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  • 1.
    Altgärde, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Redéen, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hilding, Niclas
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Drott, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Horse-related trauma in children and adults during a two year period2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 22, no 40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Horse riding, with almost 200,000 participants, is the eighth most popular sport in Sweden. Severe injuries can occur with horse riding accidents which is well documented. This study was undertaken to investigate if injuries associated with horse riding are common, which type of injuries occur, what mechanisms are involved and to estimate the costs to the society. Material and methods: All patients attending the emergency department at Link ping University Hospital, during the years 2003-2004, due to horse related trauma were prospectively recorded. The patients were divided into two groups according to age, 147 children and 141 adults. The medical records were retrospectively scrutinized. Results: The most common mechanism of injury was falling from the horse. Most commonly, minor sprains and soft tissue injuries were seen, but also minor head injuries and fractures, mainly located in the upper limb. In total 26 adults and 37 children were admitted. Of these 63 patients 19 were considered having a serious injury. In total, four patients needed treatment in intensive care units. The total cost in each group was 200,000 Euro/year. Conclusion: Horse riding is a sport with well known risks. Our results corresponds to the literature, however we have not observed the same incidence of serious injuries. In contrast we find these to be fairly uncommon. The injuries are mainly minor, with a small risk of long term morbidity. Over time regulations and safety equipment seem to have decreased the number of serious accidents.

  • 2.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dalal, Koustuv
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hazardous Drinking Concepts, Limits and Methods: Low Levels of Awareness, Knowledge and Use in the Swedish Population.2011In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 638-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate the awareness and knowledge of hazardous drinking limits among the general population in Sweden and the extent to which people estimate their alcohol consumption in standard drinks to assess their level of drinking.

    Methods: A population-based study involving 6000 individuals selected from the total Swedish population was performed. Data were collected by means of a postal questionnaire. The mail survey response rate was 54.3% (n = 3200) of the net sample of 5891 persons.

    Results: With regard to drinking patterns, 10% of the respondents were abstainers, 59% were sensible drinkers and 31% were classified as hazardous drinkers. Most of the abstainers (80%), sensible drinkers (64%) and hazardous drinkers (56%) stated that they had never heard about the standard drink method. Familiarity with the hazardous drinking concept also differed between the three categories although ∼61% of sensible and hazardous drinkers expressed awareness of the concept (46% of the abstainers). Knowledge about the limits for sensible drinking was very poor. Between 94 and 97% in the three categories did not know the limit. There was a statistically significant association between having visited health care within the last 12 months and being aware of the standard drink method and the hazardous drinking concept, but not with knowing the hazardous drinking limits. Similarly, there was a significant association between having had at least one alcohol conversation in health care within the last 12 months and being aware of the standard drink method and the hazardous drinking concept, but not with knowing the hazardous drinking limits.

    Conclusion: The results can be seen as a major challenge for the health-care system and public health authorities because they imply that a large proportion of the Swedish population does not know when alcohol consumption becomes a threat to their health. The current strategy to disseminate knowledge about sensible drinking limits to the population through the health-care system seems to have failed and new means of informing the population are warranted.

  • 3.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    McCambridge, Jim
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics.
    Effectiveness of a proactive mail-based alcohol Internet intervention for university students: dismantling the assessment and feedback components in a randomized controlled trial2012In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 14, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: University students in Sweden routinely receive proactive mail-based alcohol Internet interventions sent from student health services. This intervention provides personalized normative feedback on alcohol consumption with suggestions on how to decrease drinking. Earlier feasibility trials by our group and others have examined effectiveness in simple parallel-groups designs.Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of electronic screening and brief intervention, using a randomized controlled trial design that takes account of baseline assessment reactivity (and other possible effects of the research process) due to the similarity between the intervention and assessment content. The design of the study allowed for exploration of the magnitude of the assessment effects per se.Methods: This trial used a dismantling design and randomly assigned 5227 students to 3 groups: (1) routine practice assessment and feedback, (2) assessment-only without feedback, and (3) neither assessment nor feedback. At baseline all participants were blinded to study participation, with no contact being made with group 3. We approached students 2 months later to participate in a cross-sectional alcohol survey. All interventions were fully automated and did not have any human involvement. All data used in the analysis were based on self-assessment using questionnaires. The participants were unaware that they were participating in a trial and thus were also blinded to which group they were randomly assigned.Results: Overall, 44.69% (n = 2336) of those targeted for study completed follow-up. Attrition was similar in groups 1 (697/1742, 40.01%) and 2 (737/1742, 42.31% retained) and lower in group 3 (902/1743, 51.75% retained). Intention-to-treat analyses among all participants regardless of their baseline drinking status revealed no differences between groups in all alcohol parameters at the 2-month follow-up. Per-protocol analyses of groups 1 and 2 among those who accepted the email intervention (36.2% of the students who were offered the intervention in group 1 and 37.3% of the students in group2 ) and who were risky drinkers at baseline (60.7% follow-up rate in group 1 and 63.5% in group 2) suggested possible small beneficial effects on weekly consumption attributable to feedback.Conclusions: This approach to outcome evaluation is highly conservative, and small benefits may follow the actual uptake of feedback intervention in students who are risky drinkers, the precise target group.Trial Registration: International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 24735383; http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN24735383 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6Awq7gjXG)

  • 4.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Stark Ekman, Diana
    Karlstad University.
    Johansson, Anne Lie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leijon, Matti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Referral to an electronic screening and brief alcohol intervention in primary health care in Sweden: impact of staff referral to the computer2011In: International Journal of Telemedicine and Applications, ISSN 1687-6415, E-ISSN 1687-6423, Vol. 2011, p. 1-11, article id 918763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate whether primary health care staff's referral of patients to perform an electronic screening and brief intervention (e-SBI) for alcohol use had a greater impact on change in alcohol consumption after 3 month, compared to patients who performed the test on their own initiative. Staff-referred responders reported reduced weekly alcohol consumption with an average decrease of 8.4 grams. In contrast, self-referred responders reported an average increase in weekly alcohol consumption of 2.4 grams. Staff-referred responders reported a 49% reduction of average number of heavy episodic drinking (HED) occasions per month. The corresponding reduction for self-referred responders was 62%. The differences between staff- and self-referred patient groups in the number who moved from risky drinking to nonrisky drinking at the followup were not statistically significant. Our results indicate that standalone computers with touchscreens that provide e-SBIs for risky drinking have the same effect on drinking behaviour in both staff-referred patients and self-referred patients.

  • 5.
    Bergstrand, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Källman, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Södra Älvsborgs Sjukhus, Borås, Sweden.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Microcirculatory responses of sacral tissue in healthy individuals and inpatients on different pressure-redistribution mattresses2015In: Journal of Wound Care, ISSN 0969-0700, E-ISSN 2052-2916, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 346-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the interaction between interface pressure and pressure-induced vasodilation and reactive hyperemia with different pressureredistribution mattresses.

    Method: A cross-sectional study was performed with a convenience sample of 42 healthy individuals between 18 and 64 years of age, 38 healthy individuals 65 years or older, and 35 inpatients 65 years or older at a university hospital in Sweden. Blood flow was measured at depths of 1 mm, 2 mm, and 10 mm using a combined system of laser Doppler flowmetry and photoplethysmography. The blood flow, interface pressure and skin temperature were measured in the sacral tissue before, during, and after load while lying on one standard hospital mattress and three different pressure-redistribution mattresses.

    Results: There were significant differences between the three foam mattresses with regard to average sacral pressure, peak sacral pressure, and local probe pressure with the lowest values at the visco-elastic foam/air mattress (23.5 ± 2.5 mmHg, 49.3 ± 11.1 mmHg, 29.2 ± 14.0 mmHg respectively). A greater proportion of subjects had affected blood flow in terms of lack of pressure-induced vasodilation on the visco-elastic foam/air mattress compared to the alternating pressure mattress at tissue depths of 2 mm (39.0% vs. 20.0%, respectively) and 10 mm (56.9 % vs. 35.1%, respectively). Eleven individuals, including subjects in all three subject groups were identified with no pressure-induced vasodilation or reactive hyperemia in any mattress, and this was considered a high-risk blood flow response.

    Conclusion: Interface pressure magnitudes considered not harmful during pressure-exposure lying on different pressure-redistribution mattresses can affect the microcirculation in different tissue structures. Despite having the lowest pressure values compared to the other mattresses, the visco-elastic foam/air mattress had the highest proportion of subjects with decreased blood flow indicating a more affected blood flow. Three young healthy individuals were identified with the high-risk blood flow response, indicating an innate vulnerability to pressure exposure and may not benefit from pressure-redistribution mattresses. Finally it was shown that the evaluation of pressure-redistribution support surfaces in terms of mean blood flow during and after tissue exposure is not feasible but assessment of pressure-induced vasodilation and reactive hyperemia could be a new possibility to assess individualized physiological measurements of mechanisms known to be related to pressure ulcer development.

  • 6.
    Bergstrand, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Källman, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Södra Älvsborgs Sjukhus, Borås, Sweden.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Lindberg, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pressure-induced vasodilation and reactive hyperemia at different depths in sacral tissue under clinically relevant conditions2014In: Microcirculation, ISSN 1073-9688, E-ISSN 1549-8719, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 761-771Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia at different sacral tissue depths in different populations under clinically relevant pressure exposure.

    METHODS: Forty-two subjects (< 65 years), 38 subjects (≥ 65 years), and 35 patients (≥ 65 years) participated. Interface pressure, skin temperature, and blood flow at tissue depths of 1 mm, 2 mm, and 10 mm (using laser Doppler flowmetry and photoplethysmography) were measured in the sacral tissue before, during, and after load in a supine position.

    RESULTS: pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia were observed at three tissue depths. At 10 mm depth, the proportion of subjects with a lack of pressure-induced vasodilatation was higher compared to superficial depths. The patients had higher interface pressure during load than the healthy individuals, but there were no significant differences in blood flow. Twenty-nine subjects in all three study groups were identified with a lack of pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia.

    CONCLUSIONS: pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia can be measured at different tissue depths. A lack of these responses was found in healthy individuals as well as in patients indicating an innate susceptibility in some individuals, and are potential important factors to evaluate in order to better understand the etiology of pressure ulcers.

  • 7.
    Bäck, Karolina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Islam, Rakibul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Git
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Chisalita, Ioana Simona
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Insulin and IGF1 receptors in human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells: metabolic, mitogenic and anti-inflammatory effects2012In: Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0022-0795, E-ISSN 1479-6805, Vol. 215, no 1, p. 89-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diabetes is associated with microcirculatory dysfunction and heart failure and changes in insulin and IGF1 levels. Whether human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-Cs) are sensitive to insulin and/or IGF1 is not known. We studied the role of insulin receptors (IRs) and IGF1 receptors (IGF1Rs) in metabolic, mitogenic and anti-inflammatory responses to insulin and IGF1 in HMVEC-Cs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). IR and IGF1R gene expression was studied using real-time RT-PCR. Receptor protein expression and phosphorylation were determined by western blot and ELISA. Metabolic and mitogenic effects were measured as glucose accumulation and thymidine incorporation. An E-selectin ELISA was used to investigate inflammatory responses. According to gene expression and protein in HMVEC-Cs and HUVECs, IGF1R is more abundant than IR. Immunoprecipitation with anti-IGF1R antibody and immunoblotting with anti-IR antibody and vice versa, showed insulin/IGF1 hybrid receptors in HMVEC-Cs. IGF1 at a concentration of 10(-8) mol/l significantly stimulated phosphorylation of both IGF1R and IR in HMVEC-Cs. In HUVECs IGF1 10(-8) mol/l phosphorylated IGF1R. IGF1 stimulated DNA synthesis at 10(-8) mol/l and glucose accumulation at 10(-7) mol/l in HMVEC-Cs. TNF-alpha dramatically increased E-selectin expression, but no inflammatory or anti-inflammatory effects of insulin, IGF1 or high glucose were seen. We conclude that HMVEC-Cs express more IGF1Rs than IRs, and mainly react to IGF1 due to the predominance of IGF1Rs and insulin/IGF1 hybrid receptors. TNF-alpha has a pronounced pro-inflammatory effect in HMVEC-Cs, which is not counteracted by insulin or IGF1.

  • 8.
    Bäck, Karolina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Islam, Rakibul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Git
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Chisalita, Simona
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Role of insulin and IGF-I receptors in human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells; metabolic, mitogenic and anti-inflammatory effectsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Diabetes is associated with coronary microcirculatory dysfunction and heart failure as well as changes in insulin and IGF-I levels. Our aim was to study the role of insulin receptors and IGF-I receptors in metabolic, mitogenic and anti-inflammatory responses to insulin and IGF-I in human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-C) and, for comparison, also human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Insulin receptor (IR) and IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) gene expression was studied with real-time RT-PCR. Receptor protein expression and phosphorylation was determined with Western blot and ELISA. The metabolic and mitogenic effects were measured as glucose accumulation and thymidine incorporation. An E-selectin ELISA was used to investigate the anti-inflammatory responses. IGF-IR was more abundant than IR both regarding gene expression and protein in HMVEC-C and HUVEC. Immunoprecipitation with anti-IGF-IR antibody and immunoblotting with anti-IR antibody and vice versa, showed insulin/IGF-I hybrid receptors in these cells. IGF-I 10-8 M significantly stimulated phosphorylation of both IGF-IR and IR in HMVEC-C. In HUVEC IGF-I 10-8 M phosphorylated IGF-IR. IGF-I also stimulated DNA synthesis at 10-8 M and glucose accumulation at 10-7 M. TNF-α significantly increased E-selectin expression whereas no effects were found by insulin, IGF-I or high glucose.

    We conclude that HMVEC-C express more IGF-I receptors than insulin receptors and at physiological concentrations of insulin and IGF-I mainly reacts to IGF-I probably due to the predominance of IGF-I receptors and insulin/IGF-I hybrid receptors. TNF-α has a pronounced pro-inflammatory effect in HMVEC-C which is not counteracted by insulin or IGF-I.

  • 9.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics.
    Lindberg, Malou
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Applying the RE-AIM framework to evaluate two implementation strategies used to introduce a tool for lifestyle intervention in Swedish primary health care2012In: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 167-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate two implementation strategies for the introduction of a lifestyle intervention tool in primary health care (PHC), applying the RE-AIM framework to assess outcome. A computer-based tool for lifestyle intervention was introduced in PHC. A theory-based, explicit, implementation strategy was used at three centers, and an implicit strategy with a minimum of implementation efforts at three others. After 9 months a questionnaire was sent to staff members (n= 159) and data from a test database and county council registers were collected. The RE-AIM framework was applied to evaluate outcome in terms of reach, effectiveness, adoption and implementation. The response rate for the questionnaire was 73%. Significant differences in outcome were found between the strategies regarding reach, effectiveness and adoption, in favor of the explicit implementation strategy. Regarding the dimension implementation, no differences were found according to the implementation strategy. A theory-based implementation strategy including a testing period before using a new tool in daily practice seemed to be more successful than a strategy in which the tool was introduced and immediately used for patients.                 

  • 10.
    Chisalita, Ioana Simona
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Increased IGF1 levels in relation to heart failure and cardiovascular mortality in an elderly population: impact of ACE inhibitors2011In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 165, no 6, p. 891-898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: There are conflicting results regarding the association of circulating IGF1 with cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. We assessed the relationship between IGF1 levels and heart failure (HF), ischemic heart disease (IHD), and CV mortality in an elderly population taking into account the possible impact of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Design and methods: A total of 851 persons aged 66-81 years, in a rural Swedish municipality, were subjected to medical history, clinical examination, electrocardiography, echocardiography, and fasting plasma samples. They were then followed for 8 years. Results and conclusion: Patients on ACE inhibitors had higher IGF1 levels compared with those without ACE inhibitors. In patients on ACE inhibitors, higher IGF1 values were found in patients with an ejection fraction (EF) less than40% compared with EF greater than= 40%, in patients with higher proBNP levels in quartile 4 vs 1, and in patients with IHD when compared to those without ACE inhibitors (P less than 0.001). In patients without ACE inhibitors, no relationship was found between IGF1 levels and HF or IHD. In multivariate regression, only ACE inhibitors, ECG changes characteristic for IHD, and gender had a significant impact on IGF1. Patients with higher IGF1 levels in quintiles 4 and 5 compared to quintiles 1 and 2 had a 50% higher risk for CV death (P=0.03). This was significant after adjustment for well-known CV risk factors and ACE inhibitors (P=0.03). Conclusions: Our results show that treatment with ACE inhibitors in an elderly population is associated with increased IGF1 levels, especially in patients with impaired cardiac function or IHD. High IGF1 levels tend to be associated with an increased risk for CV mortality.

  • 11.
    Chisalita, Ioana Simona
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Proinsulin and IGFBP-1 predicts mortality in an elderly population2014In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 174, no 2, p. 260-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    High IGFBP-1 in elderly subjects is related to all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality. We studied the relation of IGFBP-1 to cardiometabolic risk factors and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, and also the impact of proinsulin and insulin on this association in an unselected elderly primary health care population.

    HYPOTHESIS:

    Our hypothesis was that proinsulin and insulin may have an impact on the association of high IGFBP-1 levels with all-cause and CV-mortality in elderly.

    DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS:

    A cross-sectional and prospective study was carried out in a rural Swedish population. 851 persons aged 66-81 years were evaluated by medical history, clinical examination, electrocardiography, echocardiography, and fasting plasma samples, and were followed prospectively for up to 12 years.

    RESULTS:

    At baseline, in a multivariate analysis, IGFBP-1 was associated with gender, N-terminal proBNP (NT pro-BNP), blood glucose, body mass index (BMI), insulin and proinsulin, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and haemoglobin (Hb). During the follow-up period there were 230 deaths (27%), of which 134 (16%) were due to CV mortality. When divided into tertiles there was a significant difference for CV mortality and all-cause mortality between tertiles of IGFBP-1 and proinsulin. For insulin there was a significant difference only for all-cause mortality. After adjustment for well-known risks factors, proinsulin and IGFBP-1 had significant impact on all-cause mortality but only proinsulin on CV mortality.

    CONCLUSION:

    Only proinsulin is an independent predictor for both all-cause mortality and CV mortality when comparing IGFBP-1, insulin, and proinsulin as prognostic biomarkers for CV and all-cause mortality in an elderly population.

  • 12.
    Dini, Francesca
    et al.
    Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
    Capuano, Rosamaria
    Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
    Strand, Tillan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Paolesse, Roberto
    Department of Chemical Science and Technology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
    Di Natale, Corrado
    Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Volatile Emissions from Compressed Tissue2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since almost every fifth patient treated in hospital care develops pressure ulcers, early identification of risk is important. A non-invasive method for the elucidation of endogenous biomarkers related to pressure ulcers could be an excellent tool for this purpose. We therefore found it of interest to determine if there is a difference in the emissions of volatiles from compressed and uncompressed tissue. The ultimate goal is to find a non-invasive method to obtain an early warning for the risk of developing pressure ulcers for bed-ridden persons. Chemical analysis of the emissions, collected in compresses, was made with gas-chromatography – mass spectrometry and with a chemical sensor array, the so called electronic nose. It was found that the emissions from healthy and hospitalized persons differed significantly irrespective of the site. Within each group there was a clear difference between the compressed and uncompressed site. Peaks that could be certainly deemed as markers of the compression were, however, not identified. Nonetheless, different compounds connected to the application of local mechanical pressure were found. The results obtained with GC-MS reveal the complexity of VOC composition, thus an array of non-selective chemical sensors seems to be a suitable choice for the analysis of skin emission from compressed tissues; it may represent a practical instrument for bed side diagnostics. Results show that the adopted electronic noses are likely sensitive to the total amount of the emission rather than to its composition. The development of a gas sensor-based device requires then the design of sensor receptors adequate to detect the VOCs bouquet typical of pressure. This preliminary experiment evidences the necessity of studies where each given person is followed for a long time in a ward in order to detect the insurgence of specific VOCs pattern changes signalling the occurrence of ulcers.

  • 13.
    Efsen, Eva
    et al.
    Department of Gastroenterology, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark.
    Saermark, Torben
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care.
    Hansen, Alastair
    Department of Pathology, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark.
    Bruun, Eywin
    Department of Gastroenterology, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark.
    Brynskov, Jörn
    Department of Gastroenterology, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark.
    Ramiprilate Inhibits Functional Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Crohns Disease Fistulas2011In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 109, no 3, p. 208-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, -3 and -9 has been demonstrated in Crohns disease fistulas, but it is unknown whether these enzymes are biologically active and represent a therapeutic target. Therefore, we investigated the proteolytic activity of MMPs in fistula tissue and examined the effect of inhibitors, including clinically available drugs that beside their main action also suppress MMPs. Fistula specimens were obtained by surgical excision from 22 patients with Crohns disease and from 10 patients with fistulas resulting from other causes. Colonic endoscopic biopsies from six controls were also included. Total functional MMP activity was measured by a high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based, fluorogenic MMP-substrate cleavage assay, and the specific activity of MMP-2, -3 and -9 by the MMP Biotrak Activity Assay. The MMP inhibitors comprised ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA), the synthetic broad-spectrum inhibitor, GM6001, the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, ramiprilate, and the tetracycline, doxycycline. In Crohns disease fistulas, about 50% of the total protease activity was attributable to MMP activity. The average total MMP activity was significantly higher (about 3.5-times) in Crohns fistulas (471 FU/mu g protein, range 49-2661) compared with non-Crohns fistulas [134 FU/mu g protein, range 0-495, (p andlt; 0.05)] and normal colon [153 FU/mu g protein, range 77-243, (p andlt; 0.01)]. MMP-3 activity was increased in Crohns fistulas (1.4 ng/ml, range 0-9.83) compared with non-Crohns fistulas, [0.32 ng/ml, range 0-2.66, (p andlt; 0.02)]. The same applied to MMP-9 activity [0.64 ng/ml, range 0-5.66 and 0.17 ng/ml, range 0-1.1, respectively (p andlt; 0.04)]. Ramiprilate significantly decreased the average total MMP activity level by 42% and suppressed the specific MMP-3 activity by 72%, which is comparable to the effect of GM6001 (87%). Moreover, MMP-9 activity was completely blunted by ramiprilate. Doxycycline had no effect on MMP activity. Increased functional MMP activity, notably MMP-3 and -9, is present in Crohns fistulas and may be inhibited by ramiprilate, a widely available ACE inhibitor.

  • 14.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Flensner, Gullvi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fatigue and cognitive effort in multiple sclerosis: an fMRI study2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite recent advances in therapy and diagnosis, fatigue remains a mayor challenge in multiple sclerosis (MS).  To further the understanding of the neural underpinnings of fatigue, we undertook a study using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate neural networks that may be affected by MS-related fatigue. Twelve MS patients and 12 age- and sex matched controls were administered the Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS) to assess clinically significant fatigue, and underwent a neuropsychological examination. The participants performed a working memory task (Daneman’s  ‘Reading Span’ task) while being monitored by means of a 1.5 T Philips Achieva MR scanner. We have previously shown that this task triggers an executive network comprising frontal and parietal areas typically involved in working memory. In addition, the task engages a core network involving the anterior insula and the anterior cingulate cortex.  This latter network may be implicated in allocation of mental resources and monitoring of the present state of the individual. There were two main findings. MS participants evidenced less activation than controls in the anterior cingulate and the left parietal cortex (Brodmann area 7) and more activation in left hemisphere language areas as well as the anterior insula. The second main finding was that clinical ratings of fatigue were strongly correlated with activity in wide areas of the core network, as well as posterior language areas. We take this finding to indicate that fatigue is related to compensatory involvement of the core network, and that excess activity in the core network possibly could be used as an objective marker of fatigue in MS.

  • 15.
    Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Flensner, Gullvi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Thalamo-striato-cortical determinants to fatigue in multiple sclerosis2013In: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 715-728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The aim was to explore the thalamo-striato-cortical theory of central fatigue in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with self-reported fatigue. If the theory correctly predicted fatigue based on disruptions of the thalamo-striato-cortical network, we expected altered brain activation in this network in MS participants while performing a complex cognitive task that challenged fatigue.

    Methods

    MS participants with self-reported fatigue were examined by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the performance of a complex working memory task. In this task, cognitive effort was challenged by a parametric design, which modeled the cerebral responses at increasing cognitive demands. In order to explore the theory of central fatigue in MS we also analyzed the cerebral responses by adding perceived fatigue scores as covariates in the analysis and by calculating the functional connectivity between regions in the thalamo-striatocortical network. The main findings were that MS participants elicited altered brain responses in the thalamo-striato-cortical network, and that brain activation in the left posterior parietal cortex and the right substantia nigra was positively correlated to perceived fatigue ratings. MS participants had stronger cortical-to-cortical and subcortical-to-subcortical connections, whereas they had weaker cortical-to-subcortical connections.

    Conclusions

    The findings of the present study indicate that the thalamo-striato-cortical network is involved in the pathophysiology of fatigue in MS, and provide support for the theory of central fatigue. However, due to the limited number of participants and the somewhat heterogeneous sample of MS participants, these results have to be regarded as tentative, though they might serve as a basis for future studies.

  • 16.
    Flensner, Gullvi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Soderhamn, Olle
    University of West, Sweden .
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Work capacity and health-related quality of life among individuals with multiple sclerosis reduced by fatigue: a cross-sectional study2013In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Among individuals diagnosed with the chronic neurologic disease, multiple sclerosis (MS), a majority suffers from fatigue, which strongly influences their every-day-life. The aim of this study was to investigate work capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a group of MS patients and also to investigate if work capacity and HRQoL could be predicted by background factors, fatigue, heat sensitivity, cognitive dysfunction, emotional distress or degree of disability. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: A descriptive, cross-sectional, designed survey was undertaken A questionnaire was sent to 323 individuals diagnosed with MS, aged between 20 and 65 years, with physical disability on the expanded disability status score (EDSS) in the interval 0 andgt;= EDSS andlt;= 6.5, living in sterg"tland county in eastern Sweden. Questions on background factors, occupation and work, together with the health-related quality of life short form instrument (SF-36), the fatigue severity scale (FSS), the perceived deficit questionnaire (PDQ) and the hospital anxiety depression scale (HAD) were posed. Associations between variables were analyzed using Pearsons and Spearmans correlations. Differences between groups were tested using the Chi-square test, the Mann Whitney U-test, and the Students t-test. Predictive factors were analyzed using multiple linear and multiple logistic regression analysis. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Of those who completed the questionnaire (n = 257, 79.6%), 59.8% were working. Work capacity was found significantly more among men (p andlt; 0.005), those with a higher level of education (p andlt; 0.001), those reporting less fatigue (p andlt; 0.001), and those having no heat sensitivity (p = 0.004). For work capacity, significant predictors were low physical disability (EDSS), low fatigue, higher level of education, male sex and lower age. Those with work capacity showed significantly higher HRQoL than those who had no work capacity (p andlt; 0.001). Levels of fatigue, cognition and emotional distress were found to be major contributing factors for HRQoL. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: Work capacity and HRQoL among individuals diagnosed with MS are highly influenced by fatigue which can be considered as a key symptom. Work capacity was influenced by heat-sensitivity, cognitive difficulties and emotional distress and significant predictive factors besides fatigue, were physical disability (EDSS), age, sex, and level of education. Remaining at work also gives a better HRQoL.

  • 17.
    Hallberg, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care.
    Health-Related Quality of Life 7 Years After Hip or Vertebral fractures2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Keurhorst, Myrna N.
    et al.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Anderson, Peter
    Newcastle University, United Kingdom.
    Spak, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Segura, Lidia
    Government of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain.
    Colom, Joan
    Government of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Deluca, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England.
    van Steenkiste, Ben
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Wallace, Paul
    UCL, England.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    Fac Med, England.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Fac Med, England.
    Gual, Toni
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Laurant, Miranda G H.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Implementing training and support, financial reimbursement, and referral to an internet-based brief advice program to improve the early identification of hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption in primary care (ODHIN): study protocol for a cluster randomized factorial trial2013In: Implementation Science, ISSN 1748-5908, E-ISSN 1748-5908, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The European level of alcohol consumption, and the subsequent burden of disease, is high compared to the rest of the world. While screening and brief interventions in primary healthcare are cost-effective, in most countries they have hardly been implemented in routine primary healthcare. In this study, we aim to examine the effectiveness and efficiency of three implementation interventions that have been chosen to address key barriers for improvement: training and support to address lack of knowledge and motivation in healthcare providers; financial reimbursement to compensate the time investment; and internet-based counselling to reduce workload for primary care providers.

    Methods/design

    In a cluster randomized factorial trial, data from Catalan, English, Netherlands, Polish, and Swedish primary healthcare units will be collected on screening and brief advice rates for hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption. The three implementation strategies will be provided separately and in combination in a total of seven intervention groups and compared with a treatment as usual control group. Screening and brief intervention activities will be measured at baseline, during 12 weeks and after six months. Process measures include health professionals’ role security and therapeutic commitment of the participating providers (SAAPPQ questionnaire). A total of 120 primary healthcare units will be included, equally distributed over the five countries. Both intention to treat and per protocol analyses are planned to determine intervention effectiveness, using random coefficient regression modelling.

    Discussion

    Effective interventions to implement screening and brief interventions for hazardous alcohol use are urgently required. This international multi-centre trial will provide evidence to guide decision makers.

  • 19.
    Källman, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bergstrand, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindberg, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Different lying positions and their effects on tissue blood flow and skin temperature in older adult patients2013In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 133-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To report a study to compare the effects of different lying positions on tissue blood flow and skin temperature in older adult patients. This article reports the evaluation of study design and procedures. Background. To reduce risk of pressure ulcers, repositioning of immobile patients is a standard nursing practice; however, research into how different lying positions effect tissue microcirculation is limited. Design. Descriptive comparative design. Methods. From MarchOctober 2010, 20 inpatients, aged 65 years or older, were included in the study. Tissue blood flow and skin temperature were measured over bony prominences and in gluteus muscle in four supine and two lateral positions. Results. The blood flow over the bony prominence areas was most influenced in the superficial skin and especially in the 30 degrees lateral position, where the blood flow decreased significantly in comparison with the supine positions. There were significant individual differences in blood flow responses, but no common trend was identified among the patients considered at risk for pressure ulcer development. The study procedure worked well and was feasible to perform in an inpatient population. Conclusion. The lying positions seem to influence the tissue blood flow over the bony prominences in different ways in older adult inpatients, but further study is needed to confirm the results and to make recommendations to clinical practice. The study procedure worked well, although some minor adjustments with regard to heat accumulation will be made in future studies.

  • 20.
    Källman, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Södra Älvsborgs Sjukhus, Borås, Sweden .
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Bergstrand, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Cristina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindberg, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Effects of Different Lying Positions on Interface Pressure, Skin Temperature, and Tissue Blood Flow in Nursing Home Residents2015In: Biological Research for Nursing, ISSN 1099-8004, E-ISSN 1552-4175, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 142-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although repositioning is considered an important intervention to prevent pressure ulcers, tissue response during loading in different lying positions has not been adequately explored.

    Aim: To compare the effects of different lying positions on interface pressure, skin temperature, and tissue blood flow in nursing home residents.

    Method: From May 2011 to August 2012, interface pressure, skin temperature, and blood flow at three tissue depths were measured for 1 hr over the sacrum in 30 supine tilt and 0 supine positions and over the trochanter major in 30lateral and 90lateral positions in 25 residents aged 65 years or older. Measurement of interface pressure was accomplished using a pneumatic pressure transmitter connected to a digital manometer, skin temperature using a temperature sensor, and blood flow using photoplethysmography and laser Doppler flowmetry.

    Results: Interface pressure was significantly higher in the 0supine and 90lateral positions than in 30supine tilt and 30 lateral positions. The mean skin temperature increased from baseline in all positions. Blood flow was significantly higher in the 30 supine tilt position compared to the other positions. A hyperemic response in the post pressure period was seen at almost all tissue depths and positions.

    Conclusion: The 30supine tilt position generated less interface pressure and allowed greater tissue perfusion, suggesting that this position is the most beneficial.

  • 21.
    Leijon, Matti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arvidsson, Daniel
    Lund University/Region Skåne, Malmö.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stark Ekman, Diana
    University West, Trollhättan.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Anne Lie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Improvement of Physical Activity by a Kiosk-based Electronic Screening and Brief Intervention in Routine Primary Health Care: Patient-Initiated Versus Staff-Referred2011In: Journal of medical Internet research, ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 13, no 4, p. e99-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Interactive behavior change technology (eg, computer programs, Internet websites, and mobile phones) may facilitate the implementation of lifestyle behavior interventions in routine primary health care. Effective, fully automated solutions not involving primary health care staff may offer low-cost support for behavior change.

    OBJECTIVES: We explored the effectiveness of an electronic screening and brief intervention (e-SBI) deployed through a stand-alone information kiosk for promoting physical activity among sedentary patients in routine primary health care. We further tested whether its effectiveness differed between patients performing the e-SBI on their own initiative and those referred to it by primary health care staff.

    METHODS: The e-SBI screens for the physical activity level, motivation to change, attitudes toward performing the test, and physical characteristics and provides tailored feedback supporting behavior change. A total of 7863 patients performed the e-SBI from 2007 through 2009 in routine primary health care in Östergötland County, Sweden. Of these, 2509 were considered not sufficiently physically active, and 311 of these 2509 patients agreed to participate in an optional 3-month follow-up. These 311 patients were included in the analysis and were further divided into two groups based on whether the e-SBI was performed on the patient´s own initiative (informed by posters in the waiting room) or if the patient was referred to it by staff. A physical activity score representing the number of days being physically active was compared between baseline e-SBI and the 3-month follow-up. Based on physical activity recommendations, a score of 5 was considered the cutoff for being sufficiently physically active.

    RESULTS: In all, 137 of 311 patients (44%) were sufficiently physically active at the 3-month follow-up. The proportion becoming sufficiently physically active was 16/55 (29%), 40/101 (40%), and 81/155 (52%) for patients with a physical activity score at baseline of 0, 1 to 2, and 3 to 4, respectively. The patient-initiated group and staff-referred group had similar mean physical activity scores at baseline (2.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8-2.3, versus 2.3, 95% CI 2.1-2.5) and at follow-up, (4.1, 95% CI 3.4-4.7, vs 4.2, 95% CI 3.7-4.8).

    CONCLUSIONS: Among the sedentary patients in primary health care who participated in the follow-up, the e-SBI appeared effective at promoting short-term improvement of physical activity for about half of them. The results were similar when the e-SBI was patient-initiated or staff-referred. The e-SBI may be a low-cost complement to lifestyle behavior interventions in routine primary health care and could work as a stand-alone technique not requiring the involvment of primary health care staff.

  • 22.
    Leijon, Matti E.
    et al.
    Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University .
    Faskunger, Johan
    Swedish National Institute of Public Health.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Who is not adhering to physical activity referrals, and why?2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 234-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To analyse patients self-reported reasons for not adhering to physical activity referrals (PARs). Design and setting. Data on 1358 patients who did not adhere to PARs were collected at 38 primary health care (PHC) centres in Sweden. Intervention. PHC providers issued formal physical activity prescriptions for home-based activities or referrals for facility-based activities. Subjects. Ordinary PHC patients whom regular staff believed would benefit from increased physical activity. Main outcome measure: Reasons for non-adherence to PARs: "sickness", "pain", "low motivation", "no time", "economic factors", and "other". Results. Sickness and pain were the most common motives for non-adherence among older patients. The youngest patients blamed economic factors and lack of time more frequently than those in the oldest age group. Economic factors was a more common reason for non-adherence among those referred for facility-based activities compared with those prescribed home-based activities. Low motivation was a more frequent cause of non-adherence among those prescribed home-based activities compared with those referred for facility-based activities. Furthermore, lack of time was a more common reason for non-adherence among patients issued with PARs due to high blood pressure than other patients, while low motivation was a more common reason among patients issued with PARs because of a BMI of greater than 25. Conclusion. The reasons for non-adherence differ between patients prescribed home-based activities and referred for facility-based activities, as well as between patients with different specific characteristics. The information obtained may be valuable not only for the professionals working in PHC, but also for those who work to develop PARs for use in different contexts.

  • 23.
    McCambridge, Jim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK, England.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    White, Ian R.
    Institute Public Heatlh, England .
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Alcohol assessment and feedback by e-mail for university student hazardous and harmful drinkers: study protocol for the AMADEUS-2 randomised controlled trial2013In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13, no 949Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Alcohol is responsible for a large and growing proportion of the global burden of disease, as well as being the cause of social problems. Brief interventions are one component of comprehensive policy measures necessary to reduce these harms. Brief interventions increasingly take advantage of the Internet to reach large numbers of high risk groups such as students. The research literature on the efficacy and effectiveness of online interventions is developing rapidly. Although many studies show benefits in the form of reduced consumption, other intervention studies show no effects, for reasons that are unclear. Sweden became the first country in the world to implement a national system in which all university students are offered a brief online intervention via an e-mail. Methods/Design: This randomized controlled trial (RCT) aims to evaluate the effectiveness of this national system comprising a brief online intervention among university students who are hazardous and harmful drinkers. This study employs a conventional RCT design in which screening to determine eligibility precedes random allocation to immediate or delayed access to online intervention. The online intervention evaluated comprises three main components; assessment, normative feedback and advice on reducing drinking. Screening is confined to a single question in order to minimise assessment reactivity and to prevent contamination. Outcomes will be evaluated after 2 months, with total weekly alcohol consumption being the primary outcome measure. Invitations to participate are provided by e-mail to approximately 55,000 students in 9 Swedish universities. Discussion: This RCT evaluates routine service provision in Swedish universities via a delay in offer of intervention to the control group. It evaluates effects in the key population for whom this intervention has been designed. Study findings will inform the further development of the national service provision.

  • 24.
    McCambridge, Jim
    et al.
    London School Hyg and Trop Med, England .
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    White, Ian R.
    Institute Public Heatlh, England .
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Alcohol assessment and feedback by email for university students: main findings from a randomised controlled trial2013In: British Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0007-1250, E-ISSN 1472-1465, Vol. 203, no 5, p. 334-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanBrief interventions can be efficacious in changing alcohol consumption and increasingly take advantage of the internet to reach high-risk populations such as students. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanAims less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanTo evaluate the effectiveness of a brief online intervention, controlling for the possible effects of the research process. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethod less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanA three-arm parallel groups design was used to explore the magnitude of the feedback and assessment component effects. The three groups were: alcohol assessment and feedback (group 1); alcohol assessment only without feedback (group 2); and no contact, and thus neither assessment nor feedback (group 3). Outcomes were evaluated after 3 months via an invitation to participate in a brief cross-sectional lifestyle survey. The study was undertaken in two universities randomising the email addresses of all 14 910 students (the AMADEUS-1 study, trial registration: ISRCTN28328154). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanOverall, 52% (n=7809) of students completed follow-up, with small differences in attrition between the three groups. For each of the two primary outcomes, there was one statistically significant difference between groups, with group 1 having 3.7% fewer risky drinkers at follow-up than group 3 (P=0.006) and group 2 scoring 0.16 points lower than group 3 on the three alcohol consumption questions from the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT-C) (P = 0.039). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThis study provides some evidence of population-level benefit attained through intervening with individual students.

  • 25.
    McCambridge, Jim
    et al.
    London School Hyg and Tropical Medicine, England .
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics.
    Alcohol email assessment and feedback study dismantling effectiveness for university students (AMADEUS-1): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial2012In: TRIALS, ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 13, no 49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Alcohol causes huge problems for population health and for society, which require interventions with individuals as well as populations to prevent and reduce harms. Brief interventions can be effective and increasingly take advantage of the internet to reach high-risk groups such as students. The research literature on the effectiveness of online interventions is developing rapidly and is confronted by methodological challenges common to other areas of e-health including attrition and assessment reactivity and in the design of control conditions. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods/design: The study aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief online intervention, employing a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design that takes account of baseline assessment reactivity, and other possible effects of the research process. Outcomes will be evaluated after 3 months both among student populations as a whole including for a randomized no contact control group and among those who are risky drinkers randomized to brief assessment and feedback (routine practice) or to brief assessment only. A three-arm parallel groups trial will also allow exploration of the magnitude of the feedback and assessment component effects. The trial will be undertaken simultaneously in 2 universities randomizing approximately 15,300 students who will all be blinded to trial participation. All participants will be offered routine practice intervention at the end of the study. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDiscussion: This trial informs the development of routine service delivery in Swedish universities and more broadly contributes a new approach to the study of the effectiveness of online interventions in student populations, with relevance to behaviors other than alcohol consumption. The use of blinding and deception in this study raise ethical issues that warrant further attention.

  • 26.
    McCambridge, Jim
    et al.
    London School Hyg and Trop Med, England .
    Kypri, Kypros
    University of Newcastle, Australia .
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Porter, John
    London School Hyg and Trop Med, England .
    The Use of Deception in Public Health Behavioral Intervention Trials: A Case Study of Three Online Alcohol Trials2013In: American Journal of Bioethics, ISSN 1526-5161, E-ISSN 1536-0075, Vol. 13, no 11, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some public health behavioral intervention research studies involve deception. A methodological imperative to minimize bias can be in conflict with the ethical principle of informed consent. As a case study, we examine the specific forms of deception used in three online randomized controlled trials evaluating brief alcohol interventions. We elaborate our own decision making about the use of deception in these trials, and present our ongoing findings and uncertainties. We discuss the value of the approach of pragmatism for examining these kinds of ethical issues that can arise in research on public health interventions.

  • 27.
    McNamara, Paul N
    et al.
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    O'Doherty, Jim
    Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, UK.
    O'Connell, Marie-Louise
    University of Limerick.
    Fitzgerald, Barry W
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Toll, Rani
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Leahy, Martin J
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Tissue viability (TiVi) imaging: temporal effects of local occlusion studies in the volar forearm2010In: Journal of Biophotonics, ISSN 1864-063X, E-ISSN 1864-0648, Vol. 3, no 1-2, p. 66-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tissue Viability (TiVi) imaging is a promising new technology for the assessment of microcirculation in the upper human dermis. Although the technique is easily implemented and develops large amounts of observational data, its role in the clinical workplace awaits the development of standardised protocols required for routine clinical practice. The present study investigates the use of TiVi technology in a human, in vivo, localized, skin blood flow occlusion protocol. In this feasibility study, the response of the cutaneous microcirculation after provocation on the volar surface of the forearm was evaluated using a high temporal-low spatial resolution TiVi camera. 19 healthy subjects - 10 female and 9 male - were studied after a localized pressure was applied for 5 different time periods ranging from 5 to 25 seconds. Areas corresponding to 100 x 100 pixels (2.89 cm(2)) were monitored for 60 seconds prior to, during and after each occlusion period. Our results demonstrated the removal of blood from the local area and a hyperaemic response supporting the suitability of TiVi imaging for the generation of detailed provocation response data of relevance for the physiological function of the skin microcirculation in health and disease.

  • 28.
    Nilsen, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    McCambridge, Jim
    University of London London School Hyg and Trop Med, England .
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dalal, Koustuv
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    When is it appropriate to address patients alcohol consumption in health care-national survey of views of the general population in Sweden2012In: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 37, no 11, p. 1211-1216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the Swedish populations beliefs and attitudes on when it is appropriate to address patients alcohol in health care services and to identify the characteristics of those who are most supportive of this alcohol-preventive work. A cross-sectional study of 5981 nationally representative individuals (18-64 years) was done using confidential mail questionnaires. Alcohol consumption was assessed with AUDIT-C and respondents were classified into four levels of drinking status. Sociodemographic data were also collected. Thirty-four percent completely agreed that health care providers should routinely ask patients about their alcohol habits and 33% completely agreed that providers should ask but only if patients have consulted them with alcohol-related symptoms. There was limited support for a statement that alcohol conversations should be premised on the patient bringing up the issue and even less support for the notion that alcohol habits are peoples own business and not something that health care providers should address. Thirty-four percent believed that people did not answer honestly when asked about their alcohol habits in health care. There appears to be considerable support in the general population for alcohol prevention in Swedish health care services that involves questions being asked routinely about alcohol. This should be helpful in ongoing efforts to improve the implementation of alcohol screening and brief interventions in Sweden. Further studies on the views of hazardous and excessive drinkers appear particularly important.

  • 29.
    Nilsen, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    McCambridge, Jim
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Brief interventions in routine health care: a population-based study of conversations about alcohol in Sweden.2011In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 106, no 10, p. 1748-1756Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To investigate how brief alcohol interventions are delivered in routine practice in the Swedish health-care system. Design, setting and participants  A cross-sectional sample of 6000 individuals representative of the adult population aged 18-64 years registered in the Swedish total population register was drawn randomly. Data were collected in 2010 by means of a mail questionnaire. The response rate was 54%.

    Measurements The questionnaire consisted of 27 questions, of which 15 variables were extracted for use in this study. Whether alcohol had been discussed and the duration, contents, experiences and effects of any conversations about alcohol, as reported by patients themselves, were assessed.

    Findings Sixty-six per cent of the respondents had visited health-care services in the past 12 months and 20% of these had had one or more conversations about alcohol during these visits (13% of the population aged 18-64 years). The duration of the conversations was generally brief, with 94% taking less than 5 minutes, and were not experienced as problematic. The duration, contents, experiences and effects of these conversations generally varied between abstainers, moderate, hazardous and excessive drinkers. Twelve per cent of those having a conversation about alcohol reported that it led to reduced alcohol consumption. Reduced alcohol consumption was more likely when conversations lasted for 1-10 minutes rather than less than 1 minute and included advice on how to reduce consumption.

    Conclusions Population survey data in Sweden suggest that when health-care professionals give brief advice to reduce alcohol consumption, greater effects are observed when the advice is longer and includes advice on how to achieve it.

  • 30.
    Nordqvist, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmqvist, Marika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care.
    Intention to change heavy episodic drinking and actual change seen among emergency care patients2008In: Journal of Drug Addiction, Education and Eradication, ISSN 1546-6965, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 263-276Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Rajani, Rupesh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jennersjö, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care.
    Bergquist, Annika
    Department of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Melin, Tor
    Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, University Hospital, Lund.
    Friis-Liby, Ingalill
    Department of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Kapraali, Marjo
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences Danderyd Hospital, Division of Medicine, Stockholm.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Increased Factor VIII Activity in Portal Vein Thrombosis and Budd-Chiari Syndrome2010Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 32.
    Reinholdz, Hanna
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Fornazar, Robin
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Spak, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Comparison of Systematic Versus Targeted Screening for Detection of Risky Drinking in Primary Care2013In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 172-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To compare two identification methods for risky drinking in primary health care centres (PHCs). Methods: Sixteen PHCs from three Swedish counties were randomized into strands: consultation-based early identification (CEI) or systematic screening early identification (SS). Measurements took place at baseline and during two intervention periods. Patients filled in questionnaires including gender, age, if they had the issue of alcohol brought up during the consultation and the AUDIT-C (a three item screening tool). The intervention periods were preceded by training sessions for clinicians. The AUDIT-C was used for categorization of risky drinking with cut-offs for risky drinking set at andgt;= 5 for men and andgt;= 4 for women. In the SS strand, clinicians were supposed to give AUDIT-C to all patients for the identification of risky drinking. In the CEI strands, they were encouraged to use early clinical signs to identify risky drinking. Results: The proportions of patients having the issue of alcohol brought up are higher during the intervention periods than baseline. A higher proportion of all patients and of risk drinkers in SS, than in CEI, had the issue of alcohol brought up. A higher mean score of AUDIT-C was found among patients having the issue of alcohol brought up in CEI than in SS, and this was also true after adjusting for age and gender. Conclusions: More patients are asked about alcohol in the SS strand and thus have the possibility of receiving brief interventions. CEI identifies risk drinkers with higher AUDIT-C scores which might indicate more severe problems. No comparison of the effectiveness of a brief intervention following these alternative identification procedures is reported here.

  • 33.
    Reinholdz, Hanna K
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Spak, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg.
    Different Methods of Early Identification of Risky Drinking: A Review of Clinical Signs2011In: ALCOHOL AND ALCOHOLISM, ISSN 0735-0414, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 283-291Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To review the literature on detection of risky drinking to compare early identification based on everyday clinical encounters with systematic screening. We also reviewed specific clinical signs that have been suggested to be used as indicators of risky drinking. Methods: A literature review was performed in PubMed and CINAHL of articles up to November 2010. Results: Systematic screening and semi-systematic methods in various forms detected more risky drinkers than non-systematic identification during clinical encounter, but there was a lack of studies comparing the various means of identifying risky drinking. It may be too early to completely rule out the possibility of using non-systematic methods as an effective strategy to identify risky drinking. The earliest signs of risky drinking suggested in the literature are psychological distress and social problems. Conclusion: From a public health perspective, there is a lack of evidence that non-systematic or semi-systematic methods can substitute systematic screening in terms of numbers of risky drinkers detected. If early signs are going to be used to identify risky drinkers, or those to be screened for risky drinking, more focus should be on psychological and social signs because they appear earlier than somatic signs.

  • 34.
    Rooney, Kevin D
    et al.
    Intensive Care Unit, Royal Alexandra Hospital and University of the West of Scotland, UK .
    Schilling, Ulf Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Point-of-care testing in the overcrowded emergency department - can it make a difference?2014In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 692-Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emergency departments (EDs) face several challenges in maintaining consistent quality care in the face of steadily increasing public demand. Improvements in the survival rate of critically ill patients in the ED are directly related to the advancement of early recognition and treatment. Frequent episodes of overcrowding and prolonged waiting times force EDs to operate beyond their capacity and threaten to impact upon patient care. The objectives of this review are as follows: (a) to establish overcrowding as a threat to patient outcomes, person-centered care, and public safety in the ED; (b) to describe scenarios in which point-of-care testing (POCT) has been found to ameliorate factors thought to contribute to overcrowding; and (c) to discuss how POCT can be used directly, and indirectly, to expedite patient care and improve outcomes. Various studies have shown that overcrowding in the ED has profound effects on operational efficiency and patient care. Several reports have quantified overcrowding in the ED and have described a relationship between heightened periods of overcrowding and delays in treatment, increased incidence of adverse events, and an even greater probability of mortality. In certain scenarios, POCT has been found to increase the number of patients discharged in a timely manner, expedite triage of urgent but non-emergency patients, and decrease delays to treatment initiation. This review concludes that POCT, when used effectively, may alleviate the negative impacts of overcrowding on the safety, effectiveness, and person-centeredness of care in the ED.

  • 35.
    Rutberg, HANS
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Eckhardt, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Biermann, O.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Patient safety in Sweden2015In: Bundesgesundheitsblatt - Gesundheitsforschung - Gesundheitsschutz, ISSN 1436-9990, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 16-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes the patient safety work in Sweden and the cooperation between the Nordic countries in the area of patient safety. It depicts the national infrastructure, methods and partners in patient safety work as well as the development in key areas. Since 2000, the interest in patient safety and quality issues has significantly increased. A national study (2009) showed that more than 100,000 patients (8.6 %) experienced preventable harm in hospitals. Since 2007, all Swedish counties and regions work on the "National commitment for increased patient safety" to systematically minimize adverse events in the healthcare system. Also, a national strategy for patient safety has been proposed based on a new law regulating the responsibility for patient safety (2011) and a zero vision in terms of preventable harm and adverse events. The Nordic collaboration in this field currently focuses on the development of indicators and quality measurement with respect to nosocomial infections, harm in inpatient somatic care, patient safety culture, hospital mortality and polypharmacy in the elderly. The Nordic collaboration is driven by the development, exchange and documentation of experiences and evidence on patient safety indicators. The work presented in this article is only a part of the Swedish and the Nordic efforts related to patient safety and provides an interesting insight into how this work can be carried out.

  • 36.
    Schilling, Ulf Martin
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Case-report: 20-year-old with chemical burn.2010In: MMW, Fortschritte der Medizin, ISSN 1438-3276, E-ISSN 1613-3560, Vol. 152, no 11, p. 42-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 37.
    Schilling, Ulf Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Chest pain at the emergency department2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Schilling, Ulf Martin
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Clinical evaluation and cross-validation of the point-of-care system istat at the emergency department versus central laboratory analysis2014In: Point of Care, ISSN 1533-029X, E-ISSN 1533-0303, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 24-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In the emergency department (ED), large numbers of blood samples are taken on a daily basis. Owing to their ability to produce rapid results, point-of-care (POC) analysis systems are applied increasingly in the ED. In the current study, we cross validated the quality of the POC iSTAT (Abbott point of care) against the central laboratory for the most common blood samples taken at the ED of a tertiary care university hospital. METHODS: Forty-one patients older than 18 years presenting to the ED owing to shortness of breath or chest pain were enrolled in the study. In all patients, the following tests were performed on venous blood: iSTAT Chem8 + (sodium, Na; potassium, K; chloride, Cl; ionized Ca; glucose; serum urea nitrogen, BUN; creatinine; hematocrit; hemoglobin), and CG4 + (venous blood gas [VBG] + lactate). Similar tests were performed parallel to the central laboratory of the hospital. Troponin testing was performed but omitted for clinical consideration owing to the routine use of high-sensitivity troponin by our central laboratory. Statistical analysis was performed using the Pearson correlation coefficient on each analyte. RESULTS: The results of the POC analysis were available at a mean ± SD of 48.5 minutes earlier than the central laboratory results. The Chem8 + results between iSTAT and central laboratory correlated to a high degree, with the least correlation relating to K (κ = 0.77), Cl (κ = 0.82), and ionized Ca (κ = 0.86). All other items ranged between κ = 0.9 (Na) and κ andgt; 0.95 (glucose, BUN, creatinine, hematocrit, and hemoglobin). For the CG4 +, pH revealed a κ = 0.87, pCO2 κ = 0.9, base excess κ = 0.9, HCO3 κ = 0.72, pO2 κ = 0.62, and SpO2 (saturation) κ = 0.77. Lactate analysis showed a κ = 0.94. The results from the central analysis testing showed lower pH, base excess, and HCO3 values than the POC, whereas the pCO2 and lactate values were higher in the central laboratory. The discrepant values might have resulted in inadequate treatment in the clinical context. When an arterial blood gas was simultaneously analyzed by POC and the central laboratory (20 samples), we found the following results: HCO3 κ = 0.9, SpO2 κ = 0.93, and all other κ andgt; 0.95. CONCLUSION: The electrolyte analyses performed by the POC-system iSTAT correlate to a very high degree with the analysis provided by our central laboratory. The POC iSTAT system might be considered as a potential POC device for use in the ED. Furthermore, our findings suggest that POC might serve as independent control system for the clinician to find potential problems in the process of blood sample analysis.

  • 39.
    Schilling, Ulf Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Costs and the emergency department2012In: Toward Healthcare Resource Stewardship / [ed] Joe Sam Robinson, M. Sami Walid and Aaron C.M. Barth, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2012, p. 181-202Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Schilling, Ulf Martin
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Cutting costs: the impact of price lists on the cost development at the emergency department.2010In: European journal of emergency medicine, ISSN 0969-9546, E-ISSN 1473-5695, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 337-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It was shown that physicians working at the Swedish emergency department (ED) are unaware of the costs for investigations performed. This study evaluated the possible impact of price lists on the overall laboratory and radiology costs at the ED of a Swedish university hospital. Price lists including the most common laboratory analyses and radiological investigations at the ED were created. The lists were distributed to all internal medicine physicians by e-mail and exposed above their working stations continually. No lists were provided for the orthopaedic control group. The average costs for laboratory and radiological investigations during the months of June and July 2007 and 2008 were calculated. Neither clinical nor admission procedures were changed. The physicians were blinded towards the study. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student's t-test. A total of 1442 orthopaedic and 1585 medical patients were attended to in 2007. In 2008, 1467 orthopaedic and 1637 medical patients required emergency service. The average costs per patient were 980.27 SKR (98€)/999.41 SKR (100€, +1.95%) for orthopaedic and 1081.36 SKR (108€)/877.3 SKR (88€, -18.8%) for medical patients. Laboratory costs decreased by 9% in orthopaedic and 21.4% in medical patients. Radiology costs changed +5.4% in orthopaedic and -20.59% in medical patients. The distribution and promotion of price lists as a tool at the ED to heighten cost awareness resulted in a major decrease in the investigation costs. A significant decrease in radiological costs could be observed. It can be concluded that price lists are an effective tool to cut costs in public healthcare.

  • 41.
    Schilling, Ulf Martin
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Drunkning2010In: Akut pediatrik / [ed] Svante Norgren, Jonas F. Ludvigsson och Mikael Norman, Liber , 2010, 1, p. 349-352Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Schilling, Ulf Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Emergency physicians are more accurate in detecting pulmonary embolism at the emergency department then internal medicine physicians2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 9, article id P13Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Detecting pulmonary embolism (PE) is a major problem at the ED. Final diagnosis often is made by CT-scan. Due to specialisation in emergency medicine emergency physicians might perform better than internal medicine physicians in detecting PE. To confirm this hypothesis, a single center retrospective cohort-study was performed.

    Methods

    During the three-month periods (march till may) 2007 and 2008 the findings in all patients undergoing pulmonary CT at our emergency department were reviewed. The investigations were attributed to emergency physician (EP) or internal medicine physician (IP). Negative and positive investigations were evaluated, and the number of patients treated by the respective group were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed by the Students-T-test, and probability levels of 5% were accepted as significant.

    Results

    In 2007, a total of 2847 patients attended for medical problems. 576 were treated by EP (20.23%). In 2008, 2408 patients searched for medical problems and 625 (25.95%) were attended by EP. EP ordered a total of 34 pulmonary CT 2007 and 35 in 2008. 17.64% (2007)/22.86% (2008) of these resulted in the diagnosis of PE. IP ordered a 77 (2007) and 64 (2008) pulmonary CT, with positive findings in 12.98% (2007)/10.93% (2008). EP ordered pulmonary CT for 5.9% (2007)/5.6% (2008) of their patients, whilst IP performed CT-scans in 3.39% (2007)/3.59% (2008) (p = 0.0108). This means that EP have a higher index of suspicion for the diagnosis of PE at the emergency department (1.74 (2007)/1.56 (2008).

    CT-scans were positive in 1.04% (2007)/1.28% (2008) for the EP, and in 0.43% (2007)/0.39% (2008) for the IP (p < 0.01). EP are more accurate in detecting PE at the emergency department (OR 2.43(2007)/3.26(2008).

    At the hospital including the emergency department were 14.29% (2007)/14.15% (2008) of CT-scans positive. No significant difference could be found between the positive findings for all the hospital compared to the EP (p = 0.38) or IP (p = 0.27).

    Conclusion

    Emergency physicians seem to have a higher index of suspicion for PE than internal medicine physicians and are more accurate in detecting PE at the emergency department. Compared with the total of our university hospital, emergency physicians are at least comparable in diagnosing PE.

  • 43.
    Schilling, Ulf Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Kompendium av akut ultraljud: Protokollen FEEL, FAST, EFAST, CAUSE, Abdominell Aorta2013Other (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Schilling, Ulf Martin
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    POCT in the emergency department: A review2013In: Hospital Healthcare Europe, p. 99-102Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The clinical work-up of patients with chest pain and dyspnoea for selected diagnoses, and the use of point-of-care testing in the process are discussed

  • 45.
    Schilling, Ulf Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    The clinical point of view: The basic laboratory investigation in the critical emergency patient2013In: Klinisk kemi i Norden, ISSN 1101-2013, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 44-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Schilling, Ulf Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Time is money-the economic impact of point of care on the emergency department of a tertiary care university hospital2014In: Point of Care, ISSN 1533-029X, E-ISSN 1533-0303, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 21-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: With Swedish emergency departments (EDs) becoming independent financial units, economic pressure is placed onto the EDs. The use of point-of-care (POC) systems allowing rapid analysis of blood samples is increasing in the ED. In this study, we analyzed the potential economic impact of the use of the iSTAT POC system in the ED of a university hospital. METHODS: Prices for the test batteries Chem8 +, CG4 +, and TNI and for the analyzers were provided by the manufacturer and compared to analyses by the hospitals central laboratory. With staffing being the major cost in the ED, the cost for attending each minute a patient in the ED was calculated. Fixed costs were omitted in the analysis. The difference in turnaround time for the available results of analysis by POC and by the central laboratory was determined. RESULTS: The use of POC resulted in direct savings for analysis of 111 US$/patient. The mean ± SD delay between POC results and central laboratory results was 48.5 ± 28.67 minutes. This is equivalent to 32,333 working hours per year. Emergency department staffing accounts for a cost of 1.5 US$ per patient per minute. The time saved by POC translates into potential savings of 72.75 US$ per patient. Based on 40,000 patient visits per year in our ED, 7,350,000 US$ could be saved by the stringent use of POC. CONCLUSIONS: The use of POC could produce a major economic impact for the ED if all potential savings are realized. Considering the potential savings on waiting times, POC might also increase patientsÊ safety and satisfaction as well as help to alleviate overcrowding in the ED. Copyright

  • 47.
    Schilling, Ulf Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Turfing in the emergency department2014In: EMERGENCIAS, ISSN 1137-6821, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 129-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objective: Turfing, defined as finding any excuse to refer a patient to a different department or team, is commonly done to avoid patient admission. Research on turfing is limited, and the practice is rarely spoken about. The author has sometimes experienced difficulty obtaining radiology images because of a stringent policy of avoiding doing such tests out of regular office hours. I suspected that physicians may present patients symptoms in ways that imply certain medical conditions, in other words to "optimize" the patient according to the criteria needed for the investigation asked for. In this study, I explored the presence and extent of turfing and optimizing in a Swedish emergency department (ED). Method: The emergency physicians (EP) at a tertiary care university hospital were invited to participate in an anonymous intranet-based survey. Demographic data collected were the physicians total experience (years), the total number of patients treated, and the experience within the present hospital (years). The EP were asked about their experience of turfing and optimizing and the percentage of patients to whom these practices were applied. The respondents were also asked how they viewed turfing and optimizing and how they thought these practices affected ED wait times. Results: Responses were received from 18 EP with a mean (SD) of 11.5 (8.48) years of total experience and of 4.4 (3.73) years in the present hospital (62% response rate). The majority had treated more than 5000 patients. All respondents confirmed the practice of turfing, and it was estimated that turfing was used in 17.34% (13.08%) of all patients (range, 2%-50%). Seventeen of the 18 respondents felt obliged to optimize patients to get tests performed, estimating that 23.23% (22.97%) of their patients were affected (range, 5%-80%). Twelve regarded turfing and optimizing to be unsafe and 17 believed that these practices influenced ED wait times. Conclusion: Turfing and optimizing, affecting approximately 1 in 5 emergency patients in this setting, seem to be major problems for the surveyed Swedish EP.

  • 48.
    Schilling, Ulf Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Two surgeons and the ECG: A double blind study2012In: Journal of acute disease, ISSN 2221-6189, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 13-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To assess the capability of operating abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons to analyze a set of standardized ECG.

    Methods

    Twenty operating abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons at a university hospital were included. Each participant analyzed a set of five standardized ECG with an answering scheme for eight different items, giving a maximum score of 40. The answers were matched according to specialty and experience of the doctors of less than 5 years, between 5 and 10 years or more than 10 years. The reference standard was set by two independent consultants in cardiology.

    Results

    The mean overall score was 25.25 (63.13%±4.78%) varying between 38 (95%) and 20(50%). Abdominal surgeons performed a mean score of 27.625 (69.06%±9.53%), and orthopaedic surgeons 23.67 points (59.17%±3.69%). The difference between the performance of abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons was not significant (P=0.09). 20/20 surgeons identified ST-elevation and no surgeon accepted the ECG showing acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction as normal.

    Conclusions

    Abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons provided an answering scheme are able to interprete the ECG and identify both the normal and the ECG showing life-threatening pathology. The hypothesis that surgeons were unable to interprete the ECG must be rejected.

  • 49.
    Schilling, Ulf Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Bortolin, M.
    Harvard University, MA 02138 USA Serv Emergenza Territoriale 118, Italy .
    Drowning2012In: Minerva Anestesiologica, ISSN 0375-9393, E-ISSN 1827-1596, Vol. 78, no 1, p. 69-77Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Approximately 500,000 deaths due to drowning are reported annually, 30,000 of which are reported in Europe. Because of the relatively low incidence of drowning victims at emergency departments, most emergency physicians do not routinely handle drowning victims. Although confusion regarding the classification and pathophysiology of drowning could be reduced by following the Utstein style consensus, the application of therapeutic modalities and, most important, the estimation of probable prognostic outcomes remain difficult for emergency physicians. This article presents an overview of the classification, pathophysiology, emergency-department treatment and prognostic outcomes of drowning accidents.

  • 50.
    Schilling, Ulf Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Bortolin, M.
    Harvard University, MA 02138 USA .
    Letter: Authors reply to "Comment on Drowning" in MINERVA ANESTESIOLOGICA, vol 78, issue 8, pp 972-9732012In: Minerva Anestesiologica, ISSN 0375-9393, E-ISSN 1827-1596, Vol. 78, no 8, p. 972-973Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

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