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  • 1.
    Christina, Snöbohm
    et al.
    KI, sjukgymnastik.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV). Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i östra Östergötland, LAH/Linnéa-enheten.
    Heiwe, Sussanne
    KI, sjukgymnastik.
    Experiencing one's body after a diagnosis of cancer-a phenomenological study of young adults.2010Inngår i: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 19, nr 8, s. 863-869Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Young adults with cancer are still in the process of shaping their lives and are therefore at a vulnerable stage. Altered body image may change how patients cope with the disease and impact rehabilitation capacity.Objective: To describe the essence of how young adults with cancer experience their bodies.Methods: Interviews (12 informants), transcribed verbatim. Analysis: Giorgi's phenomenological method.Results: Identified themes: experience of 'physical body change', 'discomfort', 'the body at the moment without reflecting on the disease and treatment', 'body image' and 'grasping the illness'. Essences: The body as the bearer of life; conflict between age and disease; manifest changes in appearance, physically and mentally; the body no longer a whole; the body as influenceable and able to recover and heal.Conclusions: These patients undergo physical and mental changes that affect their self-image and health-related life quality. Thus, future studies need to explore interventions that may enhance the individualś perception of their body.

  • 2. Bestill onlineKjøp publikasjonen >>
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV). Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i östra Östergötland, LAH/Linnéa-enheten.
    Crossing the border: Different ways cancer patients, family members and physicians experience information in the transition to the late palliative phase2002Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Information in the transition to the late palliative phase is not a well-studied area, especially not from the perspective of patients and family members. The aim of this thesis was to describe how cancer patients, family members and physicians experience information during the transition from a curative or early palliative phase to a late palliative phase, i.e. when tumour-specific treatment could not be offered. Cancer patients (n=30) admitted to palliative hospital based home care, family members (n=20) of cancer patients, and physicians (n=30) working with cancer patients in different settings were included in order to create a maximum variation sampling.

    Tape-recorded, semi-structured interviews and qualitative, phenomenographic analyses were done in all the studies.

    Patients described the physician as an expert (study I), an important person during this event, despite characterising him/her in different ways ranging from the empathetic professional to the rough and ready expert. Their relationship with the physician was also stressed. Their own resources, i.e. a sense of well being, a sense of security and individual strength, and their previous knowledge, were important components regarding their ability to take part in the communication (study II). Patients interpret words and phrases carefully and can perceive them as forewarnings, as being emotionally trying, and as fortifying and strengthening (study III). The overall message could be interpreted as either focused on quality if life, on treatment or on death and threat.

    Family members wanted to protect the patient during this period and could be very active and prominent in their protective role (study IV). However, other family members described themselves as being in the background more or less involuntarily. Family members also felt that there were expectations regarding their behaviour, either that they should take over in terms of communication, or that they should restrict their participation. When giving information, the physicians had a clear goal - to make the patient understand while being as considerate toward the patient as possible. However, the strategies for reaching this goal differed and included: explaining and convincing, softening the impact and vaguely suggesting, preparing and adapting. Some physicians had a main strategy while others mixed different strategies depending on the context.

    The experience of receiving and providing information about discontinuing tumour specific treatment is like crossing a border, where patients experience the behaviour of the physician and the words they express of great significance. Family members assume the role of protectors. Physicians use different strategies in order to help patients cross the border.

    Delarbeid
    1. Breaking bad news in the transition from curative to palliative cancer care-patient's view of the doctor giving the information
    Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Breaking bad news in the transition from curative to palliative cancer care-patient's view of the doctor giving the information
    2000 (engelsk)Inngår i: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, Vol. 8, nr 6, s. 472-478Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In the transition from curative to palliative cancer care, communication is of special importance. The aim of this study was to explore how patients with a disseminated cancer disease experienced the information about their incurable state, focusing on the physician. The persons taking part were 30 patients admitted to a hospital-based home care unit in Sweden. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using a qualitative method. All patients described their doctors as experts, despite different qualities. Six subcategories were identified: (1) the inexperienced messenger, (2) the emotionally burdened, (3) the rough and ready expert (4) the benevolent but tactless expert, (5) the "distanced" doctor and (6), the empathic professional. The relationship was described as very important to the patients' capacity to handle the information and was felt to have been built up during earlier meetings. The relationship was described in four subcategories: personal between well-acquainted individuals, impersonal between unacquainted individuals, personal between unacquainted individuals and impersonal between well-acquainted individuals. Both the character of the physician and his or her ability to create personal relationships influence patients' capacity to cope with this specific situation. Education and guidance are needed both in clinical practice and in medical schools.

    Emneord
    Doctor - patient communication, Palliative care, Behaviour, Patient's opinion
    HSV kategori
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13723 (URN)10.1007/s005200000147 (DOI)
    Tilgjengelig fra: 2002-05-24 Laget: 2002-05-24 Sist oppdatert: 2015-06-10
    2. Cancer patients' perceptions of their own participation and own resources after receiving information about discontinuation of active tumour treatment
    Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Cancer patients' perceptions of their own participation and own resources after receiving information about discontinuation of active tumour treatment
    2000 (engelsk)Inngår i: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0001-6381, Vol. 39, nr 8, s. 919-925Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of most studies on informational needs has been on primary cancer diagnosis. The aim of this study was to explore how cancer patients in a palliative care setting perceived their own participation and resources after receiving information about the discontinuation of active tumour treatment. Thirty cancer patients admitted to a hospital-based home-care unit participated in the study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using a phenomenographic method. The patients described their own participation as being either verbally passive or active, in order to receive more information or to avoid information. Furthermore, previous knowledge, at different levels, was described as important: 1) Unsuspecting naive, 2) apprehensive suspicious, 3) well prepared. Patients' own resources included a sense of wellbeing, a sense of security and individual strength. In conclusion, patients' previous knowledge and own resources are important components for their capacity to take part in the dialogue when receiving information.

    HSV kategori
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13724 (URN)10.1080/02841860050215882 (DOI)
    Tilgjengelig fra: 2002-05-24 Laget: 2002-05-24 Sist oppdatert: 2015-06-10
    3. Cancer patients' interpretations of verbal expressions when given information about ending cancer treatment
    Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Cancer patients' interpretations of verbal expressions when given information about ending cancer treatment
    2002 (engelsk)Inngår i: Palliative Medicine, ISSN 0269-2163, Vol. 16, nr 4, s. 323-330Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cancer patients' interpretations of the meaning of words used when given bad news are not well studied in medical settings. The aim of this study was to ascertain what significance verbal expressions had for cancer patients when they were given information about ending active tumour treatment, and what message they felt they received.

    METHODS: Tape-recorded semi-structured interviews were performed and analysed using a qualitative phenomenographical approach.

    RESULTS: Thirty patients with incurable cancer admitted to hospital-based home care unit in Sweden participated. Three main categories about the significance of words emerged: 1) words could indicate indirect warnings as being forewarnings, evasive or ambiguous; 2) words could also be perceived as emotionally trying, as threats or abandoning; 3) other words were fortifying and strengthened the patient in this situation. The overall message given during the information could be interpreted differently: either focused on treatment, on quality of life, or on threat and death.

    CONCLUSION: The understanding of the significance of words to tailor the information to patients helps the physician to use forewarnings and fortifying words and to identify and avoid the use of threatening words.

    Emneord
    communication, neoplasms, palliative care, patient perception, phenomenography
    HSV kategori
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13725 (URN)10.1191/0269216302pm543oa (DOI)
    Tilgjengelig fra: 2002-05-24 Laget: 2002-05-24 Sist oppdatert: 2015-06-10
    4. Receiving bad news- experiences of family members
    Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Receiving bad news- experiences of family members
    2001 (engelsk)Inngår i: Journal of Palliative Care, ISSN 0825-8597, Vol. 17, nr 4, s. 241-247Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about how next-of-kin experience receiving bad news. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of family members when receiving information about ending tumour treatment, with a focus on their role in this context.

    METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were performed and analyzed using a qualitative phenomenographic method.

    RESULTS: Twenty family members of patients with incurable progressive cancer admitted to hospital-based home care were included in the study. Data showed that family members want to protect, represent, or act on behalf of the patient. Some described themselves as assuming prominent roles: the demander-of-truth role, the secret-keeper role, and the controller role. Others assumed more passive roles: the surrendering role, the considerate listener role, and the excluded outsider role.

    CONCLUSION: This study has revealed possible-explanations as to why family members are dissatisfied with information. The results of this study may help doctors in clinical practice recognize the different types of behaviour family members exhibit when receiving bad news.

    sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
    Montreal, Canada: Centre for Bioethics, 2001
    HSV kategori
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13726 (URN)000173319900004 ()
    Tilgjengelig fra: 2002-05-24 Laget: 2002-05-24 Sist oppdatert: 2017-12-13
    5. Doctors' strategies when breaking bad news to terminally ill cancer patients
    Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Doctors' strategies when breaking bad news to terminally ill cancer patients
    2003 (engelsk)Inngår i: Journal of Palliative Medicine, ISSN 1096-6218, Vol. 6, nr 4, s. 565-574Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Breaking bad news to patients with a terminal disease is a difficult task for physicians. The aim of this study was to study how doctors perceive their strategies when giving information to cancer patients about discontinuing active tumour treatment. Thirty doctors with different demographic characteristics working with patients with cancer in Sweden participated. Semistructured interviews were conducted and analyzed using a qualitative phenomenographic method. The goal when giving this information was described as making the patient understands while being as considerate as possible. However, the strategies for reaching this goal were different: (1) explaining and convincing information, (i.e., giving a long explanation about why treatment has to be discontinued); (2) softening the impact of the information, with the doctor recommending discontinuation of treatment; (3) and preparing either the patient or the physician himself/herself for the information; (4) adapting or tailoring the information to the patient, with the doctor actively seeking knowledge about the patient in order to be able to adapt the information to the patient's level, or with the doctor briefly describing the situation and then remaining silent, allowing room for the patient's reactions and questions (i.e., letting the patient take an active part). When giving information, the doctors' goal was to make patients understand, but the strategies differed depending on the context.

    HSV kategori
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13727 (URN)10.1089/109662103768253678 (DOI)
    Tilgjengelig fra: 2002-05-24 Laget: 2002-05-24 Sist oppdatert: 2015-06-10
  • 3.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV). Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i östra Östergötland, LAH/Linnéa-enheten.
    Lindholm, Ann
    Stockholms sjukhem.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV). Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, LAH Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i östra Östergötland, Palliativt kompetenscentrum.
    Experiences of truth disclosure in terminally ill cancer patients in palliative home care2011Inngår i: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 9, nr 2, s. 173-180Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and preferences of terminally ill cancer patients regarding truth telling in the communication of poor prognoses.

    Method: We recorded and transcribed interviews with 45 patients who knew their cancer was terminal, and analyzed their responses hermeneutically.

    Results: Patients identified three different modes of truth: (1) the absolute objective truth that they are dying; (2) the partial truth about their condition including some facts but not all of the details; and (3) the desired truth, originating in the patient's own beliefs about a healthy or better life. Coping strategies were related to patients’ preferred mode of truth: (1) facing the truth in order to take action; (2) facing some parts of the truth in order to maintain hope; and (3) hovering between facing and avoiding the truth. In their struggle for existential survival, patients used different coping strategies, changing from one to another depending upon the circumstances.

    Significance of results: Varying use of different coping strategies impacts on patient preferences concerning communication about bad news with their doctors. Truth-telling entails more than merely providing information related to the forthcoming death. It also concerns how physicians or other healthcare staff can support the patient's existential survival by fine-tuning the communication of “truth” according to the individuals’ preferences.

  • 4.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV). Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i östra Östergötland, LAH/Linnéa-enheten.
    Strang, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Doctors' strategies when breaking bad news to terminally ill cancer patients2003Inngår i: Journal of Palliative Medicine, ISSN 1096-6218, Vol. 6, nr 4, s. 565-574Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Breaking bad news to patients with a terminal disease is a difficult task for physicians. The aim of this study was to study how doctors perceive their strategies when giving information to cancer patients about discontinuing active tumour treatment. Thirty doctors with different demographic characteristics working with patients with cancer in Sweden participated. Semistructured interviews were conducted and analyzed using a qualitative phenomenographic method. The goal when giving this information was described as making the patient understands while being as considerate as possible. However, the strategies for reaching this goal were different: (1) explaining and convincing information, (i.e., giving a long explanation about why treatment has to be discontinued); (2) softening the impact of the information, with the doctor recommending discontinuation of treatment; (3) and preparing either the patient or the physician himself/herself for the information; (4) adapting or tailoring the information to the patient, with the doctor actively seeking knowledge about the patient in order to be able to adapt the information to the patient's level, or with the doctor briefly describing the situation and then remaining silent, allowing room for the patient's reactions and questions (i.e., letting the patient take an active part). When giving information, the doctors' goal was to make patients understand, but the strategies differed depending on the context.

  • 5.
    Milberg, Anna
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV). Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, LAH Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i östra Östergötland, Palliativt kompetenscentrum.
    Wåhlberg, Rakel
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i östra Östergötland, LAH/Linnéa-enheten.
    Jakobsson, Maria
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i östra Östergötland, Palliativt kompetenscentrum.
    Olsson, Eva-Carin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Omvårdnad. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Olsson, Maria
    PRIVO/Palliative Consulting Team, Northern County of Kalmar, Oskarshamn.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV). Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i östra Östergötland, Palliativt kompetenscentrum.
    What is a “secure base” when death is approaching? A study applying attachment theory to adult patients’ and family members’ experiences of palliative home care2012Inngår i: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 21, nr 8, s. 886-895Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Attachment theory has received much interest lately in relation to how adults cope with stress and severe illness. The aim of this study was using the experiences of patients and family members to explore palliative home care as a ‘secure base’ (a central concept within the theory).

    Methods

    Twelve patients and 14 family members were interviewed during ongoing palliative home care. The interviews were analysed with deductive qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    Informants expressed the relevance of sensing security during palliative home care because death and dying were threats that contributed to vulnerability. Palliative home care could foster a feeling of security and provide a secure base. This was facilitated when informants had trust in staff (e.g. due to availability and competence in providing symptom relief), felt recognised as individuals and welcomed to contact the team in times of needs. Being comfortable, informed and having an everyday life also contributed to a perception of palliative home care as a secure base. Family members stressed the importance of being relieved from responsibilities that were too heavy. The underlying meanings of experiencing palliative home care as a secure base involved gaining a sense of control and of inner peace, perceiving that despite a demanding and changed life situation, one could continue partially being oneself and having something to hope for, even if this no longer concerned cure for the ill person.

    Conclusions

    Important aspects of palliative home care as providing a secure base were identified and these have implications for clinical practice. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 6.
    Ring Jacobsson, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV). Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV). Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i östra Östergötland, LAH/Linnéa-enheten.
    Göransson, Anne
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV). Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i östra Östergötland, Medicinkliniken ViN.
    Does a Coeliac School increase psychological well-being in women suffering from coeliac disease, living on a gluten-free diet?2012Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, nr 5-6, s. 766-775Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objective.  To assess the effects of an active method of patient education on the psychological well-being of women with coeliac disease in remission.

    Background.  Despite remission with a gluten-free diet, adults with coeliac disease and especially women experience a subjective poor health. Self-management education seems to be promising tool to help patients suffering from coeliac disease to cope with their disorder.

    Design.  A randomised controlled trial. Methods.  A total of 106 women, ≥20 years, with confirmed coeliac disease, who had been on a gluten-free diet for a minimum of five years. The intervention group (n = 54) underwent a 10-session educational programme, 'Coeliac School', based on problem-based learning. The controls (n = 52) received information regarding coeliac disease sent home on a regular basis. The primary outcomes were psychological general well-being measured with a validated questionnaire.

    Results.  Participants in the Coeliac School reported a significant improvement in psychological well-being at 10 weeks, whereas the controls given usual care reported a worsening in psychological well-being. After six months, a significant improvement remained for the index of vitality.

    Conclusions.  Patient education increased psychological well-being in women with coeliac disease. There is a need to refine the methods of patient education to make the effects of well-being more pronounced over time.

    Relevance to clinical practice. Patient education using problem-based learning promotes self-management in coeliac disease by improving the well-being of patients who have been struggling with the gluten-free diet for years.

  • 7.
    Ring Jacobsson, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV). Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV). Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i östra Östergötland, LAH/Linnéa-enheten.
    Göransson, Anne
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV). Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i östra Östergötland, Medicinkliniken ViN.
    Impact of an Active Patient Education Programme on GastrointestinalSymptoms in Women with Celiac Disease Following a Gluten-free Diet: Randomized Controlled Trial2012Inngår i: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, E-ISSN 1538-9766, Vol. 35, nr 3, s. 200-206Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite living with a gluten-free diet Swedish women with celiac disease report a higher rate of gastrointestinal symptoms than women without the disease. This study was designed to assess the impact of active patient education on gastrointestinal symptoms in women with a gluten-free diet. A total of 106 Swedish women, > 20 years, with celiac disease on a gluten free diet for minimum five years took part in a randomized, controlled trial. The intervention group (n=54) underwent a ten-session educational program “Celiac School”, based on problem-based learning. Controls (n=52) were sent information regarding celiac disease at home. Outcome measure was gastrointestinal symptoms at ten weeks and six months after intervention, assessed with the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale. After ten weeks “Celiac school” (p=0.013) the participating women reported significant improvements that remained six months later (p=0.029). The controls did not improve significantly. A comparison of the development of scores, from baseline to 10 weeks, could not demonstrate a significant difference in the overall index between the two groups but showed a significant improvement concerning one of its components, namely the index reflecting Abdominal Pain (p= 0.007). Intervention methods should be refined in order to reach an even more pronounced effect.

  • 8.
    Ring Jacobsson, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV). Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV). Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i östra Östergötland, Medicinkliniken ViN.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV). Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i östra Östergötland, Palliativt kompetenscentrum. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i östra Östergötland, LAH Öst.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV). Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i östra Östergötland, LAH/Linnéa-enheten.
    Coeliac disease: Women’s experiences in everyday life2012Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, nr 23-24, s. 3442-3450Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. This paper is a report of a descriptive study on what life is like as a woman living with coeliac disease (CD).

    Background. The therapy for CD is a gluten-free diet (GFD), and if sufferers keep strictly to this it is suggested that they will stay well. However, previous studies point out that people who are treated for CD, particularly women, experience various kinds of inconvenience in relation to having CD and to being treated with GFD.

    Methods. A phenomenological approach as devised by Giorgi was used. Taperecorded qualitative interviews with a total of 15 women who were being treated for CD were conducted in 2008 in Sweden.

    Results. The results demonstrated that CD can influence women’s lives in different ways. The general structure of being a woman with coeliac disease was described as a striving towards a normalised lifeworld. Three  conditions necessary to achieve a normalised life were described, namely being secure, being in control and being seen and included.

    Conclusion. The results of this study can help caregivers, and others, to understand and develop support for women with this condition.

  • 9.
    Yngman-Uhlin, Pia
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Omvårdnad. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Hälsa, Aktivitet, Vård (HAV). Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i östra Östergötland, LAH/Linnéa-enheten.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Kalmar Regional Hospital.
    Fernström, Anders
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Njurmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Medicincentrum, Njurmedicinska kliniken US.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Omvårdnad. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Circling around in tiredness: perspectives of patients on peritoneal dialysis2010Inngår i: Nephrology Nursing Journal : Journal of The American Nephrology Nurses Association, ISSN 1526-744X, E-ISSN 2163-5390, Vol. 37, nr 4, s. 407-413Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The experience of tiredness linked to poor sleep in patients on peritoneal dialysis was explored using the qualitative method phenomenology. Eight women and six men in southeast Sweden were interviewed. The patients' descriptions were characterized by a circular structure "circling around in tiredness." This study illustrates the problems of tiredness and illuminates the need for healthcare professionals to assess the impact of tiredness and highlight the need for strategies to improve the patient's situation.

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