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  • 1.
    Abelius, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jedenfalk, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Pregnancy modulates the allergen-induced cytokine production differently in allergic and non-allergic women2017In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 818-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The immunological environment during pregnancy may differ between allergic and non-allergic women. This study investigates the effect of maternal allergy on the allergen-induced cytokine and chemokine levels and whether pregnancy modulates these immune responses differently in allergic and non-allergic women. Methods: The birch-, cat-, phytohemagglutinin- and tetanus toxoid-induced interferon-gamma(IFN-gamma), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, the T-helper 1 (Th1)-associated chemokine CXCL10 and the Th2-associated chemokine CCL17 levels were quantified in 20 women with allergic symptoms (sensitized, n=13) and 36 women without allergic symptoms (non-sensitized, n=30) at gestational weeks 10-12, 15-16, 25, 35 and 2 and 12months post-partum. Results: Birch-, but not cat-induced, IL-5, IL-13 and CCL17 levels were increased during pregnancy as compared to post-partum in the sensitized women with allergic symptoms. In contrast, cat-, but not birch-induced, IL-5 and IL-13 levels were increased during pregnancy as compared to post-partum in the non-sensitized women without allergic symptoms. Furthermore, IFN-gamma secretion was increased in the first and decreased in the second and third trimesters in response to birch and decreased in the third trimester in response to cat as compared to post-partum in the non-sensitized women without allergic symptoms. Increased allergen-induced IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 levels were associated with allergic symptoms and sensitization. Conclusions: Pregnancy had a clear effect on the allergen-induced IL-5, IL-13, CCL17, IFN-gamma and CXCL10 production, with distinct enhanced Th2-responses to birch in the allergic group and to cat in the non-allergic group.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-10-03 12:41
  • 2.
    Abelius, Martina S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg.
    Duchén, Karel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Placental Immune Milieu is Characterized by a Th2- and Anti-Inflammatory Transcription Profile, Regardless of Maternal Allergy, and Associates with Neonatal Immunity2015In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 73, no 5, p. 445-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PROBLEM: How maternal allergy affects the systemic and local immunological environment during pregnancy and the immune development of the offspring is unclear.

    METHOD OF STUDY: Expression of 40 genes was quantified by PCR arrays in placenta, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) from 7 allergic and 12 non-allergic women and their offspring.

    RESULTS: Placental gene expression was dominated by a Th2-/anti-inflammatory profile, irrespectively of maternal allergy, as compared to gene expression in PBMC. p35 expression in placenta correlated with fetal Tbx21 (ρ = -0.88, P < 0.001) and IL-5 expression in PBMC with fetal galectin1 (ρ = 0.91, P < 0.001). Increased expression of Th2-associated CCL22 in CBMC preceded allergy development.

    CONCLUSIONS: Gene expression locally and systemically during pregnancy was partly associated with the offspring's gene expression, possibly indicating that the immunological milieu is important for fetal immune development. Maternal allergy was not associated with an enhanced Th2 immunity in placenta or PBMC, while a marked prenatal Th2 skewing, shown as increased CCL22 mRNA expression, might contribute to postnatal allergy development.

  • 3.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Oreland, Lars
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Comasco, Erika
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    A Biopsychosocial Approach to Risk and Resilience on Behavior in Children Followed from Birth to Age 122017In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 584-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing prevalence of mental health problems calls for more knowledge into factors associated with resilience. The present study used multiple statistical methodologies to examine a biopsychosocial model of risk and resilience on preadolescence behavior. Data from 889 children and mothers from a birth cohort were used. An adversity score was created by combining maternal symptoms of depression, psychosocial risk and childrens experiences of life events. The proposed resilience factors investigated were candidate genetic polymorphisms, child temperament, social functioning, and maternal sense of coherence. The l/ l genotype of the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region was associated with lower internalizing scores, but not mainly related to the level of adversity. An easy temperament was associated with resilience for children exposed to high adversity. Social functioning was found to be promotive independent of the risk level. The results support a multiple-level model of resilience indicating effects, though small, of both biological and psychosocial factors.

  • 4.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Oreland, Lars
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Comasco, Erika
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    A biopsychosocial approach to risk and resilience on behavior in children followed from birth to age twelve2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing prevalence of mental health problems calls for more knowledge into factors associated with resilience in the context of child behavior. Biological factors are seldom considered in psychosocial models of resilience. The present study used multiple statistical methodologies to examine a biopsychosocial model of risk and resilience on behavior at preadolescence. Data from 889 children and their mothers were used. A cumulative adversity score was created by combining maternal symptoms of depression, psychosocial risk and children’s experiences of life events. The proposed resilience factors investigated were candidate genetic polymorphisms, child temperament and social functioning, and maternal sense of coherence. Results show that the l/l genotype of the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) was associated with lower internalizing scores, especially for children exposed to low adversity. An easy temperament was associated with resilient outcomes for children exposed to high adversity. Child social functioning was found to be more of a general resource variable buffering risk in both high and low adversity groups. The results support a multiple level model of resilience indicating effects, though small, of both biological and psychosocial factors. The present findings call for both preventive actions and further studies on biopsychosocial models in resilience research.

  • 5.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Comasco, Erika
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Oreland, Lars
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Early predictors of behavioural problems in pre-schoolers: a longitudinal study of constitutional and environmental main and interaction effects2016In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The early environment is important for child development and wellbeing. Gene-by-environment studies investigating the impact of the serotonin transporter genelinked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphisms by life events on mental health and behaviour problems have been inconclusive. Methodological differences regarding sample sizes, study population, definitions of adversities and measures of mental health problems obstacle their comparability. Furthermore, very few studies included children. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between a broad range of risk factors covering pregnancy and birth, genetic polymorphism, experience of multiple life events and psychosocial environment, and child behaviour at age three, using a comparably large, representative, population-based sample.

    Methods: A total of 1,106 children, and their mothers, were followed from pregnancy to age three. Information on pregnancy and birth-related factors was retrieved from the Medical Birth Register. Questionnaires on depressive symptoms, child behaviour and child experiences of life events were filled in by the mothers. Child saliva samples were used for genotyping the 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms. Multiple logistic regression was used to investigate the association between psychological scales and genetic polymorphisms.

    Results: Symptoms of postpartum depression increased the risk of both internalizing and externalizing problems. Experience of multiple life events was also a predictor of behavioural problems across the scales. No gene-by-environment or gene-bygene-by-environment interactions were found. Children of immigrants had an increased risk of internalizing problems and parental unemployment was significantly associated with both internalizing and externalizing type of problems.

    Conclusion: This study shows the importance of the psychosocial environment for psychosocial health in preschool children, and adds to  the literature of null-findings of gene-by-environment effects of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF in children

  • 6.
    Andolf, Ellika G.
    et al.
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sharma, Surendra
    Brown University, RI 02908 USA.
    Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and later dementia: a Swedish National Register Study2017In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 96, no 4, p. 464-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Our aim was to investigate the rate of vascular dementia and dementia in women with previous hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, since white matter lesions of the brain and cardiovascular disease are linked both to dementia and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. Material and methods. Prospective population-based registry study on all women giving birth in Sweden between 1973 and 1975 (284 598). Women with and without hypertensive disorders in pregnancy were identified by means of the Swedish Medical Birth Register and linked to the National Patient Register, where data on somatic disease later in life were obtained. International classification of disease was used. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate hazard ratios for both groups and adjusted for possible confounders. Main outcome measures were in-hospital diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, vascular dementia and dementia. Results. No increased risks were seen for vascular dementia or dementia after any hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. If broken down in specific diagnoses for hypertensive disease in pregnancy, adjusted risks for vascular dementia after hypertension and proteinuria during pregnancy the hazard ratio was 6.27 (95% CI 1.65-27.44). Higher risks for cardiovascular disease were confirmed. Conclusions. Because of the very low absolute risk, the wide confidence interval and risk of misclassification, our results on vascular dementia could be questioned. Considering the pathophysiology of preeclampsia, the findings of brain lesions and the increased risk for cardiovascular disease, the possibly increased risk for all kinds of dementia must be investigated in larger and more well-defined cohorts.

  • 7.
    Armuand, Gabriela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lampic, C.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Skoog-Svanberg, A.
    Uppsala University of Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wanggren, K.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Survey shows that Swedish healthcare professionals have a positive attitude towards surrogacy but the health of the child is a concern2018In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 1, p. 101-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimIn February 2016, Sweden upheld its ban on surrogacy following a Government enquiry. This survey investigated attitudes towards surrogacy among primary health professionals working with children and their experiences of working with families following surrogacy abroad. MethodsFrom April to November 2016, nurses, physicians and psychologist working in primary child health care in four counties in Sweden were invited to participate in a cross-sectional online survey about surrogacy. ResultsThe mean age of the 208 participants was 49.2years (range 27-68) and nearly 91% were women. Approximately 60% supported legalised surrogacy. Wanting a conscience clause to be introduced in Sweden was associated with not supporting surrogacy for any groups, while personal experiences of infertility and clinical experiences with families following surrogacy were associated with positive attitudes towards surrogacy for heterosexual couples. The majority (64%) disagreed that surrogate children were as healthy as other children, and many believed that they risked worse mental health (21%) and social stigmatisation (21%). ConclusionWe found that 60% supported legalised surrogacy, but many expressed concerns about the childrens health and greater knowledge about the medical and psychosocial consequences of surrogacy is needed.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-09-15 16:56
  • 8.
    Axelsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Maternal obesity, obstetric interventions and post-partum anaemia increase the risk of post-partum sepsis: a population-based cohort study based on Swedish medical health registers2017In: Infectious Diseases, ISSN 2374-4235, E-ISSN 2374-4243, Vol. 49, no 10, p. 765-771Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The objective was to estimate whether maternal obesity and/or obstetric interventions are associated with diagnosed maternal post-partum sepsis. Methods: A retrospective observational cohort study including all deliveries in Sweden between 1997 and 2012 (N=1,558,752). Cases of sepsis (n=376) were identified by International Classification of Diseases, (ICD-10) codes A40, A41 and O 85 in the Medical Birth Register and the National Patient Register. The reference population was non-infected, and therefore, women with any other infection diagnosis and/or with dispensed antibiotics within eight weeks post-partum were excluded. Information on dispensed drugs was available in the prescribed drug Register. Women with sepsis were compared with non-infected women concerning maternal characteristics and obstetric interventions. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) were determined using the Mantel-Haenszel technique. Adjustments were made for maternal age, parity and smoking. Results: Obese women (body mass index 30) had a doubled risk of sepsis (3.6/10,000) compared with normal weight women (2.0/10,000) (aOR 1.85 (95%CI: 1.37-2.48)). Induction of labour (aOR 1.44 (95%CI: 1.09-1.91)), caesarean section overall (aOR 3.06 (95%CI: 2.49-3.77)) and elective caesarean section (aOR 2.41 (95%CI: 1.68-3.45)) increased the risk of sepsis compared with normal vaginal delivery. Post-partum anaemia due to acute blood loss was associated with maternal sepsis (aOR 3.40 (95%CI: 2.59-4.47)). Conclusions: Maternal obesity, obstetric interventions and post-partum anaemia due to acute blood loss increased the risk of diagnosed post-partum sepsis indicating that interventions in obstetric care should be considered carefully and anaemia should be treated if resources are available.

  • 9.
    Axelsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Postpartum infection in relation to maternal characteristics, obstetric interventions and complications2018In: Journal of Perinatal Medicine, ISSN 0300-5577, E-ISSN 1619-3997, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 271-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose was to evaluate the association between maternal characteristics, obstetrical interventions/complications and postpartum wound infections (WI), urinary tract infection (UTI) and endometritis. Furthermore, this study aimed to determine the time from delivery to onset of infections after discharge from the hospital. Three large Swedish Medical Health Registers were scrutinized for the period 2005-2012. A total of 582,576 women had 795,072 deliveries. Women with diagnosis codes for WIs, UTIs or endometritis, from delivery to 8 weeks postpartum, were compared to non-infected women. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Increasing age and body mass index (BMI) were both associated with increasing prevalence of postpartum infections. WIs were most strongly associated with cesarean section (CS) (OR 17.2; 95% CI 16.1-18.3), 3rd and 4th degree tears (OR 10.7%; 95% CI 9.80-11.9) and episiotomy (OR 10.2; 95% CI 8.94-11.5). Endometritis was associated with anemia (OR 3.16; 95% CI 3.01-3.31) and manual placental removal (OR 2.72; 95% CI 2.51-2.95). UTI was associated with emergency CS (OR 3.46; 95% CI 3.07-3.89) and instrumental delivery (OR 3.70; 95% CI 3.29-4.16). For women discharged from the delivery hospital the peak occurrence of UTI was 6 days postpartum, while for WIs and endometritis it was 7 days postpartum.

  • 10.
    Bengtsdotter, Hanna
    et al.
    Örebro Univ, Sweden.
    Lundin, Cecilia
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Gemzell Danielsson, Kristina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Bixo, Marie
    Umeå Univ, Sweden.
    Baumgart, Juliane
    Örebro Univ, Sweden.
    Marions, Lena
    Karolinska Inst Södersjukhuset, Sweden.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Malmborg, Agota
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindh, Ingela
    Gothenburg Univ, Sweden.
    Poromaa, Inger Sundstrom
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Ongoing or previous mental disorders predispose to adverse mood reporting during combined oral contraceptive use2018In: European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, ISSN 1362-5187, E-ISSN 1473-0782, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 45-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Previous studies have emphasised that women with pre-existing mood disorders are more inclined to discontinue hormonal contraceptive use. However, few studies have examined the effects of combined oral contraceptives (COC) on mood in women with previous or ongoing mental disorders. Materials and methods: This is a supplementary analysis of an investigator-initiated, double-blinded, randomised clinical trial during which 202 women were treated with either a COC (1.5mg estradiol and 2.5mg nomegestrolacetate) or placebo during three treatment cycles. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview was used to collect information on previous or ongoing mental disorders. The primary outcome measure was the total change score in five mood symptoms on the Daily Record of Severity of Problems (DRSP) scale in the intermenstrual phase of the treatment cycle. Results: Women with ongoing or previous mood, anxiety or eating disorders allocated to COC had higher total DRSP -scores during the intermenstrual phase of the treatment cycle in comparison with corresponding women randomised to placebo, mean difference 1.3 (95% CI 0.3-2.3). In contrast, among women without mental health problems, no difference in total DRSP -scores between COC- and placebo users was noted. Women with a risk use of alcohol who were randomised to the COC had higher total DRSP -scores than women randomised to placebo, mean difference 2.1 (CI 95% 1.0-3.2). Conclusions: Women with ongoing or previous mental disorders or risk use of alcohol have greater risk of COC-induced mood symptoms. This may be worth noting during family planning and contraceptive counselling.

  • 11.
    Berin, Emilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindblom, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindh Åstrand, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Spetz, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Resistance training for hot flushes in postmenopausal women: Randomized controlled trial protocol2016In: Maturitas, ISSN 0378-5122, E-ISSN 1873-4111, Vol. 85, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Hot flushes and night sweats affect 75% of all women after menopause and is a common reason for decreased quality of life in mid-aged women. Hormone therapy is effective in ameliorating symptoms but cannot be used by all women due to contraindications and side effects. Engagement in regular exercise is associated with fewer hot flushes in observational studies, but aerobic exercise has not proven effective in randomized controlled trials. It remains to be determined whether resistance training is effective in reducing hot flushes and improves quality of life in symptomatic postmenopausal women. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of standardized resistance training on hot flushes and other health parameters in postmenopausal women. Study design: This is an open, parallel-group, randomized controlled intervention study conducted in Linkoping, Sweden. Sixty symptomatic and sedentary postmenopausal women with a mean of at least four moderate to severe hot flushes per day or 28 per week will be randomized to an exercise intervention or unchanged physical activity (control group). The intervention consists of 15 weeks of standardized resistance training performed three times a week under supervision of a physiotherapist. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome is hot flush frequency assessed by self-reported hot flush diaries, and the difference in change from baseline to week 15 will be compared between the intervention group and the control group. Conclusion: The intention is that this trial will contribute to the evidence base regarding effective treatment for hot flushes. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 12.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Birth Characteristics’ Impacton Future Reproduction and Morbidity Among Twins an dSingletons2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Globally, in both developed and developing countries, the twinning rates have increased since the early 70’s. A large proportion of twins are born preterm and/or small-for-gestational-age (SGA) and/or with a low birth weight. Several studies have been performed on the long-term effect of these non-optimal birth characteristics on future reproductive performance and morbidity. Yet, most studies exclude twins or higher order pregnancies and thus the findings are based on singleton pregnancies only.

    The aim of the present thesis was therefore to investigate the impact of non-optimal birth characteristics in terms of preterm birth, small-for-gestational age, and low birth weight, on the reproductive pattern and morbidity among twins and singletons Furthermore, the present thesis attempted to establish whether twins and singletons were affected in the same manner.

    The studies included in this thesis are prospective population-based register studies, including all men and women, alive and living in Sweden at age 13, who were born between 1973 and 1983 (1,000,037 singletons and 16,561 twins) for the first three studies with follow-up till the end of 2006 and 2009. The last study included all men and women, alive and living in Sweden at age 13, who were born between 1973 and 1993 (2,051,479 singletons and 39,726 twins) with follow-up till the end of 2012.

    In general, twins were found less likely to reproduce between 13 and 33 years of age compared with singletons. Stratifying data by different birth characteristics, it was found that twins had a lower likelihood of reproducing on several different birth characteristics (appropriate-for-gestational-age, normal birth weight, low birth weight, term birth, preterm birth). However, twins born very preterm had an increased likelihood of reproducing compared with singletons born very preterm.

    Not taking birth characteristics into account, twinning was associated with a higher degree of hospitalization. However, accounting for the diverging birth characteristics this difference diminished and for some diagnoses the relationship was reversed such that twins were actually less likely to be hospitalized compared with singletons.

    In terms of the heritability of non-optimal birth characteristics singleton mothers born preterm were more predisposed to give birth to a child that was preterm while singleton mothers born SGA more often gave birth to a child either born preterm or SGA. Among twins this heritability was not as evident. The only difference observed was among twin mothers born SGA who were more likely to give birth to a child born SGA.

    In the extended cohort comprising those born between 1973 and 1993, male and female twins were found to be less likely to become parents compared with singletons. No difference was found among women in terms of having a second child, while male twins were more likely to have a second child compared with male singletons. It was also found that the likelihood of becoming a first-time parent and second-time parent was positively associated with the number of siblings.

    List of papers
    1. Reproductive patterns among twins: a Swedish register study of men and women born 1973-1983
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reproductive patterns among twins: a Swedish register study of men and women born 1973-1983
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    2013 (English)In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    During the last decades there has been a steady increase of twin births. A combination of improved medical treatment of preterm and small-for-gestational age children has contributed to a higher number of surviving twins. Prematurity is known to affect reproduction in a negative way. Few studies have focused on the potential effect twinning may have on future reproduction. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of being born a twin compared to being born a singleton have on future reproduction.

    Methods

    In a national population-based register study, all individuals born between 1973–1983 who were alive and living in Sweden at 13 years of age (n = 1 016 908) constituted the sample. Data on each study subject’s own birth as well as the birth of their first offspring, and parental socio-demographic factors were collected from Swedish population based registers. Hazard ratios and corresponding 95% CI was calculated using Cox proportional hazards model.

    Results

    Twins, both men and women, had a reduced likelihood of reproducing compared to singletons (women: HR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.86-0.93; men: HR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.87-0.97). This difference in birth rates can only partly be explained by diverging birth characteristics. Amongst men and women born very preterm, twins had an increased likelihood of reproducing compared to singletons (women: HR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.02-1.62; men: HR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.01-1.78).

    Conclusions

    Twins have lower reproduction rates compared to singletons, which only to a certain degree can be explained by diverging birth characteristics.

    Keywords
    Twin, Singleton, Reproduction rate, Birth characteristics
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89750 (URN)10.1186/1471-2393-13-6 (DOI)000314290200001 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden||

    Available from: 2013-03-05 Created: 2013-03-05 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    2. Hospitalization in Adolescence and Young Adulthood Among Twins and Singletons: A Swedish Cohort Study of Subjects Born Between 1973 and 1983
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hospitalization in Adolescence and Young Adulthood Among Twins and Singletons: A Swedish Cohort Study of Subjects Born Between 1973 and 1983
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    2013 (English)In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 707-715Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Children born with non-optimal birth characteristics — that is, are small for gestational age and/or preterm — have an increased risk for several long-term effects such as neurological sequelae and chronic disease. The purpose of this study was to examine whether twins exhibited a different outcome, compared with singletons, in terms of hospitalization during adolescence and early adulthood, and to what extent differences remain when considering the divergence in birth characteristics between singletons and twins. Persons born between 1973 and 1983 in Sweden and surviving until age 13 were included and followed until the end of 2006. Data on birth characteristics, parental socio-demographic factors, and hospitalizations were collected from national registers. Adjusting for parental socio-demographic factors, twins had a higher risk of being hospitalized than singletons (odds ratio, OR = 1.17, 95% confidence interval, CI = 1.10–1.25) and more often due to ‘Congenital anomalies’ (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.06–1.28), ‘Infections’ (OR = 1.14; 95% CI = 1.08–1.20), ‘External causes of illness’ (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.06–1.15), and ‘Diseases of the nervous system’ (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.10–1.26). Stratifying for birth characteristics, this difference diminishes, and for some diagnoses non-optimal twins seem to do slightly better than non-optimal singletons. Thus, twins with non-optimal birth characteristics had a lower risk of hospitalization than non-optimal singletons on, for example, ‘Congenital anomalies’ and ‘Diseases of the nervous system’ (OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.77–0.96; OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.81–0.97, respectively) and Total (any) hospitalization (OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.83–0.92). Among those with optimal birth characteristics, twins had an increased hospitalization due to ‘External causes of illness’ (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.02–1.13) compared with optimal singletons. Twins have higher hospitalization rates than singletons. In stratifying for birth characteristics, this difference diminishes, and for some diagnoses, non-optimal twins seem to do less poorly than non-optimal singletons.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Cambridge University Press (CUP), 2013
    Keywords
    twin, singleton, morbidity, SGA, preterm, low birthweight
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-94317 (URN)10.1017/thg.2013.27 (DOI)000319127400007 ()
    Available from: 2013-06-24 Created: 2013-06-24 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    3. Intergenerational cohort study of preterm and small-for-gestational-age birth in twins and singletons
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intergenerational cohort study of preterm and small-for-gestational-age birth in twins and singletons
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    2015 (English)In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 581-590Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    To date several studies have investigated the intergenerational effect of preterm and small-for-gestational-age births. However, most studies excluded both twin mothers and twin offspring from the analyses. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the intergenerational effect of preterm birth and small for gestational age (SGA) among twins and singletons.

    A prospective population based register study of mother-first-born offspring pairs recorded in the Swedish Medical Birth Register was performed. The study included 4073 twins and 264,794 singletons born in 1973-1983 and their firstborns born in 1986-2009. Preterm birth was defined as birth <37 weeks of gestation and SGA as < 2 standard deviations of the Swedish standard. Logistic regressions were performed to estimate the intergenerational effect of each birth characteristic. Adjustments were made for maternal grandmothers and mother’s socio-demographic factors in addition to maternal birth- characteristics.

    Among mothers born as singletons, being born preterm was associated with an increased risk for delivering a preterm child (adjusted OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.29-1.50) while being born SGA increased the likelihood of a SGA child (adjusted OR 3.04, 95% CI 2.80-3.30) as well as a preterm child (adjusted OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.20-1.40). In twin mothers, the corresponding ORs tended to be lower and the only statistically significant association was between a SGA mother and a SGA child (adjusted OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.40-3.31). A statistically significant interaction between twinning and mother’s size for gestational was identified in a multivariate linear regression analysis indicating that singleton mothers born SGA were associated with a lower birth weight compared to mothers not born SGA.

    Preterm birth and SGA appear to be transferred from one generation to the next, although not always reaching statistical significance. These effects seem to be less evident in mothers born as twins compared with those born as singletons.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Cambridge University Press, 2015
    National Category
    Pediatrics Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121275 (URN)10.1017/thg.2015.60 (DOI)000361660800010 ()
    Note

    Funding: Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden

    Available from: 2015-09-11 Created: 2015-09-11 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
    4. Reproductive pattern among twins and singletons in relation to number of siblings: a Swedish cohort study of individuals born between 1973 and 1993
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reproductive pattern among twins and singletons in relation to number of siblings: a Swedish cohort study of individuals born between 1973 and 1993
    Show others...
    2015 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Twinning has been shown to be associated with a reduced reproductive rate compared to singletons. This can partly be explained by the birth-characteristics pertaining to twinning as many twins are born preterm, with low birth weight or small for gestational age. However, the intergenerational reproductive rate may also be due to familial factors such as number of siblings.

    Methods This is a register-based study of all men and women born in Sweden between 1973 and 1993 who were living in Sweden at 13 years of age. Data on the study objects’ own births as well as their offspring, parental socio-demographic factors were collected from Swedish population based registers. Hazard ratios for the likelihood of becoming a parent were estimated using Cox’s proportion hazard models. All models were adjusted for socio-demographic and birth characteristics.

    Results Adjusting for number of siblings, socio-demographic factors and birth characteristics, twinning was associated with a decreased likelihood of becoming a first-time parent, compared with singletons both for females (HR (95% CI)=0.90 (0.88-0.93) and males (HR (95% CI)=0.96 (0.93-0.99). Having 3 or more siblings increased the chance of becoming a first-time parent among both male twins (HR (95% CI)=1.17 (1.08-1.27)) and singletons (HR (95% CI)=1.16 (1.15-1.18)) compared to having fewer than 3 siblings. This increased likelihood of becoming a parent was also present among female twins (HR (95% CI)=1.18 (1.10-1.26)) and singletons (HR (95% CI)=1.22 (1.21-1.24)).

    Conclusions Twins have a decreased likelihood of becoming a parent compared to singletons even when adjusting for number of siblings.

    Keywords
    Twinning, reproduction, siblings, prematurity, size for gestational age, birth weight
    National Category
    Pediatrics Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121276 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-09-11 Created: 2015-09-11 Last updated: 2016-04-01Bibliographically approved
  • 13.
    Bladh, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Intergenerational cohort study of preterm and small-for-gestational-age birth in twins and singletons2015In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 581-590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date several studies have investigated the intergenerational effect of preterm and small-for-gestational-age births. However, most studies excluded both twin mothers and twin offspring from the analyses. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the intergenerational effect of preterm birth and small for gestational age (SGA) among twins and singletons.

    A prospective population based register study of mother-first-born offspring pairs recorded in the Swedish Medical Birth Register was performed. The study included 4073 twins and 264,794 singletons born in 1973-1983 and their firstborns born in 1986-2009. Preterm birth was defined as birth <37 weeks of gestation and SGA as < 2 standard deviations of the Swedish standard. Logistic regressions were performed to estimate the intergenerational effect of each birth characteristic. Adjustments were made for maternal grandmothers and mother’s socio-demographic factors in addition to maternal birth- characteristics.

    Among mothers born as singletons, being born preterm was associated with an increased risk for delivering a preterm child (adjusted OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.29-1.50) while being born SGA increased the likelihood of a SGA child (adjusted OR 3.04, 95% CI 2.80-3.30) as well as a preterm child (adjusted OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.20-1.40). In twin mothers, the corresponding ORs tended to be lower and the only statistically significant association was between a SGA mother and a SGA child (adjusted OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.40-3.31). A statistically significant interaction between twinning and mother’s size for gestational was identified in a multivariate linear regression analysis indicating that singleton mothers born SGA were associated with a lower birth weight compared to mothers not born SGA.

    Preterm birth and SGA appear to be transferred from one generation to the next, although not always reaching statistical significance. These effects seem to be less evident in mothers born as twins compared with those born as singletons.

  • 14.
    Bladh, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Reproductive pattern among twins and singletons in relation to number of siblings: a Swedish cohort study of individuals born between 1973 and 19932015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Twinning has been shown to be associated with a reduced reproductive rate compared to singletons. This can partly be explained by the birth-characteristics pertaining to twinning as many twins are born preterm, with low birth weight or small for gestational age. However, the intergenerational reproductive rate may also be due to familial factors such as number of siblings.

    Methods This is a register-based study of all men and women born in Sweden between 1973 and 1993 who were living in Sweden at 13 years of age. Data on the study objects’ own births as well as their offspring, parental socio-demographic factors were collected from Swedish population based registers. Hazard ratios for the likelihood of becoming a parent were estimated using Cox’s proportion hazard models. All models were adjusted for socio-demographic and birth characteristics.

    Results Adjusting for number of siblings, socio-demographic factors and birth characteristics, twinning was associated with a decreased likelihood of becoming a first-time parent, compared with singletons both for females (HR (95% CI)=0.90 (0.88-0.93) and males (HR (95% CI)=0.96 (0.93-0.99). Having 3 or more siblings increased the chance of becoming a first-time parent among both male twins (HR (95% CI)=1.17 (1.08-1.27)) and singletons (HR (95% CI)=1.16 (1.15-1.18)) compared to having fewer than 3 siblings. This increased likelihood of becoming a parent was also present among female twins (HR (95% CI)=1.18 (1.10-1.26)) and singletons (HR (95% CI)=1.22 (1.21-1.24)).

    Conclusions Twins have a decreased likelihood of becoming a parent compared to singletons even when adjusting for number of siblings.

  • 15.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Avoiding the first cesarean section-results of structured organizational and cultural changes2016In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 95, no 5, p. 580-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionIn 2006 the overall rates of instrumental deliveries (10%) and cesarean sections (CS) (20%) were high in our unit. We decided to improve quality of care by offering more women a safe and attractive normal vaginal delivery. The target group was primarily nulliparous women at term with spontaneous onset of labor and cephalic presentation. Material and methodsImplementation of a nine-item list of structured organizational and cultural change in Linkoping 2006-15. The nine items include monitoring of obstetric results, recruitment of a midwife coordinator, risk classification of women, introduction of three different midwife competence levels, improved teamwork, obstetrical morning round, fetal monitoring skills, obstetrical skills training, and public promotion of the strategy. ResultsThe CS rate in nulliparous women at term with spontaneous onset of labor decreased from 10% in 2006 to 3% in 2015. During the same period the overall CS rate dropped from 20% to 11%. The prevalence of children born at the unit with umbilical cord pH &lt;7 and Apgar score &lt;4 at 5 min were the same over the years studied. At present, 95.2% of women delivering at our unit are satisfied with their delivery experience. ConclusionsThe CS rates have declined after implementing the nine items of organizational and cultural changes. It seems that a specific and persistent multidisciplinary activity with a focus on the Robson group 1 can reduce CS rates without increased risk of neonatal complications.

  • 16.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Fetma under graviditet ökar risken för både kvinna och barn: Kompetent omhändertagande kan minska riskökningen2015In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 112, no 48, p. 2156-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Fetma hos en gravid kvinna innebär ökad risk för missbildning hos fostret. Vid screeningultraljud upptäcks färre missbildningar än hos barn till normalviktiga kvinnor, men KUB-metoden för att upptäcka Downs syndrom är lika effektiv i alla BMI-grupper. Fetma hos kvinnan innebär ökad risk för gestationsdiabetes, preeklampsi, prematur förlossning och intrauterin fosterdöd. Öppningsskedet under förlossningen är förlängt hos kvinnor med BMI >30, men krystskedet är snabbt. Det finns ökad risk för atonisk postpartumblödning, vilket kan indicera profylaktisk behandling med uterotonika. Fetma hos kvinnan medför fler allvarliga komplikationer hos barnet under första levnadsveckan oavsett förlossningssätt.

  • 17.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Team-led hospital-based care reduced the number of obstetric interventions in ACTA OBSTETRICIA ET GYNECOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA2016In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 95, no 11, p. 1320-1320Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 18.
    Boij, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Mjosberg, Jenny
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Svensson Arvelund, Judit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hjorth, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Regulatory T-cell Subpopulations in Severe or Early-onset Preeclampsia2015In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 74, no 4, p. 368-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem A deficiency in regulatory T (Treg) cells causing reduced immune regulatory capacity has been proposed in preeclampsia. Objective Utilizing recent advances in flow cytometry phenotyping, we aimed to assess whether a deficiency of Treg subpopulations occurs in preeclampsia. Method of study Six-color flow cytometry was used for Treg phenotyping in 18 preeclamptic women (one early-onset, one severe and 16 both), 20 women with normal pregnancy, and 20 non-pregnant controls. Results No differences were found in major Treg populations including CD127(low)CD25(+)/CD127(ow)FOXP3(+), resting (FOXP3(dim)CD45RA(+)), and activated (FOXP3(bright)CD45RA(-)) Treg cells, whereas preeclamptic women showed increased CTLA-4(+) and CCR4(+) proportions within resting/activated Treg populations. Corticosteroid treatment prior to blood sampling (n = 10) affected the distribution of Treg populations. Conclusions Although we found no major alterations in circulating Treg frequencies, differences in CTLA-4(+) and CCR4(+) frequencies suggest a migratory defect of Treg cells in preeclampsia. Corticosteroid treatment should be taken into account when evaluating Treg cells.

  • 19.
    Borendal Wodlin, Ninnie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Intraoperative cervical treatment does not affect the prevalence of vaginal bleeding 1 year postoperatively after subtotal hysterectomy. A register study from the Swedish National Register for Gynecological Surgery2017In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 96, no 12, p. 1430-1437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionThe objectives were to establish the prevalence of persistent vaginal bleeding following subtotal hysterectomy, to analyze the effect of intraoperative cervical treatment on the occurrence of persistent vaginal bleeding, and to evaluate the impact of persistent vaginal bleeding on the patient-reported opinion concerning result of surgery and medical condition. Material and methodsRetrospective study with data from the Swedish National Register for Gynecological Surgery including 5240 women undergoing subtotal hysterectomy for benign conditions between January 2004 and June 2016. Demographic and clinical data were obtained from the pre- and perioperative forms. Data concerning occurrence of persistent vaginal bleeding, rating of medical condition and contentment with result of surgery were collected from the 1-year inquiry form. Statistical analyses were performed with multivariable logistic regression models. The results are presented as adjusted odd ratios and 95% confidence intervals. ResultsPersistent vaginal bleeding occurred in 18.6%. Intraoperative cervical treatment did not affect the frequency of persistent vaginal bleeding (adjusted odds ratio 1.48; 95% confidence interval 0.93-2.37). More than 90% were satisfied with the result of the hysterectomy, but women with persistent vaginal bleeding were less content compared with those without persistent vaginal bleeding (adjusted odds ratio 0.42; 95% confidence interval 0.26-0.67). The self-perception of the medical condition did not differ between the women with and without persistent vaginal bleeding (adjusted odds ratio 1.16; 95% confidence interval 0.33-4.12). ConclusionsNearly two in ten women may expect persistent vaginal bleeding following subtotal hysterectomy, and cervical treatment intraoperatively did not affect this. More than 90% were satisfied with the result but women with persistent vaginal bleeding were less content. Preoperative information on this risk of persistent vaginal bleeding may be important when choosing hysterectomy technique.

  • 20.
    Boström, A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thulin, K.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Norrköping.
    Fredriksson, M.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Reese, D.
    IFK Norrköping, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Rockborn, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Norrköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Risk factors for acute and overuse sport injuries in Swedish children 11 to 15 years old: What about resistance training with weights?2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 317-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To determine the 1-year self-reported incidence of overuse and traumatic sport injuries and risk factors for injuries in children participating in a summer sports camp representing seven different sports. 4363 children, 11 to 15 years old participating in a summer camp in seven different sports answered a questionnaire. Injury in this cross-sectional study was defined as a sport-related trauma or overload leading to pain and dysfunction preventing the person from participation in training or competition for at least 1 week. A number of risk factors for injury were investigated such as sex, age, number of hours spent on training in general, and on resistance training with weights. Nearly half [49%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 48–51%] of the participants had been injured as a result of participation in a sport during the preceding year, significantly more boys than girls (53%, 95% CI 50–55% vs 46%, 95% CI 43–48%; P < 0.001). Three factors contributed to increased incidence of sport injuries: age, sex, and resistance training with weights. Time spent on resistance training with weights was significantly associated with sport injuries in a logistic regression analysis. In children age 11 to 15 years, the risk of having a sport-related injury increased with age and occurred more often in boys than in girls. Weight training was the only modifiable risk factor that contributed to a significant increase in the incidence of sport injuries.

  • 21.
    Brohede, Sabina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomberg, Karin
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    I will be at deaths door and realize that Ive wasted maybe half of my life on one body part: the experience of living with body dysmorphic disorder2016In: International journal of psychiatry in clinical practice (Print), ISSN 1365-1501, E-ISSN 1471-1788, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 191-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of patients living with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), including their experiences with the health care system. Methods: Fifteen individuals with BDD were interviewed, and interpretive description was used to analyse the interviews. Results: The following six themes were identified: being absorbed in time-consuming procedures, facing tension between ones own ideal and the perceived reality, becoming the disorder, being restricted in life, attempting to reduce ones problems and striving to receive care. The overarching concept derived from the themes was feeling imprisoned - struggling to become free and to no longer feel abnormal. Conclusions: Ideas of imprisonment and abnormality compose the entire experience of living with this disorder. Although the participants suffered greatly from their BDD, these patients encountered difficulties in accessing health care and had disappointing experiences during their encounters with the health care system. Therefore, it is important to increase awareness and knowledge of BDD among health care professionals to ensure that patients with BDD receive the appropriate care.

  • 22.
    Brohede, Sabina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder among Swedish women: A population-based study2015In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, ISSN 0010-440X, E-ISSN 1532-8384, Vol. 58, p. 108-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by a highly distressing and impairing preoccupation with nonexistent or slight defects in appearance. Patients with BDD present to both psychiatric and non-psychiatric physicians. A few studies have assessed BDD prevalence in representative samples of the general population and have demonstrated that this disorder is relatively common. Our primary objective was to assess the prevalence of BDD in the Swedish population because no data are currently available. Methods: In the current cross-sectional study, 2891 randomly selected Swedish women aged 18-60 years participated. The occurrence of BDD was assessed using the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ), which is a validated self-report measure derived from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV criteria for BDD. In addition, symptoms of depression and anxiety were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Results: The prevalence of BDD among Swedish women was 2.1%. The women with BDD had significantly more symptoms of depression and anxiety than the women without BDD. Depression (HADS depression score greater than= 8) and anxiety (HADS anxiety score greater than= 8) were reported by 42% and 72% of the women with BDD, respectively. Conclusions: The results of the present study indicate that BDD is relatively common among Swedish women (2.1%) and that it is associated with significant morbidity.

  • 23.
    Brohede, Sabina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Wyon, Yvonne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Body dysmorphic disorder in female Swedish dermatology patients2017In: International Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0011-9059, E-ISSN 1365-4632, Vol. 56, no 12, p. 1387-1394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundIndividuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) are highly distressed and impaired owing to perceived defects in their physical appearance that are not noticeable to others. They are frequently concerned about their skin and often present to dermatologists rather than psychiatrists. However, BDD patients attending dermatology clinics may be at risk of not receiving an appropriate assessment and beneficial treatment. The aims of this study were to estimate the BDD prevalence rate among Swedish female dermatology patients and to assess the psychological condition of BDD patients compared to that of other dermatology patients. MethodsThe occurrence of BDD was estimated using the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ), a validated self-report measure for BDD. Symptoms of depression and anxiety were measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and quality of life was assessed using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). ResultsThe prevalence rate of BDD among female Swedish dermatology patients was 4.9% (95% CI 3.2-7.4). Anxiety (HADS A11) was 4-fold more commonly reported by patients with positive BDD screening (48% vs. 11%), and depression (HADS D11) was over 10-fold more common in patients with positive BDD screening (19% vs. 1.8%) (Pamp;lt;0.001). The median DLQI score was 18 in the BDD group, compared to a score of 4 in the non-BDD group (Pamp;lt;0.001). ConclusionsOur results indicate that BDD is fairly common among female Swedish dermatology patients (4.9%) and that BDD patients have high levels of depression and anxiety and severely impaired quality of life.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-09-27 09:39
  • 24.
    Bruno, Valentina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Tor Vergata Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Svensson Arvelund, Judit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rubér, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Piccione, Emilio
    Tor Vergata Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Effects of low molecular weight heparin on the polarization and cytokine profile of macrophages and T helper cells in vitro2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 4166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is widely used in recurrent miscarriage treatment. The anticoagulant effects are established, while immunological effects are not fully known. Our aim was to assess LMWH effects on activation and polarization of central regulatory immune cells from healthy women, and on placenta tissues from women undergoing elective abortions. Isolated blood monocytes and T helper (Th) cells under different activation and polarizing conditions were cultured with or without LMWH. Flow cytometry showed that LMWH exposure induced increased expression of HLA-DR and CD206 in macrophages. This phenotype was associated with increased secretion of Th17-associated CCL20, and decreased secretion of CCL2 (M2-associated) and CCL22 (Th2), as measured by multiplex bead array. In accordance, LMWH exposure to Th cells reduced the proportion of CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T-cells, intensified IFN-gamma secretion and showed a tendency to increase the lymphoblast proportions. Collectively, a mainly pro-inflammatory effect was noted on two essential tolerance-promoting cells. Although the biological significancies of these in vitro findings are uncertain and need to be confirmed in vivo, they suggest the possibility that immunological effects of LMWH may be beneficial mainly at an earlier gestational age to provide an appropriate implantation process in women with recurrent miscarriage.

  • 25.
    Brüggemann, Jelmer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    A first online intervention to increase patients perceived ability to act in situations of abuse in health care: reports of a Swedish pre-post study2015In: BMC Medical Ethics, ISSN 1472-6939, E-ISSN 1472-6939, Vol. 16, no 35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Efforts to counteract abuse in health care, defined as patient-experienced abuse, have mainly focused on interventions among caregivers. This study is the first to test an online intervention focusing on how patients can counteract such abuse. The intervention aimed at increasing patients intention and perceived ability to act in future situations where they risk experiencing abuse. Methods: Participants were recruited through a nephrology clinic in Sweden. The intervention consisted of an online program that aimed to stimulate patients to think of possible actions in situations in which they risk experiencing abuse. The program comprised stories and exercises in text and comic form. The participants filled out a questionnaire immediately before and after going through the program, as well as during follow-up four to eight weeks later. Results: Forty-eight patients (39 %) participated in the study and spent, on average, 41 min responding to questions and going through the program. Both men and women, of various ages and educational backgrounds, participated. An increase in participants self-reported ability to identify opportunities to act in a given situation was seen immediately afterwards, as well as during follow up. Conclusion: The current study suggests that it is feasible and most likely useful to a variety of patients to work with the provided material that has the aim of counteracting abuse in health care. It would be of interest to further develop ways of using comics and to test similar interventions in other health care settings.

  • 26.
    Carlhäll, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Thorsell, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Maternal obesity (Class I-III), gestational weight gain and maternal leptin levels during and after pregnancy: a prospective cohort study2016In: BMC Obesity, ISSN 2052-9538, Vol. 3, no 28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Maternal obesity is accompanied by maternal and fetal complications during and after pregnancy. The risks seem to increase with degree of obesity. Leptin has been suggested to play a role in the development of obesity related complications. Whether maternal leptin levels differ between obese and morbidly obese women, during and after pregnancy, have to our knowledge not been previously described. Neither has the association between maternal leptin levels and gestational weight gain in obese women. The aim was to evaluate if maternal plasma leptin levels were associated with different degrees of maternal obesity and gestational weight gain.

    Methods

    Prospective cohort study including women categorized as obesity class I-III (n = 343) and divided into three gestational weight gain groups (n = 304). Maternal plasma leptin was measured at gestational week 15, 29 and 10 weeks postpartum. Maternal Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated from early pregnancy weight. Gestational weight gain was calculated using maternal weight in delivery week minus early pregnancy weight. The mean value and confidence interval of plasma-leptin were analysed with a two-way ANOVA model. Interaction effect between BMI and gestational weight gain group was tested with a two-way ANOVA model.

    Results

    The mean maternal leptin concentrations were significantly higher in women with obesity class III compared to women in obesity class I, at all times when plasma leptin were measured. The mean leptin concentrations were also significantly higher in women with obesity class II compared to women in obesity class I, except in gestational week 29. There was no difference in mean levels of plasma leptin between the gestational weight gain groups. No significant interaction between BMI and gestational weight gain group was found.

    Conclusions

    Plasma leptin levels during and after pregnancy were associated with obesity class but not with degree of gestational weight gain. These results are in concordance with epidemiological findings where the risk of obstetric complications increases with increased maternal obesity class. The effect on obstetric outcome by degree of gestational weight gain is less pronounced than the adverse effects associated with maternal obesity.

  • 27.
    Christmann, Benjamin S.
    et al.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bernstein, Charles N.
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Wayne Duck, L.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Mannon, Peter J.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bjorksten, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Elson, Charles O.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Human seroreactivity to gut microbiota antigens2015In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 136, no 5, p. 1378-1386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although immune responses directed against antigens from the intestinal microbiota are observed in certain diseases, the normal human adaptive immune response to intestinal microbiota is poorly defined. Objective: Our goal was to assess the adaptive immune response to the intestinal microbiota present in 143 healthy adults and compare this response with the response observed in 52 children and their mothers at risk of having allergic disease. Methods: Human serum was collected from adults and children followed from birth to 7 years of age, and the serum IgG response to a panel of intestinal microbiota antigens was assessed by using a novel protein microarray. Results: Nearly every subject tested, regardless of health status, had serum IgG that recognized a common set of antigens. Seroreactivity to the panel of antigens was significantly lower in atopic adults. Healthy infants expressed the highest level of IgG seroreactivity to intestinal microbiota antigens. This adaptive response developed between 6 and 12 months of age and peaked around 2 years of age. Low IgG responses to certain clusters of microbiota antigens during infancy were associated with allergy development during childhood. Conclusions: There is an observed perturbation of the adaptive response to antigens from the microbiota in allergic subjects. These perturbations are observable even in childhood, suggesting that optimal stimulation of the adaptive immune system by the microbiota might be needed to prevent certain immune-mediated diseases.

  • 28.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hultgren, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lifestyle habits and womens attitudes towards discussing them at a visit for contraceptive advice2015In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 114-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aims of this study was to use visits for contraceptive counselling as opportunities for examining womens actual life style habits with the main focus being placed on alcohol consumption but also to evaluate the womens opinions about discussing their alcohol and tobacco habits and their weight status. Methods: A total of 535/802 (67%) women completed a study-specific anonymous questionnaire after a contraceptive counselling visit with a midwife. Results: A majority of the women thought that a discussion concerning alcohol habits at a contraceptive counselling session was important (85.5%) and not intrusive (86.4%) neither embarrassing (81.7%). Women with high-risk drinking habits were younger, more often tobacco users and more often planning for childbirth in the future, compared with women who did not display high-risk drinking behaviour. A significantly higher percentage of women who practiced high-risk drinking thought that a discussion of alcohol was intrusive (10.9%) and embarrassing (46.7%), compared with women not practicing highrisk alcohol consumption. Most women (72.9%) stated that no other caregiver during the preceding year except the midwife had discussed drinking habits with them. The weight was a good thing that the midwife brought up for discussion according to 82.5% of the women but the discussions about weight was more often found embarrassing (18.4%) than the discussion about alcohol habits. Conclusion: Women who came for contraceptive counselling found the discussion concerning alcohol habits important, not intrusive or embarrassing and a good thing to be brought up by the midwife. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 29.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Larsson, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Steen, Linda
    Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    You just need to leave the room when you breastfeed: Breastfeeding experiences among obese women in Sweden – A qualitative study2018In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The benefits of breastfeeding for the infant as well for the mother are well-known. It is recognized that obese (Body Mass Index ≥30 kg/m2) women may have less antenatal intention to breastfeed, and shortened duration of breastfeeding compared with normal-weight women. This may result in adverse short- and long-term health for both mother and child, such as a shortened lactational amenorrhoea and decreased protection against breast cancer for the women, and an increased risk for infectious diseases and overweight/obesity among the children. Therefore, it is important to gain more knowledge and understanding of obese women’s experiences of breastfeeding in order to attain good health care. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify and describe obese women’s experiences of breastfeeding.

    Methods

    This is an explorative study. Data was collected 2 – 18 months after childbirth through semi-structured face-to-face interviews with 11 obese women with breastfeeding experience. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was used.

    Results

    Three themes emerged from the data analysis: Breastfeeding - a part of motherhood, the challenges of breastfeeding, and support for breastfeeding. The women described an antenatal hope for breastfeeding, the body’s ability to produce milk fascinated them, and the breast milk was seen as the best way to feed the child and also as promoting the attachment between mother and child. Breastfeeding was described as a challenge even though it is natural. The challenges concerned technical difficulties such as the woman finding a good body position and helping the child to achieve an optimum grip of the nipple. Another challenge was the exposure of the body connected to public breastfeeding. Support of breastfeeding was described as the importance of being confirmed as an individual behind the obesity, rather than an individual with obesity, and to obtain enough professional breastfeeding support.

    Conclusions

    Breastfeeding was experienced as a natural part of being a mother. There were practical challenges for obese women concerning how to manage breastfeeding and how to handle the public exposure of the body. There was a need for realistic information about breastfeeding concerning both the child and the woman.

  • 30.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Olhager, Elisabeth
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Oldin, Carin
    Regional Jonköping County, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Effects of a Gestational Weight Gain Restriction Program for Obese Pregnant Women: Childrens Weight Development during the First Five Years of Life2016In: CHILDHOOD OBESITY, ISSN 2153-2168, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 162-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Maternal prepregnancy obesity (BMI 30kg/m(2)) and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) have shown a strong positive association with a higher BMI and risk of obesity in the offspring. The aim of this study is to estimate the effect of a GWG restriction program for obese pregnant women on the childrens BMI at 5 years of age and weight-for-length/height (WL/H) development from 2 months of age until 5 years of age. Methods: This was a follow-up study of 302 children (137 children in an intervention group and 165 children in a control group) whose mothers participated in a weight gain restriction program during pregnancy. Results: BMI at five years of age did not differ between girls and boys in the intervention and control group. The degree of maternal GWG, amp;lt;7kg or 7kg, did not affect the offsprings WL/H. Compared with Swedish reference data, just over half of the children in both the intervention and control group had a BMI within the average range, whereas slightly more than one-third of the children had a higher BMI. Conclusion: Despite a comprehensive gestational intervention program for obese women containing individual weekly visits and opportunity to participate in aqua aerobic classes, there were no differences between BMI or weight development among the offspring at 5 years of age in the intervention and control group.

  • 31.
    Comasco, Erika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Agnafors, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aho, Nikolas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Psychiatric symptoms in adolescents: FKBP5 genotype-early life adversity interaction effects2015In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 24, no 12, p. 1473-1483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychiatric disorders are multi-factorial and their symptoms overlap. Constitutional and environmental factors influence each other, and this contributes to risk and resilience in mental ill-health. We investigated functional genetic variation of stress responsiveness, assessed as FKBP5 genotype, in relation to early life adversity and mental health in two samples of adolescents. One population-based sample of 909 12-year-old adolescents was assessed using the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events scale and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. One sample of 398 17-year-old adolescents, enriched for poly-victimized individuals (USSS), was assessed using the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire and the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC). The FKBP5 rs1360780 and rs3800373 polymorphisms were genotyped using a fluorescence-based competitive allele-specific PCR. Most prominently among poly-victimized older male adolescents, the least common alleles of the polymorphisms, in interaction with adverse life events, were associated with psychiatric symptoms, after controlling for ethno-socio-economic factors. The interaction effect between rs3800373 and adverse life events on the TSCC sub-scales-anxiety, depression, anger, and dissociation-and with the rs1360780 on dissociation in the USSS cohort remained significant after Bonferroni correction. This pattern of association is in line with the findings of clinical and neuroimaging studies, and implies interactive effects of FKBP5 polymorphisms and early life environment on several psychiatric symptoms. These correlates add up to provide constructs that are relevant to several psychiatric symptoms, and to identify early predictors of mental ill-health.

  • 32.
    Dahm-Kähler, Pernilla
    et al.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Borgfeldt, Christer
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Skane University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Regional Cancer Center Western Sweden, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Staf, Christian
    Regional Cancer Center Western Sweden, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Falconer, Henrik
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjurberg, Maria
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stålberg, Karin
    Department of Women's and Children's health Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Högberg, Thomas
    Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Population-based study of survival for women with serous cancer of the ovary, fallopian tube, peritoneum or undesignated origin - on behalf of the Swedish gynecological cancer group (SweGCG).2017In: Gynecologic Oncology, ISSN 0090-8258, E-ISSN 1095-6859, Vol. 144, no 1, p. 167-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to determine survival outcome in patients with serous cancer in the ovary, fallopian tube, peritoneum and of undesignated origin.

    METHODS: Nation-wide population-based study of women≥18years with histologically verified non-uterine serous cancer, included in the Swedish Quality Registry for primary cancer of the ovary, fallopian tube and peritoneum diagnosed 2009-2013. Relative survival (RS) was estimated using the Ederer II method. Simple and multivariable analyses were estimated by Poisson regression models.

    RESULTS: Of 5627 women identified, 1246 (22%) had borderline tumors and 4381 had malignant tumors. In total, 2359 women had serous cancer; 71% originated in the ovary (OC), 9% in the fallopian tube (FTC), 9% in the peritoneum (PPC) and 11% at an undesignated primary site (UPS). Estimated RS at 5-years was 37%; for FTC 54%, 40% for OC, 34% for PPC and 13% for UPS. In multivariable regression analyses restricted to women who had undergone primary or interval debulking surgery for OC, FTC and PPC, site of origin was not independently associated with survival. Significant associations with worse survival were found for advanced stages (RR 2.63, P<0.001), moderate (RR 1.90, P<0.047) and poor differentiation (RR 2.20, P<0.009), neoadjuvant chemotherapy (RR1.33, P<0.022), residual tumor (RR 2.65, P<0.001) and platinum single (2.34, P<0.001) compared to platinum combination chemotherapy.

    CONCLUSION: Survival was poorer for serous cancer at UPS than for ovarian, fallopian tube and peritoneal cancer. Serous cancer at UPS needs to be addressed when reporting and comparing survival rates of ovarian cancer.

  • 33.
    Elenis, Evangelia
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Skoog-Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Stavreus-Evers, Anneli
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Akerud, Helena
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    HRG C633T polymorphism and risk of gestational hypertensive disorders: a pilot study2018In: BMC Medical Genetics, ISSN 1471-2350, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 19, article id 44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Preeclampsia and gestational hypertensive disorders are thought to occur due to endothelial cell dysfunction and abnormal placentation, triggered by angiogenesis-related factors yet undetermined. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a genetic polymorphism (SNP) of Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG), HRG C633T SNP, is associated with gestational hypertensive disorders. Methods: It was performed a nested case-control study from the BASIC Cohort of Uppsala University Hospital comprising 92 women diagnosed with gestational hypertensive disorders without other comorbidities and 200 women with full term uncomplicated pregnancies, all genotyped regarding HRG C633T SNP. Results: The genetic analysis of the study sample showed that C/C genotype was more prevalent among controls. The presence of the T-allele showed a tendency towards an increased risk of gestational hypertensive disorders. After clustering the study participants based on their genotype, it was observed that the odds for gestational hypertensive disorders among heterozygous C/T or homozygous T/T carriers were higher compared to homozygous C/C carriers [OR 1.72, 95% CI (1.04-2.84)]. The association remained significant even after adjustment for maternal age, BMI and parity. Conclusions: The HRG C633T genotype seems to be associated with gestational hypertensive disorders, and as part of a greater algorithm, might contribute in the future to the prediction of the individual susceptibility to the condition.

  • 34.
    Elenis, Evangelia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Akerud, Helena
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Adverse obstetric outcomes in pregnancies resulting from oocyte donation: a retrospective cohort case study in Sweden2015In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 15, no 247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Oocyte donation has been associated to gestational diabetes, hypertensive disorders, placental abnormalities, preterm delivery and increased rate of caesarean delivery while simultaneously being characterized by high rates of primiparity, advanced maternal age and multiple gestation constituting the individual risk of mode of conception difficult to assess. This study aims to explore obstetrical outcomes among relatively young women with optimal health status conceiving singletons with donated versus autologous oocytes (via IVF and spontaneously). Methods: National retrospective cohort case study involving 76 women conceiving with donated oocytes, 150 nulliparous women without infertility conceiving spontaneously and 63 women conceiving after non-donor IVF. Data on obstetric outcomes were retrieved from the National Birth Medical Register and the medical records of oocyte recipients from the treating University Hospitals of Sweden. Demographic and logistic regression analysis were performed to examine the association of mode of conception and obstetric outcomes. Results: Women conceiving with donated oocytes (OD) had a higher risk of hypertensive disorders [adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR) 2.84, 95 % CI (1.04-7.81)], oligohydramnios [aOR 12.74, 95 % CI (1.24-130.49)], postpartum hemorrhage [aOR 7.11, 95 % CI (2.02-24.97)] and retained placenta [aOR 6.71, 95 % CI (1.58-28.40)] when compared to women who conceived spontaneously, after adjusting for relevant covariates. Similar trends, though not statistically significant, were noted when comparing OD pregnant women to women who had undergone non-donor IVF. Caesarean delivery [aOR 2.95, 95 % CI (1.52-5.71); aOR 5.20, 95 % CI (2.21-12.22)] and induction of labor [aOR 3.00, 95 % CI (1.39-6.44); aOR 2.80, 95 % CI (1.10-7.08)] occurred more frequently in the OD group, compared to the group conceiving spontaneously and through IVF respectively. No differences in gestational length were noted between the groups. With regard to the indication of OD treatment, higher intervention was observed in women with diminished ovarian reserve but the risk for hypertensive disorders did not differ after adjustment. Conclusion: The selection process of recipients for medically indicated oocyte donation treatment in Sweden seems to be effective in excluding women with severe comorbidities. Nevertheless, oocyte recipients-despite being relatively young and of optimal health status-need careful counseling preconceptionally and closer monitoring prenatally for the development of hypertensive disorders.

  • 35.
    Elenis, Evangelia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Neonatal outcomes in pregnancies resulting from oocyte donation: a cohort study in Sweden2016In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 16, no 170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pregnancies resulting through oocyte donation have been associated with increased risk for adverse outcomes for the mother, such as gestational hypertensive disorders. However, little is known about possible neonatal complications of such pregnancies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the neonatal health outcomes among singleton pregnancies in a population of relatively young and healthy oocyte recipients in Sweden, taking into account the medical indication leading to treatment. Methods: This cohort study involved 76 women conceiving with donated oocytes, 149 age-matched nulliparous women conceiving spontaneously and 63 women conceiving after non-donor IVF. Participants were recruited during 2005-2008 and followed up until delivery. Data on neonatal outcomes were retrieved from the National Birth Medical Register and the medical records of oocyte recipients from seven Swedish University Hospitals with IVF clinics. Logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association of mode of conception and neonatal outcomes, adjusted for maternal age and BMI, gestational age and delivery by cesarean section. Results: Infants conceived through oocyte donation had higher odds for premature delivery [OR 2.36, 95 % CI (1.02-5.45)], for being small for gestational age [OR 4.23, 95 % CI (1.03-17.42)] and having Apgar score below 7 at 5 min [OR 10.57, 95 % CI (1.21-92.20)] compared to spontaneously conceived infants. Similar trends were observed when comparing infants conceived through oocyte donation to those conceived by traditional IVF. Furthermore, donor oocyte infants had a lower mean birthweight and length compared to autologous oocyte neonates (p = 0.013); however no differences were noted among infants born at term. Neonatal outcomes were more favorable among women with diminished ovarian reserve compared to those with other indications for oocyte donation. Conclusions: Infants conceived after oocyte donation in Sweden have higher odds of being born prematurely and having lower mean birthweight in comparison to non-donor infants. It seems that these unfavorable neonatal outcomes are present despite the age, weight and health restrictions applied to recipients before oocyte donation treatment in Sweden.

  • 36.
    Elmerstig, Eva
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Being "Good in Bed"Body Concerns, Self-Perceptions, and Gender Expectations Among Swedish Heterosexual Female and Male Senior High-School Students2017In: Journal of sex & marital therapy, ISSN 0092-623X, E-ISSN 1521-0715, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 326-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated gender differences regarding body perceptions, self-perceptions, values and expectations in sexual situations, and factors associated with expectations, among Swedish heterosexual female and male high-school students. A total of 2,765 students (aged 18 to 22) completed questionnaires. Women reported lower satisfaction with themselves and their body appearance (p amp;lt; 0.001), and felt more inferior to their partner (p amp;lt; 0.001). Men felt more superior to their partner, and felt higher expectations (p amp;lt; 0.001). Male sex, difficulty saying no to sex, dissatisfaction with the body, feeling inferior or superior to partner, and considering partners satisfaction as more important, were all associated with feeling expectations during sex.

  • 37.
    Enblom, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institutionen för klinisk neurovetenskap, Osher centrum för integrativ medicin, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Institutionen för onkologi-patologi, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper, avdelning för onkologi, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Reduced Need for Rescue Antiemetics and Improved Capacity to Eat in Patients Receiving Acupuncture Compared to Patients Receiving Sham Acupuncture or Standard Care during Radiotherapy.2017In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, Vol. 2017, article id 5806351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate if consumption of emesis-related care and eating capacity differed between patients receiving verum acupuncture, sham acupuncture, or standard care only during radiotherapy. Methods. Patients were randomized to verum (n = 100) or sham (n = 100) acupuncture (telescopic blunt sham needle) (median 12 sessions) and registered daily their consumption of antiemetics and eating capacity. A standard care group (n = 62) received standard care only and delivered these data once. Results. More patients in the verum (n = 73 of 89 patients still undergoing radiotherapy; 82%, Relative Risk (RR) 1.23, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.01-1.50) and the sham acupuncture group (n = 79 of 95; 83%, RR 1.24, CI 1.03-1.52) did not need any antiemetic medications, as compared to the standard care group (n = 42 out of 63; 67%) after receiving 27 Gray dose of radiotherapy. More patients in the verum (n = 50 of 89; 56%, RR 1.78, CI 1.31-2.42) and the sham acupuncture group (n = 58 of 94 answering patients; 62%, RR 1.83, CI 1.20-2.80) were capable of eating as usual, compared to the standard care group (n = 20 of 63; 39%). Conclusion. Patients receiving acupuncture had lower consumption of antiemetics and better eating capacity than patients receiving standard antiemetic care, plausible by nonspecific effects of the extra care during acupuncture.

  • 38.
    Gebhardt, Anja J.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Indekeu, Astrid
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Parenting stress and its association with perceived agreement about the disclosure decision in parents following donor conception2017In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 96, no 8, p. 968-975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionFor many donor-conceiving heterosexual parents, the process of deciding whether and what to tell children about their genetic origin is challenging. We hypothesized that incomplete couple agreement about disclosure could be associated with parenting stress. The aim of the study was to investigate: (1) parenting stress levels among heterosexual parents of young children following gamete donation and (2) whether parenting stress is related to perceived agreement about disclosure of the donor conception to the children. Material and methodsThis study is part of the longitudinal multicenter Swedish Study on Gamete Donation and included a total of 213 heterosexual parents with children aged 1-4years following oocyte donation (n=103) and sperm donation (n=110). Parents individually completed a questionnaire that included validated instruments on parenting stress (SPSQ) and relationship quality (ENRICH), as well as a study-specific measure on disclosure agreement. Multiple regression analysis was applied. ResultsIncomplete couple agreement on disclosure to the children was not statistically significantly associated with increased levels of parenting stress. Relationship satisfaction consistently and significantly accounted for variation in parenting stress levels, indicating that relationship satisfaction had a buffering impact on parenting stress. ConclusionsParental stress does not appear to be negatively influenced by incomplete couple agreement about disclosure to children. As children grow up, reaching agreement about what to tell the child about the donor conception might become more relevant for couples stress related to parenthood.

  • 39.
    Ginstman, Charlotte
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Frisk, Jessica
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ottosson, Johan
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Contraceptive Use Before and After Gastric Bypass: a Questionnaire Study2015In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 25, no 11, p. 2066-2070Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At present, women are recommended to avoid pregnancy 12-18 months after bariatric surgery. Our aim in this study was to describe patterns of contraceptive use before and after gastric bypass in Sweden, and to describe the contraceptive counseling given preoperatively to women undergoing gastric bypass. In October 2012, a questionnaire was sent to 1000 Swedish women who all had undergone gastric bypass during 2010. The women had been included in the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Register at time of surgery. The main outcome measures were patterns of use of contraception before and after bariatric surgery. The response rate was 57 %. The most commonly used contraceptive methods were intrauterine devices, 29 % preoperatively and 26 % postoperatively even though there was a postoperative switch from the copper intrauterine device to the levonorgestrel intrauterine system. Thirty percent did not use any contraceptive during the first 12 months after surgery. Sixty percent of the responders were aware of the recommendations to avoid pregnancy after surgery. Many women who undergo bariatric surgery are not using any contraceptive method despite the recommendation that they should avoid pregnancy for at least 12 months. There is a great need to improve contraceptive counseling for this growing group of women.

  • 40.
    Grundström, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Impact of Pelvic Pain and Endometriosis on Patient-Reported Outcomes and Experiences of Benign Hysterectomy: A Study from the Swedish National Register for Gynecological Surgery2017In: Journal of Women's Health, ISSN 1540-9996, E-ISSN 1931-843XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The study objective was to analyze and compare patient-reported experience measures (PREMs) and patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) after hysterectomy in women with and without a preoperative complaint of pelvic pain associated with and without a confirmed diagnosis of endometriosis. Methods: Retrospective nationwide register study. Data on 28,776 hysterectomies performed on benign indication between 2004 and 2016 were retrieved from the Swedish National Register for Gynecological Surgery. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to compare the PREMs and PROMs items. The results are presented as adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Regardless of the occurrence of pelvic pain preoperatively and a diagnosis of endometriosis, 1 year after surgery, the women were satisfied or very satisfied (amp;gt;90%) with the hysterectomy, and their medical condition was improved or much improved (amp;gt;95%). The women with a preoperative complaint of pelvic pain and endometriosis more often reported excessively short hospital stays (aOR 1.45, 95% CI 1.17-1.79), more severe complications after discharge (aOR 2.02, 95% CI 1.59-2.66) at the 8-week follow-up and at the 1-year follow-up (aOR 2.31, 95% CI 1.57-3.39), and more dissatisfaction with the operation (aOR 1.83, 95% CI 1.35-2.48) than preoperative pelvic pain-free women without endometriosis at the 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: The majority of the women were satisfied after their hysterectomy. The women with pelvic pain and endometriosis were at a higher risk of being dissatisfied. Pelvic pain per se seemed to be the main factor affecting the rating in the PREMs and PROMs, and the endometriosis was a significant contributing factor.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-12-01 10:22
  • 41.
    Grundström, Hanna
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjølhede, Preben
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    “A challenge” – healthcare professionals' experiences when meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis2016In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 7, p. 65-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The aim of the study was to identify and describe the experiences of healthcare professionals when meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis.

    Methods

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 gynecologists, six general practitioners and nine midwives working at one university hospital, one central hospital, one private gynecology clinic and five healthcare centers in south-east Sweden. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative conventional content analysis.

    Results

    Three clusters were identified: the corroborating encounter, the normal variation of menstruation cycles, and the suspicion of endometriosis. The healthcare professionals tried to make a corroborating encounter by acknowledging the woman, taking time to listen, and giving an explanation for the problems. Healthcare professionals had different ways to determine what was normal as regards menstrual pain, ovulation pain and dyspareunia. They also needed to have the competence to act and react when the symptoms indicated endometriosis.

    Conclusions

    Meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis is challenging and demands a certain level of competence from healthcare professionals. Sometimes the symptoms are camouflaged as “normal” menstruation pain, making it hard to satisfy the needs of this patient group.

  • 42.
    Hammar, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Larsson, Erika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gäddlin, P O
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Leijon, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    A long-term follow-up study of men born with very low birth weight and their reproductive hormone profile2018In: Systems biology in reproductive medicine, ISSN 1939-6376, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 207-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental factors during the fetal period may adversely affect reproductive functions in men being born with very low birth weight (VLBW, <1500 g). The objective of this prospective, controlled cohort study was to investigate if VLBW men have an altered reproductive hormone profile compared with men born at term. The study group initially consisted of all VLBW boys live-born between 1 February 1987 and 30 April 1988 in the south-east region of Sweden (n = 47). A control child was chosen born at term, at the same hospital, with the same parity, without malformations, and next in order after each VLBW child who survived the first four weeks (n = 45). The present follow-up was performed when the men were 26-28 years of age and included measurements of serum hormone levels, hair testosterone concentration, and anthropometric data. Also life-style questionnaires were collected from 26 VLBW men and 19 controls. The VLBW group (n = 26) had higher median levels of serum estradiol, 84.5 pmol/L than controls (n = 19), 57.5 pmol/L (p = 0.008). There was no significant correlation between serum estradiol and BMI (r = 0.06, p = 0.74). There were no differences in other hormone levels or the reproductive pattern between the groups. In conclusion, even though there was a statistically significant difference in estradiol levels between the groups, both groups had low normal mean levels of questionable clinical significance. The reproductive pattern was similar in the two groups and in this study being born VLBW does not seem to affect these measured aspects of reproduction.

    ABBREVIATIONS: ADHD: attention deficit hyperactive disorder; AGA: average for gestational age; BMI: body mass index; CP: cerebral palsy; DHT: dihydrotestosterone; FSH: follicle stimulating hormone; LBW: low birth weight; LH: luteinizing hormone; SAD: sagittal abdominal diameter; SGA: small for gestational age; SHBG: sex hormone binding globulin; TSH: thyroid stimulating hormone; T3: triiodothyronine; T4: thyroxin; VLBW: very low birth weight.

  • 43.
    Hjerpe, Elisabet
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Staf, Christian
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Dahm-Kahler, Pernilla
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Stalberg, Karin
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Bjurberg, Maria
    Skåne Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden.
    Borgfeldt, Christer
    Skåne Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Tholander, Bengt
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hellman, Kristina
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Högberg, Thomas
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Åvall Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lymph node metastases as only qualifier for stage IV serous ovarian cancer confers longer survival than other sites of distant disease - a Swedish Gynecologic Cancer Group (SweGCG) study2018In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 331-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) ovarian cancer staging system includes no sub-stage for lymph nodes (LN) as only distant disease manifestation. We explore the prognostic implication of LN as only stage IV classifier in serous ovarian cancer.Method: This is a nation-wide, population-based study on 551 women with serous stage IV cancers diagnosed between 2009-2014. We compare overall survival (OS) in women with LN as only distant metastatic site to those with pleural metastases only and to patients with other/multiple stage IV manifestations. Cox regression models were used for uni- and multivariable estimations.Results: Of 551stage IV cases, distant metastatic site was registered in 433. Median OS for women with LN (n=51) was 41.4 months, compared to 25.2 and 26.8 months for patients with pleural (n=195) or other/multiple (n=187) distant metastases (p=.0007). The corresponding five-year survival rates were 32, 11 and 22%, respectively. Multivariable analyzes confirmed shorter survival for women with pleural (HR 2.99, p=.001) or other/multiple distant sites (HR 2.67, p=.007), as compared to LN cases. LN only patients lived 9.1 months longer after primary than after interval surgery, but this difference was not significant (p=.245).Conclusion: Women with stage IV serous ovarian cancer having lymph nodes as only distant metastatic site live longer than other stage IV patients.

  • 44.
    Hjertberg, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Uustal, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Pihl, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Maternal Body Mass Index and Anovaginal Distance in Active Phase of Term Labor2018In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, article id 1532949Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. To evaluate if there was a difference in the anovaginal distance (AVD) measured by transperineal ultrasound between obese and normal weight women. Material and Methods. A prospective observational study including 207 primiparous women at term in first stage of labor. Transperineal ultrasound with a vaginal probe was used to measure the AVD. Maternal, pregnancy, and delivery characteristics potentially associated with perineal thickness were extracted from womans medical records. The participants were divided into three BMI groups based on maternal weight in early pregnancy: normal weight (BMI amp;lt; 25), overweight (BMI 25-29.9), and obesity (BMI amp;gt;= 30). Obese and overweight women were compared with normal weight women regarding the AVD. Results. The mean AVD was 24.3, 24.9, and 27.0 mm in the normal weight, overweight, and obesity group, respectively. There were no group differences in background characteristics. The AVD was significantly longer in obese women compared with normal weight women (p = 0.018). Conclusions. The observed longer AVD in obese women might be protective of the anal sphincter complex, explaining lower rates of anal sphincter injuries in this group. Further studies are indicated to evaluate whether the length of the AVD plays a role in the risk assessment of obstetric anal sphincter injury.

  • 45.
    Isaksson, S.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Skoog-Svanberg, A.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Linell, L.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lampic, C.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    It takes two to tango: information-sharing with offspring among heterosexual parents following identity-release sperm donation2016In: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 125-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do heterosexual parents reason about and experience information-sharing with offspring following identity-release sperm donation? Sharing information about using donor-conception with offspring is a complex process at several levels, with the parents personal beliefs and the childs responses serving as driving or impeding forces for the information-sharing process. The overall view of disclosure in gamete donation has shifted from secrecy to openness, but there is still uncertainty among parents concerning how and when to tell the child about his/her genetic origin. Most research on donor-conceived families has focused on donation treatment under anonymous or known circumstances, and there is a lack of studies in settings with identity-release donations. A qualitative interview study among 30 parents following identity-release sperm donation treatment. Interviews were conducted from February 2014 to March 2015. The present study is part of the prospective longitudinal Swedish Study on Gamete Donation (SSGD), including all fertility clinics performing gamete donation in Sweden. A sample of participants in the SSGD, consisting of heterosexual parents with children aged 7-8 years following identity-release sperm donation, participated in individual semi-structured interviews. The analysis revealed one main theme: information-sharing is a process, with three subthemes; (i) the parent as process manager, (ii) the child as force or friction and (iii) being in the process. The first two subthemes were viewed as being linked together and their content served as driving or impeding forces in the information-sharing process. The fact that the study was performed within the context of the Swedish legislation on identity-release donation must be taken into consideration as regards transferability to other populations, as this may affect parents reasoning concerning their information-sharing with the child. The present findings highlight the role of the donor-conceived child in the information-sharing process and may contribute to develop counselling that increases parents confidence in handling childrens reactions to information about their genetic origin. Financial support from The Swedish Research Council, The Family Planning Fund in Uppsala and Ferring Pharmaceuticals. There are no conflicts of interest to declare. N/A.

  • 46.
    Ivars, Katrin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nelson Follin, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ström, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Correction: Development of Salivary Cortisol Circadian Rhythm and Reference Intervals in Full-Term Infants2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 3, article id e0151888Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Cortisol concentrations in plasma display a circadian rhythm in adults and children older than one year. Earlier studies report divergent results regarding when cortisol circadian rhythm is established. The present study aims to investigate at what age infants develop a circadian rhythm, as well as the possible influences of behavioral regularity and daily life trauma on when the rhythm is established. Furthermore, we determine age-related reference intervals for cortisol concentrations in saliva during the first year of life.

    METHODS:

    130 healthy full-term infants were included in a prospective, longitudinal study with saliva sampling on two consecutive days, in the morning (07:30-09:30), noon (10:00-12:00) and evening (19:30-21:30), each month from birth until the infant was twelve months old. Information about development of behavioral regularity and potential exposure to trauma was obtained from the parents through the Baby Behavior Questionnaire and the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events checklist.

    RESULTS:

    A significant group-level circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol secretion was established at one month, and remained throughout the first year of life, although there was considerable individual variability. No correlation was found between development of cortisol circadian rhythm and the results from either the Baby Behavior Questionnaire or the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events checklist. The study presents salivary cortisol reference intervals for infants during the first twelve months of life.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Cortisol circadian rhythm in infants is already established by one month of age, earlier than previous studies have shown. The current study also provides first year age-related reference intervals for salivary cortisol levels in healthy, full-term infants.

  • 47.
    Johansson, Torsten
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Department Orthopaed, Sweden.
    Lindblad, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Norrköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Incidence of Perthes disease in children born between 1973 and 1993: A Swedish nationwide cohort study of 2.1 million individuals2017In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 96-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - The incidence of Perthes disease as reported in the literature varies widely between and within countries. The etiology of the disease is still unknown. Both environmental and genetic factors have been suggested to play a part in either causing the disease or increasing the susceptibility of an individual. We determined the incidence of Perthes disease in Sweden and investigated possible relationships to parental socioeconomic status, ethnicity, marital status, mothers age when giving birth, parity, number of siblings, and smoking habits. Patients and methods - Six Swedish population-based registers were used, together covering all children born in Sweden from 1973 through 1993. Results - The incidence of Perthes disease in Sweden was 9.3 per 100,000 subjects. The ratio between boys and girls was 3.1:1. The educational level of the father and the mother of a child with Perthes disease was lower than in the controls. The incidence was lower when the fathers were in the highest income bracket (above the 90(th) percentile). A higher proportion of parents of Nordic lineage had children with Perthes disease than parental pairs with one or both who were not of such lineage. Interpretation - This study confirms that there is an association between the incidence of Perthes disease and the socioeconomic status of the parents.

  • 48.
    Kastbom, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Department of Psychology, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Priebe, Gisela
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Comparing quality of life between Swedish adolescents and young adults from sexual minorities and heterosexual groups2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between sexual identity and socio- demographics, sexual experience, health, experience of child abuse, sexual exploitation and present behavior among Swedish adolescents and young adults.

    Methods: A cross-sectional survey with 3,503 adolescents completing a  survey  about their sexuality, health and abuse at a mean age of 18.3 years. In addition, 362 members of the Swedish Federation for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Rights completed the same survey at a mean age of 21.4 years.

    Results: Sexual minority respondents were more likely to say that their parental relationship was based on low care and high overprotection and they used alcohol and other drugs to a significantly higher extent than their heterosexual peers. Multivariate analysis showed a positive correlation between sexual minority and  low  self-esteem, poor mental health and experience of sexual abuse, physical abuse and sexual exploitation.

    Conclusion: The sexual minority group had a lower quality of life than their heterosexual peers and professionals need to be more aware that they are more vulnerable in a number of respects, including an increased risk of having experienced child abuse, and offer them different forms of support.

  • 49.
    Kastbom, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Department of Psychology, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Priebe, Gisela
    Department of Psychology, Linnæus University, Växjö, Sweden; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Differences in sexual behavior, health, and history of child abuse among school students who had and had not engaged in sexual activity by the age of 18 years: a cross-sectional study2016In: Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics, ISSN 1179-318X, Vol. 7, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Empirical research about late sexual debut and its consequences is limited, and further research is needed.

    Objective: To explore how students who had not had intercourse by the age of 18 years differed in terms of sociodemographic factors, physical and psychological health, sexual behavior, and history of sexual abuse from those who had.

    Materials and methods: This is a cross-sectional survey involving 3,380 Swedish 18-year-olds. Descriptive analyses were used to investigate different types of sexual behavior. Ordinal data concerning alcohol consumption, self-esteem, sexual and physical abuse, parental relationships, sense of coherence, and health were analyzed, and multiple regression was carried out to identify the most important factors associated with no sexual debut.

    Results: Just under a quarter of the adolescents had not had oral, anal, or vaginal sex by the age of 18 years, and they comprised the index group. They were characterized by being more likely to have caring fathers, parents born outside Europe, lower pornography consumption, lower alcohol and tobacco consumption, less antisocial behavior, and above all lower sexual desire (sometimes, adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 3.8; never/seldom, aOR 13.3) and fewer experiences of sexual abuse (aOR 25.5). Family structure and culture matters when it comes to the age of sexual debut.

    Conclusion: Adolescents with no sexual debut at 18 years of age seemed to live a more stable and cautious life than more sexual experienced peers, exemplified by fewer antisocial acts, less smoking and alcohol/drug consumption, less sexual desire, and less experience of sexual abuse.

  • 50.
    Kastbom, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Priebe, Gisela
    Lund University, Sweden; Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Sexual debut before the age of 14 leads to poorer psychosocial health and risky behaviour in later life2015In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 104, no 1, p. 91-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This study investigated the relationship between sexual debut before 14 years of age and socio-demographics, sexual experience, health, experience of child abuse and behaviour at 18 years of age.

    Methods: A sample of 3432 Swedish high school seniors completed a survey about sexuality, health and abuse at the age of 18.

    Results: Early debut was positively correlated with risky behaviours, such as the number of partners, experience of oral and anal sex, health behaviours, such as smoking, drug and alcohol use, and antisocial behaviour, such as being violent, lying, stealing and running away from home. Girls with an early sexual debut had significantly more experience of sexual abuse. Boys with an early sexual debut were more likely to have a weak sense of coherence, low self-esteem and poor mental health, together with experience of sexual abuse, selling sex and physical abuse. A multiple logistic regression model showed that a number of antisocial acts and health behaviours remained significant, but early sexual debut did not increase the risk of psychiatric symptoms, low self-esteem or low sense of coherence at 18 years of age.

    Conclusion: Early sexual debut was associated with problematic behaviours during later adolescence, and this vulnerability requires attention from parents and healthcare providers.

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