER LIMB FUNCTION IN POST-STROKE SPASTICITY (PSS) PATIENTS: THE BOTOX (R) ECONOMIC SPASTICITY TRIAL (BEST) in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY, vol 18, issue SI, pp 445-4452011In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY, Wiley-Blackwell , 2011, Vol. 18, no SI, p. 445-445Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 16.
    Wressle, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    High job demands and lack of time: A future challenge in occupational therapy2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 421-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to identify work-related stress factors that contributed to work-related stress among Swedish occupational therapists and to investigate the association between work-related stress, demographic factors and perceived overall stress. Methods: A postal questionnaire and a letter of invitation were sent to 807 Swedish occupational therapists, selected at random and representing 10% of occupational therapists working in Sweden. The response rate was 59%. A stress index presenting 49 stress factors graded on a scale from 1 (indicating no source of stress) to 6 (definitely a source of stress) was included. In addition, the level of perceived overall stress during the last 2 weeks was scored on a rating scale with the end points 0 (no stress) and 10 (extreme stress). Results: The main findings indicated that lack of resources and lack of time were the main stressors. “Working at a superficial level due to lack of time” was the only variable associated with high overall stress when both work-related and personal factors were included. Professional identity and clarity about the role were graded low with regard to stress. Conclusions: Work-related stress is just one aspect of the overall stress experienced but knowledge about its consequences highlights the importance of further studies.

  • 17.
    Wressle, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The self-reported use of research in clinical practice: A survey of occupational therapists in Sweden2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 226-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Today, healthcare providers and occupational therapists are increasingly required to rely on evidence-based practices. In both out-patient and in-patient settings, the use of research-based practices can be identified using the questionnaire Research Utilization Measure. Aim: This study explores how occupational therapists in Sweden perceive research utilization. Method: The Research Utilization measure was sent to 807 randomly selected occupational therapists in Sweden, and the response rate was 59% (n=472). Results: The majority of respondents (56%, n=256) reported use of research-based knowledge in their practice “very or rather often”, although 49% (n=225) of these therapists noted that they “very seldom or never” discussed research findings with their managers. Differences in answers for most items were related to degree of education and length of experience. Occupational therapists with higher education levels more often reported use of research in their clinical practice and therapists with greater experience less often reported use of research in their clinical practice. Conclusion: Education seems to influence the degree to which occupational therapists rely on research to inform their practices. A future challenge for managers and occupational therapists is to create strategic discussions on how to implement treatment that is based on current research.

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