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  • 1.
    Albrecht, Matthew A.
    et al.
    Curtin University, Australia .
    Stuart, Geoffrey W.
    La Trobe University, Australia .
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin University, Australia, Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Ordqvist, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Leung, Denise
    Curtin University, Australia .
    Foster, Jonathan K.
    Curtin University, Australia Health Department WA, Australia .
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Brief Report: Visual Acuity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders2014In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 2369-2374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, there has been heightened interest in suggestions of enhanced visual acuity in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) which was sparked by evidence that was later accepted to be methodologically flawed. However, a recent study that claimed children with ASD have enhanced visual acuity (Brosnan et al. in J Autism Dev Disord 42:2491-2497, 2012) repeated a critical methodological flaw by using an inappropriate viewing distance for a computerised acuity test, placing the findings in doubt. We examined visual acuity in 31 children with ASD and 33 controls using the 2 m 2000 Series Revised Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study chart placed at twice the conventional distance to better evaluate possible enhanced acuity. Children with ASD did not demonstrate superior acuity. The current findings strengthen the argument that reports of enhanced acuity in ASD are due to methodological flaws and challenges the reported association between visual acuity and systemising type behaviours.

  • 2.
    Alföldi, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Wiklund, Tobias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Comorbid insomnia in patients with chronic pain: a study based on the Swedish quality registry for pain rehabilitation (SQRP)2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 36, no 20, p. 1661-1669Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study investigates the prevalence of insomnia and its relationship to other symptoms and health aspects in patients with chronic pain. Methods: Patients with chronic pain conditions (n = 845) referred to a multidisciplinary pain centre completed surveys provided by the Swedish quality registry for pain rehabilitation (SQRP). The SQRP collects data on socio-demographics, health status, symptoms of pain, mood and insomnia and life satisfaction. Results: The majority of patients (65.3%) had clinical insomnia according to the insomnia severity index (ISI). Insomnia correlated significantly but weakly with pain, depression, anxiety and coping; the strongest multivariate correlations were found with depression and anxiety followed by pain interference and pain severity. Pain intensity, depression and anxiety correlated stronger than ISI with respect to the two investigated aspects of health. Conclusions: The prevalence of insomnia is high in patients with chronic pain conditions, but the level of importance in relation to other symptoms for health aspects is low, and the associations with other important symptoms are relatively weak. One way to increase the effects of multimodal rehabilitation programs may be to provide interventions directed specifically at insomnia rather than focusing only on interventions that address pain, depression and anxiety. Implications for Rehabilitation The prevalence of insomnia is high in patients with complex chronic pain conditions. Relatively low correlations existed between insomnia and pain intensity, depression, anxiety and other psychological aspects. Pain intensity, anxiety and depression were more important for perceived health aspects than insomnia. One way to increase the effects of multimodal rehabilitation programs may be to also include interventions directed directly to insomnia.

  • 3.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Granlund, Mats
    Örebro University, Sweden; Jönköping University, Sweden .
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Örebro University, Sweden.
    Important aspects of participation and participation restrictions in people with a mild intellectual disability2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 36, no 15, p. 1264-1272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study explored a possibility to assess the concepts of participation and participation restrictions in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) by combining self-ratings of the perceived importance with the actual performance of different everyday activities in people with a mild intellectual disability. Method: Structured interviews regarding 68 items from the ICF activity/participation domain were conducted (n = 69). The items were ranked by perceived importance, performance and by combined measures. Furthermore, the measures were related to a single question about subjective general well-being. Results: Rankings of performance highlighted about the same items as "important participation", while rankings of low performance addressed quite different items compared with "important participation restriction". Significant correlations were found between subjective general well-being and high performance (r = 0.56), high performance/high importance (important participation) (r = 0.56), low performance (r = -0.56) and low performance/high importance (important participation restriction; r -0.55). Conclusions: The results support the clinical relevance of the ICF and the studied selection of 68 items. Although performance only may sometimes be a relevant aspect, knowledge about the relationship between the perceived importance and the actual performance is essential for clinical interventions and for research aiming to understand specific needs regarding participation.

  • 4.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Granlund, Mats
    University of Örebro, Sweden Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories explored for self-rated participation in Swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability2012In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 562-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore internal consistency and correlations between perceived ability, performance and perceived importance in a preliminary selection of self-reported items representing the activity/participation component of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Design: Structured interview study. Subjects: Fifty-five Swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability. Methods: Questions about perceived ability, performance and perceived importance were asked on the basis of a 3-grade Likert-scale regarding each of 68 items representing the 9 ICF domains of activity/participation. Results: Internal consistency for perceived ability (Cron-bachs alpha for all 68 items): 0.95 (values for each domain varied between 0.57 and 0.85), for performance: 0.86 (between 0.27 and 0.66), for perceived importance: 0.84 (between 0.27 and 0.68). Seventy-two percent of the items showed correlations greater than0.5 (mean =0.59) for performance vs perceived importance, 41% greater than0.5 (mean =0.47) for perceived ability vs performance and 12% greater than0.5 (mean =0.28) for perceived ability vs perceived importance. Conclusion: Measures of performance and perceived importance may have to be based primarily on their estimated clinical relevance for describing aspects of the ICF participation concept. With a clinimetric approach, parts of the studied items and domains may be used to investigate factors related to different patterns and levels of participation, and outcomes of rehabilitation.

  • 5.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Jonköping University, Sweden; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jonköping University, Sweden; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    How are the activity and participation aspects of the ICF used? Examples from studies of people with intellectual disability2015In: NeuroRehabilitation (Reading, MA), ISSN 1053-8135, E-ISSN 1878-6448, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 45-49Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Interdisciplinary differences regarding understanding the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) concepts activity/participation may hinder its unifying purpose. In the ICF model, functioning (and disability) is described as a tripartite concept: 1) Body structures/functions, 2) Activities, and 3) Participation. Activities refer to an individual perspective on disability that does not tally with the basic structure of social models. OBJECTIVE: To review how activity and participation are actually used in studies of intellectual disability (ID). CONCLUSION: Based on 16 papers, four different usages of activity/participation were found. 1) Theoretical reference to tripartite ICF concept with attempts to use it. 2) Theoretical reference to tripartite ICF concept without actual use of activities. 3) "Atheoretical" approach with implicit focus on participation. 4) Theoretical reference to bipartite concept with corresponding use of terms. The highlighted studies have in common a focus on participation. However, the usage of the term "activity" differs both within and between studies. Such terminology will probably confuse interdisciplinary communication rather than facilitating it. Also, the use of an explicit underlying theory differs, from references to a tripartite to references to a bipartite concept of disability. This paper is focused on ID, but the discussed principles regarding the ICF and interdisciplinary disability theory are applicable to other diagnostic groups within rehabilitation practices.

  • 6.
    Barns, Angela
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Svanholm, Frida
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Living in the present: Women's everyday experiences of living with rheumatoid arthritis2015In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the findings from a qualitative research project exploring eight women’s experiences of living with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Through semistructured interviews, the women provided insights into the physical, emotional, and social impacts of RA and the “work” involved in negotiating its influence in the everyday life. In narrating their experiences of adapting to RA, the women express a common desire for “normalcy,” to return to a time and space before the disruption of RA. The women’s accounts also emphasized the interrelatedness between bodily experience and constructions of self, highlighting the corporeal nature of RA and the constant shaping and reshaping of personal meanings and values.

  • 7.
    Bendelin, Nina
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahl, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Umea University.
    Zetterqvist Nelson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Experiences of guided Internet-based cognitive-behavioural treatment for depression: A qualitative study2011In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 11, no 107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ackground: Internet-based self-help treatment with minimal therapist contact has been shown to have an effect in treating various conditions. The objective of this study was to explore participants views of Internet administrated guided self-help treatment for depression. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: In-depth interviews were conducted with 12 strategically selected participants and qualitative methods with components of both thematic analysis and grounded theory were used in the analyses. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Three distinct change processes relating to how participants worked with the treatment material emerged which were categorized as (a) Readers, (b) Strivers, and (c) Doers. These processes dealt with attitudes towards treatment, views on motivational aspects of the treatment, and perceptions of consequences of the treatment. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: We conclude that the findings correspond with existing theoretical models of face-to-face psychotherapy within qualitative process research. Persons who take responsibility for the treatment and also attribute success to themselves appear to benefit more. Motivation is a crucial aspect of guided self-help in the treatment of depression.

  • 8.
    Bjelkemyr, Anna
    et al.
    SAFER Vehicle and Traffic Safety Centre at Chalmers, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dukic, Tania
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Owens, Rachel
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Lee, Hoe C.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Support Systems Designed for Older Drivers to Achieve Safe and Comfortable Driving2013In: Journal of Transportation Technologies, ISSN 2160-0473, E-ISSN 2160-0481, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 233-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The number of older people is increasing. Many of them expect to maintain a rich social life and to con- tinue driving at an older age. Objective: The present study investigates the mechanisms behind self-regulation and driving cessation in order to suggest development of support systems to prolong older drivers’ safe mobility. Method: Three focus groups were conducted with 19 older active drivers aged 65+ who were divided according to annual mile- age driven. Results: A content analysis revealed broad self-regulatory behaviour as already reported in the literature, e.g., avoiding driving at rush hour and at night. The participants also reported difficulty in finding the way to their final destination and an increasing need to plan their travelling. Co-piloting was a behaviour applied by couples to cope with difficulties encountered in traffic. A large part of the discussion was focused on emerging feelings of stress, anxiety and fear when driving in recent years, a feeling induced by external factors e.g., other road users’ behaviour, traffic density or high speed. Apart from health problems, high levels of stress could explain driving cessation, especially for women. An increased feeling of safety and comfort could be achieved by an increased use of support systems specifically de- signed to respond to older drivers’ needs. Conclusion: Support systems for older drivers should increase comfort and decrease their stress levels. New systems, such as co-pilot function and more developed Global Positioning System (GPS) supporting of the entire travel from door to door, should be developed to respond to the market needs.

     

  • 9.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Katz, Patricia
    University of California, San Francisco, USA.
    Validation and internal consistency of the Swedish version of the Valued Life Activities scale.2016In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 30, no 12, p. 1211-1219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to create a linguistically and culturally validated Swedish version of the Valued Life Activities scale. The aim was also to describe its content and concurrent validity and its internal consistency in persons with rheumatoid arthritis.

    METHODS: The Valued Life Activities scale was translated to Swedish and culturally adapted. In order to describe the content validity, both the Swedish and original Valued Life Activities scale were linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. The concurrent validity and internal consistency were evaluated in 737 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. To establish concurrent validity, the scale was correlated to disease activity, activity limitations, and life satisfaction. Internal consistency was assessed with Cronbach's alpha.

    RESULTS: The equivalence of meaning between the Swedish and the original Valued Life Activities scale was ensured by harmonization review. Content validity was high when linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Concurrent validity showed a strong correlation with the activity limitations (r = 0.87), moderate with life satisfaction (r = -0.61), and weak with disease activity (r = 0.38). Internal consistency was excellent (Cronbach's alpha = 0.97).

    CONCLUSIONS: The Swedish Valued Life Activities scale has been tested in a large and well-characterized sample and found to be a linguistically valid and culturally adapted self-reported measure of participation. Content validity of the Valued Life Activities scale was excellent, concurrent validity strong, and the internal consistency excellent. Since both individual preferences and International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health concepts of disability are taken into account, the Swedish Valued Life Activities scale appears to be a promising new scale addressing important aspects of participation.

  • 10.
    Borgestig, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Change in eye controlled performance over time with an eye tracker controlled system, used by children with severe physical disabilities2013In: Assistive Technology: From Research to Practice, IOS Press, 2013, Vol. 33, p. 473-477Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe how speed and accuracy in eye controlled computer performance changed over time for children with severe physical disabilities that used eye tracker controlled system (ETCS) in daily activities as an effect of assistive technology (AT) intervention. Data was collected with diaries and with Compass software. The preliminary results from this study from the first four children indicate that two children improved significantly in eye controlled performance up to 19 months since start of ETCS usage in daily activities.

  • 11.
    Bromley Milton, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Börsbo, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Rovner, Graciela
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundgren-Nilsson, Åsa
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stibrant-Sunnerhagen, Katharina
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Is Pain Intensity Really That Important to Assess in Chronic Pain Patients? A Study Based on the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP)2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Incorporating the patient's view on care and treatment has become increasingly important for health care. Patients describe the variety of consequences of their chronic pain conditions as significant pain intensity, depression, and anxiety. We hypothesised that intensities of common symptoms in chronic pain conditions carry important information that can be used to identify clinically relevant subgroups. This study has three aims: 1) to determine the importance of different symptoms with respect to participation and ill-health; 2) to identify subgroups based on data concerning important symptoms; and 3) to determine the secondary consequences for the identified subgroups with respect to participation and health factors.

    Methods and Subjects

    This study is based on a cohort of patients referred to a multidisciplinary pain centre at a university hospital (n = 4645, participation rate 88%) in Sweden. The patients answered a number of questionnaires concerning symptoms, participation, and health aspects as a part of the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP).

    Results

    Common symptoms (such as pain intensity, depression, and anxiety) in patients with chronic pain showed great variability across subjects and 60% of the cohort had normal values with respect to depressive and anxiety symptoms. Pain intensity more than psychological symptoms showed stronger relationships with participation and health. It was possible to identify subgroups based on pain intensity, depression, and anxiety. With respect to participation and health, high depressive symptomatology had greater negative consequences than high anxiety.

    Conclusions

    Common symptoms (such as pain intensity and depressive and anxiety symptoms) in chronic pain conditions carry important information that can be used to identify clinically relevant subgroups.

  • 12.
    Buchanan, Angus
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia .
    Peterson, Sunila
    Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia .
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia .
    A qualitative exploration of the recovery experiences of consumers who had undertaken shared management, person-centred and self-directed services2014In: International Journal of Mental Health Systems, ISSN 1752-4458, E-ISSN 1752-4458, Vol. 8, no 23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The mental health sector across states in Australia is moving to offering individualised funds and shared management, person-centred and self-directed (SPS) services. However, little is known about the recovery experiences of consumers with mental illness who had used a SPS service that was recently introduced in Western Australia. This study explored the recovery experiences of these consumers. Methods: Data relating to sixteen consumers lived experiences were analysed using an abbreviated grounded theory approach. These data had been developed in the past by consumers, the Guides (staff) and an independent evaluator. Results: Four over-arching categories, and related sub-categories, emerged. These suggested that consumers recovery experiences included them gaining: 1) a greater sense of empowerment; 2) expanded connections with the community, others and the self; 3) an enriched sense of the self; and 4) an enhanced quality of life. Conclusions: Access to SPS services, including having access to individualised funds, high quality shared management and person-centred relationships with the Guides, and a chance to self-direct services enabled consumers to have control over all aspects of their recovery journey, facilitated change and growth, and improved their capacity to self-direct services. Most consumers encountered a number of positive recovery experiences at varied levels that enhanced their lived experiences.

  • 13.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Do low levels of Beta-endorphin in the cerebrospinal fluid indicate defective top-down inhibition in patients with chronic neuropathic pain? A cross-sectional, comparative study2014In: Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.), ISSN 1526-2375, E-ISSN 1526-4637, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 111-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Pain medicine still lacks mechanism-specific biomarkers to guide diagnosis and treatment, and defective top-down modulation is an important factor in the pathophysiology of chronic pain conditions. Using modern analytical tools and advanced multivariate statistical analysis, the aim of this study was to revisit two classical potential biomarkers of pro- and anti-nociception in humans (substance P and beta-endorphin), focusing particularly on the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).

    Design

    Cross-sectional, comparative, observational study.

    Subjects

    Patients with chronic, post-traumatic and/or post-surgical, neuropathic pain refractory to conventional treatment (N = 15) and healthy controls (N = 19) were included.

    Methods

    Samples were taken from CSF and blood, and levels of substance P and beta-endorphin were investigated using a Luminex technology kit.

    Results

    We found low levels of beta-endorphin in the CSF of neuropathic pain patients (66 ± 11 pcg/mL) compared with healthy controls (115 ± 14 pcg/mL) (P = 0.017). Substance P levels in the CSF did not differ (20 ± 2 pcg/mL, 26 ± 2, P = 0.08). However, our multivariate data analysis showed that belonging to the patient group was associated with low levels of both substances in the CSF. A higher correlation between the levels of beta-endorphin and substance P in CSF was found in healthy controls than in patients (rs = 0.725, P < 0.001 vs rs = 0.574, P = 0.032).

    Conclusions

    Patients with chronic neuropathic pain due to trauma or surgery had low levels of beta-endorphin in the CSF. We speculate that this could indicate a defective top-down modulation of pain in chronic neuropathic pain. Our results also illustrate the importance of taking a system-wide, multivariate approach when searching for biomarkers.

  • 14.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Sörensen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Nerve block as analgesia forneoplastic brachial plexopathy2010In: European Journal of Palliative Care, ISSN 1352-2779, E-ISSN 1479-0793, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 218-220Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Brachial plexus nerve blocks are performed to treat patients with chronic pain referable to the brachial plexus. The needle insertion and trajectory are based on palpation of surface landmarks. Occasionally, the surface landmarks are difficult to identify owing to body habitus or anatomic alterations secondary to surgery or radiation therapy. The intent of this manuscript is to describe a technique for brachial plexus block guided with computed tomography and to report our initial results for regional pain management.

  • 15.
    Börsbo, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Peolsson, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Impact of the interaction between selfefficacy, symptoms and catastrophizing on disability, quality of life and health in chronic pain patients2010In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 32, no 17, p. 1387-1396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the interactions between self-efficacy–including subcomponents–and symptoms (pain, depression, and anxiety), catastrophizing, disability, quality of life, and health in a population of chronic pain patients. The study used 433 chronic pain patients including 47 patients with spinal cord injuryrelated pain, 150 with chronic whiplash-associated disorders, and 236 with fibromyalgia. The participants answered a postal questionnaire that provided background data, pain intensity and duration, and psychological- and health-related items. In the multivariate context, depression, anxiety, catastrophizing, and disability were intercorrelated. Self-efficacy correlated positively with variables of quality of life and general health. These two groups of variables were negatively correlated. The pain variables–duration of pain, pain intensity, and spreading of pain–formed a third group of variables. Self-efficacy function was negatively correlated to these three pain variables. When regressing disability, quality of life, and health, we found that self-efficacy had a positive impact whereas symptoms, catastrophizing, and pain had a negative influence on these aspects. Different patterns of influencing variables were discerned for the three different analyses, and specific patterns of the subscales of self-efficacy corresponded to specific patterns of negative factors for the outcome of disability, quality of life, and health.

    Perspective: This article presents the complex interaction of psychological factors and symptoms and their positive and negative influence on disability, quality of life, and health. The results indicate that it might be important to assess and influence both enhancing and detoriating factors to ensure an effective pain management programme.

  • 16.
    Börsbo, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Liedberg, Gunilla M
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wallin, Mia
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Subgroups based on thermal and pressure pain thresholds in women with chronic whiplash display differences in clinical presentation - an explorative study2012In: Journal of pain research, ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 5, p. 511-521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the presence of subgroups in chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) based on pain thresholds for pressure (PPT), cold (CPT), and heat (HPT) and to compare these subgroups with respect to symptomatology, disability, and health aspects. Methods: Two groups of female subjects – patients with chronic WAD (n = 28) and healthy controls (CON; n = 29) – were investigated. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) for thermal thresholds and algometry for PPT at four sites in the body (over the trapezius and tibialis anterior bilaterally) were determined. Habitual pain intensities, psychological strain, disability, and health aspects were registered using a questionnaire.Results: A cluster analysis based on PPT, CPT, and HPT identified two subgroups of chronic WAD: one sensitive subgroup (s-WAD; n = 21), and one less sensitive subgroup (ls-WAD; n = 6). S-WAD displayed widespread hyperalgesia, whereas ls-WAD had localized hyperalgesia in the neck area, with tendencies to supernormal values in remote areas of the body. Generally, s-WAD had a significantly worse situation than the CON with respect to symptomatology, disability, and health aspects. The ls-WAD group was intermediary between s-WAD and CON in these aspects.Conclusion: Different explanations, eg, severity of the pain condition per se, etiological factors, and pre-trauma differences in pain sensitivity, may exist for the differences in pain thresholds between the two subgroups. Future research should investigate the role of pain thresholds in the chronic stage to determine the efficacy of treatment interventions.

  • 17.
    Chee, D. Y. T.
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
    Lee, H. C.
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
    Lee, A. H.
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
    Performance of drivers with Parkinson’s Disease under the effect of cognitive overloading: insinuation for assessment and training2013In: Advances in Transportation Studies, ISSN 1824-5463, no A29, p. 5-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Signs and symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) include a combination of slowness of movement, increased tone, tremor and loss of postural reflexes. Cognitive changes and dementia can also be found in older people affected by PD. The excessive expenditure of cerebral resources in multitasks can cause cognitive overload resulting in deterioration of functional performance. Previous research has highlighted that the balance of cognitive load is essential for safe driving; however, this has not yet been researched in relation to people with PD. Coupled with mental inflexibility and sluggish reasoning, PD drivers exposed to demanding traffic scenarios may reach dangerous levels of cognitive overload. The present study employed computation of arithmetic sums as secondary task to investigate the effect of cognitive overloading on older PD drivers.

    Methodology: A pre-post case-control study design was implemented. Convenience sample of 28 mild to moderate stages of PD drivers and 30 age-matched healthy controls were recruited and their motor and cognitive functions were assessed using the Digit Vigilance Test (DVT), Perdue Pegboard, Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT) and Trail-Making Test- Part A and B. Participants were then assessed twice using a driving simulator: with and without exposure to the secondary task.

    Results: When compared with healthy controls, PD drivers scored lower in motor and cognitive psychometric assessments and performed less competently in driving assessments. However, PD drivers drove more cautiously and took more time to complete all the driving tests when compared with the healthy counterparts. With the distraction of the secondary task, both the performance of PD drivers and controls declined, but PD drivers to a greater extent. The Trail-Making Test-B was found to be valuable in predicting the overall performance of PD drivers. The ability of PD participants was observed to have significant deterioration in driving through T-junctions and roundabouts.

    Conclusion: PD drivers should avoid cognitive overload caused by, for example, multitasking while driving. Cognitive overload may compound the problem of indecisiveness of the drivers; leading to inconvenience or dangers to other road users. Training of PD drivers should emphasize intersection manoeuvre management.

     

  • 18.
    Chen, Janice D.
    et al.
    Curtin University, Australia .
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Parsons, Richard
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Buzzard, Jennifer
    Hollywood Hospital, Australia .
    Ciccarelli, Marina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Impact of experience when using the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment to assess postural risk in children using information and communication technologies2014In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 398-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) is an observation-based screening tool that has been used to assess postural risks of children in school settings. Studies using eye-tracking technology suggest that visual search strategies are influenced by experience in the task performed. This study investigated if experience in postural risk assessments contributed to differences in outcome scores on the RULA and the visual search strategies utilized. While wearing an eye-tracker, 16 student occupational therapists and 16 experienced occupational therapists used the RULA to assess 11 video scenarios of a child using different mobile information and communication technologies (ICT) in the home environment. No significant differences in RULA outcome scores, and no conclusive differences in visual search strategies between groups were found. RULA can be used as a screening tool for postural risks following a short training session regardless of the assessors experience in postural risk assessments.

  • 19.
    Dahlman, Joakim
    et al.
    Swedish Defense Research Agency, Linköping.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Forsman, Fredrik
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg.
    Perceived motion sickness and effects on performance following naval transportation2012In: Journal of human performance in extreme environments, ISSN 1529-5168, Vol. 10, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study focused on the relationship between previous experiences of, and rated susceptibility to, motion sickness and its correlation to subjective measurements and actual performance. Performance was measured in terms of shooting precision among 23 participants from the Swedish amphibious corps after transportation in a small amphibious boat, while sealed off with no reference to the outside world. Self-rating questionnaires were collected regarding perceived performance and presence of motion sickness. The physiological status perceived by each participant was related to factors that generally indicate early stages of motion sickness, which also were correlated to deficits in performance. It was further shown that participants who believed that their performance could be affected by motion sickness also performed less well.

  • 20.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Prognostic rule generation controlling for treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Factors related to fatigue in women and men with early rheumatoid arthritis (the Swedish TIRA study)2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Dawson, Andreas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Svensson, Peter
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Pain and intramuscular release of algesic substances in the masseter muscle after experimental tooth-clenching exercises in healthy subjects2013In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 350-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS:

    To investigate whether experimental tooth clenching leads to a release of algesic substances in the masseter muscle.

    METHODS:

    Thirty healthy subjects (16 females, 14 males) participated. During two sessions, separated by at least 1 week, intramuscular microdialysis was performed to collect masseter muscle 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and glutamate as well as the metabolic markers pyruvate and lactate. Two hours after the start of microdialysis, participants were randomized to a 20-min repetitive experimental tooth-clenching task (50% of maximal voluntary contraction) or a control session (no clenching). Pain and fatigue were measured throughout. The Friedman and Wilcoxon tests were used for statistical analyses.

    RESULTS:

    No alterations were observed in the concentrations of 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate over time in the clenching or control session, or between sessions at various time points. Pain (P < .01) and fatigue (P < .01) increased significantly over time in the clenching session and were significantly higher after clenching than in the control session (P < .01).

    CONCLUSION:

    Low levels of pain and fatigue developed with this experimental tooth-clenching model, but they were not associated with an altered release of 5-HT, glutamate, lactate, or pyruvate. More research is required to elucidate the peripheral release of algesic substances in response to tooth clenching.

  • 23.
    Djerf Svenningsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olausson, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Hallbeck, Anna-Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Walz, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Resistance to gefitinib in malignant melanoma cells is related to increased expression of Met and the insulin receptor and sustained Akt signaling2012Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Acquired resistance to cancer therapy, including targeted therapies such as epidermal growth factor receptor (ErbB) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), constitutes a major clinical problem in treating patients with malignant disease. Several drug resistance mechanisms for ErbB1 TKIs involving abnormal activation of growth factor receptors or activation of intracellular signaling pathways have been discovered. ErbB TKIs have recently been shown to inhibit growth in melanoma cells. This study was undertaken to develop a gefitinib-resistant melanoma cell line in order to find any resistance mechanism to gefitinib in melanoma cells lacking activating mutation in BRAF or NRAS.

    Material and methods: A malignant melanoma cell line (RaH5) was made resistant to the ErbB1 TKI gefitinib by continuous culture with stepwise increasing concentrations of the drug up to 10 μM. The phosphorylation status of 42 different human receptor tyrosine kinases was screened in a protein array in resistant (RaH5ZDR) and wild-type RaH5 cells treated with or without gefitinib. The PI3K, MAPK and Stat3 signaling pathways were studied in an analogous way by Western blot analysis; 2-D gel electrophoresis was performed to determine other potential proteins involved in gefitinib resistance in RaH5 cells. In addition, the effect of the pan-ErbB TKI canertinib on gefitinib-resistant cells was investigated.

    Results: Protein array experiments showed that only Met and the insulin receptor (IR) exhibited substantially increased activation in RaH5ZDR cells as compared to their nonresistant counterparts. Interestingly, following gefitinib treatment ErbB2 and ErbB3 receptor signaling in resistant cells were equally well suppressed as in non-resistant cells. However, downstream Akt and Erk1/2 phosphorylation was inhibited to a greater extent in non-resistant RaH5 cells.

    Conclusion: Resistance to gefitinib in RaH5 cells appears to be related to an increased expression of Met and IR and linked to a more persistent signaling through Akt and Erk1/2. However, additional studies are required to further elucidate the resistance to gefitinib in our experimental system.

  • 24.
    Ernberg, M.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Castrillon, E.E.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    List, T.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Svensson, P.
    Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Experimental myalgia induced by repeated infusion of acidicsaline into the human masseter muscle does not cause the release of algesic substances2013In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 539-550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Animal studies have shown that two repeated intramuscular injections of acidic saline induce mechanical allodynia that lasts for 4 weeks with spread to the contralateral side. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that two repeated intramuscular infusions of acidic saline into the human masseter muscle is associated with pain, mechanical allodynia and release of algesic substances. Eighteen healthy volunteers participated. On day 1, 2.5 mL of acidic saline (pH 3.3) was infused into one of the masseter muscles and isotonic saline (pH 6.0) into the other (randomized and single-blind). Two days later, intramuscular microdialysis was performed to sample serotonin, glutamate, pyruvate, lactate and glucose, during which the saline infusions were repeated. Pain and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded before and after infusions on both days.

    RESULTS:

    Pain intensity induced by the infusions was higher after acidic than that after isotonic saline (p < 0.05). PPTs were decreased on both sides after microdialysis compared with baseline day 1 (p's < 0.05), but there were no differences in PPTs between sides at any time point. The levels of serotonin, glutamate, pyruvate, lactate or glucose did not change significantly during microdialysis.

    CONCLUSION:

    Infusion of acidic saline caused low levels of muscle pain, but no mechanical allodynia and no increased release of algesic substances. The value of this model appears modest, but future studies could be performed with larger sample size and higher flow rate before definite conclusions about the validity of the model for craniofacial myalgia can be drawn.

  • 25.
    Evans, Kiah L.
    et al.
    Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia .
    Millsteed, Jeannine
    Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia .
    Richmond, Janet E.
    Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia .
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia; Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Perth, Australia, Jönköping University, Sweden; La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya J.
    Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia; Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    The complexity of role balance: Support for the Model of Juggling Occupations2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 334-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This pilot study aimed to establish the appropriateness of the Model of Juggling Occupations in exploring the complex experience of role balance amongst working women with family responsibilities living in Perth, Australia. Methods: In meeting this aim, an evaluation was conducted of a case study design, where data were collected through a questionnaire, time diary, and interview. Results: Overall role balance varied over time and across participants. Positive indicators of role balance occurred frequently in the questionnaires and time diaries, despite the interviews revealing a predominance of negative evaluations of role balance. Between-role balance was achieved through compatible role overlap, buffering, and renewal. An exploration of within-role balance factors demonstrated that occupational participation, values, interests, personal causation, and habits were related to role balance. Conclusions: This pilot study concluded that the Model of Juggling Occupations is an appropriate conceptual framework to explore the complex and dynamic experience of role balance amongst working women with family responsibilities. It was also confirmed that the case study design, including the questionnaire, time diary, and interview methods, is suitable for researching role balance from this perspective.

  • 26.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA, Australia .
    Horlin, Chiara
    Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA, Australia .
    Dahlman, Joakim
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Dukic, Tania
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, VTI, Linköping, Sweden .
    Barnett, Tania
    Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA, Australia .
    Usability of the SAFEWAY2SCHOOL system in children with cognitive disabilities2013In: European Transport Research Review, ISSN 1867-0717, E-ISSN 1866-8887, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 127-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    SAFEWAY2SCHOOL is a programme based on several systems for the enhancement of school transportation safety for children. The aim of the study was to explore whether children with cognitive disabilities will notice, realise, understand, trust and accept the SAFEWAY2SCHOOL system and act in accordance with its instructions.

    Methods

    Fourteen children with cognitive disabilities and a control group of 23 children were shown five videos of scenarios involving journeys to and from school. During the first viewing visual scanning patterns were recorded with an eye tracking device. After a second viewing the participant was asked ten questions per scenario. Five questions addressed what the children saw on the video, and the remaining five what they would need to know and/or do within the scenario. Additional ratings of trust, likability, acceptability and usability were also collected.

    Results

    Very few differences were found in the visual scanning patterns of children with disabilities compared to children who participated in the control group. Of the 50 questions regarding what children saw or needed to know and/or do, only one significant difference between groups was found. No significant differences were found regarding self-reported ratings of trust, acceptability or usability of the system. Despite some significant differences across five of the 11 likability aspects, ratings were consistently high for both groups.

    Conclusions

    Children with cognitive disabilities proved that the SAFEWAY2SCHOOL system is as useful for them as it was for children in the control group. However, a valid estimation of the full utility of SAFEWAY2SCHOOL requires in situ testing of the system with these children.

  • 27.
    Fornander, Louise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Work and Environmental Science.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Kihlström, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Åkerlind, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Schön, Thomas
    Kalmar County Hospital.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Work and Environmental Science.
    Innate immunity proteins and a new truncated form of SPLUNC1 in nasopharyngeal aspirates from infants with respiratory syncytial virus infection2011In: PROTEOMICS CLINICAL APPLICATIONS, ISSN 1862-8346, Vol. 5, no 9-10, p. 513-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of severe respiratory tract infection in infants. The aim was to identify host defence components in nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) from infants with RSV infection and to study the expression of the novel 25 kDa innate immunity protein SPLUNC1. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanExperimental design: NPAs from infants were analyzed with 2-DE and MS in a pilot study. The levels of SPLUNC1 were analyzed with immunoblotting in 47 NPAs, admitted for RSV diagnosis. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Totally, 35 proteins were identified in NPA, including several innate immunity proteins such as group X phospholipase A(2), different S100 proteins and SPLUNC1. In addition, a new truncated 15 kDa form of SPLUNC1 was identified that was detected in about 50% of the aspirates admitted for RSV diagnosis. RSV-positive boys had significantly less 25 kDa SPLUNC1 than RSV-negative boys while there were no significant differences among girls. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions and clinical relevance: Several important innate immunity proteins were identified in NPA. Notably, a new truncated form of the newly suggested anti-bacterial protein SPLUNC1 was found. It is possible that a decrease in SPLUNC1 in the upper airways may increase the risk for severe pneumonia in boys.

  • 28.
    Fornander, Louise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Graff, Pål
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Work and Environmental Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Airway irritation among indoor swimming pool personnel: trichloramine exposure, exhaled NO and protein profiling of nasal lavage fluids2013In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 86, no 5, p. 571-580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Occurrence of airway irritation among indoor swimming pool personnel was investigated. The aims of this study were to assess trichloramine exposure levels and exhaled nitric oxide in relation to the prevalence of airway symptoms in swimming pool facilities and to determine protein effects in the upper respiratory tract.

    Methods

    The presence of airway symptoms related to work was examined in 146 individuals working at 46 indoor swimming pool facilities. Levels of trichloramine, as well as exhaled nitric oxide, were measured in five facilities with high prevalence of airway irritation and four facilities with no airway irritation among the personnel. Nasal lavage fluid was collected, and protein profiles were determined by a proteomic approach.

    Results

    17 % of the swimming pool personnel reported airway symptoms related to work. The levels of trichloramine in the swimming pool facilities ranged from 0.04 to 0.36 mg/m3. There was no covariance between trichloramine levels, exhaled nitric oxide and prevalence of airway symptoms. Protein profiling of the nasal lavage fluid showed that the levels alpha-1-antitrypsin and lactoferrin were significantly higher, and S100-A8 was significantly lower in swimming pool personnel.

    Conclusions

    This study confirms the occurrence of airway irritation among indoor swimming pool personnel. Our results indicate altered levels of innate immunity proteins in the upper airways that may pose as potential biomarkers. However, swimming pool facilities with high prevalence of airway irritation could not be explained by higher trichloramine exposure levels. Further studies are needed to clarify the environmental factors in indoor swimming pools that cause airway problems and affect the immune system.

  • 29.
    Fornander, Louise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Graff, Pål
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Wåhlén, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ydreborg, Kjell
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Flodin, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Airway symptoms and biological markers in nasal lavage fluid in subjects exposed to metalworking fluids2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 12, p. e83089-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUNDS: Occurrence of airway irritation among industrial metal workers was investigated. The aims were to study the association between exposures from water-based metal working fluids (MWF) and the health outcome among the personnel, to assess potential effects on the proteome in nasal mucous membranes, and evaluate preventive actions.

    METHODS: The prevalence of airway symptoms related to work were examined among 271 metalworkers exposed to MWF and 24 metal workers not exposed to MWF at the same factory. At the same time, air levels of potentially harmful substances (oil mist, morpholine, monoethanolamine, formaldehyde) generated from MWF was measured. Nasal lavage fluid was collected from 13 workers and 15 controls and protein profiles were determined by a proteomic approach.

    RESULTS: Airway symptoms were reported in 39% of the workers exposed to MWF although the measured levels of MWF substances in the work place air were low. Highest prevalence was found among workers handling the MWF machines but also those working in the same hall were affected. Improvement of the ventilation to reduce MWF exposure lowered the prevalence of airway problems. Protein profiling showed significantly higher levels of S100-A9 and lower levels of SPLUNC1, cystatin SN, Ig J and β2-microglobulin among workers with airway symptoms.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that upper airway symptoms among metal workers are a common problem and despite low levels of MWF-generated substances, effects on airway immune proteins are found. Further studies to clarify the role of specific MWF components in connection to airway inflammation and the identified biological markers are warranted.

  • 30.
    Forsman, Fredrik
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Sjörs-Dahlman, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Dahlman, Joakim
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Lee, Hoe C
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Eye tracking during high speed naviation at sea: Field trial in search of navigational gaze behaviour2012In: Journal of Transportation Technologies, ISSN 2160-0473, E-ISSN 2160-0481, Vol. 2, p. 277-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Professional high speed sea navigational procedures are based on turn points, courses, dangers and steering cues in the environment. Since navigational aids have become less expensive and due to the fact that electronic sea charts can be integrated with both radar and transponder information, it may be assumed that traditional navigation by using paper based charts and radar will play a less significant role in the future, especially among less experienced navigators. Possible navigational differences between experienced and non-experienced boat drivers is thus of interest with regards to their use of navigational aids. It may be assumed that less experienced navigators rely too much on the information given by the electronic sea chart, despite the fact that it is based on GPS information that can be questioned, especially in littoral waters close to land.

    Method: This eye tracking study investigates gaze behaviour from 16 experi- enced and novice boat drivers during high speed navigation at sea.

    Results: The results show that the novice drivers look at objects that are close to themselves, like instrumentation, while the experienced look more at objects far away from the boat. This is in accordance with previous research on car drivers. Further, novice boat drivers used the elec-tronic navigational aids to a larger extent than the experienced, especially during high speed conditions. The experienced drivers focused much of their attention on objects outside the boat.

    Conclusions: The findings verify that novice boat drivers tend to rely on electronic navigational aids. Experienced drivers presumably use the navigational aids to verify what they have observed in the surrounding environment and further use the paper based sea chart to a larger extent than the novice drivers.

  • 31.
    Fristedt, Sofi
    et al.
    Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Dahl, Anna K.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Wretstrand, Anders
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Bjorklund, Anita
    Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Changes in Community Mobility in Older Men and Women. A 13-Year Prospective Study2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 87827-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Community mobility, defined as "moving [ones] self in the community and using public or private transportation", has a unique ability to promote older peoples wellbeing by enabling independence and access to activity arenas for interaction with others. Early predictors of decreased community mobility among older men and women are useful in developing health promoting strategies. However, long-term prediction is rare, especially when it comes to including both public and private transportation. The present study describes factors associated with community mobility and decreased community mobility over time among older men and women. In total, 119 men and 147 women responded to a questionnaire in 1994 and 2007. Respondents were between 82 and 96 years old at follow-up. After 13 years, 40% of men and 43% of women had decreased community mobility, but 47% of men and 45% of women still experienced some independent community mobility. Cross-sectional independent community mobility among men was associated with higher ratings of subjective health, reporting no depression and more involvement in sport activities. Among women, cross-sectional independent community mobility was associated with better subjective health and doing more instrumental activities of daily living outside the home. Lower subjective health predicted decreased community mobility for both men and women, whereas self-reported health conditions did not. Consequently, general policies and individual interventions aiming to improve community mobility should consider older persons subjective health.

  • 32.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Bengtsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Sören, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brandejsky, Vaslav
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Decreased muscle concentrations of ATP and PCR in the quadriceps muscle of fibromyalgia patients – A 31P-MRS study2013In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 1205-1215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS:

    Fibromyalgia (FMS) has a prevalence of approximately 2% in the population. Central alterations have been described in FMS, but there is not consensus with respect to the role of peripheral factors for the maintenance of FMS. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) has been used to investigate the metabolism of phosphagens in muscles of FMS patients, but the results in the literature are not in consensus. The aim was to investigate the quantitative content of phosphagens and pH in resting quadriceps muscle of patients with FMS (n = 19) and in healthy controls (Controls; n = 14) using (31) P-MRS. It was also investigated whether the concentrations of these substances correlated with measures of pain and/or physical capacity.

    RESULTS:

    Significantly lower concentrations of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and phosphocreatinine (PCr; 28-29% lower) were found in FMS. No significant group differences existed with respect to inorganic phosphate (Pi), Pi/PCr and pH. The quadriceps muscle fat content was significantly higher in FMS than in Controls [FMS: 9.0 ± 0.5% vs. Controls: 6.6 ± 0.6%; (mean ± standard error); P = 0.005]. FMS had significantly lower hand and leg capacity according to specific physical test, but there were no group differences in body mass index, subjective activity level and in aerobic fitness. In FMS, the specific physical capacity in the leg and the hand correlated positively with the concentrations of ATP and PCr; no significant correlations were found with pain intensities.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Alterations in intramuscular ATP, PCr and fat content in FMS probably reflect a combination of inactivity related to pain and dysfunction of muscle mitochondria.

  • 33.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Ernberg, Malin
    Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Chronic musculoskeletal pain: review of mechanisms and biochemical biomarkers as assessed by the microdialysis technique2014In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 7, p. 313-326Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions are multifaceted, and approximately 20% of the adult population lives with severe chronic pain, with a higher prevalence in women and in lower income groups. Chronic pain is influenced by and interacts with physical, emotional, psychological, and social factors, and a biopsychosocial framework is increasingly applied in clinical practice. However, there is still a lack of assessment procedures based on the activated neurobiological pain mechanisms (ie, the biological part of the biopsychosocial model of pain), which may be a necessary step for further optimizing outcomes after treatments for patients with chronic pain. It has been suggested that chronic pain conditions are mainly driven by alterations in the central nervous system with little or no peripheral stimuli or nociception. In contrast, other authors argue that such central alterations are driven by peripheral alterations and nociceptive input. Microdialysis is an in vivo method for studying local tissue alterations and allows for sampling of substances in the interstitium of the muscle, where nociceptor free nerve endings are found close to the muscle fibers. The extracellular matrix plays a key role in physiologic functions of cells, including the primary afferent nociceptor. The present review mainly concerns the results of microdialysis studies and how they can contribute to the understanding of activated peripheral nociceptive and pain mechanisms in humans with chronic pain. The primary aim was to review molecular studies using microdialysis for the investigation of human chronic muscle pain, ie, chronic masticatory muscle pain, chronic trapezius myalgia, chronic whiplash-associated disorders, and chronic widespread pain/fibromyalgia syndrome. Several studies clearly showed elevated levels of serotonin, glutamate, lactate, and pyruvate in localized chronic myalgias and may be potential biomarkers. These results indicate that peripheral muscle alterations are parts of the activated pain mechanisms in common chronic pain conditions. Muscle alterations have been reported in fibromyalgia syndrome and chronic widespread pain, but more studies are needed before definite conclusions can be drawn. For other substances, results are inconclusive across studies and patient groups.

  • 34.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Kristiansen, Jesper
    National Research Centre Working Environm, Denmark.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Saltin, Bengt
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sogaard, Karen
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Sjogaard, Gisela
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Algogenic substances and metabolic status in work-related Trapezius Myalgia: a multivariate explorative study2014In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 15, no 357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study compares the levels of algesic substances between subjects with trapezius myalgia (TM) and healthy controls (CON) and explores the multivariate correlation pattern between these substances, pain, and metabolic status together with relative blood flow changes reported in our previous paper (Eur J Appl Physiol 108: 657-669, 2010). Methods: 43 female workers with (TM) and 19 females without (CON) trapezius myalgia were - using microdialysis - compared for differences in interstitial concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), bradykinin (BKN), serotonin (5-HT), lactate dehydrogenas (LDH), substance P, and N-terminal propeptide of procollagen type I (PINP) in the trapezius muscle at rest and during repetitive/stressful work. These data were also used in multivariate analyses together with previously presented data (Eur J Appl Physiol 108: 657-669, 2010): trapezius muscle blood flow, metabolite accumulation, oxygenation, and pain development and sensitivity. Results: Substance P was significantly elevated in TM (p=0.0068). No significant differences were found in the classical algesic substances (p: 0.432-0.926). The multivariate analysis showed that blood flow related variables, interstitial concentrations of metabolic (pyruvate), and algesic (BKN and K+) substances were important for the discrimination of the subjects to one of the two groups (R-2: 0.19-0.31, pless than0.05). Pain intensity was positively associated with levels of 5-HT and K+ and negatively associated with oxygenation indicators and IL-6 in TM (R-2: 0.24, pless than0.05). A negative correlation existed in TM between mechanical pain sensitivity of trapezius and BKN and IL-6 (R-2: 0.26-0.39, pless than0.05). Conclusion: The present study increased understanding alterations in the myalgic muscle. When considering the system-wide aspects, increased concentrations of lactate, pyruvate and K+ and decreased oxygenation characterized TM compared to CON. There are three major possible explanations for this finding: the workers with pain had relatively low severity of myalgia, metabolic alterations preceded detectable alterations in levels of algesics, or peripheral sensitization and other muscle alterations existed in TM. Only SP of the investigated algesic substances was elevated in TM. Several of the algesics were of importance for the levels of pain intensity and mechanical pain sensitivity in TM. These results indicate peripheral contribution to maintenance of central nociceptive and pain mechanisms and may be important to consider when designing treatments.

  • 35.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Potential Muscle Biomarkers of Chronic Myalgia in Humans - A Systematic Review of Microdialysis Studies2012In: Biomarker / [ed] Tapan Kumar Khan, INTECH, 2012, p. 102-132Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of biomarkers in present day health care system, health management and healthy life is enormous. Clinicians need them for diagnosis, prognosis, effect of therapeutic intervention, and most importantly, for early detection of a disease. Pharmaceutical industries need them for new drug discovery and drug efficiency test. Regulatory authorities need them for testing toxicity and environmental impact. Epidemiologists need them for population screening and risk factor determination. In post genomic era biomarkers would have a huge impact in personalized medicine and personalized health management. This scope of this book is not limited to just a few of the most important aspects of biomarkers but covers wide variety of subjects, from biomarkers cancer to neurodegenerative diseases. Chapters cover variety of aspects, from modern cell based technologies to molecular imaging; from drug discovery to critical care prognosis. A great amount of information is also devoted to bioinformatics and statistics. There is an enormous potential for commercial value of biomarkers. The global diagnostic market accounts for only 1-2% of government healthcare expense, however, it influences on 60-70% decisions in healthcare. My sincere thanks go to all the contributors of this book who took the extra effort beyond their busy schedules. Last, but not least I would like to express my gratitude to the publishing group for their tireless support

  • 36.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Forsberg, Frida
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Nazdar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Karlsson, Linn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Stensson, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Chronic Widespread Pain: Increased Glutamate and Lactate Concentrations in the Trapezius Muscle and Plasma2014In: The Clinical Journal of Pain, ISSN 0749-8047, E-ISSN 1536-5409, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 409-420Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:: Chronic widespread pain (CWP), including fibromyalgia syndrome (FM), is associated with prominent negative consequences. CWP has been associated with alterations in the central processing of nociception. Whereas some researchers consider CWP/FM as a central hyperexcitability pain condition, others suggest that the central alterations are maintained by peripheral nociceptive input. Microdialysis can be used in vivo to study muscle alterations in chronic myalgia. AIM:: The aim of the study was to investigate the plasma and interstitial concentrations of metabolites and algesics in the trapezius muscle of women with CWP and in pain-free women (CON).

    MATERIALS AND METHODS:: Seventeen women with CWP and 24 CON went through a clinical examination and completed a questionnaire; the pressure pain thresholds in the upper and lower extremities were registered. Microdialysis was conducted in the trapezius muscle, and a blood sample was drawn. Muscle blood flow, interstitial muscle concentrations, and plasma concentrations of lactate, pyruvate, glutamate, glucose, and glycerol (not in the plasma) were determined.

    RESULTS:: CWP patients had significantly increased interstitial muscle (P=0.02 to 0.001) and plasma (P=0.026 to 0.017) concentrations of lactate and glutamate. No significant differences existed in blood flow between CWP and CON. The interstitial concentrations-but not the plasma levels-of glutamate and lactate correlated significantly with aspects of pain such as pressure pain thresholds of the trapezius (R=0.22) and tibialis anterior (R=0.18) and the mean pain intensity (R=0.10) in CWP but not in CON.

    CONCLUSIONS:: The present study supports the suggestion that aspects of pain and central alterations in CWP/FM are influenced by peripheral tissue alterations.

  • 37.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Umeå universitet / Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå.
    Borg, Kristian
    Karolinska institutet / Danderyds sjukhus, Stockholm.
    Ruding, Karin
    Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala.
    Brodda Jansen, Gunilla
    Karolinska institutet / Danderyds sjukhus, Stockholm.
    Rivano Fischer, Marcello
    Lunds universitet / Skånes universitetssjukhus.
    Utvärdering av rehabiliteringsgarantin kräver bättre vetenskapligt underlag: [Evaluation of the rehabilitation guarantee requires better scientific support]2013In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 110, no 9-10, p. 499-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Inspektionen för socialförsäkringen har utvärderat ­rehabiliteringsgarantin. Rapporten uppvisar stora brister, vilket bekräftas av en granskning av den del som rör multimodal rehabilitering vid långvariga smärtor.

  • 38.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjörs, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leandersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Interstitial concentration of serotonin is increased in myalgic human trapezius muscle during rest, repetitive work and mental stress - an in vivo microdialysis study2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 70, no 7, p. 478-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The pathophysiology of trapezius myalgia is not fully elucidated. Serotonin (5-HT) is involved in modulation of nociception and hyperalgesia. Our aim was to compare the interstitial 5-HT levels of the trapezius muscle in women with chronic trapezius myalgia and in pain-free controls.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Microdialysate of the trapezius muscle collected every 20 minutes during rest, work (100 min) and stress (20 min) was used to study the dynamics of 5-HT in women with chronic trapezius myalgia (MYA; n=18) and in pain-free controls (CON; n=30).

    RESULTS: MYA had higher levels of 5-HT than CON at baseline, during repetitive work, during mental stress and during recovery. There were no significant time effects on 5-HT levels.

    CONCLUSION: 5-HT has the potential of a biomarker of chronic myalgia. Elevated levels of 5-HT may be involved in maintenance of habitual chronic pain and might contribute to increased pain during exercise by facilitating the effect of released algesic substances linked to such muscle demands.

  • 39.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Persson, H Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pulmonary Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Intriguing bronchoalveolar lavage proteome in a case of pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis2013In: The American journal of case reports, ISSN 1941-5923, Vol. 14, p. 129-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is a rare interstitial lung disease associated with tobacco smoke exposure. New insights into its pathogenesis and how it differs from that of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may be provided by proteomic studies on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF).

    CASE REPORT: We present the BALF proteome in a biopsy-proven case of PLCH and compare it with typical proteomes of COPD and of the healthy lung. The BALF proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and the protein patterns were analyzed with a computerized 2-DE imaging system. As compared to the healthy subject and the COPD case, the PLCH case showed a strikingly different 2-DE pattern. There was much more IgG (heavy chain) and orosomucoid, and less α1-antitrypsin, surfactant protein-A, haptoglobin, cystatin-S, Clara cell protein 10, transthyretin and gelsolin. Moreover, no apolipoprotein-A1, pro-apolipoprotein-A1, amyloid P, calgranulin A, or calgranulin B was detected at all.

    CONCLUSIONS: This case of PLCH presents with an extreme BALF proteome lacking significant amounts of protective and anti-inflammatory proteins. Thus, the intriguing BALF proteome opens up new lines of research into the pathophysiology of PLCH and how its pathogenesis differs from that in COPD.

  • 40.
    Ghafouri, Nazdar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Fowler, Christopher J.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Turkina, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Linn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Effects of Two Different Specific Neck Exercise Interventions on Palmitoylethanolamide and Stearoylethanolamide Concentrations in the Interstitium of the Trapezius Muscle in Women with Chronic Neck Shoulder Pain2014In: Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.), ISSN 1526-2375, E-ISSN 1526-4637, Vol. 15, no 8, p. 1379-1389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. Chronic neck/shoulder pain (CNSP) is one of the most common pain conditions. The understanding of mechanisms, including the peripheral balance between nociceptive and antinociceptive processes, is incomplete. N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) are a class of endogenous compounds that regulate inflammation and pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of two NAEs: the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor type-a ligand palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and stearoylethanolamide (SEA) in the muscle interstitium of the trapezius muscle in women with CNSP randomized to two different neck specific training programs and in a healthy pain-free control group (CON). Materials and Methods. Fifty-seven women with CNSP were randomized to strength + stretch or stretch alone exercise programs. Twenty-nine subjects underwent microdialysis procedure before and after 4-6 months of exercise. Twenty-four CON subjects underwent microdialysis procedure before and after 4-6 months without any intervention in between. Microdialysate samples were collected from the trapezius muscle and analyzed by mass spectrometry for PEA and SEA levels. Results. PEA and SEA levels were significantly higher in CNSP patients compared with CON. PEA was significantly higher in CNSP than in CON after both training programs. SEA was significantly higher in CNSP than in CON after stretch alone but not after strength + stretch training. A significant positive correlation was found between changes in pain intensity and in SEA levels in the strength + stretch group, but not in the stretch alone group. Conclusion. Our results indicate that exercise interventions differentially affect the levels of the bioactive lipids PEA and SEA in the interstitium of the trapezius muscle in women with CNSP.

  • 41.
    Ghafouri, Nazdar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Stensson, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fowler, Christopher J.
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Palmitoylethanolamide and stearoylethanolamide levels in the interstitium of the trapezius muscle of women with chronic widespread pain and chronic neck-shoulder pain correlate with pain intensity and sensitivity2013In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 154, no 9, p. 1649-1658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic widespread pain (CWP) is a complex condition characterized by central hyperexcitability and altered descending control of nociception. However, nociceptive input from deep tissues is suggested to be an important drive. N-Acylethanolamines (NAEs) are endogenous lipid mediators involved in regulation of inflammation and pain. Previously we have reported elevated levels of the 2 NAEs, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor type-alpha ligand N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) and N-stearoylethanolamine (SEA) in chronic neck/shoulder pain (CNSP). In the present study, the levels of PEA and SEA in women with CWP (n = 18), CNSP (n = 34) and healthy controls (CON, n = 24) were investigated. All subjects went through clinical examination, pressure pain threshold measurements and induction of experimental pain in the tibialis anterior muscle. Microdialysis dialysate of the trapezius was collected before and after subjects performed a repetitive low-force exercise and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The levels of PEA and SEA in CNSP were significantly higher post exercise compared with CWP, and both pre and post exercise compared with CON. Levels of both NAEs decreased significantly pre to post exercise in CWP. Intercorrelations existed between aspects of pain intensity and sensitivity and the level of the 2 NAEs in CWP and CNSP. This is the first study demonstrating that CNSP and CWP differ in levels of NAEs in response to a low-force exercise which induces pain. Increases in pain intensity as a consequence of low-force exercise were associated with low levels of PEA and SEA in CNSP and CWP. These results indicate that PEA and SEA have antinociceptive roles in humans.

  • 42.
    Ghafouri, Nazdar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Turkina, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Linn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fowler, Christopher J.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    High Levels of N-Palmitoylethanolamide and N-Stearoylethanolamide in Microdialysate Samples from Myalgic Trapezius Muscle in Women2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) are endogenous compounds that regulate inflammation and pain. These include the cannabinoid ligand anandamide (AEA) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-a ligand palmitoylethanolamide (PEA). Little is known as to the levels of NAEs in pain states in human, particularly in the skeletal muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of these lipid mediators in muscle dialysate from women with chronic neck-/shoulder pain compared to healthy controls. Methods: Eleven women with chronic neck-/shoulder pain and eleven healthy women participated in this study. All participants went through microdialysis procedures in the trapezius muscle. Muscle dialysate samples were collected during four hours and analysed by nano liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS). Results: We were able to detect AEA, PEA, N-stearoylethanolamine (SEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in a single chromatographic run. Of the NAEs studied, PEA and SEA were clearly detectable in the muscle microdialysate samples. The muscle dialysate levels of PEA and SEA were significantly higher in myalgic subjects compared to healthy controls. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that microdialysis in combination with mass spectrometry can be used for analysing NAEs in human muscle tissue regularly over time. Furthermore the significant group differences in the concentration of PEA and SEA in this study might fill an important gap in our knowledge of mechanisms in chronic myalgia in humans. In the long run this expanded understanding of nociceptive and anitinociceptive processes in the muscle may provide a base for ameliorating treatment and rehabilitation of pain.

  • 43.
    Gribble, Nigel
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
    Parsons, Richard
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
    Donlau, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Adult Habilitation.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia.
    Predictors of time to complete toileting for children with spina bifida2013In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 60, no 5, p. 343-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aim

    Previous research has shown that children with spina bifida use clean intermittent catheterisation for urination, a rather complex procedure that increases the time taken to completion. However, no studies have analysed the factors impacting on the time taken to complete the urination that could inform occupational therapy practice. Therefore, the aim was to identify the variables that predict extended time children with spina bifida take to complete urination.

    Methods

    Fifty children, aged 5–18 years old with spina bifida using clean intermittent catheterisation, were observed while toileting and responding to a set of assessments tools, among them the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. A logistic regression was used to identify which variables were independently associated with an extended toileting time.

    Results

    Children with spina bifida do take long time to urinate. More than half of this study's participants required more than five minutes completing urination, but not all required extended times. Ambulant, independent girls were more likely to perform toileting in less than six minutes compared with other children with spina bifida. However, age, IQ, maintained focus on the task, Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, time processing abilities and self-reported ratings of independence appeared to be of no relevance, to predict extended toileting times.

    Conclusion

    To minimise occupational disruption caused by extended toileting times, occupational therapists should utilise the relevant predictors: gender, independence and ambulation when they prioritise children for relevant interventions.

     

  • 44.
    Hadrevi, J
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Sjörs, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Antti, H
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Crenshaw, A G.
    University of Gavle, Sweden .
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Hellstrom, F
    University of Gavle, Sweden .
    Comparative metabolomics of muscle interstitium fluid in human trapezius myalgia: an in vivo microdialysis study2013In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 113, no 12, p. 2977-2989Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanisms behind trapezius myalgia are unclear. Many hypotheses have been presented suggesting an altered metabolism in the muscle. Here, muscle microdialysate from healthy and myalgic muscle is analysed using metabolomics. Metabolomics analyse a vast number of metabolites, enabling a comprehensive explorative screening of the cellular processes in the muscle. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMicrodialysate samples were obtained from the shoulder muscle of healthy and myalgic subjects that performed a work and stress test. Samples from the baseline period and from the recovery period were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) together with multivariate analysis to detect differences in extracellular content of metabolites between groups. Systematic differences in metabolites between groups were identified using multivariate analysis and orthogonal partial least square discriminate analysis (OPLS-DA). A complementary Mann-Whitney U test of group difference in individual metabolites was also performed. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanA large number of metabolites were detected and identified in this screening study. At baseline, no systematic differences between groups were observed according to the OPLS-DA. However, two metabolites, l-leucine and pyroglutamic acid, were significantly more abundant in the myalgic muscle compared to the healthy muscle. In the recovery period, systematic difference in metabolites between the groups was observed according to the OPLS-DA. The groups differed in amino acids, fatty acids and carbohydrates. Myristic acid and putrescine were significantly more abundant and beta-d-glucopyranose was significantly less abundant in the myalgic muscle. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThis study provides important information regarding the metabolite content, thereby presenting new clues regarding the pathophysiology of the myalgic muscle.

  • 45.
    Hadrevi, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Hellstrom, Fredrik
    University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Multivariate Modeling of Proteins Related to Trapezius Myalgia, a Comparative Study of Female Cleaners with or without Pain2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of chronic trapezius myalgia is high in women with high exposure to awkward working positions, repetitive movements and movements with high precision demands. The mechanisms behind chronic trapezius myalgia are not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to explore the differences in protein content between healthy and myalgic trapezius muscle using proteomics. Muscle biopsies from 12 female cleaners with work-related trapezius myalgia and 12 pain free female cleaners were obtained from the descending part of the trapezius. Proteins were separated with two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and selected proteins were identified with mass spectrometry. In order to discriminate the two groups, quantified proteins were fitted to a multivariate analysis: partial least square discriminate analysis. The model separated 28 unique proteins which were related to glycolysis, the tricaboxylic acid cycle, to the contractile apparatus, the cytoskeleton and to acute response proteins. The results suggest altered metabolism, a higher abundance of proteins related to inflammation in myalgic cleaners compared to healthy, and a possible alteration of the contractile apparatus. This explorative proteomic screening of proteins related to chronic pain in the trapezius muscle provides new important aspects of the pathophysiology behind chronic trapezius myalgia.

  • 46.
    Hadrévi, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Turkina, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Hellström, Fredrik
    University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Myosin light chain and calcium regulating protein differences in chronic musculoskeletal neck and shoulder pain2016In: Journal of Integrated OMICS, ISSN 2182-0287, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proteomic screening analysis has detected myosin light chain (MLC) as a protein implied to be involved in chronic musculoskeletal neck and shoulder pain. Several analyses of MLC proteins have stated a difference in phosphorylation being the determining factor for protein activation hence altered contrability of the muscle in i.e. senescence. In continuation of a previous publication, this study is an attempt to analyze the different MLC isoforms by mass spectrometry and immune-analyses in myalgic and healthy trapezius muscle. In the present study no differences in phosphorylation level between the corresponding individual proteins were detected using LC-MSMS and immunoblotting; instead we assigned different isoforms of regulatory MLCs. To further elucidate the contrability: calcium (Ca2+) regulatory proteins, sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase 1 (SERCA-1) and calsequestrine (CSQ) were analyzed by western blot. The analysis revealed a significantly increased abundance of SERCA-1 protein in the myalgic muscle and a significantly increased abundance of CSQ in healthy muscle. Myalgic muscle contraction patterns have in previous studies shown to differ from healthy muscle which may be connected to the Ca2+ availability in the muscle. Here we present the proteomic characterization of differences in Ca2+ regulating proteins and particularly regulatory MLCs in trapezius muscle of women with chronic musculoskeletal neck and shoulder pain.

  • 47.
    Hallert, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Department of Rehabilitation, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Disability in women and men with early rheumatoid arthritis during 8 years after diagnosis 8the Swedish TIRA-study2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    et al.
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Grönlund, Christer
    Biomedical Engineering and Informatics, Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Roeleveld, Karin
    Department of Human Movement Science, Dragvoll, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    The relation between neuromuscular control and pain intensity in fibromyalgia2011In: JOURNAL OF ELECTROMYOGRAPHY AND KINESIOLOGY, ISSN 1050-6411, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 519-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fibromyalgia patients are shown to have a different neuromuscular control (differential activation) than healthy persons. Before clinical trials can be initiated, the relation between differential activations and pain intensity among fibromyalgia patients needs to be investigated. Twenty-seven fibromyalgia patients performed 3 min bilateral shoulder elevations with different loads (0-4 kg) with a high-density surface electromyographical (EMG) grid placed on the upper trapezius. Differential activation was quantified by the power spectral median frequency of the difference in EMG amplitude between the cranial and caudal parts of the upper trapezius. The average duration of the differential activation was described by the inverse of the median frequency of the differential activations. The relation between frequency and duration of differential activations as an average of the 4 loads and pain intensity the same day prior to the experiment was explored by Pearsons correlation coefficients. A strong negative relation between frequency of differential activations and pain intensity (R = -0.67, p andlt; 0.001) and a strong positive association between duration of differential activations and pain intensity (R = 0.66, p andlt; 0.001) were found. The significant association between frequency and duration of differential activations and pain intensity among the fibromyalgia patients indicates a relation between this neuromuscular control pattern and pain intensity. This finding support initiation of clinical trials for investigating effects on pain intensity of modifying differential activations among fibromyalgia patients.

  • 49.
    Horlin, C.
    et al.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Curtin University of of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia.
    Albrecht, M.A.
    School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, CHIRI, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia.
    Falkmer, M.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Curtin University of of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia; School of Education and Communication, Institute of Disability Research, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Leung, D.
    School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Curtin University of of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia.
    Ordqvist, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Tan, T.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia.
    Lee, W.L.
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (CHIRI), Curtin University of of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia; School of Occupational Therapy, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3086, Australia.
    Visual search strategies of children with and without autism spectrum disorders during an embedded figures task2014In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 463-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individuals with ASD often demonstrate superior performance on embedded figures tasks (EFTs). We investigated visual scanning behaviour in children with ASD during an EFT in an attempt replicating a previous study examining differences in visual search behaviour. Twenty-three children with, and 31 children without an ASD were shown 16 items from the Figure-Ground subtest of the TVPS-3 while wearing an eye tracker. Children with ASD exhibited fewer fixations, and less time per fixation, on the target figure. Accuracy was similar between the two groups. There were no other noteworthy differences between children with and without ASD. Differences in visual scanning patterns in the presence of typical behavioural performance suggest that any purported differences in processing style may not be detrimental to cognitive performance and further refinement of the current methodology may lead to support for a purported advantageous cognitive style. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 50.
    Horlin, Chiara
    et al.
    Curtin University, Australia .
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin University, Australia Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Fitzgerald, Patrick
    Curtin University, Australia .
    Leung, Denise
    Curtin University, Australia .
    Ordqvist, Anna
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Habilitation in Central County.
    The influence of static versus naturalistic stimuli on face processing in children with and without Asperger syndrome or high-functioning autism2013In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 7, no 12, p. 1617-1624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Questions regarding the use of static or dynamic facial stimuli in experimental studies investigating facial processing of individuals with AS/HFA raises issues of both ecological validity and the applicability of experimental findings to clinical or everyday practice. Children with and without AS/HFA (n = 38) were fitted with a head-mounted eye-tracker and exposed to either static or interactive dynamic facial stimuli. Average fixation duration, the proportion of fixations in areas of interest and a comparative index that was independent of differences in presentation length between stimuli types were calculated. Visual scanning patterns of individuals with AS/HFA were not affected by stimuli type. However, control participants exhibited different scanning patterns between dynamic and static stimuli for certain regions of the face. Visual scanning patterns in children with AS/HFA are consistent regardless of the stimuli being a static photo or dynamic in the form of a real face. Hence, information from experimental studies with static photos of faces provide information that is valid and can be generalised to "real world" interactions.

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