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  • 1. Ahlgren Andersson, E
    et al.
    Almerud Österberg, S
    Elneborg, K
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Johansson, E
    Minthon, L
    Pettersson, M
    Thulesius, H
    Wohlin, S
    Åberg, B
    Östberg, H
    Låg kognitiv hastighet före operation hade samband med postoperativ förvirring efter elektiv hjärtkirurgi2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Ansell, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jedlinski, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Epidermal growth factor is a biomarker for poor cetuximab response in tongue cancer cells2016In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 9-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target for treatment in tongue cancer. Here, EGFR ligands were evaluated for their potential uses as predictive biomarkers of cetuximab treatment response.

    Methods: In three tongue cancer cell lines the influences of epidermal growth factor (EGF), amphiregulin (AR), and epiregulin (EPR) on tumour cell proliferation and cetuximab response were evaluated by the addition of recombinant human (rh) proteins or the siRNA-mediated downregulation of endogenous ligand production.

    Results: EGF or AR downregulation suppressed the proliferation of all investigated cell lines. Furthermore, all cell lines displayed increased cetuximab resistance upon the addition of rhEGF, whereas EGF silencing resulted in an improved cetuximab response in one cell line.

    Conclusions: Our data suggest that EGF and AR are critical components of the EGFR signalling network required for full proliferative potential. Moreover, EGF is a potential predictive biomarker of poor cetuximab response and a possible treatment target.

  • 3.
    Ansell, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kankainen, M.
    Institute of Biomedicine, Medical Biochemistry and Developmental Biology, Genome-Scale Biology, Research Program, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Jönsson, Jan-Ingvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Monni, O.
    Institute of Biomedicine, Medical Biochemistry and Developmental Biology, Genome-Scale Biology, Research Program, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Molecular cross-talk between head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are one of the main components of the tumor stroma and are known to increase tumor growth and stimulate  invasion and metastasis. Increasing evidence suggests that CAFs may also be an important determinant of the response to various treatments. In this study we aimed to characterize the molecular cross-talk between CAFs and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells.

    HNSCC cell lines were co-cultured with their patient-matched CAFs for seven days, after which the gene expression of tumor cells was investigated by Affymetrix microarray. 58 protein coding genes were found to be differentially expressed (Q≤0.05) in tumor cells cocultured with CAFs when compared to tumor cells cultured alone. The top functions of these genes were cancer, cellular movement, and embryonic development as analyzed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Nine genes were upregulated by ≥1.5-fold while the expression of 35 genes was found to be reduced by ≤ 0.67-fold. Several of the differentially expressed genes have been associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The change in the expression of POSTN, GREM1, COL1A2, VIM, and MMP7 was verified by qPCR analysis. Moreover, the influence of CAFs on the proliferation, migration and cetuximab sensitivity of tumor cells was investigated, and was found to vary among the tumor cell-CAF pairs.

    In conclusion, we demonstrate that CAF-derived signals cause changes in the expression of multiple genes, several of which are associated with an EMT phenotype of tumor cells. Furthermore, CAFs modulate the proliferation, migration and cetuximab treatment response of tumor cells.

  • 4.
    Asp, Filip
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hergils, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Eskilsson, Gunnar
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bilateral versus unilateral cochlear implants in children: Speech recognition, sound localization, and parental reports2012In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 817-832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare bilateral and unilateral speech recognition in quiet and in multi-source noise, and horizontal sound localization of low and high frequency sounds in children with bilateral cochlear implants. Design: Bilateral performance was compared to performance of the implanted side with the best monaural speech recognition in quiet result. Parental reports were collected in a questionnaire. Results from the CI children were compared to binaural and monaural performance of normal-hearing peers. Study sample: Sixty-four children aged 5.1-11.9 years who were daily users of bilateral cochlear implants. Thirty normal-hearing children aged 4.8-9.0 years were recruited as controls. Results and Conclusions : Group data showed a statistically significant bilateral speech recognition and sound localization benefit, both behaviorally and in parental reports. The bilateral speech recognition benefit was smaller in quiet than in noise. The majority of subjects localized high and low frequency sounds significantly better than chance using bilateral implants, while localization accuracy was close to chance using unilateral implants. Binaural normal-hearing performance was better than bilateral performance in implanted children across tests, while bilaterally implanted children showed better localization than normal-hearing children under acute monaural conditions.

  • 5.
    Bergendal, Birgitta
    et al.
    Institute Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden.
    Bakke, Merete
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sjogreen, Lotta
    National Orofacial Resource Centre Rare Disease, Sweden.
    Asten, Pamela
    Lovisenberg Diakonale Hospital, Norway.
    Profiles of orofacial dysfunction in different diagnostic groups using the Nordic Orofacial Test (NOT-S)-A review2014In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 72, no 8, p. 578-584Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening (NOT-S) was developed as a comprehensive method to assess orofacial function. Results from the screening protocol have been presented in 11 international publications to date. This study reviewed these publications in order to compile NOT-S screening data and create profiles of orofacial dysfunction that characterize various age groups and disorders. Materials and methods. NOT-S results of nine reports meeting the inclusion criteria were reviewed. Seven of these studies not only provided data on the mean and range of total NOT-S scores, but also on the most common domains of orofacial dysfunction (highest rate of individuals with dysfunction scores), allowing the construction of orofacial dysfunction profiles based on the prevalence of dysfunction in each domain of NOT-S. Results. The compiled data comprised 669 individuals, which included healthy control subjects (n = 333) and various patient groups (n = 336). All studies reported differences between individuals with diagnosed disorders and healthy control subjects. The NOT-S data could measure treatment effects and provided dysfunction profiles characterizing the patterns of orofacial dysfunction in various diagnoses. Conclusions. This review corroborates previous results that the NOT-S differentiates well between patients and healthy controls and can also show changes in individuals after treatment. NOT-S could be used as a standard instrument to assess orofacial dysfunction, evaluate the outcomes of oral habilitation and rehabilitation and improve comparability in clinical practice and research.

  • 6.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    McMahon, Catherine M.
    Macquarie University, Sydney.
    Dowell, Richard C.
    University of Melbourne.
    Choice of Ear for Cochlear Implantation in Adults With Monaural Sound-Deprivation and Unilateral Hearing Aid2012In: Otology and Neurotology, ISSN 1531-7129, E-ISSN 1537-4505, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 572-579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To identify whether speech recognition outcomes are influenced by the choice of ear for cochlear implantation in adults with bilateral hearing loss who use a hearing aid in 1 ear but have long-term auditory deprivation in the other. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanStudy Design: Retrospective matched cohort study. Speech recognition results were examined in 30 adults with monaural sound deprivation. Fifteen received the implant in the sound-deprived ear and 15 in the aided ear. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSetting: Tertiary referral centers with active cochlear implant programs. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanPatients: Adults with bilateral hearing loss and a minimum of 15 years of monaural sound deprivation who received a cochlear implant after meeting the traditional implantation criteria of the referral centers. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanIntervention: Cochlear implantation with devices approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMain Outcome Measure(s): Paired comparisons of postoperative monosyllabic word recognition scores obtained with the implant alone and in the usual listening condition (CI alone or bimodal). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: With the cochlear implant alone, individuals who received the implant in a sound-deprived ear obtained poorer scores than individuals who received the implant in the aided ear. There was no significant difference, however, in speech recognition results for the 2 groups when tested in their usual listening condition. In particular, poorer speech recognition scores were obtained with the cochlear implant alone by individuals using bimodal hearing. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Similar clinical outcomes of cochlear implantation can be achieved by adults with a long-term monaural sound deprivation when comparing the usual listening condition, irrespective of whether the implant is in the sound-deprived or in the aided ear.

  • 7.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    McMahon, Catherine M
    Macquarie University.
    Tremblay, Genevieve
    Institute Readaptat Deficience Phys Quebec.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Relative Importance of Monaural Sound Deprivation and Bilateral Significant Hearing Loss in Predicting Cochlear Implantation Outcomes2011In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 758-766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Making evidence-based recommendations to prospective unilateral cochlear implant recipients on the potential benefits of implanting one or the other ear is challenging for cochlear implant teams. This particularly occurs in cases where a hearing aid has only been used in one ear for many years (referred to here as the "hearing ear"), and the contralateral ear has, in essence, been sound-deprived. In such cases, research to date is inconclusive, and little anecdotal evidence exists to inform the debate and support best clinical practice. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign: Retrospective data on speech recognition outcomes of 16 adult participants who received a cochlear implant in an ear deprived of sound for a minimum of 15 yr were analyzed. All subjects were implanted through the Quebec Cochlear Implant Program and were provided with personalized intensive rehabilitation services. Data obtained from clinical records included demographic data and speech recognition scores measured after implantation with the sentences of a multimedia auditory test battery in the auditory-only condition. Speech recognition outcomes were compared with the duration of auditory deprivation in the implanted ear, bilateral significant hearing loss, and auditory stimulation before bilateral significant hearing loss. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Using nonparametric correlation analyses, a strong negative correlation was demonstrated between speech recognition scores and the duration of bilateral significant hearing loss and with the duration of auditory stimulation before bilateral significant hearing loss. No significant correlation with the duration of auditory deprivation or with the duration of prior auditory stimulation in the implanted ear was found. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: These findings suggest that functional outcomes of cochlear implantation for unilateral sound deprivation may be more strongly influenced by central processes than peripheral effects stemming from the deprivation per se. This indicates the relevance of considering the clients history of binaural hearing rather than the hearing in each ear individually when discussing possible outcomes with a cochlear implant.

  • 8.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Macquarie University, Australia, HEARing CRC, Australia.
    McMahon, Chaterine M
    Maquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Dowell, Richard
    Melbourne University, Australia.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Psarros, Colleen
    Sydney Area, Australia.
    Tremblay, Genevieve
    Institute Readaptation Deficience Phys Quebec, Canada.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    How the non-implanted ear influences outcomes of cochlear implantation2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Macquarie University, Australia, HEARing CRC, Australia.
    McMahon, Chaterine M
    Maquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Dowell, Richard
    Melbourne University, Australia.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Psarros, Colleen
    Sydney Area, Australia.
    Tremblay, Genevieve
    Institute Readaptat Deficience Phys Quebec, Canada.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Contribution of the non-implanted ear to Cochlear implantation Outcomes2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Macquarie University, Australia, HEARing CRC, Australia.
    McMahon, Chaterine M
    Maquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Tremblay, Genevieve
    Institute Readaptat Deficience Phys Quebec, Canada.
    Psarros, Colleen
    Sydney Area, Australia.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Multicenter Study of Cochlear Implantation Outcomes in Individuals with a Long Term Unilateral Sound Deprivation2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Brännström, Jonas
    et al.
    Clinical Sciences Lund, Sweden.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ingo, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Månsson, Kristoffer N T
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    The initial evaluation of an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clientsThe process of developing an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clients2016In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 82-91Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Ceder, Rebecca
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Haig, Ylva
    Karolinska Institute.
    Merne, Marina
    Karolinska Institute.
    Hansson, Annette
    Karolinska Institute.
    Zheng, Xi
    Karolinska Institute.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Nees, Matthias
    VTT Technical Research Centre Finland.
    Iljin, Kristiina
    VTT Technical Research Centre Finland.
    Bloor, Balvinder K
    Kings College London.
    Morgan, Peter R
    Kings College London.
    Fadeel, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute.
    Grafstrom, Roland C
    Karolinska Institute.
    Differentiation-Promoting Culture of Competent and Noncompetent Keratinocytes Identifies Biomarkers for Head and Neck Cancer2012In: American Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0002-9440, E-ISSN 1525-2191, Vol. 180, no 2, p. 457-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aberrant contact-inhibited proliferation and differentiation induction couple with tumor severity, albeit with an imprecise association with prognosis. Assessment of contact inhibition and differentiation-promoting culture in this study of normal and immortalized oral keratinocytes (NOK and SVpgC2a, respectively) demonstrated elevated cloning ability and saturation density in the immortalized versus normal state, including consistent absence of differentiated morphological features. Transcriptomic analysis implicated 48 gene ontology categories, 8 molecular networks, and 10 key regulator genes in confluency-induced differentiation of NOK, all of which remained nonregulated in SVpgC2a. The SVpgC2a versus NOK transcriptome enriched 52 gene ontology categories altogether, 18 molecular networks, and 39 key regulator genes, several of which were associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Assessment of the previously described gene sets relative to training data sets of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma samples, one including data on tumor differentiation and patient outcome and one present in the Human Gene Expression Map, identified four genes with association to poor survival (COX7A1, MFAP5, MPDU1, and POLD1). This gene set predicted poor outcome in an independent data set of 71 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. The present study defines, for the first time to our knowledge, the broad gene spectrum that couples to induction, and loss, of oral keratinocyte differentiation. Bioinformatics assessments of the results relative to clinical data generated novel differentiation-related tumor biomarkers relevant to patient outcome.

  • 13.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ng, Hoi Ning Elaine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kilman, Lisa
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Reading span performance in 339 Swedish 50-89 year old individuals with hearing impairment: Effects of test version and age, and relation to speech recognition in noise2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish reading span test (Rönnberg, Lyxell, Arlinger, & Kinnefors, 1989) is often used to assess working memory capacity (WMC) in the field of cognitive hearing science. The test has proven useful as a predictor of speech recognition in noise in adverse conditions. It has been used in a wide range of experimental studies and has been translated to several languages. The purpose of this paper was to provide reference data for the Swedish reading span test (Rönnberg et al., 1989) in a large sample of adults with hearing impairment aged 50-89 years that are representative of patients seeking rehabilitation at audiological clinics. Data from finished and ongoing projects were collated and reanalyzed for this purpose. The original full version and a shortened version of the test were compared, in terms of percentage correct. In addition, performance on the full version was compared across two different age-cohorts, 50-69 year olds and 70-89 year olds. Frequency distributions and percentile scores are reported, as well as relations with demographic variables, and speech recognition in noise. Results showed that reading span performance was related to age, but not sex, with lower scores in older participants. Pure tone hearing thresholds accounted for a small but significant amount of the variance such that higher reading span scores were related to better hearing. The frequency distributions of scores did not differ across the two versions of the test, but the long version seemed to be more sensitive to age. Performance in both versions was significantly correlated with speech recognition in noise. Regression analyses however showed that reading span explained additional variance in speech in noise recognition, after the effects of age and pure tone hearing thresholds were accounted for, only in the 50-69 year olds. These findings are discussed in relation to  age-related differences in the ability to recruit cognitive resources in the service of speech communication.

  • 14.
    Edfeldt, Lennart
    et al.
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Stromback, Karin
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Grendin, Joakim
    Umeå University Hospital, Sweden .
    Bunne, Marie
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway .
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Peebo, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Eeg-Olofsson, Mans
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Petersson, Carl-Magnus
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Konradsson, Konrad
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Evaluation of cost-utility in middle ear implantation in the Nordic School: a multicenter study in Sweden and Norway2014In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 134, no 1, p. 19-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conclusion: Hearing restoration using an active middle ear implant (AMEI) is a highly cost-effective treatment for a selected group of patients with no other possibilities for auditory rehabilitation. Objectives: To evaluate the cost-utility of using an AMEI for hearing rehabilitation. Methods: This was a prospective, multicenter, single-subject repeated study in six tertiary referral centers. Twenty-four patients with sensorineural (SNHL), conductive (CHL), and mixed hearing loss (MHL) were implanted with the AMEI Vibrant Soundbridge (R) (VSB) for medical reasons. All patients were previously rehabilitated with conventional hearing aids. Multiple validated quality of life patient questionnaires, Health Utilities Index (HUI 2 and 3), and Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile (GHABP) were used to determine the utility gain and quality adjusted life years (QALY). Directly related treatment costs for the implantation were calculated and related to utility gain and QALY. Results: The cost/QALY for patients with SNHL was estimated at (sic)7260/QALY, and for patients with C/MHL at (sic)12 503/QALY.

  • 15.
    Eklund, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Fanny, Pehrson
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience.
    An acoustic comparison of voice characteristics in ‘kulning’, head and modal registers.2013In: Robert Eklund (ed.), Proceedings of Fonetik 2013, the XXVIth Swedish Phonetics Conference, Studies in Language and Culture, no. 21, ISBN 978-91-7519-582-7, eISBN 978-91-7519-579-7, ISSN 1403-2570, pp. 21–24. / [ed] Robert Eklund, 2013, p. 21-24Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish folk singing style ‘kulning’ issurprisingly understudied, despite its almostmythical status in Swedish folklore. While somephysiological–productive aspects of kulninghave been treated in previous work, acousticproperties are still much lacking description.This paper compares kulning, head (‘falsetto’)and modal voice from an acoustic perspective.

  • 16.
    Elisabet, Sundewall Thorén
    et al.
    Eriksholm Reserach Centre, Denmark.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Rehabiliteringsprogram för vuxna hörapparatanvändare2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Enflo, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sundberg, Johan
    Department of Speech, Music and Hearing, KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Collision and phonation threshold pressures before and after loud, prolonged vocalization in trained and untrained voices2013In: Journal of Voice, ISSN 0892-1997, E-ISSN 1873-4588, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 527-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phonation threshold pressure (PTP) is defined as the lowest subglottal pressure needed for obtaining and sustaining vocal fold oscillation. It has been found to increase during vocal fatigue. In the present study, PTP is measured together with the threshold pressure needed for vocal fold collision; henceforth, the collision threshold pressure (CTP). PTP and CTP are compared before and after loud, prolonged vocalization in singer and nonsinger voices. Ten subjects repeated the vowel sequence /a, e, i, o, u/ at a Sound Pressure Level of at least 80 dB at 0.3 m for 20 minutes. Audio and electroglottography signals were recorded before and after this exercise. At the same time, oral pressure was registered while the subjects produced a diminuendo repeating the syllable /pa:/, thus acquiring an approximate of the subglottal pressure. CTP and PTP increased significantly after the vocal loading in the nonsinger subjects. On the other hand, singers reported no substantial effect of the exercise, and most singers had a mean after-to-before ratio close to 1 for both CTP and PTP.

  • 18.
    Enflo, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sundberg, Johan
    Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan.
    Romedahl, Camilla
    ABC Logopedtjänst, Stockhom .
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Effects of Tube Phonation on Collision and Phonation Threshold Pressures in Mezzo-soprano Voices2011In: Pan European Voice Conference (PEVOC9) / [ed] Antoine Giovanni & Nathalie Henrich,, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tube phonation is a voice therapy method widely used in Scandinavia and Germany. Invented by Sovijärvi (1965 & 1969) in the sixties, it is now used to treat several kinds of voice pathologies but also to solve passaggio and speech problems among singers. The subject phonates into a 26-28 cm long tube, typically made of glass, with the other end placed a few cm under water in a bowl. The resulting bubbling causes a modulation of intraoral pressure. Tube phonation is supposed to contribute to the development of appropriate combinations of air flow and subglottal pressure needed for a healthy voice control and/or vocal skill.

     The present study is part of a project aiming at exploring the potentials of the collision threshold pressure (CTP) (Enflo and Sundberg, 2009; Enflo et al., 2009), defined as the lowest subglottal pressure needed for vocal fold collision. This pressure may be a valuable complement to the commonly used phonation threshold pressure (PTP), defined as the lowest subglottal pressure needed to obtain and sustain vocal fold vibration. In the present investigation we analysed the effects of tube phonation on these threshold pressures. Twelve mezzo-sopranos with differing levels of singing training participated in the experiment, six highly advanced classically trained singers with daily  singing practise, and six modestly experienced choir singers without daily  singing practise. Subglottal pressure, EGG and audio were recorded before and after a tube phonation exercise. The tube phonation induced intraoral pressure modulation amplitude of about five cm H2O. Perceptual effects of the tube phonation in these subjects was assessed by a listening test. On average across singers CTP tended to rise, particularly in the less well trained singers. The listening test indicated that tube phonation was associated with a clearly audible improvement of voice function, at least in the less well-trained singers.

  • 19.
    Enflo, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sundberg, Johan
    KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Romedahl, Camilla
    Speech-Language Pathologist, Stockholm, Sweden.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Effects on vocal fold collision and phonation threshold pressure of resonance tube phonation with tube end in water2013In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 56, p. 1530-1538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Resonance tube phonation in water (RTPW) or in air is a voice therapy method successfully used for treatment of several voice pathologies. Its effect on the voice has not been thoroughly studied. This investigation analyzes the effects of RTPW on collision and phonation threshold pressures (CTP and PTP), the lowest subglottal pressure needed for vocal fold collision and phonation, respectively.

    Method: Twelve mezzo-sopranos phonated into a glass tube, the end of which was placed under the water surface in a jar. Subglottal pressure, electroglottography and audio signals were recorded before and after exercise. Also, the perceptual effects were assessed in a listening test with an expert panel which also rated the subjects’ singing experience.

    Results: Resonance tube phonation significantly increased CTP, and also tended to improve perceived voice quality. The latter effect was mostly greater in singers who did not practice singing daily. In addition, a more pronounced perceptual effect was found in singers rated as being less experienced.

    Conclusion: Resonance tube phonation significantly raised CTP and tended to improve perceptual ratings of voice quality. The effect on PTP failed to reach significance.

  • 20.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden .
    Graf, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundeborg Hammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Tonsillotomy versus tonsillectomy on young children: 2 year post surgery follow-up2014In: Journal of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, ISSN 1916-0216, Vol. 43, article id 26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To study the long-term effect of tonsillotomy and tonsillectomy in young children after two years in comparison to the results after six months. Method: Children, age 4-5 with Sleep Disordered Breathing (SDB) and tonsil hyperplasia, were randomized to TE (32) or TT (35). TT was performed ad modum Hultcrantz with radiofrequency technique (Ellman). An adenoidectomy with cold steel was performed in the same session for 80% of cases. The patients were assessed prior to surgery, at six and 24 months postoperatively. Effects of surgery were evaluated clinically, through questionnaire (general health/snoring/ENT-infections), Quality of Life (QoL), survey of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea with OSA-18, and childrens behavior with the Child Behavior Checklist. Results: After two years there was still no difference between the groups with respect to snoring and frequency or severity of upper airway infections. Both TT and TE had resulted in large improvement in short and long term QoL and behavior. Three TT-children and one TE child had been re-operated due to recurrence of obstructive problems, the TE-child and one of the TT-children with adenoidectomy and two of the TT-children with tonsillectomy. Three of the TT-children had tonsil tissue protruding slightly out of the tonsil pouch and twelve TE-children had small tonsil remnants within the tonsil pouches, but with no need for surgery. Conclusion: Younger children have a small risk of symptom-recurrence requiring re-surgery within two years after TT. For the majority, the positive effect on snoring, infections, behavior and quality of life remain and is similar to TE.

  • 21.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hemlin, Claes
    Aleris Sabbatsberg Hospital, Stockholm.
    Hessén Söderman, Anne- Charlotte
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Roos, Kristian
    Lundby Hospital, Göteborg.
    Sunnergren, Ola
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Stalfors, Joacim
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg.
    Webb-based information for tonsillar surgery2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hemlin, Claes
    Aleris Sabbatsberg, Stockholm .
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Månsson, Ingemar
    Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
    Roos, Kristian
    Capio Lundby Sjukhus, Göteborg.
    Stahlfors, Joacim
    Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
    Weitz, Per
    Centrallasarettet, Västerås.
    Tonsilloperation: Nationella Medicinska Indikationer: Rapport från expertgruppen för tonsilloperation inom Svensk förening för Otorhinolaryngologi, Huvud- och halskirurgi 2009Report (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Tonsil Surgery in Youths: Good Results With A Less Invasive Method2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Lundeberg, Stefan
    Smärtbehandlingsenheten, Astrid Lindgrens Barnsjukhus, Stockholm.
    Brattwall, Metha
    An/Op/IVA/Sc Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Mölndal.
    Stalfors, Joacim
    ÖNH-Kliniken, Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
    Hemlin, Claes
    ÖNH-Kliniken, Aleris Specialistvård Sabbatsberg, Stockholm.
    Hessén-Söderman, Anne-Charlotte
    ÖNH-Kliniken, Aleris Specialistvård Sabbatsberg, Stockholm.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sunnergren, Ola
    ÖNH- Kliniken, Länssjukhuset Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Odhagen, Erik
    ÖNH-Kliniken, Södra Älvsborgs Sjukhus, Borås.
    Nationella riktlinjer för farmakologisk behandling av smärta och illamående i samband med tonsillotomi och tonsillektomi på barn och ungdomar (<18 år)2013In: Svensk ÖNH-tidskrift, ISSN 1400-0121, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 4p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Riktlinjerna är framtagna av referensgruppen för Tonsilloperation. Syftet med dessa riktlinjer är att optimera det perioperativa omhändertagandet (premedicinering - peroperativt - postoperativt smärtomhändertagande) i samband med tonsilloperationer på barn och ungdomar. Bakgrund och referenser till riktlinjerna finns i ett separat dokument.

    Riktlinjerna gäller för friska barn. Finns det riskfaktorer som ex grav sömnapné, kraftig övervikt, komplicerande sjukdomstillstånd eller organpåverkan behöver den farmakologiska behandlingen anpassas efter situationen.

    Tonsillkirurgi medför svår och långvarig smärta samt hög frekvens av illamående. Smärtan är ofta värst dag 3 till 5 efter tonsillektomi. Tonsillotomi ger generellt upphov till mindre smärta än tonsillektomi. För att uppnå effekt behöver den farmakologiska smärtbehandlingen påbörjas redan vid premedicineringen och fortlöpa under själva anestesin/ingreppet. En multimodal behandling ska eftersträvas och målsättningen är att uppnå en för individen acceptabel smärtnivå i det postoperativa skedet och i hemmet.

    Den farmakologiska behandlingen ska kombineras med preoperativ information om ingreppet till patienten och vårdnadshavare. En lugn och trygg situation före anestesistart ökar chanserna för ett lugnt postoperativt förlopp.

  • 25.
    Eriksson, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Joosten, M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    The histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A reduces lysosomal pH and enhances cisplatin-induced apoptosis2013In: Experimental Cell Research, ISSN 0014-4827, E-ISSN 1090-2422, Vol. 319, no 1, p. 12-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs) has been documented in several types of cancer and may be associated with survival advantage. In a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell line, cisplatin-induced apoptosis was augmented by pretreatment with the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin Apoptosis was accompanied by lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), as shown by immunoblotting of the lysosomal marker protease cathepsin B in extracted cytosol and by immunofluorescence. Moreover, LAMP-2 (lysosomal associated membrane protein-2) was translocated from lysosomal membranes and found in a digitonin extractable fraction together with cytosolic proteins and pretreatment with trichostatin A potentiated the release. Overall, protein level of LAMP-2 was decreased during cell death and, interestingly, inhibition of cysteine cathepsins, by the pan-cysteine cathepsin inhibitor zFA-FMK, prevented loss of LAMP-2. The importance of LAMP-2 for lysosomal membrane stability, was confirmed by showing that LAMP-2 knockout MEFs (mouse embryonic fibroblasts) were more sensitive to cisplatin as compared to the corresponding wildtype cells. Trichostatin A reduced lysosomal pH from 4.46 to 4.25 and cell death was prevented when lysosomal pH was increased by NH4Cl, or when inhibiting the activity of lysosomal proteases. We conclude that trichostatin A enhances cisplatin induced cell death by decreasing lysosomal pH, which augments cathepsin activity resulting in reduced LAMP-2 level, and might promote LMP.

  • 26.
    Farnebo, Lovisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Tiefenböck, Katharina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ansell, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thunell, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Garvin, Stina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Strong expression of survivin is associated with positive response to radiotherapy and improved overall survival in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients2013In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 133, no 8, p. 1994-2003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a malignancy that is associated with severe mortality despite advances in therapy. Todays standard treatment most commonly includes radiotherapy, often combined with chemotherapy or surgery. There are so far no established biomarkers to predict response to radiation, and thus the aim of this study was to investigate a series of markers that could potentially identify HNSCC patients who would benefit from radiotherapy. The selected markers, both proteins (epidermal growth factor receptor, survivin and p53), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes of XRCC3, XRCC1, XPC, XPD, MDM2, p53 and FGFR4 were correlated to the response to radiotherapy and overall survival. Investigations were performed on pretreatment tumor biopsies from patients classified as responders or nonresponders to radiotherapy. Protein expression was examined using immunohistochemistry and the genotyping of specific SNPs was analyzed using PCR-RFLP or pyrosequencing. We found that survivin expression was significantly stronger in the responder group (p = 0.003) and that patients with a strong survivin expression had a significantly better overall survival (p andlt; 0.001). Moreover, downregulation of survivin by siRNA in two HNSCC cell lines significantly decreased their sensitivity to radiation. Among the SNPs analyzed, patients with the XPD Lys751Gln SNP had a significantly shorter overall survival (p = 0.048), and patients with the FGFR4 Gly388Arg SNP had a significantly longer overall survival (p = 0.010). In conclusion, our results suggest that survivin plays an important role in the response to radiotherapy and may be a useful marker for predicting radiotherapy response in patients with HNSCC. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanWhats new? Resistance to radiation therapy is a significant problem in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and has created a need for the discovery of markers predictive of radiotherapy response. One promising marker is survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis. Here, in pre-treatment biopsies from 40 patients with HNSCC, strong survivin expression was significantly associated with response to radiotherapy and increased overall survival. The data also indicate that single nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes XPD and FGFR4 are other possible predictors of overall survival after radiotherapy.

  • 27.
    Fisher, James L.
    et al.
    Ohio State University, OH 43201 USA Ohio State University, OH 43201 USA Ohio State University, OH 43201 USA .
    Pettersson, David
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Palmisano, Sadie
    Ohio State University, OH 43201 USA .
    Schwartzbaum, Judith A.
    Ohio State University, OH 43201 USA Ohio State University, OH 43201 USA Ohio State University, OH 43201 USA Ohio State University, OH 43201 USA .
    Edwards, Colin G.
    Mt Carmel Health Syst, OH USA .
    Mathiesen, Tiit
    Karolinska Hospital, Sweden .
    Prochazka, Michaela
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Bergenheim, Tommy
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Florentzson, Rut
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Siesjo, Peter
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Feychting, Maria
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Loud Noise Exposure and Acoustic Neuroma2014In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 180, no 1, p. 58-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The results from studies of loud noise exposure and acoustic neuroma are conflicting. A population-based case-control study of 451 acoustic neuroma patients and 710 age-, sex-, and region-matched controls was conducted in Sweden between 2002 and 2007. Occupational exposure was based on historical measurements of occupational noise (321 job titles summarized by a job exposure matrix) and compared with self-reported occupational noise exposure. We also evaluated self-reported noise exposure during leisure activity. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. There was no statistically significant association between acoustic neuroma and persistent occupational noise exposure, either with or without hearing protection. Exposure to loud noise from leisure activity without hearing protection was more common among acoustic neuroma cases (odds ratio = 1.47, 95% confidence interval: 1.06, 2.03). Statistically significant odds ratios were found for specific leisure activities including attending concerts/clubs/sporting events (odds ratio = 1.82, 95% confidence interval: 1.09, 3.04) and participating in workouts accompanied by loud music (odds ratio = 2.84, 95% confidence interval: 1.37, 5.89). Our findings do not support an association between occupational exposure to loud noise and acoustic neuroma. Although we report statistically significant associations between leisure-time exposures to loud noise without hearing protection and acoustic neuroma, especially among women, we cannot rule out recall bias as an alternative explanation.

  • 28.
    Frölander, Hans Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Örebro University; Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Örebro University; Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Marshall, Jan D.
    Jackson laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA.
    Sundqvist, Anett
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnåsen, Berit
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Örebro University; Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Falkensson, Lil
    National Resource Centre, Lund, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Theory-of-mind in adolescents and young adults with Alström syndrome2014In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 530-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The study focuses on theory-of-mind in adolescents and young adults with Alström syndrome (ALMS). ALMS, an autosomal recessive syndrome causes juvenile blindness, sensorineural hearing loss, cardiomyopathy, endocrinological disorders and metabolic dysfunction. Theory-of-mind (ToM) refers to the ability to impute mental states to one self and to others. Clinical observations have revealed an increased occurrence of deviances in mental state understanding in ALMS. In the present study ToM will be examined and related to working memory (WM), verbal ability and sensory loss.

    METHODS:

    Twelve young individuals (16-37 years) with ALMS and 24 nondisabled individuals matched on age, gender and educational level participated. ToM was assessed by means of a multiple task that taxes the ability to understand thoughts and feelings of story characters'. WM was examined by means of a reading span task and verbal ability by means of a vocabulary test.

    RESULTS:

    The ALMS group performed at significantly lower levels in ToM tasks and displayed a higher variability in performance than the control group. Individuals with ALMS and a relatively poor level performance provided fewer correct mental state inferences in ToM tasks than ALMS individuals with relatively higher performance levels. ALMS individuals with relatively high performance levels made as many correct inferences in ToM tasks as the control group, but their inferences were more often incomplete. Vocabulary skills and educational level, but not WM-capacity predicted ToM performance. Degree of deafblindness did not have an impact on ToM. Age of onset of visual loss but not hearing loss related to ToM.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The individuals with ALMS display a high degree of heterogeneity in terms of ToM, where some individuals reached performance levels comparable to nondisabled individuals. The results are discussed with respect to how cognitive and verbal abilities and factors related to the disability affect ToM.

  • 29.
    Frölander, Hans-Erik
    et al.
    School of Health and medical sciences, Örebro University.
    Möller, Claes
    School of Health and medical sciences, Örebro University.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Marshall, J.D
    The Jackson Laboratory, Maine, United States.
    Rönnåsen, Berit
    School of Health and medical sciences, Örebro University.
    Falkensson, L.
    The National Resource Centre for Matters regarding Deafblindness, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Theory-of-mind in adolescents and young adults with Alströms syndrome2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Gauffin, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    van Ettinger-Veenstra, Helene
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ulrici, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognitive problems in young adults with epilepsy: Language deficits correlate to brain activation and self-esteemManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    People with epilepsy often display cognitive decline. Language function in epilepsy has been most thoroughly studied in temporal lobe epilepsy, but the impact of language deficits in epilepsy is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of epilepsy on language function with functional magnetic resonance imaging of brain activation, with behavioral methods and to relate language performance to demographic data, self-esteem and Quality of life. We specifically aimed to investigate if variation in epilepsy origin would relate to differences in language performance and if these differences could be associated with specific language activation patterns in the brain. We recruited people with epilepsy (29 in total), with focal onset seizures in either the left or right hemispheres or with generalized epilepsy; and 27 matching healthy controls. The participants’ language skills were measured with a phonemic word fluency test and a broader test measuring higher language functions. Functional magnetic resonance images of the brain were obtained during a word fluency and a sentence reading paradigm. Questionnaires on self-esteem and quality of life were collected. People with epilepsy of both focal and generalized origin had impaired function in semantic and verbal fluency tasks compared to the controls. The causes of language impairment were multifactorial; the most important determinants were education and onset age of epilepsy. Impaired language function was correlated to low self-esteem for participants with focal onset seizures; however Quality of life did not seem to be affected by language impairment. The functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation demonstrated altered functional activity during language tasks for participants with epilepsy compared to healthy controls. In epilepsy with focal seizures originating in the left hemisphere we found increased bilateral  activation of supporting areas in the anterior mid-cingulate cortex and the left anterior ventral insula, indicating a compensational functional reorganization. In generalized epilepsy, the functional language network showed an imbalance expressed as an inadequate  suppression of activation in the left anterior temporal lobe during semantic processing. Our study shows not only that reduced language functioning is present in people with epilepsy other than in the temporal lobe, but also that frequency of convulsive seizures correlates to language impairment. For patients with focalized seizures, low self esteem correlated also to language impairment. Our results highlight the importance of addressing the negative consequences of language decline in people with epilepsy of both focal and generalized origin.

  • 31.
    Gauffin, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    van Ettinger-Veenstra, Helene
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ulrici, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Impaired language function in generalized epilepsy: Inadequate suppression of the default mode network2013In: Epilepsy & Behavior, ISSN 1525-5050, E-ISSN 1525-5069, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 26-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We aimed to study the effect of a potential default mode network (DMN) dysfunction on language performance in epilepsy. Language dysfunction in focal epilepsy has previously been connected to brain damage in language-associated cortical areas. In this work, we studied generalized epilepsy (GE) without focal brain damage to see if the language function was impaired. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate if the DMN was involved. Eleven persons with GE and 28 healthy controls were examined with fMRI during a sentence-reading task. We demonstrated impaired language function, reduced suppression of DMN, and, specifically, an inadequate suppression of activation in the left anterior temporal lobe and the posterior cingulate cortex, as well as an aberrant activation in the right hippocampal formation. Our results highlight the presence of language decline in people with epilepsy of not only focal but also generalized origin.

  • 32.
    Gimbler Berglund, Ingalill
    et al.
    Omvårdnad, Hälsohögskolan i Jönköping.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Proczkowska-Björklund, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Omvårdnad, Hälsohögskolan i Jönköping.
    Nurse anaesthetists' experiences with pre-operative anxiety2013In: Nursing Children and Young People, ISSN 2046-2336, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 28-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS:

    To explore nurse anaesthetists' experiences and actions when administering and caring for children requiring anaesthesia.

    METHOD:

    A qualitative design employing critical incident technique was used. Interviews were carried out with a purposeful sample of nurse anaesthetists (n=32). The nurse anaesthetists' experiences were grouped into two main areas: organisation focused and interrelational focused. Actions were grouped into two main areas: optimising the situation and creating interpersonal interaction.

    FINDINGS:

    The categories and subcategories of the nurses' experiences appeared to influence the outcome for the child. The nurse anaesthetists' first priority was to create an optimal environment and increase sensitivity in their interactions with the child.

    CONCLUSION:

    Sensitivity to the child and flexibility in altering actions are key strategies to avoid physical restraint.

  • 33.
    Grafstrom, Roland C.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Ceder, Rebecca
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Fadeel, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Willighagen, Egon
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Bioinformatics-based cancer research have wide toxicological applicability in TOXICOLOGY LETTERS, vol 211, issue , pp S160-S1602012In: TOXICOLOGY LETTERS, Elsevier , 2012, Vol. 211, p. S160-S160Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 34.
    Granath, Anna
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Cardell, Lars-Olaf
    Karolinska Institute.
    Uddman, Rolf
    Lund University.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Letter: Altered Toll- and Nod-like receptor expression in human middle ear mucosa from patients with chronic middle ear disease2011In: Journal of Infection, ISSN 0163-4453, E-ISSN 1532-2742, Vol. 63, no 2, p. 174-176Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 35.
    Harder, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Norrköping.
    Speech-perception in elderly implant recipients2010In: 11th International Conference on Cochlear Implants and Other Implantable Auditory Technologies, 2010, p. 339-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Hemlin, Claes
    et al.
    Aleris Sabbatsberg Hospital, Stockholm.
    Sunnergren, Ola
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hessén Söderman, Anne- Charlotte
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Roos, Kristian
    Capio Lundby Hospital, Göteborg.
    Passmark, H
    Stalfors, Joacim
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg.
    A Patient questionnaire can give valid information on the prescence of morbidity after tonaillar surgery - results of a validation study2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Hengen, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Peterson, Malin
    Sollentuna.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Röstbehandling: Kartläggning av patienter och utvärdering av interventionseffekt med Rösthandikappindex2014In: Norsk tidsskrift for logopedi, ISSN 0332-7256, no 2, p. 26-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie är ett samarbetsprojekt mellan Linköpings Universitet och fyra landsting i sydöstra och södra sjukvårdsregionen. Syftet är att kartlägga patienter i röstbehandling samt jämföra patienternas RHI-skattningar före och efter genomgången röstbehandling för att undersöka huruvida ålder, kön samt antalet behandlingstillfällen påverkar resultatet. Studien bygger på 350 patienters självskattningar. Wilcoxon teckenrangtest visar en signifikant skillnad i RHI-poäng före och efter behandling med en minskning av 19 medianpoäng i RHI-index med stor effektstyrka (0,55). Kvinnor utgjorde en majoritet av patienterna (74,3 %) och medelåldern totalt var 55 år. Äldre patienter hade högre medianvärde på RHI vid behandlingsstart och behandlingsslut. En högre ålder påverkade dock inte den observerade skillnaden mellan skattningarna.

  • 38.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fonologiska och lexikala färdigheter samt arbetsminneskapacitet hos barn med ushers syndrom typ 1 och cochleaimplantat2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro Universitetssjukhus, audiologiskt forskningscentrum, Örebro Universitet.
    Forskningen kring arbetsminnet, språket och läsning fortsätter med Usher typ I i fokus2011In: Barnplantabladet, ISSN 1401-8543, p. 17-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro Universitetssjukhus, audiologiskt forskningscentrum, Örebro Universitet.
    Phonology, Lexical skills, and working memory in children with Usher type 1 and CI2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Möller, Claes
    Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cognitive skills in children with Usher syndrome type 1 and cochlear implants2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro Universitetssjukhus, audiologiskt forskningscentrum, Örebro Universitet.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ongoing project: Phonological and lexical skills, and working memory in children with Usher type 1 and CI2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro Universitetssjukhus, audiologiskt forskningscentrum, Örebro Universitet.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Phonological skills and working memory in children with CI and Usher type I2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with CI have a distinctive pattern of development of phonological skills (Wass, 2010). Previous research (Spencer & Tomblin, 2009; Wass et al., 2009) has shown that deaf children with CI perform on par with children with normal hearing on some cognitive tasks, whereas they have a significantly lower performance level than children with normal hearing on tasks with high demands on phonological processing. The present project aims to examine phonological skills and working memory capacity in children with Usher type 1 and compare their performance with deaf children with CI and nonsyndromal deafness, with children with normal hearing and children with hearing impairment. Few studies have focused on cognitive development in children with Usher syndrome type I and there is a lack of knowledge on whether the deafness and the co-existing visual condition have an impact on cognitive development and the spoken language development which is an outcome of the CI. Six children with Usher syndrome type I, in ages 6-14 years participated in the study. Preliminary results revealed that children with Usher syndrome type I have a similar pattern of results on the tests as the comparison group of children with CI.

  • 44.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro Universitetssjukhus, audiologiskt forskningscentrum, Örebro Universitet.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Phonological skills and working memoryin children with CI and Usher type 12011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Hermansen, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Cleland, Joshua A.
    Franklin Pierce University, NH USA .
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Peolsson, L.C.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of Physical Function in Individuals 11 to 14 Years after AnteriorCervical Decompression and Fusion Surgery: A Comparison betweenPatients and Healthy Reference Samples and Between 2 Surgical Techniques2014In: Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, ISSN 0161-4754, E-ISSN 1532-6586, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 87-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck-related physical function in individuals 11 to 14 years after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) surgery for degenerative cervical disk disease and to compare the long-term outcome of 2 surgical techniques, including the Cloward procedure and cervical intervertebral fusion cage. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 51 individuals, 11 years or more after ACDF, underwent testing of cervical active range of motion, hand-grip strength, static and dynamic balance, neck muscle endurance, and completed pain ratings. The participants values were compared with values of age-and sex-matched healthy individuals to evaluate impairments. Correlations between different test scores and pain were performed. Group differences were analyzed between the 2 surgical techniques. Results: Sixty-five percent and 82% exhibited impairment in ventral and dorsal neck muscle endurance, respectively. Impairment rates of 18% to 39% for cervical active range of motion, 27% to 43% for hand-grip strength, 37% for standing balance, and 35% for dynamic balance were recorded. Twenty-nine percent of the participants had impairment (greater than30 mm visual analog scale) in pain. There were no significant differences in physical function between the 2 surgical treatment groups (Cloward procedure or cervical intervertebral fusion cage) (P = .10-.92). Conclusions: In those studied, a large percentage of patients who had anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery have impairments in neck-related physical function when compared 11 to 14 years after surgery with age-and sex-matched healthy reference individuals. Neck-specific function, but not balance, was statistically correlated to pain. Neck muscle endurance was most affected, and balance impairments were also present in one-third of the individuals. There were no differences in long-term physical function between the 2 surgical techniques.

  • 46.
    Hessen Soderman, Anne-Charlotte
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hemlin, Claes
    Karolinska Institute.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Mansson, Ingemar
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Roos, Kristian
    Capio Lundby.
    Stalfors, Joacim
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Reduced Risk of Primary Postoperative Hemorrhage After Tonsil Surgery in Sweden: Results from the National Tonsil Surgery Register in Sweden Covering More Than 10 Years and 54,696 Operations2011In: The Laryngoscope, ISSN 0023-852X, E-ISSN 1531-4995, Vol. 121, no 11, p. 2322-2326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives/Hypothesis: To analyze the incidence of primary bleeding following tonsil surgery and to evaluate risk factors. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanStudy Design: Register study of the results from the National Tonsil Surgery Register in Sweden covering the period 1997 to 2008 and 54,696 operations. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: Data were collected by means of three questionnaires, two filled in by professionals and one 6 months post-operatively by the patient/parent. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: A total of 719 patients experienced primary postoperative bleeding during the hospital stay (1.3%). A number of independent factors were correlated with decreased risk of post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage: younger age (P andlt; .0001), female sex (P andlt; .0001), type of surgery (tonsillotomy) (P = .0006), and surgery performed on a day-surgery basis (P andlt; .0001). Indication for surgery and number of operations performed at the department did not correlate with postoperative bleeding risk. A significant decrease in primary postoperative hemorrhage rate from 2% to 0.96% was found during the study period. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: Primary hemorrhage following tonsil surgery is rare. During the study period, a significant decrease in primary bleeding rates occurred. The changes in practice with an increasing proportion of day-surgery cases and tonsillotomy have contributed to the reduced risk, but cannot completely explain the reduction.

  • 47.
    Hessén Söderman, Anne- Charlotte
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hemlin, Claes
    Aleris Sabbatsberg Hospital, Stockholm.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Roos, Kristian
    Capio Lundby Hospital, Göteborg.
    Sunnergren, Ola
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Stalfors, Joacim
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg.
    Posttonsillectomy haemorrhage rates related to surgical technique.2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Hua, Hakan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Swedish Institute Disabil Research, Sweden .
    Karlsson, Jan
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Widen, Stephen
    Swedish Institute Disabil Research, Sweden .
    Moller, Claes
    Swedish Institute Disabil Research, Sweden .
    Lyxell, Bjorn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Swedish Institute Disabil Research, Sweden .
    Quality of life, effort and disturbance perceived in noise: A comparison between employees with aided hearing impairment and normal hearing2013In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 9, p. 642-649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aims were to compare health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and hearing handicap between two groups of employees with normal hearing and aided hearing impairment (HI). HRQOL was also compared to a normative population. The second aim was to compare perceived effort (PE) and disturbance after completing a task in office noise between the two study groups. Design: A Swedish version of the short form-36 (SF-36) and the hearing handicap inventory for adults (HHIA) was used to determine HRQOL and hearing handicap. The Borg-CR 10 scale was used to measure PE and disturbance. Study sample: Hearing impaired (n = 20) and normally hearing (n = 20) participants. The normative sample comprised of 597 matched respondents. Results: Hearing-impaired employees report relatively good HRQOL in relation to the normative population, but significantly lower physical functioning and higher PE than their normally-hearing peers in noise. Results from the HHIA showed mild self-perceived hearing handicap. Conclusions: The current results demonstrate that physical health status can be negatively affected even at a mild-moderate severity of HI, and that a higher PE is reported from this group when performing a task in noise, despite the regular use of hearing aids.

  • 49.
    Hua, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Emilsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ellis, Rachel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Not Found:Linkoping Univ, Linnaeus Ctr HEAD, Swedish Inst Disabil Res, Orebro, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci and Learning, Orebro, Sweden .
    Widen, Stephen
    School of Health and Medical Sciences and Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    School of Health and Medical Sciences and Örebro University; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Cognitive skills and the effect of noise on perceived effort in employees with aided hearing impairment and normal hearing2014In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 16, no 69, p. 79-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the following study was to examine the relationship between working memory capacity (WMC), executive functions (EFs) and perceived effort (PE) after completing a work-related task in quiet and in noise in employees with aided hearing impairment (HI) and normal hearing. The study sample consisted of 20 hearing-impaired and 20 normally hearing participants. Measures of hearing ability, WMC and EFs were tested prior to performing a work-related task in quiet and in simulated traffic noise. PE of the work-related task was also measured. Analysis of variance was used to analyze within-and between-group differences in cognitive skills, performance on the work-related task and PE. The presence of noise yielded a significantly higher PE for both groups. However, no significant group differences were observed in WMC, EFs, PE and performance in the work-related task. Interestingly, significant negative correlations were only found between PE in the noise condition and the ability to update information for both groups. In summary, noise generates a significantly higher PE and brings explicit processing capacity into play, irrespective of hearing. This suggest that increased PE involves other factors such as type of task that is to be performed, performance in the cognitive skill required solving the task at hand and whether noise is present. We therefore suggest that special consideration in hearing care should be made to the individuals prerequisites on these factors in the labor market.

  • 50.
    Hua, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Emilsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kähäri, Kim
    Department of Audiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University.
    Widen, Stephen
    School of Health and Medical Sciences and Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    School of Health and Medical Sciences and Örebro University; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    The impact of different background noises: Effects on cognitive performance and perceived disturbance in employees with aided hearing impairment and normal hearing2014In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 859-868Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Health care professionals frequently meet employees with hearing impairment (HI) who experience difficulties at work. There are indications that the majority of these difficulties might be related to the presence of background noise. Moreover, research has also shown that high level noise has a more detrimental effect on cognitive performance and selfrated disturbance in individuals with HI than low level noise.

    Purpose: To examine the impact of different types of background noise on cognitive performance and perceived disturbance (PD) in employees with aided HI and normal hearing.

    Research Design: A mixed factorial design was conducted to examine the effect of noise under four experimental conditions.

    Study Sample: Forty participants (21 men and 19 women) were recruited to take part in the study .The study sample consisted of employees with HI (n =20) and normal hearing (n = 20). The group with HI had a mild-moderate sensorineural HI and they were all frequent hearing aid users.

    Intervention: The current study was conducted by employing four general work-related tasks (mental arithmetic, orthographic decoding, phonological decoding and serial recall) in four different background conditions: (1) quiet, (2) office noise at 56 dBA, (3) daycare noise at 73.5 dBA and (4) traffic noise at 72.5 dBA. Reaction time (RT) and the proportion of correct answers in the working tasks were used as outcome measures of cognitive performance. The Borg CR-10 scale was used to assess PD.

    Data Collection and Analysis: Data collection occurred on two separate sessions, completed within four weeks of each other. All tasks and experimental conditions were employed in a counterbalanced order. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to analyze the results. To examine interaction effects, pairwise t-tests were used. Pearson’s correlation coefficients between RT and proportion of correct answers, and cognitive performance and PD were also calculated to  examine the possible correlation between the different variables.

    Results: No significant between or within-group differences in cognitive performance were observed across the four background conditions. Ratings of PD showed that both groups rated PD according to noise level, where higher noise level generated a higher PD. The present findings also demonstrate that the group with HI was more disturbed by higher than lower levels of noise (i.e. traffic and daycare setting compared to the office setting). This pattern was observed consistently throughout four working tasks where the group with HI reported a significantly greater PD in the daycare and traffic setting compared to the office noise.

    Conclusions: The present results demonstrate that background noise does not impair cognitive performance in non-auditory tasks in employees with HI and normal hearing, but that PD is affected to a greater extent in employees with HI during higher level of background noise exposure. In addition, this study also supports previous studies regarding the detrimental effects high level noise has on employees with HI. We therefore emphasize the need of both self-rated and cognitive measurements in hearing care and occupational health services for both employees with normal hearing and HI.

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