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  • 1.
    Abdalla, Maie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Landerholm, Kalle
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Andersson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Risk of Rectal Cancer After Colectomy for Patients With Ulcerative Colitis: A National Cohort Study2017In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 1055-1060, article id e2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND amp; AIMS: Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have an increased risk of rectal cancer, therefore reconstruction with an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) generally is preferred to an ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) after subtotal colectomy. Similarly, completion proctectomy is recommended for patients with ileostomy and a diverted rectum, although this approach has been questioned because anti-inflammatory agents might reduce cancer risk. We performed a national cohort study in Sweden to assess the risk of rectal cancer in patients with UC who have an IRA, IPAA, or diverted rectum after subtotal colectomy.

    METHODS: We collected data from the Swedish National Patient Register for a cohort of 5886 patients with UC who underwent subtotal colectomy with an IRA, IPAA, or diverted rectum from 1964 through 2010. Patients who developed rectal cancer were identified from the Swedish National Cancer Register. The risk of rectal cancer was compared between this cohort and the general population by standardized incidence ratio analysis.

    RESULTS: Rectal cancer occurred in 20 of 1112 patients (1.8%) who received IRA, 1 of 1796 patients (0.06%) who received an IPAA, and 25 of 4358 patients (0.6%) with a diverted rectum. Standardized incidence ratios for rectal cancer were 8.7 in patients with an IRA, 0.4 in patients with an IPAA, and 3.8 in patients with a diverted rectum. Risk factors for rectal cancer were primary sclerosing cholangitis in patients with an IRA (hazard ratio, 6.12), and colonic severe dysplasia or cancer before subtotal colectomy in patients with a diverted rectum (hazard ratio, 3.67).

    CONCLUSIONS: In an analysis of the Swedish National Patient Register, we found that the risk for rectal cancer after colectomy in patients with UC is low, in relative and absolute terms, after reconstruction with an IPAA. An IRA and diverted rectum are associated with an increased risk of rectal cancer, compared with the general population, but the absolute risk is low. Patients and their health care providers should consider these findings in making decisions to leave the rectum intact, perform completion proctectomy, or reconstruct the colon with an IRA or IPAA.

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  • 2.
    Abdalla, Maie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Norblad, Rickard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Olsson, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Landerholm, Kalle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Center for Disaster Medicine and Traumatology.
    Söderholm, Johan D.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Anorectal Function After Ileo-Rectal Anastomosis Is Better than Pelvic Pouch in Selected Ulcerative Colitis Patients2020In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, p. 250-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: With a lifelong perspective, 12% of ulcerative colitis patients will need a colectomy. Further reconstruction via ileo-rectal anastomosis or pouch can be affected by patients' perspective of their quality of life after surgery.

    AIM: To assess the function and quality of life after restorative procedures with either ileo-rectal anastomosis or ileal pouch-anal anastomosis in relation to the inflammatory activity on endoscopy and in biopsies.

    METHOD: A total of 143 UC patients operated with subtotal colectomy and ileo-rectal anastomosis or pouches between 1992 and 2006 at Linköping University Hospital were invited to participate. Those who completed the validated questionnaires (Öresland score, SF-36, Short Health Scale) were offered an endoscopic evaluation including multiple biopsies. Associations between anorectal function and quality of life with type of restorative procedure and severity of endoscopic and histopathologic grading of inflammation were evaluated.

    RESULTS: Some 77 (53.9%) eligible patients completed questionnaires, of these 68 (88.3%) underwent endoscopic evaluation after a median follow-up of 12.5 (range 3.5-19.4) years after restorative procedure. Patients with ileo-rectal anastomosis reported better overall Öresland score: median = 3 (IQR 2-5) for ileo-rectal anastomosis (n = 38) and 10 (IQR 5-15) for pouch patients (n = 39) (p < 0.001). Anorectal function (Öresland score) and endoscopic findings (Baron-Ginsberg score) were positively correlated in pouch patients (tau: 0.28, p = 0.006).

    CONCLUSION: Patients operated with ileo-rectal anastomosis reported better continence compared to pouches. Minor differences were noted regarding the quality of life. Ileo-rectal anastomosis is a valid option for properly selected ulcerative colitis patients if strict postoperative endoscopic surveillance is carried out.

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  • 3.
    Abdul-Sattar Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Jancke, Georg
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Skoglund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Stapled versus robot-sewn ileo-ileal anastomosis during robot-assisted radical cystectomy: a review of outcomes in urinary bladder cancer patients2021In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 41-45Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundWhereas the literature has demonstrated an acceptable safety profile of stapled anastomoses when compared to the hand-sewn alternative in open surgery, the choice of intestinal anastomosis using sutures or staples remains inadequately investigated in robotic surgery. The purpose of this study was to compare the surgical outcomes of both anastomotic techniques in robotic-assisted radical cystectomy.MethodsA retrospective analysis of patients with urinary bladder cancer undergoing cystectomy with urinary diversion and with ileo-ileal intestinal anastomosis at a single tertiary centre (2012–2018) was undertaken. The robotic operating time, hospital stay and GI complications were compared between the robotic-sewn (RS) and stapled anastomosis (SA) groups. The only difference between the groups was the anastomosis technique; the other technical steps during the operation were the same. Primary outcomes were GI complications; the secondary outcome was robotic operation time.ResultsThere were 155 patients, of which 112 (73%) were male. The median age was 71 years old. A surgical stapling device was used to create 66 (43%) separate anastomoses, while a robot-sewn method was employed in 89 (57%) anastomoses. There were no statistically significant differences in primary and secondary outcomes between RS and SA.ConclusionsCompared to stapled anastomosis, a robot-sewn ileo-ileal anastomosis may serve as an alternative and cost-saving approach. 

  • 4.
    Adamina, Michel
    et al.
    Cantonal Hosp Winterthur, Switzerland; Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Bonovas, Stefanos
    Humanitas Univ, Italy; Humanitas Clin and Res Ctr, Italy.
    Raine, Tim
    Cambridge Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Spinelli, Antonino
    Humanitas Univ, Italy.
    Warusavitarne, Janindra
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Armuzzi, Alessandro
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Italy.
    Bachmann, Oliver
    Siloah St Trudpert Hosp, Germany.
    Bager, Palle
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Biancone, Livia
    Univ Tor Vergata Rome, Italy.
    Bokemeyer, Bernd
    Gastroenterol Practice Minden, Germany.
    Bossuyt, Peter
    Imelda Gen Hosp, Belgium.
    Burisch, Johan
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Collins, Paul
    Royal Liverpool Univ Hosp, England.
    Doherty, Glen
    St Vincents Univ Hosp, Ireland; St Vincents Univ Hosp, Ireland.
    El-Hussuna, Alaa
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Ellul, Pierre
    Mater Dei Hosp, Malta.
    Fiorino, Gionata
    Humanitas Univ, Italy; Humanitas Clin and Res Ctr, Italy.
    Frei-Lanter, Cornelia
    Hosp Zollikerberg, Switzerland.
    Furfaro, Federica
    Humanitas Clin and Res Ctr, Italy.
    Gingert, Christian
    Cantonal Hosp Winterthur, Switzerland; Univ Witten Herdecke, Germany.
    Gionchetti, Paolo
    Univ Bologna, Italy.
    Gisbert, Javier P.
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Spain.
    Gomollon, Fernando
    Hosp Cli Univ Lozano Blesa, Spain.
    Lorenzo, Marien Gonzalez
    Humanitas Univ, Italy.
    Gordon, Hannah
    Barts Hlth NHS Trust, England.
    Hlavaty, Tibor
    Comenius Univ, Slovakia; Comenius Univ, Slovakia.
    Juillerat, Pascal
    Univ Hosp Bern, Switzerland.
    Katsanos, Konstantinos
    Univ and Med Sch Ioannina, Greece.
    Kopylov, Uri
    Tel HaShomer Sheba Med Ctr, Israel; Sackler Med Sch, Israel.
    Krustins, Eduards
    Riga Stradins Univ, Latvia.
    Kucharzik, Torsten
    Hosp Luneburg, Germany.
    Lytras, Theodore
    Natl Publ Hlth Org, Greece.
    Maaser, Christian
    Hosp Luneburg, Germany.
    Magro, Fernando
    Dept Pharmacol and Therapeut, Portugal; Univ Porto, Portugal.
    Marshall, John Kenneth
    McMaster Univ, Canada; McMaster Univ, Canada.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Pellino, Gianluca
    Univ Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Italy.
    Rosa, Isadora
    IPOLFG, Portugal.
    Sabino, Joao
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Savarino, Edoardo
    Univ Padua, Italy.
    Stassen, Laurents
    Maastricht Univ Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Torres, Joana
    Hosp Beatriz Angelo, Portugal.
    Uzzan, Mathieu
    Beaujon Hosp, France.
    Vavricka, Stephan
    Univ Hosp, Switzerland.
    Verstockt, Bram
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium; Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Zmora, Oded
    Shamir Med Ctr Assaf Harofe, Israel.
    ECCO Guidelines on Therapeutics in Crohns Disease: Surgical Treatment2020In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 155-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is the second in a series of two publications relating to the European Crohns and Colitis Organisation [ECCO] evidence-based consensus on the management of Crohns disease. The first article covers medical management; the present article addresses surgical management, including preoperative aspects and drug management before surgery. It also provides technical advice for a variety of common clinical situations. Both articles together represent the evidence-based recommendations of the ECCO for Crohns disease and an update of previous guidelines.

  • 5.
    Adamina, Michel
    et al.
    Cantonal Hosp Winterthur, Switzerland; Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Feakins, Roger
    Royal Free Hosp, England.
    Iacucci, Marietta
    Univ Birmingham, England; Univ Hosp Birmingham NHS Trust, England.
    Spinelli, Antonino
    Humanitas Clin & Res Ctr, Italy; Humanitas Univ, Italy.
    Cannatelli, Rosanna
    Univ Birmingham, England; Spedali Civili Brescia, Italy.
    DHoore, Andre
    Univ Hosp Leuven, Belgium.
    Driessen, Ann
    Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Katsanos, Konstantinos
    Univ Ioannina, Greece; Med Sch Ioannina, Greece.
    Mookhoek, Aart
    Amsterdam UMC, Netherlands.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Pellino, Gianluca
    Univ Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Italy; Vall dHebron Univ Hosp, Spain.
    Peros, Georgios
    Cantonal Hosp Winterthur, Italy; Humanitas Clin & Res Ctr, Italy.
    Tontini, Gian Eugenio
    Fdn IRCCS Ca Granda Osped Maggiore Policlin, Italy; Univ Milan, Italy.
    Tripathi, Monika
    Cambridge Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Yanai, Henit
    IBD Ctr, Israel.
    Svrcek, Magali
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    ECCO Topical Review Optimising Reporting in Surgery, Endoscopy, and Histopathology Collaboration Between S-ECCO, EduCom, H-ECCO2021In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 1089-1105Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: Diagnosis and management of inflammatory bowel diseases [IBD] requires a lifelong multidisciplinary approach.The quality of medical reporting is crucial in this context.The present topical review addresses the need for optimised reporting in endoscopy, surgery, and histopathology. Methods: A consensus expert panel consisting of gastroenterologists, surgeons, and pathologists, convened by the European Crohns and Colitis Organisation, performed a systematic literature review. The following topics were covered: in endoscopy: [i] general IBD endoscopy; [ii] disease activity and surveillance; [iii] endoscopy treatment in IBD; in surgery: [iv] medical history with surgical relevance, surgical indication, and strategy; [v] operative approach; [vi] intraoperative disease description; [vii] operative steps; in pathology: [viii] macroscopic assessment and interpretation of resection specimens; [ix] IBD histology, including biopsies, surgical resections, and neoplasia; [x] IBD histology conclusion and report. Statements were developed using a Delphi methodology incorporating two consecutive rounds. Current practice positions were set when &gt;= 80% of participants agreed on a recommendation. Results: Thirty practice positions established a standard terminology for optimal reporting in endoscopy, surgery, and histopathology. Assessment of disease activity, surveillance recommendations, advice to surgeons for operative indication and strategies, including margins and extent of resection, and diagnostic criteria of IBD, as well as guidance for the interpretation of dysplasia and cancer, were handled. A standardised report including a core set of items to include in each specialty report, was defined. Conclusions: Interdisciplinary high-quality care requires thorough and standardised reporting across specialties.This topical review offers an actionable framework and practice recommendations to optimise reporting in endoscopy, surgery, and histopathology.

  • 6.
    Ahle, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Drott, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Elfvin, Anders
    Department of Pediatrics, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Roland E.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Maternal, fetal and perinatal factors associated with necrotizing enterocolitis in Sweden: A national case-control study2018In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e0194352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To analyze associations of maternal, fetal, gestational, and perinatal factors with necrotizing enterocolitis in a matched case-control study based on routinely collected, nationwide register data.

    Study design

    All infants born in 1987 through 2009 with a diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis in any of the Swedish national health care registers were identified. For each case up to 6 controls, matched for birth year and gestational age, were selected. The resulting study population consisted of 720 cases and 3,567 controls. Information on socioeconomic data about the mother, maternal morbidity, pregnancy related diagnoses, perinatal diagnoses of the infant, and procedures in the perinatal period, was obtained for all cases and controls and analyzed with univariable and multivariable logistic regressions for the whole study population as well as for subgroups according to gestational age.

    Results

    In the study population as a whole, we found independent positive associations with necrotizing enterocolitis for isoimmunization, fetal distress, cesarean section, neonatal bacterial infection including sepsis, erythrocyte transfusion, persistent ductus arteriosus, cardiac malformation, gastrointestinal malformation, and chromosomal abnormality. Negative associations were found for maternal weight, preeclampsia, maternal urinary infection, premature rupture of the membranes, and birthweight. Different patterns of associations were seen in the subgroups of different gestational age.

    Conclusion

    With some interesting exceptions, especially in negative associations, the results of this large, population based study, are in keeping with earlier studies. Although restrained by the limitations of register data, the findings mirror conceivable pathophysiological processes and underline that NEC is a multifactorial disease.

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  • 7.
    Ali, Adnan
    et al.
    Univ Lancaster, England.
    Ahle, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Portal vein embolization with N-butyl cyanoacrylate glue is superior to other materials: a systematic review and meta-analysis2021In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 5464-5478Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives It remains uncertain which embolization material is best for portal vein embolization (PVE). We investigated the various materials for effectiveness in inducing future liver remnant (FLR) hypertrophy, technical and growth success rates, and complication and resection rates. Methods A systematic review from 1998 to 2019 on embolization materials for PVE was performed on Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane. FLR growth between the two most commonly used materials was compared in a random effects meta-analysis. In a separate analysis using local data (n = 52), n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) was compared with microparticles regarding costs, radiation dose, and procedure time. Results In total, 2896 patients, 61.0 +/- 4.0 years of age and 65% male, from 51 papers were included in the analysis. In 61% of the patients, either NBCA or microparticles were used for embolization. The remaining were treated with ethanol, gelfoam, or sclerosing agents. The FLR growth with NBCA was 49.1% +/- 29.7 compared to 42.2% +/- 40 with microparticles (p = 0.037). The growth success rate with NBCA vs microparticles was 95.3% vs 90.7% respectively (p &lt; 0.001). There were no differences in major complications between NBCA and microparticles. In the local analysis, NBCA (n = 41) entailed shorter procedure time and reduced fluoroscopy time (p &lt; 0.001), lower radiation exposure (p &lt; 0.01), and lower material costs (p &lt; 0.0001) than microparticles (n = 11). Conclusion PVE with NBCA seems to be the best choice when combining growth of the FLR, procedure time, radiation exposure, and costs.

  • 8.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindblom, Gunnar
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Skoog, Susann
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    PET/CT versus conventional CT for detection of lymph node metastases in patients with locally advanced bladder cancer.2015In: BMC Urology, E-ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 87-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: We studied patients treated with radical cystectomy for locally advanced bladder cancer to compare the results of both preoperative positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and conventional CT with the findings of postoperative histopathological evaluation of lymph nodes.

    METHODS: Patients who had bladder cancer and were candidates for cystectomy underwent preoperative PET/CT using 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and conventional CT. The results regarding lymph node involvement were independently evaluated by two experienced radiologists and were subsequently compared with histopathology results, the latter of which were reassessed by an experienced uropathologist (HO).

    RESULTS: There were 54 evaluable patients (mean age 68 years, 47 [85 %] males and 7 [15 %] females) with pT and pN status as follows: < pT2-14 (26 %), pT2-10 (18 %), and > pT2-30 (56 %); pN0 37 (69 %) and pN+ 17 (31 %). PET/CT showed positive lymph nodes in 12 patients (22 %), and 7 of those cases were confirmed by histopathology; the corresponding results for conventional CT were 11 (20 %) and 7 patients (13 %), respectively. PET/CT had 41 % sensitivity, 86 % specificity, 58 % PPV, and 76 % NPV, whereas the corresponding figures for conventional CT were 41 %, 89 %, 64 %, and 77 %. Additional analyses of the right and left side of the body or in specified anatomical regions gave similar results.

    CONCLUSIONS: In this study, PET/CT and conventional CT had similar low sensitivity in detecting and localizing regional lymph node metastasis in bladder cancer.

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  • 9.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    M2-macrophage infiltration and macrophage traits of tumor cells in urinary bladder cancer2018In: Urologic Oncology, ISSN 1078-1439, E-ISSN 1873-2496, Vol. 36, no 4, article id 159.e19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) constitute a subset of nonneoplastic cells in tumor stroma and influence cancer progression in solid tumors. The clinical significance of TAMs in urinary bladder cancer(UBC) is controversial.

    Methods

    We prospectively studied 103 patients with stage pT1–T4 UBC treated with cystectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Tumor sections were immunostained with M2-specific macrophage marker CD163 and proliferation marker Ki-67. The expression of these markers in cancer cells as well as macrophage infiltration (MI) in tumor stroma was analyzed in relation to clinical data and outcome.

    Results

    The mean rate of CD163 and Ki-67 expressed by cancer cells were 35% and 78%, respectively. With borderline significance, MI was associated with lower rate of lymph node metastasis (P = 0.06). CD163 expression in cancer cells was proportional to MI (P<0.014). Patients with CD163-positive tumors and strong MI had significantly longer cancer-specific survival (CSS) (76 months), compared to patient with CD163-positive tumors and weak MI (28 months) (P = 0.02).

    Conclusions

    M2-specific MI tends to be inversely correlated with LN metastasis and improved CSS in UBC. MI might have protective impact in CD163-positive tumors. Expression of CD163 in cancer cells is significantly correlated with MI and might have a tumor promoting impact.

  • 10.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    The expression profile of p14, p53 and p21 in tumour cells is associated with disease-specific survival and the outcome of postoperative chemotherapy treatment in muscle-invasive bladder cancer2018In: Urologic Oncology, ISSN 1078-1439, E-ISSN 1873-2496, Vol. 36, no 12, p. 530.e7-530.e18, article id 530.e7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: We investigated the effects of alterations in the biological markers p14, p53, p21, and p16 in relation to tumour cell proliferation, T-category, N- category, lymphovascular invasion, and the ability to predict prognosis in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) treated with cystectomy and, if applicable, chemotherapy.

    Materials and methods: We prospectively studied patients with urinary bladder cancer pathological stage pT1 to pT4 treated with cystectomy, pelvic lymph node dissection and postoperative chemotherapy. Tissue microarrays from paraffin-embedded cystectomy tumour samples were examined for expression of immunostaining of p14, p53, p21, p16 and Ki-67 in relation to other clinical and pathological factors as well as cancer-specific survival.

    Results: The median age of the 110 patients was 70 years (range 51-87 years), and 85 (77%) were male. Pathological staging was pT1 to pT2 (organ-confined) in 28 (25%) patients and pT3 to pT4 (non-organ-confined) in 82 (75%) patients. Lymph node metastases were found in 47 patients (43%). P14 expression was more common in tumours with higher T-stages (P = 0.05). The expression of p14 in p53 negative tumours was associated with a significantly shorter survival time (P=0.003). Independently of p53 expression, p14 expression was associated with an impaired response to chemotherapy (P=0.001). The expression of p21 in p53 negative tumours was associated with significantly decrease levels of tumour cell proliferation detected as Ki-67 expression (P=0.03).

    Conclusions: The simultaneous expression of the senescence markers involved in the p53-pathway shows a more relevant correlation to the pathological outcome of MIBC than each protein separately. P14 expression in tumours with non-altered (p53-) tumours is associated with poor prognosis. P14 expression is associated with impaired response to chemotherapy. P21 expression is related to decreased tumour cell proliferation.

  • 11.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Endocrine and Sarcoma Surgery Unit, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna Stockholm, Sweden .
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Radio-guided sentinel lymph node detection and lymph node mapping in invasive urinary bladder cancer: a prospective clinical study.2017In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 120, no 3, p. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the possibility of detecting sentinel lymph nodes (SNs) in patients with urinary bladder cancer (BCa) intra-operatively and whether the histopathological status of the identified SNs reflected that of the lymphatic field.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied 103 patients with BCa pathological stage T1-T4 who were treated with cystectomy and pelvic lymph node (LN) dissection during 2005-2011 at the Department of Urology, Linköping University Hospital. Radioactive tracer Nanocoll 70 MBq and blue dye were injected into the bladder wall around the primary tumour before surgery. SNs were detected ex vivo during the operation with a handheld Geiger probe (Gamma Detection System; Neoprobe Corp., Dublin, OH, USA). All LNs were formalin-fixed, sectioned three times, mounted on slides and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. An experienced uropathologist evaluated the slides.

    RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 69 years, and 80 (77%) were male. Pathological staging was T1-12 (12%), T2-20 (19%), T3-48 (47%) and T4-23 (22%). A mean (range) number of 31 (7-68) nodes per patient were examined, totalling 3 253 nodes. LN metastases were found in 41 patients (40%). SNs were detected in 83 of the 103 patients (80%). Sensitivity and specificity for detecting metastatic disease by SN biopsy (SNB) varied between LN stations, with average values of 67% and 90%, respectively. LN metastatic density (LNMD) had a significant prognostic impact; a value of ≥8% was significantly related to shorter survival. Lymphovascular invasion (LVI) occurred in 65% of patients (n = 67) and was significantly associated with shorter cancer-specific survival (P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: We conclude that SNB is not a reliable technique for peri-operative localization of LN metastases during cystectomy for BCa; however, LNMD has a significant prognostic value in BCa and may be useful in the clinical context and in BCa oncological and surgical research. LVI was also found to be a prognostic factor.

  • 12.
    Alkaissi, Lina Y.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Winberg Tinnerfelt, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Heil, Stéphanie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Molecular Medicine and Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Haapaniemi, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Stange, Eduard F
    Department of Gastroenterology, Dept. Internal Medicine I, University of Tübingen, 72076 Tübingen, Germany.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Keita, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Antagonism of Adherent Invasive E. coli LF82 With Human α-defensin 5 in the Follicle-associated Epithelium of Patients With Ileal Crohn’s Disease2021In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 1116-1127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The first visible signs of Crohns disease (CD) are microscopic erosions over the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE). The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of human alpha-defensin 5 (HD5) on adherent-invasive Escherichia coli LF82 translocation and HD5 secretion after LF82 exposure in an in vitro model of human FAE and in human FAE ex vivo. Methods: An in vitro FAE-model was set up by the coculture of Raji B cells and Caco-2-cl1 cells. Ileal FAE from patients with CD and controls were mounted in Ussing chambers. The effect of HD5 on LF82 translocation was studied by LF82 exposure to the cells or tissues with or without incubation with HD5. The HD5 secretion was measured in human FAE exposed to LF82 or Salmonella typhimurium. The HD5 levels were evaluated by immunofluorescence, immunoblotting, and ELISA. Results: There was an increased LF82 translocation across the FAE-model compared with Caco-2-cl1 (P < 0.05). Incubation of cell/tissues with HD5 before LF82 exposure reduced bacterial passage in both models. Human FAE showed increased LF82 translocation in CD compared with controls and attenuated passage after incubation with sublethal HD5 in both CD and controls (P < 0.05). LF82 exposure resulted in a lower HD5 secretion in CD FAE compared with controls (P < 0.05), whereas Salmonella exposure caused equal secretion on CD and controls. There were significantly lower HD5 levels in CD tissues compared with controls. Conclusions: Sublethal HD5 reduces the ability of LF82 to translocate through FAE. The HD5 is secreted less in CD in response to LF82, despite a normal response to Salmonella. This further implicates the integrated role of antimicrobial factors and barrier function in CD pathogenesis.

  • 13.
    Almby, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Edholm, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Anastomotic Strictures After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass: a Cohort Study from the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry2019In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 172-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundRoux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the most common bariatric procedure worldwide. Anastomotic stricture is a known complication of RYGB. The aim was to explore the incidence and outcomes of strictures within the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry (SOReg).MethodSOReg included prospective data from 36,362 patients undergoing bariatric surgery in the years 2007-2013. Outcomes were recorded at 30-day and at 1-year follow-up according to the standard SOReg routine. The medical charts of patients suffering from stricture after RYGB were requested and assessed.SettingNational bariatric surgery registryResultsAnastomotic stricture within 1year of surgery was confirmed in 101 patients representing an incidence of 0.3%. Risk factors for stricture were patient age above 60years (odds ratio (OR), 6.2 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.7-14.3), circular stapled gastrojejunostomy (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.4-5.5), postoperative anastomotic leak (OR 8.9 95%, CI 4.7-17.0), and marginal ulcer (OR 30.0, 95% CI 19.2-47.0). Seventy-five percent of the strictures were diagnosed within 70days of surgery. Two dilatations or less was sufficient to successfully treat 50% of patients. Ten pecent of patients developed perforation during dilatation, and the risk of perforating at each dilatation was 3.8%. Perforation required surgery in six cases but there was no mortality. Strictures in SOReg may be underreported, which could explain the low incidence in the study.ConclusionMost strictures present within 2months and are successfully treated with two dilatations or less. Dilating a strictured gastrojejunostomy entails a risk of perforation (3.8%).

  • 14.
    Almlöv, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Woisetschläger, Mischa
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Loftås, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Elander, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    MRI Lymph Node Evaluation for Prediction of Metastases in Rectal Cancer2020In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 2757-2763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore whether the size and characteristics of the largest regional lymph node in patients with rectal cancer, based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), following neoadjuvant therapy and before surgery, is able to identify patients at high risk of developing metachronous metastases.

    Patients and Methods: A retrospective case–control study with data from the Swedish Colo-Rectal Cancer Registry. Forty patients were identified with metachronous metastases (M+), and 40 patients without metastases (M0) were matched as controls.

    Results: Patients with M+ disease were more likely to have a regional lymph node measuring ≥5 mm than patients with M0. (87% vs. 65%, p=0.02). There was also a significant difference between the groups regarding the presence of an irregular border of the largest lymph node (68% vs. 40%, p=0.01).

    Conclusion: Lymph nodes measuring ≥5 mm with/without displaying irregular borders at MRI performed after neoadjuvant therapy emerged as risk factors for metachronous metastases in patients with rectal cancer. Intensified follow-up programmes may be indicated in these patients.

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  • 15.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Influence of Virchow-Robin spaces in the Electric Field Distribution in Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Previous investigations have shown the appearance of cysts i.e. Virchow-Robin spaces (VR) in the basal ganglia and their relationship with parkinsonian symptoms [1-3]. Simulations [4]using the finite element method (FEM) suggests that VR affects the electric field around deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. The aim of the study was to evaluate how the electric field is modified by the presence of cysts in the STN. Methods: The effect of cysts on the electric field around the DBS lead placed in the STN was evaluated using FEM. 3D patient-specific brain models were built with COMSOL 5.2 (COMSOL AB, Sweden) and an in-house developed software [5] to convert a T2 weighted MRI of Parkinsonian patients (ethics approval no: 2012/434-3) into electrical conductivity matrix readable by FEM software. VR was classified as CSF [6]assigning a high electrical conductivity (2.0 S/m). The stimulation amplitudes were set to the clinically programmed values. Depending on the lead used, the stimulation was set to voltage control (3389) or current control (6180, ring mode). The coordinates corresponding to the lowest (first) electrode and the third higher up in the lead, taken from the postoperative CT electrode artefact, were used to localize the leads in the brain model [7]. The electric field was visualized with a 0.2V/mm isosurface. Results: Simulations showed that the electric field distribution is affected by the cysts. The higher conductivity at these regions in the vicinity of the electrode redistributes the electric field pushing it away from the cyst. The same effect occurs regardless of the operating mode or the lead design as long as the directional lead is configured in ring mode. Conclusions: The use of patient-specific models has shown the importance of considering nuances of the patients’ anatomy in the STN. This information can be used to determine the stimulation parameter and to support the analysis of side effects induced by the stimulation. The potential advantage of directional leads can also be assessed by including in the model patient-specific data.

  • 16.
    Al-Taie, Baraa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Rosvall, Oda
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Larsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Edholm, David
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Button battery injury causing an aorto-oesophageal fistula in a 1-year-old child - Sengstaken-Blakemore tube, a life-saving bridge during surgery2023In: Paediatrics and International Child Health, ISSN 2046-9047, E-ISSN 2046-9055Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ingestion of button batteries (BB) by children has become more common, and this can cause oesophageal injury, perforation and even life-threatening haemorrhage.A 1-year-old infant who presented to the emergency room with loss of appetite and vomiting, and was discharged with suspected gastro-enteritis is described. One week later she returned with haematemesis. Chest radiography detected a BB in the stomach and it was removed operatively. Haematemesis and hypovolaemic shock ensued and, while waiting for the paediatric cardiothoracic team, the profuse oesophageal bleeding was controlled using an adult-size Sengstaken-Blakemore tube (SBT). An aorto-oesophageal fistula at the aortic arch was identified and repaired. This case highlights the importance of suspecting ingestion of BB, and performing a chest radiography in children who present with swallowing difficulties, haematemesis and haemodynamic instability. The adult-size SBT was well tolerated by the child and was lifesaving in controlling the bleeding from the aorta.AbbreviationAEF: aorto-oesophageal fistula;BB: button battery;CTA: computed tomography angiography;ER: emergency room;GI: gastro-intestinal;SBT: Sengstaken-Blakemore tubeAbbreviationAEF: aorto-oesophageal fistula;BB: button battery;CTA: computed tomography angiography;ER: emergency room;GI: gastro-intestinal;SBT: Sengstaken-Blakemore tubeAbbreviationAEF: aorto-oesophageal fistula;BB: button battery;CTA: computed tomography angiography;ER: emergency room;GI: gastro-intestinal;SBT: Sengstaken-Blakemore tubeAbbreviationAEF: aorto-oesophageal fistula;BB: button battery;CTA: computed tomography angiography;ER: emergency room;GI: gastro-intestinal;SBT: Sengstaken-Blakemore tubeAbbreviationAEF: aorto-oesophageal fistula;BB: button battery;CTA: computed tomography angiography;ER: emergency room;GI: gastro-intestinal;SBT: Sengstaken-Blakemore tubeAbbreviationAEF: aorto-oesophageal fistula;BB: button battery;CTA: computed tomography angiography;ER: emergency room;GI: gastro-intestinal;SBT: Sengstaken-Blakemore tube

  • 17.
    Amin, Awin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Nordén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Enheten för folkhälsa. Linköping University.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per A
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences.
    Patient-reported participation in hepatopancreatobiliary surgery cancer care: A pilot intervention study with patient-owned fast-track protocols2022In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 31, no 3, article id e13570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Fast-track concepts have been implemented in hepatopancreatobiliary surgery cancer care to improve postoperative recovery. For optimal postoperative care, patient participation is also required. The aim was to investigate and analyse whether an intervention with patient-owned fast-track protocols (PFTPs) may lead to increased patient participation and improve information for patients who underwent surgery for hepatopancreatobiliary cancer. Methods A quantitative comparative design with a control and intervention group was used. The participants in the intervention group followed a PFTP during their admission. After discharge, the patients answered a questionnaire regarding patient participation. Data analyses were performed with descriptive statistics and ANCOVA. Results The results are based on a total of 222 completed questionnaires: 116 in the control group and 106 in the intervention group. It is uncertain whether the PFTP increased patient participation and information, but its use may indicate an improvement for the patient group. Conclusion A successful implementation strategy for the use of PFTP, with daily reconciliations, could be part of the work required to improve overall satisfaction with patient participation.

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  • 18.
    Andersson, Christer
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Operations management Region Östergötland, Övrig enhet.
    Magnusson, Martin
    Region Östergötland, Operations management Region Östergötland, Övrig enhet.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Mortalitet bland sjukhusvårdade tycktes inte öka under sommaren [Mortality among hospitalized patients did not appear to increase during the summer]2019In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A retrospective review of medical records (2017-2018) at Linköping University Hospital compared hospital mortality for the 2-month period of summer vacations (group A) with two months of regular activity (group B). The mortality was 163 patients in group A and 216 in group B. Emergency admittance dominated (95%) in both groups. Comorbidity was found in 81%, and at admittance the risk for death during the hospital stay was estimated to more than 50% in three out of four patients. There was no difference between the groups regarding demography, hospital stay, or diagnosis. Due to a 30% reduction of hospital beds during the summer some patients were relocated to other specialties. No relocated patient died in group A but six in group B. Eight deaths were judged as probably preventable, but none definitely preventable. The similarity between the groups regarding mortality does not allow estimations of differences in adverse events in general. Low mortality among relocated patients is probably due to identification of high-risk patients not suitable for relocation.

  • 19.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Björn, Åke
    Region Östergötland.
    Berggren, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Center for Disaster Medicine and Traumatology. Linköpings universitet.
    Varaktig vård2020In: Partnerships for sustainable health care systems: the international medical program approach / [ed] Ruhija Hodza-Beganovic, Åke Björn, Peter Berggren, Linköping: Region Östergötland , 2020, Vol. Sidorna 25-29, p. 25-29Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Muhrbeck, Måns
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Veen, Harald
    Int Comm Red Cross, Switzerland.
    Osman, Zaher
    Int Comm Red Cross, Switzerland.
    von Schreeb, Johan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hospital Workload for Weapon-Wounded Females Treated by the International Committee of the Red Cross: More Work Needed than for Males2018In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 93-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Civilians constitute 33-51% of victims in armed conflicts. Several reports on civilian injuries exist, but few have focused on injuries afflicting females. We analyzed routinely collected data on weapon-related injuries from the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) hospital in northwestern Pakistan in order to define injury patterns and types of surgical treatment for females. A total of 3028 patient files (376 females) from consecutively admitted patients to the ICRC-hospital in Peshawar from February 2009 to May 2012 were included. Information regarding injury-mechanism, time since injury, vital parameters at admission, type of injury, treatment and basic outcome was extracted from the files and analyzed. Comparisons between gender and age-groups were done by cross-table analyses or nonparametric tests. Females were younger than males (20 vs. 25 years), arrived sooner after injury (24 vs. 48 h) (p amp;lt; 0.001 for both) and were victims of bombs and missiles more frequently (64.4 vs. 54.6%) (p amp;lt; 0.001). Vital parameters such as systolic blood pressure (110 vs. 113 mmHg) and pulse rate (100 vs. 86) were more affected at admission (p amp;lt; 0.001 for both). Females were subjected to surgery (83.0 vs. 77.4%) (p amp;lt; 0.05) and were given blood transfusions more often (18.8 vs. 13.6%) (p amp;lt; 0.01). No differences in amputations or in-hospital mortality were found. Females treated at the ICRC-hospital in northwestern Pakistan are markedly affected by indiscriminate weapons such as bombs and missiles. Their average consumption of surgery is greater than for males, and this might be relevant in planning for staffing and facility needs in similar contexts.

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  • 21.
    Andersson, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Vilhelmsson, Mattias
    Reg Hosp Vaxjo, Sweden.
    Fomichov Casaballe, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Enheten för folkhälsa.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Drott, Jenny
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Patient involvement in surgical care-Healthcare personnel views and behaviour regarding patient involvement2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background All professions in surgical care have a responsibility to include patients in their health care. By Swedish law, all care should be done in dialogue with the patient. The essential part of health care is the meeting between patient and healthcare professional. In the interaction, a decision can be made, and needs can be identified to a safer care. Previous studies on patient participation have focussed on patients perspectives in surgical care, but there is a paucity of studies about the personnels perspective of estimated patient involvement in surgical care. Aim The aim of this study was to identify and describe healthcare personnels view and behaviour regarding patient involvement in surgical care. Method A quantitative study with various professions was conducted. A validated questionnaire was used, remaining questions grouped under following areas: patient involvement, acute phase, hospital time, discharge phase and questions on employment and workplace. Results A total of 140 questionnaires were sent out to a surgical clinic in Sweden, and 102 questionnaires were answered. All professionals stated that clear information is an important part of patient involvement in surgical care. Statistically significant differences existed between the professions in the subscale information. Physicians rated their information higher than the Registered Nurses (p = 0.005) and the practical nurses did (p = 0.001). Hindrances to involving patients were lack of time and other priority tasks. Conclusions Professionals in surgical care graded information to be the most important thing for patient involvement. Participation in important decisions, including the possibility to express personal views and ask questions, is important factors for patient involvement. Barriers against patient involvement are lack of time and prioritisation of other work activities.

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  • 22.
    Arezzo, Alberto
    et al.
    Univ Torino, Italy.
    Francis, Nader
    Yeovil Dist Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England; Northwick Pk & St Marks Hosp, England.
    Mintz, Yoav
    Hebrew Univ Jerusalem, Israel.
    Adamina, Michel
    Cantonal Hosp Winterthur, Switzerland; Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Antoniou, Stavros A.
    European Univ Cyprus, Cyprus; Mediterranean Hosp Cyprus, Cyprus.
    Bouvy, Nicole
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Copaescu, Catalin
    Ponderas Acad Hosp, Romania.
    de Manzini, Nicolo
    Univ Trieste, Italy.
    Di Lorenzo, Nicola
    Univ Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Morales-Conde, Salvador
    Univ Seville, Spain.
    Mueller-Stich, Beat P.
    Univ Heidelberg Hosp, Germany.
    Nickel, Felix
    Univ Heidelberg Hosp, Germany.
    Popa, Dorin
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Tait, Diana
    Royal Marsden NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Thomas, Cenydd
    Yeovil Dist Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Nimmo, Susan
    Western Gen Hosp, Scotland.
    Paraskevis, Dimitrios
    Natl & Kapodistrian Univ Athens, Greece.
    Pietrabissa, Andrea
    Fdn IRCCS Policlin San Matteo, Italy.
    EAES Recommendations for Recovery Plan in Minimally Invasive Surgery Amid COVID-19 Pandemic2021In: Surgical Endoscopy, ISSN 0930-2794, E-ISSN 1432-2218, Vol. 35, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background COVID-19 pandemic presented an unexpected challenge for the surgical community in general and Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) specialists in particular. This document aims to summarize recent evidence and experts opinion and formulate recommendations to guide the surgical community on how to best organize the recovery plan for surgical activity across different sub-specialities after the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods Recommendations were developed through a Delphi process for establishment of expert consensus. Domain topics were formulated and subsequently subdivided into questions pertinent to different surgical specialities following the COVID-19 crisis. Sixty-five experts from 24 countries, representing the entire EAES board, were invited. Fifty clinicians and six engineers accepted the invitation and drafted statements based on specific key questions. Anonymous voting on the statements was performed until consensus was achieved, defined by at least 70% agreement. Results A total of 92 consensus statements were formulated with regard to safe resumption of surgery across eight domains, addressing general surgery, upper GI, lower GI, bariatrics, endocrine, HPB, abdominal wall and technology/research. The statements addressed elective and emergency services across all subspecialties with specific attention to the role of MIS during the recovery plan. Eighty-four of the statements were approved during the first round of Delphi voting (91.3%) and another 8 during the following round after substantial modification, resulting in a 100% consensus. Conclusion The recommendations formulated by the EAES board establish a framework for resumption of surgery following COVID-19 pandemic with particular focus on the role of MIS across surgical specialities. The statements have the potential for wide application in the clinical setting, education activities and research work across different healthcare systems.

  • 23.
    Asbun, H.J.
    et al.
    Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreas Surgery, Miami Cancer Institute, Miami, FL, United States.
    Moekotte, A.L.
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Vissers, F.L.
    Department of Surgery, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Kunzler, F.
    Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreas Surgery, Miami Cancer Institute, Miami, FL, United States.
    Cipriani, F.
    Department of Surgery, San Raffaele Hospital, Milan, Italy.
    Alseidi, A.
    Division of Hepatopancreatobiliary and Endocrine Surgery, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, VA, United States.
    DAngelica, M.I.
    Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, NY, United States.
    Balduzzi, A.
    Division of Pancreatic Surgery, University Hospital of Verona, Verona, Italy.
    Bassi, C.
    Division of Pancreatic Surgery, University Hospital of Verona, Verona, Italy.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Boggi, U.
    Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Callery, M.P.
    Department of General and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, United States.
    Del, Chiaro M.
    Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, University of Colorado, Denver, CO, United States.
    Coimbra, F.J.
    Department of Abdominal Surgery, AC Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Conrad, C.
    Department of Surgery, St. Elizabeths Medical Center, Boston, MA, United States.
    Cook, A.
    Wessex Institute, University of Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Coppola, A.
    General Surgery and Liver Transplant, Unit Department of General Surgery, Fondazione Policlinico, Universitario Agostino Gemelli, IRCCS, Rome, Italy.
    Dervenis, C.
    Department of Surgery, Medical School, University of Cyprus, Cyprus.
    Dokmak, S.
    Department of Surgery, Beaujon Hospital, Paris, France.
    Edil, B.H.
    Department of Surgery, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK, United States.
    Edwin, B.
    Intervention Centre, Department of HPB Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Giulianotti, P.C.
    Division of Minimally Invasive, General Surgery and Robotic Surgery, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, United States.
    Han, H.-S.
    Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea.
    Hansen, P.D.
    Department of Surgery, Portland Providence Medical Center, Portland, OR, United States.
    Van, Der Heijde N.
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Van, Hilst J.
    Department of Surgery, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Hester, C.A.
    Department of Surgery, University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States.
    Hogg, M.E.
    Department of Surgery, NorthShore University Health System, Evanston, IL, United States.
    Jarufe, N.
    Department of Digestive Surgery, Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.
    Jeyarajah, D.R.
    Department of HPB Surgery, Methodist Richardson Medical Center, Richardson, TX, United States.
    Keck, T.
    Clinic for Surgery, University of Schleswig-Holstein Campus Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany.
    Kim, S.C.
    Department of Surgery, Ulsan University, College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea.
    Khatkov, I.E.
    Department of Surgery, Moscow Clinical Scientific Center, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Kokudo, N.
    Department of Surgery, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
    Kooby, D.A.
    Department of Surgery, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    Korrel, M.
    Department of Surgery, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    De, Leon F.J.
    HPB and Transplant Unit, Regional Hospital, Málaga, Spain.
    Lluis, N.
    Department of Surgery, Bellvitge University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain.
    Lof, S.
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Machado, M.A.
    Department of Surgery, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Demartines, N.
    Department of Visceral Surgery, Lausanne University Hospital CHUV, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Martinie, J.B.
    Division of HPB Surgery, Department of Surgery, Carolinas Health Care Hospital, Charlotte, NC, United States.
    Merchant, N.B.
    Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Molenaar, I.Q.
    Department of Surgery, UMC Utrecht Cancer Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Moravek, C.
    Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, Manhattan Beach, CA, United States.
    Mou, Y.-P.
    Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatic Surgery, Zhengjiang Provincial Peoples Hospital, Peoples Hospital of Hangzhou Medical College, Zhejiang, China.
    Nakamura, M.
    Department of Surgery and Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
    Nealon, W.H.
    Department of Surgery, Northwell Health, Manhasset, NY, United States.
    Palanivelu, C.
    Department of Surgical Gastroenterology and HPB Surgery, GEM Hospital and Research Centre, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Pessaux, P.
    Division of Hepato-Biliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.
    Pitt, H.A.
    Department of Surgery, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
    Polanco, P.M.
    Department of Surgery, University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States.
    Primrose, J.N.
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Rawashdeh, A.
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Sanford, D.E.
    Division of Hepatobiliary, Pancreatic, and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University, School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States.
    Senthilnathan, P.
    Department of Surgical Gastroenterology and HPB Surgery, GEM Hospital and Research Centre, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Shrikhande, S.V.
    Department of Surgery, Tata Memorial Center, Mumbai, India.
    Stauffer, J.A.
    Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL, United States.
    Takaori, K.
    Department of Surgery, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.
    Talamonti, M.S.
    Department of Surgery, NorthShore University Health System, Evanston, IL, United States.
    Tang, C.N.
    Department of Surgery, Pamela Youde Nethersle Eastern Hospital, Chai Wan, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Vollmer, C.M.
    Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
    Wakabayashi, G.
    Center for Advanced Treatment of HPB Diseases, Ageo Central General Hospital, Saitama, Japan.
    Walsh, R.M.
    Department of General Surgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, United States.
    Wang, S.-E.
    Department of Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Zinner, M.J.
    Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreas Surgery, Miami Cancer Institute, Miami, FL, United States.
    Wolfgang, C.L.
    Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, John Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States.
    Zureikat, A.H.
    Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
    Zwart, M.J.
    Department of Surgery, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Conlon, K.C.
    Department of Surgery, Trinity College Dublin, Tallaght University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
    Kendrick, M.L.
    Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States; Department of Surgery, Istituto Fondazione Poliambulanza, Brescia, Italy.
    Zeh, H.J.
    Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
    Hilal, M.A.
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Besselink, M.G.
    Department of Surgery, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    The Miami International Evidence-based Guidelines on Minimally Invasive Pancreas Resection2020In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 271, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to develop and externally validate the first evidence-based guidelines on minimally invasive pancreas resection (MIPR) before and during the International Evidence-based Guidelines on Minimally Invasive Pancreas Resection (IG-MIPR) meeting in Miami (March 2019).Summary Background Data: MIPR has seen rapid development in the past decade. Promising outcomes have been reported by early adopters from high-volume centers. Subsequently, multicenter series as well as randomized controlled trials were reported; however, guidelines for clinical practice were lacking. Methods: The Scottisch Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) methodology was used, incorporating these 4 items: systematic reviews using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases to answer clinical questions, whenever possible in PICO style, the GRADE approach for assessment of the quality of evidence, the Delphi method for establishing consensus on the developed recommendations, and the AGREE-II instrument for the assessment of guideline quality and external validation. The current guidelines are cosponsored by the International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association, the Americas Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association, the Asian-Pacific Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association, the European-African Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association, the European Association for Endoscopic Surgery, Pancreas Club, the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgery, the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract, and the Society of Surgical Oncology. Results: After screening 16,069 titles, 694 studies were reviewed, and 291 were included. The final 28 recommendations covered 6 topics; laparoscopic and robotic distal pancreatectomy, central pancreatectomy, pancreatoduodenectomy, as well as patient selection, training, learning curve, and minimal annual center volume required to obtain optimal outcomes and patient safety.Conclusion: The IG-MIPR using SIGN methodology give guidance to surgeons, hospital administrators, patients, and medical societies on the use and outcome of MIPR as well as the approach to be taken regarding this challenging type of surgery. © 2019 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 24.
    Azhar, Najia
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Johanssen, Anette
    Department of Digestive Surgery, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway.
    Sundström, Tove
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Folkesson, Joakim
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wallon, Conny
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Kørner, Hartvig
    Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway; Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Blecic, Ljiljana
    Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Østfold Hospital, Fredrikstad, Norway.
    Forsmo, Håvard Mjørud
    Department of Gastrointestinal and Emergency Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Øresland, Tom
    Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Yaqub, Sheraz
    Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Buchwald, Pamela
    Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Schultz, Johannes Kurt
    Department of Digestive Surgery, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway.
    Laparoscopic Lavage vs Primary Resection for Acute Perforated Diverticulitis: Long-term Outcomes From the Scandinavian Diverticulitis (SCANDIV) Randomized Clinical Trial2021In: JAMA Surgery, ISSN 2168-6254, E-ISSN 2168-6262, Vol. 156, no 2, p. 121-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Perforated colonic diverticulitis usually requires surgical resection, with significant morbidity. Short-term results from randomized clinical trials have indicated that laparoscopic lavage is a feasible alternative to resection. However, it appears that no long-term results are available.

    OBJECTIVE To compare long-term (5-year) outcomes of laparoscopic peritoneal lavage and primary resection as treatments of perforated purulent diverticulitis.

    DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This international multicenter randomized clinical trial was conducted in 21 hospitals in Sweden and Norway, which enrolled patients between February 2010 and June 2014. Long-term follow-upwas conducted between March 2018 and November 2019. Patients with symptoms of left-sided acute perforated diverticulitis, indicating urgent surgical need and computed tomography-verified free air, were eligible. Those available for trial intervention (Hinchey stages<iv) were="" included="" in="" the="" long-term="" follow-up.<="" p="" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; list-style: none; padding: 0px; font-family: inherit;"></iv)>

    INTERVENTIONS Patients were assigned to undergo laparoscopic peritoneal lavage or colon resection based on computer-generated, center-stratified block randomization.

    MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome was severe complications within 5 years. Secondary outcomes included mortality, secondary operations, recurrences, stomas, functional outcomes, and quality of life.

    RESULTS Of 199 randomized patients, 101were assigned to undergo laparoscopic peritoneal lavage and 98were assigned to colon resection. At the time of surgery, perforated purulent diverticulitiswas confirmed in 145 patients randomized to lavage (n = 74) and resection (n = 71). The median follow-upwas 59 (interquartile range, 51-78; full range, 0-110) months, and 3 patientswere lost to follow-up, leaving a final analysis of 73 patients who had had laparoscopic lavage (mean [SD] age, 66.4 [13] years; 39 men [53%]) and 69 who had received a resection (mean [SD] age, 63.5 [14] years; 36 men [52%]). Severe complications occurred in 36%(n = 26) in the laparoscopic lavage group and 35%(n = 24) in the resection group (P = .92). Overall mortalitywas 32%(n = 23) in the laparoscopic lavage group and 25%(n = 17) in the resection group (P = .36). The stoma prevalencewas 8%(n = 4) in the laparoscopic lavage group vs 33% (n = 17; P =.002) in the resection group among patients who remained alive, and secondary operations, including stoma reversal, were performed in 36%(n = 26) vs 35%(n = 24; P = .92), respectively. Recurrence of diverticulitiswas higher following laparoscopic lavage (21% [n = 15] vs 4%[n = 3]; P = .004). In the laparoscopic lavage group, 30%(n = 21) underwent a sigmoid resection. Therewere no significant differences in the EuroQoL-5Dquestionnaire or Cleveland Global Quality of Life scores between the groups.

    CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Long-term follow-up showed no differences in severe complications. Recurrence of diverticulitis after laparoscopic lavage was more common, often leading to sigmoid resection. This must be weighed against the lower stoma prevalence in this group. Shared decision-making considering both short-term and long-term consequences is encouraged.

  • 25.
    Bahlmann, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Halldestam, Ingvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Goal-directed therapy during transthoracic oesophageal resection does not improve outcome: Randomised controlled trial2019In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 153-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Goal-directed therapy (GDT) is expected to be of highest benefit in high-risk surgery. Therefore, GDT is recommended during oesophageal resection, which carries a high risk of postoperative complications.

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to confirm the hypothesis that GDT during oesophageal resection improves outcome compared with standard care.

    DESIGN: A randomised controlled study.

    SETTING: Two Swedish university hospitals, between October 2011 and October 2015.

    PATIENTS: Sixty-four patients scheduled for elective transthoracic oesophageal resection were randomised. Exclusion criteria included colonic interposition and significant aortic or mitral valve insufficiency.

    INTERVENTION: A three-step GDT protocol included stroke volume optimisation using colloid boluses as assessed by pulse-contour analysis, dobutamine infusion if cardiac index was below 2.5 l min m and norepinephrine infusion if mean arterial blood pressure was below 65 mmHg.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The incidence of complications per patient at 5 and 30 days postoperatively as assessed using a predefined list.

    RESULTS: Fifty-nine patients were available for analysis. Patients in the intervention group received more colloid fluid (2190 ± 875 vs. 1596 ± 759 ml, P < 0.01) and dobutamine more frequently (27/30 vs. 9/29, P < 0.01). The median [interquartile range, IQR] incidence of complications per patient 5 days after surgery was 2 [0 to 3] in the intervention group and 1 [0 to 2] in the control group (P = 0.10), and after 30 days 4 [2 to 6] in the intervention group and 2 [1 to 4] in the control group (P = 0.10).

    CONCLUSION: Goal-directed therapy during oesophageal resection did not result in a reduction of the incidence of postoperative complications.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01416077.

  • 26.
    Balci, Deniz
    et al.
    Bahcesehir Univ, Turkey.
    Nadalin, Silvio
    Univ Hosp Tubingen, Germany.
    Mehrabi, Arianeb
    Heidelberg Univ, Germany.
    Alikhanov, Ruslan
    Moscow Clin Res Ctr Named Loginov AS, Russia.
    Fernandes, Eduardo S. M.
    Univ Federaldo Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Di Benedetto, Fabrizio
    Univ Modena & Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Hernandez-Alejandro, Roberto
    Univ Rochester, NY USA.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Efanov, Mikhail
    Moscow Clin Res Ctr Named Loginov AS, Russia.
    Capobianco, Ivan
    Univ Hosp Tubingen, Germany.
    Clavien, Pierre-Alain
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Switzerland.
    Kirimker, Elvan Onur
    Univ Sch Med Ankara, Turkey.
    Petrowsky, Henrik
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Switzerland.
    Revival of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy for perihilar cholangiocarcinoma: An international multicenter study with promising outcomes2023In: Surgery, ISSN 0039-6060, E-ISSN 1532-7361, Vol. 173, no 6, p. 1398-1404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy for per-ihilar cholangiocarcinoma has been considered to be contraindicated due to the initial poor results. Given the recent reports of improved outcomes, we aimed to collect the recent expe-riences of different centers performing associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy for perihilar cholangiocarcinoma to analyze factors related to improved outcomes. Methods: This proof-of-concept study collected contemporary cases of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy for perihilar cholangiocarcinoma and analyzed for morbidity, short and long-term survival, and factors associated with outcomes. Results: In total, 39 patients from 8 centers underwent associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy for perihilar cholangiocarcinoma from 2010 to 2020. The median preoperative future liver remnant volume was 323 mL (155-460 mL). The median future liver remnant increase was 58.7% (8.9%-264. 5%) with a median interstage interval of 13 days (6-60 days). Post-stage 1 and post-stage 2 biliary leaks occurred in 2 (7.7%) and 4 (15%) patients. Six patients (23%) after stage 1 and 6 (23%) after stage 2 experienced grade 3 or higher complica-tions. Two patients (7.7%) died within 90 days after stage 2. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival was 92%, 69%, and 55%, respectively. A subgroup analysis revealed poor survival for patients under-going additional vascular resection and lymph node positivity. Lymph node-negative patients showed excellent survival demonstrated by 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival of 86%, 86%, and 86%. Conclusion: This study highlights that the critical attitude toward associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy for perihilar cholangiocarcinoma needs to be revised. In selected patients with perihilar cholangiocarcinoma, associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy can achieve favorable survival that compares to the outcome of established surgical treatment strategies reported in benchmark studies for perihilar cholangiocarcinoma including 1-stage hepatectomy and liver transplantation. (c) 2023 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 27.
    Balduzzi, A.
    et al.
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands; Univ Verona Hosp Trust, Italy.
    van Hilst, J.
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Korrel, M.
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Lof, S.
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands; Univ Hosp Southampton NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Al-Sarireh, B.
    Morriston Hosp, Wales.
    Alseidi, A.
    Virginia Mason Med Ctr, WA 98101 USA.
    Berrevoet, F.
    Ghent Univ Hosp, Belgium.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    van den Boezem, P.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Boggi, U.
    Univ Pisa, Italy.
    Busch, O. R.
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Butturini, G.
    Pederzoli Hosp, Italy.
    Casadei, R.
    St Orsola Marcello Malpighi Hosp, Italy.
    van Dam, R.
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands; Univ Hosp RWTH Aachen, Germany.
    Dokmak, S.
    Hosp Beaujon, France.
    Edwin, B.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Inst Clin Med, Norway.
    Sahakyan, M. A.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Inst Clin Med, Norway; Yerevan State Med Univ M Heratsi, Armenia.
    Ercolani, G.
    AUSL Romagna Forli, Italy; Univ Bologna, Italy.
    Fabre, J. M.
    Hop St Eloi, France.
    Falconi, M.
    Univ Vita Salute, Italy.
    Forgione, A.
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Italy.
    Gayet, B.
    Inst Mutualiste Montsouris, France.
    Gomez, D.
    Nottingham Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Koerkamp, B. Groot
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Hackert, T.
    Heidelberg Univ Hosp, Germany.
    Keck, T.
    Univ Hosp Schleswig Holstein UKSH, Germany.
    Khatkov, I
    Moscow Clin Sci Ctr, Russia.
    Krautz, C.
    Univ Hosp Erlangen, Germany.
    Marudanayagam, R.
    Univ Hosp Birmingham, England.
    Menon, K.
    Kings Coll Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Pietrabissa, A.
    Univ Hosp Pavia, Italy.
    Poves, I
    Hosp del Mar, Spain.
    Cunha, A. Sa
    Hop Paul Brousse, France.
    Salvia, R.
    Univ Verona Hosp Trust, Italy.
    Sanchez-Cabus, S.
    Hosp Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Soonawalla, Z.
    Oxford Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Abu Hilal, M.
    Univ Hosp Southampton NHS Fdn Trust, England; Ist Osped Fdn Poliambulanza, Italy; Southampton Univ, England.
    Besselink, M. G.
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Laparoscopic versus open extended radical left pancreatectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: an international propensity-score matched study2021In: Surgical Endoscopy, ISSN 0930-2794, E-ISSN 1432-2218, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 6949-6959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background A radical left pancreatectomy in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) may require extended, multivisceral resections. The role of a laparoscopic approach in extended radical left pancreatectomy (ERLP) is unclear since comparative studies are lacking. The aim of this study was to compare outcomes after laparoscopic vs open ERLP in patients with PDAC. Methods An international multicenter propensity-score matched study including patients who underwent either laparoscopic or open ERLP (L-ERLP; O-ERLP) for PDAC was performed (2007-2015). The ISGPS definition for extended resection was used. Primary outcomes were overall survival, margin negative rate (R0), and lymph node retrieval. Results Between 2007 and 2015, 320 patients underwent ERLP in 34 centers from 12 countries (65 L-ERLP vs. 255 O-ERLP). After propensity-score matching, 44 L-ERLP could be matched to 44 O-ERLP. In the matched cohort, the conversion rate in L-ERLP group was 35%. The L-ERLP R0 resection rate (matched cohort) was comparable to O-ERLP (67% vs 48%; P = 0.063) but the lymph node yield was lower for L-ERLP than O-ERLP (median 11 vs 19, P = 0.023). L-ERLP was associated with less delayed gastric emptying (0% vs 16%, P = 0.006) and shorter hospital stay (median 9 vs 13 days, P = 0.005), as compared to O-ERLP. Outcomes were comparable for additional organ resections, vascular resections (besides splenic vessels), Clavien-Dindo grade &gt;= III complications, or 90-day mortality (2% vs 2%, P = 0.973). The median overall survival was comparable between both groups (19 vs 20 months, P = 0.571). Conversion did not worsen outcomes in L-ERLP. Conclusion The laparoscopic approach may be used safely in selected patients requiring ERLP for PDAC, since morbidity, mortality, and overall survival seem comparable, as compared to O-ERLP. L-ERLP is associated with a high conversion rate and reduced lymph node yield but also with less delayed gastric emptying and a shorter hospital stay, as compared to O-ERLP.

  • 28.
    Baumgartner, Ruth
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Gilg, Stefan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Ghorbani, Poya
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sauter, Christina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Stål, Per
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sparrelid, Ernesto
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Engstrand, Jennie
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Impact of post-hepatectomy liver failure on morbidity and short- and long-term survival after major hepatectomy2022In: BJS Open, E-ISSN 2474-9842, Vol. 6, no 4, article id zrac097Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Post-hepatectomy liver failure (PHLF) is one of the most serious postoperative complications after hepatectomy. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the International Study Group of Liver Surgery (ISGLS) definition of PHLF on morbidity and short- and long-term survival after major hepatectomy. Methods This was a retrospective review of all patients who underwent major hepatectomy (three or more liver segments) for various liver tumours between 2010 and 2018 at two Swedish tertiary centres for hepatopancreatobiliary surgery. Descriptive statistics, regression models, and survival analyses were used. Results A total of 799 patients underwent major hepatectomy, of which 218 patients (27 per cent) developed ISGLS-defined PHLF, including 115 patients (14 per cent) with ISGLS grade A, 76 patients (10 per cent) with grade B, and 27 patients (3 per cent) with grade C. The presence of cirrhosis, perihilar cholangiocarcinoma, and gallbladder cancer, right-sided hemihepatectomy and trisectionectomy all significantly increased the risk of clinically relevant PHLF (grades B and C). Clinically relevant PHLF increased the risk of 90-day mortality and was associated with impaired long-term survival. ISGLS grade A had more major postoperative complications compared with no PHLF but failed to be an independent predictor of both 90-day mortality and long-term survival. The impact of PHLF grade B/C on long-term survival was no longer present in patients surviving the first 90 days after surgery. Conclusions The presently used ISGLS definition for PHLF should be reconsidered regarding mortality as only PHLF grade B/C was associated with a negative impact on short-term survival; however, even ISGLS grade A had clinical implications. The aim was to assess the ISGLS criteria for post-hepatectomy liver failure (PHLF) in a cohort of patients with major hepatectomy. The presently used ISGLS definition for PHLF should be reconsidered regarding mortality as only PHLF grade B/C was associated with a negative impact on short-term survival.

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  • 29.
    Bausch, Birke
    et al.
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Schiavi, Francesca
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Ni, Ying
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patocs, Attila
    Semmelweis University, Hungary; Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Ngeow, Joanne
    National Cancer Centre Singapore, Singapore; Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Wellner, Ulrich
    University of Lubeck, Germany.
    Malinoc, Angelica
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Taschin, Elisa
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Barbon, Giovanni
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Lanza, Virginia
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Stenman, Adam
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Larsson, Catharina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Svahn, Fredrika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Chen, Jin-Lian
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Marquard, Jessica
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Fraenkel, Merav
    Hadassah Hebrew University, Israel.
    Walter, Martin A.
    University Hospital, Switzerland.
    Peczkowska, Mariola
    Institute Cardiol, Poland.
    Prejbisz, Aleksander
    Institute Cardiol, Poland.
    Jarzab, Barbara
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre and Institute Oncol, Poland.
    Hasse-Lazar, Kornelia
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre and Institute Oncol, Poland.
    Petersenn, Stephan
    Centre Endocrine Tumors, Germany.
    Moeller, Lars C.
    University of Duisburg Essen, Germany.
    Meyer, Almuth
    HELIOS Klin, Germany.
    Reisch, Nicole
    Ludwigs Maximilians University of Munich, Germany.
    Trupka, Arnold
    City Hospital, Germany.
    Brase, Christoph
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Galiano, Matthias
    University Hospital Erlangen, Germany.
    Preuss, Simon F.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Kwok, Pingling
    University of Regensburg, Germany.
    Lendvai, Nikoletta
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Berisha, Gani
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Makay, Ozer
    Ege University, Turkey.
    Boedeker, Carsten C.
    HELIOS Hanseklinikum Stralsund, Germany.
    Weryha, Georges
    University of Nancy, France.
    Racz, Karoly
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Januszewicz, Andrzej
    Institute Cardiol, Poland.
    Walz, Martin K.
    Kliniken Essen Mitte, Germany; Kliniken Essen Mitte, Germany.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Opocher, Giuseppe
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Eng, Charis
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA; Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Neumann, Hartmut P. H.
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Clinical Characterization of the Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma Susceptibility Genes SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 for Gene-Informed Prevention2017In: JAMA Oncology, ISSN 2374-2437, E-ISSN 2374-2445, Vol. 3, no 9, p. 1204-1212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Effective cancer prevention is based on accurate molecular diagnosis and results of genetic family screening, genotype-informed risk assessment, and tailored strategies for early diagnosis. The expanding etiology for hereditary pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas has recently included SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 as susceptibility genes. Clinical management guidelines for patients with germline mutations in these 4 newly included genes are lacking. OBJECTIVE To study the clinical spectra and age-related penetrance of individuals with mutations in the SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 genes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS This study analyzed the prospective, longitudinally followed up European-American-Asian Pheochromocytoma-Paraganglioma Registry for prevalence of SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 germline mutation carriers from 1993 to 2016. Genetic predictive testing and clinical investigation by imaging from neck to pelvis was offered to mutation-positive registrants and their relatives to clinically characterize the pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma diseases associated with mutations of the 4 new genes. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Prevalence and spectra of germline mutations in the SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 genes were assessed. The clinical features of SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 disease were characterized. RESULTS Of 972 unrelated registrants without mutations in the classic pheochromocytoma- and paraganglioma-associated genes (632 female [65.0%] and 340 male [35.0%]; age range, 8-80; mean [SD] age, 41.0 [13.3] years), 58 (6.0%) carried germline mutations of interest, including 29 SDHA, 20 TMEM127, 8 MAX, and 1 SDHAF2. Fifty-three of 58 patients (91%) had familial, multiple, extra-adrenal, and/or malignant tumors and/or were younger than 40 years. Newly uncovered are 7 of 63 (11%) malignant pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas in SDHA and TMEM127 disease. SDHA disease occurred as early as 8 years of age. Extra-adrenal tumors occurred in 28 mutation carriers (48%) and in 23 of 29 SDHA mutation carriers (79%), particularly with head and neck paraganglioma. MAX disease occurred almost exclusively in the adrenal glands with frequently bilateral tumors. Penetrance in the largest subset, SDHA carriers, was 39% at 40 years of age and is statistically different in index patients (45%) vs mutation-carrying relatives (13%; P amp;lt; .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 genes may contribute to hereditary pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. Genetic testing is recommended in patients at clinically high risk if the classic genes are mutation negative. Gene-specific prevention and/or early detection requires regular, systematic whole-body investigation.

  • 30.
    Beeckmans, Dorien
    et al.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Farre, Ricard
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Riethorst, Danny
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Keita, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Augustijns, Patrick
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Vanuytsel, Tim
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Vanheel, Hanne
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Tack, Jan
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Relationship between bile salts, bacterial translocation, and duodenal mucosal integrity in functional dyspepsia2020In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 32, no 5, article id e13788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Functional dyspepsia (FD) is a complex disorder, in which multiple mechanisms underlie symptom generation, including impaired duodenal barrier function. Moreover, an altered duodenal bile salt pool was recently discovered in patients with FD. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between bile salts, bacterial translocation, and duodenal mucosal permeability in FD. Methods Duodenal biopsies from patients with FD and healthy volunteers (HV) were mounted in Ussing chambers to measure mucosal resistance and bacterial passage in the absence and presence of fluorescein-conjugated Escherichia coli and glyco-ursodeoxycholic acid (GUDCA) exposure. In parallel, duodenal fluid aspirates were collected from patients and bile salts were analyzed. Key results The transepithelial electrical resistance of duodenal biopsies from patients was lower compared with HV (21.4 +/- 1.3 omega.cm(2) vs. 24.4 +/- 1.2 omega.cm(2); P = .02; N = 21). The ratio of glyco-cholic and glyco-chenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA) to tauro- and GUDCA correlated positively with transepithelial electrical resistance in patients. Glyco-ursodeoxycholic acid slightly altered the mucosal resistance, resulting in similar values between patient and healthy biopsies (22.1 +/- 1.0 omega.cm(2) vs. 23.0 +/- 1.0 omega.cm(2); P = .5). Bacterial passage after 120 minutes was lower for patient than for healthy biopsies (0.0 [0.0-681.8] vs. 1684.0 [0.0-4773.0] E coli units; P = .02). Glyco-ursodeoxycholic acid increased bacterial passage in patient biopsies (102.1 [0.0-733.0] vs. 638.9 [280.6-2124.0] E coli units; P = .009). No correlation was found between mucosal resistance and bacterial passage. Conclusions amp; inferences Patients with FD displayed decreased duodenal mucosal resistance associated with bile salts, however, not associated with bacterial passage in vitro. In addition, the hydrophilic bile salt glyco-ursodeoxycholic acid abolished differences in mucosal resistance and bacterial passage between patient and control group.

  • 31.
    Beka, Ervin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hanna, Hanan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hemithyroidectomy, does the indication influence the outcome?2023In: Langenbeck's archives of surgery (Print), ISSN 1435-2443, E-ISSN 1435-2451, Vol. 409, no 1, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeHemithyroidectomies are mainly performed for two indications, either therapeutically to relieve compression symptoms or diagnostically for suspicious nodule(s). In case of the latter, one could consider the approach to be rather extensive since the majority of patients have no symptoms and will have benign disease. The aim of this study is to investigate the complication rates of diagnostic hemithyroidectomy and to compare it with the complication rates of compressive symptoms hemithyroidectomy.MethodsData from patients who had undergone hemithyroidectomy either for compression symptoms or for excluding malignancy were extracted from a well-established Scandinavian quality register (SQRTPA). The following complications were analyzed: bleedings, wound infections, and paresis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). Risk factors for these complications were examined by univariable and multivariable logistic regression.ResultsA total of 9677 patients were included, 3871 (40%) underwent surgery to exclude malignancy and 5806 (60%) due to compression symptoms. In the multivariable analysis, the totally excised thyroid weight was an independent risk factor for bleeding. Permanent (6-12 months after the operation) RLN paresis were less common in the excluding malignancy group (p = 0.03).ConclusionA range of factors interfere and contribute to bleeding, wound infections, and RLN paresis after hemithyroidectomy. In this observational study based on a Scandinavian quality register, the indication "excluding malignancy" for hemithyroidectomy is associated with less permanent RLN paresis than the indication "compression symptoms." Thus, patients undergoing diagnostic hemithyroidectomy can be reassured that this procedure is a safe surgical procedure and does not entail an unjustified risk.

  • 32.
    Bendrik, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blystad, Ida
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Milovanovic, Micha
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Pedagogiskt utvecklingsarbete för implementation av visualiseringsbordet på Hälsouniversitetet (HU), Linköping och Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborg.2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Bhattacharya, Pradyot
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Molecular Medicine and Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ellegård, Rada
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    Khalid, Mohammad
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Molecular Medicine and Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svanberg, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Molecular Medicine and Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Govender, Melissa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Molecular Medicine and Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Keita, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Söderholm, Johan D.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Shankar, Esaki M.
    Univ Malaya, Malaysia; Cent Univ Tamil Nadu, India.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Molecular Medicine and Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Molecular Medicine and Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Complement opsonization of HIV affects primary infection of human colorectal mucosa and subsequent activation of T cells2020In: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084X, Vol. 9, article id e57869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    HIV transmission via genital and colorectal mucosa are the most common routes of dissemination. Here, we explored the effects of free and complement-opsonized HIV on colorectal tissue. Initially, there was higher antiviral responses in the free HIV compared to complementopsonized virus. The mucosal transcriptional response at 24 hr revealed the involvement of activated T cells, which was mirrored in cellular responses observed at 96 hr in isolated mucosal T cells. Further, HIV exposure led to skewing of T cell phenotypes predominantly to inflammatory CD4+ T cells, that is Th17 and Th1Th17 subsets. Of note, HIV exposure created an environment that altered the CD8+ T cell phenotype, for example expression of regulatory factors, especially when the virions were opsonized with complement factors. Our findings suggest that HIV-opsonization alters the activation and signaling pathways in the colorectal mucosa, which promotes viral establishment by creating an environment that stimulates mucosal T cell activation and inflammatory Th cells.

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  • 34.
    Biskou, Olga
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Meira de Faria, Felipe
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Tinnerfelt Winberg, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Haapaniemi, Staffan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Keita, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Increased Numbers of Enteric Glial Cells in the Peyers Patches and Enhanced Intestinal Permeability by Glial Cell Mediators in Patients with Ileal Crohns Disease2022In: Cells, E-ISSN 2073-4409, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enteric glial cells (EGC) are known to regulate gastrointestinal functions; however, their role in Crohns disease (CD) is elusive. Microscopic erosions over the ileal Peyers patches are early signs of CD. The aim of this work was to assess the localization of EGC in the follicle and interfollicular region of the Peyers patches and in the lamina propria and study the effects of EGC mediators on barrier function in CD patients and non-inflammatory bowel disease (non-IBD) controls. EGC markers, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and S100 calcium-binding protein β (S100β) were quantified by immunofluorescence and Western blotting. Both markers showed significantly more EGC in the Peyers patches and lamina propria of CD patients compared to the non-IBD controls. In CD patients there were significantly more EGC in Peyers patches compared to lamina propria, while the opposite pattern was seen in controls. Barrier function studies using Ussing chambers showed increased paracellular permeability by EGC mediators in CD patients, whereas permeability decreased by the mediators in controls. We show the accumulation of EGC in Peyers patches of CD patients. Moreover, EGC mediators induced barrier dysfunction in CD patients. Thus, EGC might have harmful impacts on ongoing inflammation and contribute to the pathophysiology of the disease.

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  • 35.
    Björk, Dennis
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Bartholomä, Wolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Edholm, David
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lundgren, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Malignancy in elective cholecystectomy due to gallbladder polyps or thickened gallbladder wall: a single-centre experience2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 458-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Gallbladder cancer is a rare but aggressive malignancy. Surgical resection is recommended for gallbladder polyps &gt;= 10 mm. For gallbladder wall thickening, resection is recommended if malignancy cannot be excluded. The incidence of gallbladder malignancy after cholecystectomy with indications of polyps or wall thickening in the Swedish population is not known. Material/methods A retrospective study was performed at Linkoping University Hospital and included patients who underwent cholecystectomy 2010 - 2018. All cholecystectomies performed due to gallbladder polyps or gallbladder wall thickening without other preoperative malignant signs were identified. Preoperative radiological examinations were re-analysed by a single radiologist. Medical records and histopathology reports were analysed. Results In all, 102 patients were included, of whom 65 were diagnosed with gallbladder polyps and 37 with gallbladder wall thickening. In each group, one patient (1.5% and 2.7% in each group) had gallbladder malignancy &gt;= pT1b.Two (3.1%) and three (8.1%) patients with gallbladder malignancy &lt; T1b were identified in each group. Discussion/conclusion This study indicates that the incidence of malignancy is low without other malignant signs beyond gallbladder polyps and/or gallbladder wall thickening. We propose that these patients should be discussed at a multidisciplinary tumour board. If the polyp is 10-15 mm or if the gallbladder wall is thickened but no other malignant signs are observed, cholecystectomy can be safely performed by an experienced general surgeon at a general surgery unit. If the histopathology indicates &gt;= pT1b, the patient should be referred immediately to a hepatobiliary centre for liver and lymph node resection.

  • 36.
    Björk, Dennis
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Delle, Martin
    Karolinska Univ Sjukhuset, Sweden; Karolinska Univ, Sweden.
    Holmquist, Fredrik
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindell, Gert
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Sparrelid, Ernesto
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Portal vein embolization with N-butyl-cyanoacrylate improves liver hypertrophy compared to microparticles - A Swedish multicenter cohort study2023In: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 9, no 11, article id e21210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An adequate future liver remnant (FLR) is fundamental for major liver resections. To achieve sufficient FLR, portal vein embolization (PVE) may be used. The most effective material for PVE has yet to be determined. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in FLR growth between n-butyl-cyanoacrylate glue (NBCA) and microparticles.Material/methodsa: retrospective study was performed at three Swedish hepatobiliary centers and included patients who underwent PVE 2013-2021. Electronic medical records were reviewed, and procedure-related data were collected. Data were analyzed with respect to embolizing material.Results: A total of 265 patients were included: 160 in the NBCA group and 105 in the microparticle group. The NBCA group had a higher degree of hypertrophy (12.1 vs. 9.4 % points, p = 0.003) and a higher resection rate (68 vs. 59 %, p = 0.01) than the microparticle group. Procedurerelated data all indicated the superiority of NBCA. No difference in inducing hypertrophy was observed when comparing patients who received chemotherapy before PVE with those who received chemotherapy before and after PVE within the NBCA group. Discussion/conclusion: This retrospective multicenter study supports the superiority of NBCA compared to microparticles in the setting of PVE. Chemotherapy after PVE does not seem to negatively affect hypertrophy.

  • 37.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Bojmar, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Nitrite, a novel method to decrease ischemia/reperfusion injury in the rat liver2015In: World Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 1007-9327, E-ISSN 2219-2840, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 1775-1783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate whether nitrite administered prior to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) reduces liver injury.

    METHODS: Thirty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to 3 groups, including sham operated (n = 8), 45-min segmental ischemia of the left liver lobe (IR, n = 14) and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) preceded by the administration of 480 nmol of nitrite (n = 14). Serum transaminases were measured after 4 h of reperfusion. Liver microdialysate (MD) was sampled in 30-min intervals and analyzed for glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glycerol as well as the total nitrite and nitrate (NOx). The NOx was measured in serum.

    RESULTS: Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) at the end of reperfusion was higher in the IR group than in the nitrite group (40 ± 6.8 μkat/L vs 22 ± 2.6 μkat/L, P = 0.022). Similarly, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was also higher in the I/R group than in the nitrite group (34 ± 6 μkat vs 14 ± 1.5 μkat, P = 0.0045). The NOx in MD was significantly higher in the nitrite group than in the I/R group (10.1 ± 2.9 μM vs 3.2 ± 0.9 μM, P = 0.031) after the administration of nitrite. During ischemia, the levels decreased in both groups and then increased again during reperfusion. At the end of reperfusion, there was a tendency towards a higher NOx in the I/R group than in the nitrite group (11.6 ± 0.7 μM vs 9.2 ± 1.1 μM, P = 0.067). Lactate in MD was significantly higher in the IR group than in the nitrite group (3.37 ± 0.18 mM vs 2.8 ± 0.12 mM, P = 0.01) during ischemia and the first 30 min of reperfusion. During the same period, glycerol was also higher in the IRI group than in the nitrite group (464 ± 38 μM vs 367 ± 31 μM, P = 0.049). With respect to histology, there were more signs of tissue damage in the I/R group than in the nitrite group, and 29% of the animals in the I/R group exhibited necrosis compared with none in the nitrite group. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) transcription increased between early ischemia (t = 15) and the end of reperfusion in both groups.

    CONCLUSION: Nitrite administered before liver ischemia in the rat liver reduces anaerobic metabolism and cell necrosis, which could be important in the clinical setting.

  • 38.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Borrebaeck, Carl
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Elander, Nils
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Gawel, Danuta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jornsten, Rebecka
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Jung Lee, Eun Jung
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Li, Xinxiu
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health.
    Lilja, Sandra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health.
    Martinez, David
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Matussek, Andreas
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Dept Lab Med, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Schäfer, Samuel
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health.
    Stenmarker, Margaretha
    Futurum Acad Hlth and Care, Sweden; Inst Clin Sci, Sweden.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Sysoev, Oleg
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, The Division of Statistics and Machine Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zhang, Huan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health.
    Digital twins to personalize medicine2020In: Genome Medicine, ISSN 1756-994X, E-ISSN 1756-994X, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Personalized medicine requires the integration and processing of vast amounts of data. Here, we propose a solution to this challenge that is based on constructing Digital Twins. These are high-resolution models of individual patients that are computationally treated with thousands of drugs to find the drug that is optimal for the patient.

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  • 39.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Rosok, Bard
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Larsen, Peter Noergaard
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Urdzik, Jozef
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Schultz, Nicolai A.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Carling, Ulrik
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Fallentin, Eva
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Gilg, Stefan
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindell, Gert
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Sparrelid, Ernesto
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Segment 4 occlusion in portal vein embolization increase future liver remnant hypertrophy - A Scandinavian cohort study2020In: International Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1743-9191, E-ISSN 1743-9159, Vol. 75, p. 60-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The additional value of including segment 4 (S4) portal branches in right portal vein embolization (rPVE) is debated. The aim of the study was to explore this in a large multicenter cohort. Material and methods: A retrospective cohort study consisting of all patients subjected to rPVE from August 2012 to May 2017 at six Scandinavian university hospitals. PVE technique was essentially the same in all centers, except for the selection of main embolizing agent (particles or glue). All centers used coils or particles to embolize S4 branches. A subgroup analysis was performed after excluding patients with parts of or whole S4 included in the future liver remnant (FLR). Results: 232 patients were included in the study, of which 36 received embolization of the portal branches to S4 in addition to rPVE. The two groups (rPVE vs rPVE + S4) were similar (gender, age, co-morbidity, diagnosis, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bilirubin levels prior to PVE and embolizing material), except for diabetes mellitus which was more frequent in the rPVE + S4 group (p = 0.02). Pre-PVE FLR was smaller in the S4 group (333 vs 380 ml, p = 0.01). rPVE + S4 resulted in a greater percentage increase of the FLR size compared to rPVE alone (47 vs 38%, p = 0.02). A subgroup analysis, excluding all patients with S4 included in the FLR, was done. There was no longer a difference in pre-PVE FLR between groups (333 vs 325 ml, p = 0.9), but still a greater percentage increase and also absolute increase of the FLR in the rPVE + S4 group (48 vs 38% and 155 vs 112 ml, p = 0.01 and 0.02). Conclusion: In this large multicenter cohort study, additional embolization of S4 did demonstrate superior growth of the FLR compared to standard right PVE.

  • 40.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kullman, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Early endoscopic treatment of blunt traumatic pancreatic injury2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 1435-1443Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is a rare and challenging situation. In many cases, there are other associated injuries that mandate urgent operative treatment. Morbidity and mortality rates are high and complications after acute pancreatic resections are common. The diagnosis of pancreatic injuries can be difficult and often requires multimodal approach including Computed Tomography scans, Magnetic resonance imaging and Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP). The objective of this paper is to review the application of endoprothesis in the settings of pancreatic injury. A review of the English literature available was conducted and the experience of our centre described. While the classical recommended treatment of Grade III pancreatic injury (transection of the gland and the pancreatic duct in the body/tail) is surgical resection this approach carries high morbidity. ERCP was first reported as a diagnostic tool in the settings of pancreatic injury but has in recent years been used increasingly as a treatment option with promising results. This article reviews the literature on ERCP as treatment option for pancreatic injury and adds further to the limited number of cases reported that have been treated early after the trauma.

  • 41.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hjalmarsson, C.
    Blekinge Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Author response to: Comment on: Comparison of the duration of hospital stay after laparoscopic or open distal pancreatectomy: randomized controlled trial2020In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 107, no 8, p. e279-e279Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 42.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hjalmarsson, C.
    Blekinge Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Author response to: Comment on: TheLAPOPtrial of laparoscopic or open distal pancreatectomy2020In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 107, no 9, p. e356-e356Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 43.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hjalmarsson, C.
    Blekinge Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Comparison of the duration of hospital stay after laparoscopic or open distal pancreatectomy: randomized controlled trial2020In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 107, no 10, p. 1281-1288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Studies have suggested that laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP) is advantageous compared with open distal pancreatectomy (ODP) regarding hospital stay, blood loss and recovery. Only one randomized study is available, which showed enhanced functional recovery after LDP compared with ODP. Methods Consecutive patients evaluated at a multidisciplinary tumour board and planned for standard distal pancreatectomy were randomized prospectively to LDP or ODP in an unblinded, parallel-group, single-centre superiority trial. The primary outcome was postoperative hospital stay. Results Of 105 screened patients, 60 were randomized and 58 (24 women, 41 per cent) were included in the intention-to-treat analysis; there were 29 patients of mean age 68 years in the LDP group and 29 of mean age 63 years in the ODP group. The main indication was cystic pancreatic lesions, followed by neuroendocrine tumours. The median postoperative hospital stay was 5 (i.q.r. 4-5) days in the laparoscopic group versus 6 (5-7) days in the open group (P = 0 center dot 002). Functional recovery was attained after a median of 4 (i.q.r. 2-6) versus 6 (4-7) days respectively (P = 0 center dot 007), and duration of surgery was 120 min in both groups (P = 0 center dot 482). Blood loss was less with laparoscopic surgery: median 50 (i.q.r. 25-150) ml versus 100 (100-300) ml in the open group (P = 0 center dot 018). No difference was found in the complication rates (Clavien-Dindo grade III or above: 4 versus 8 patients respectively). The rate of delayed gastric emptying and clinically relevant postoperative pancreatic fistula did not differ between the groups. Conclusion LDP is associated with shorter hospital stay than ODP, with shorter time to functional recovery and less bleeding. Registration number: ISRCTN26912858 ( ).

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  • 44.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lundgren, L
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    A Personal Computer Freeware as a Tool for Surgeons to Plan Liver Resections.2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1457-4969, E-ISSN 1799-7267, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 153-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The increase in liver surgery and the proportion of resections done on the margin to postoperative liver failure make preoperative calculations regarding liver volume important. Earlier studies have shown good correlation between calculations done with ImageJ and specimen weight as well as volume calculations done with more robust systems. The correlation to actual volumes of resected liver tissue has not been investigated, and this was the aim of this study.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 30 patients undergoing well-defined liver resections were included in this study. Volumes calculated with ImageJ were compared to volume measurements done after the retrieval of resected liver tissue.

    RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: A strong correlation between calculated and measured liver volume was found with sample concordance correlation coefficient (ρc) = 0.9950. The knowledge on the nature of liver resections sets liver surgeons in a unique position to be able to accurately predict the volumes to be resected and, therefore, also the volume that will remain after surgery. This becomes increasingly important with the evolvement of methods to extend the boundaries of liver surgery. ImageJ is a reliable tool to preoperatively assess liver volume.

  • 45.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Detailed reporting is of utmost importance when a controversial treatment is being evaluated2019In: HPB, ISSN 1365-182X, E-ISSN 1477-2574, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 1250-1250Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 46.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Increasing evidence for minimally invasive approach to distal pancreatectomy2019In: Laparoscopic Surgery, E-ISSN 2616-4221, Vol. 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hjalmarsson, Claes
    Blekinge Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Laparoscopic versus open distal pancreatectomy (LAPOP): study protocol for a single center, nonblinded, randomized controlled trial2019In: Trials, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 20, article id 356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundEarlier nonrandomized studies have suggested that laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP) is advantageous compared with open distal pancreatectomy (ODP) regarding hospital stay, blood loss, and recovery. Only one randomized study has been conducted showing reduced time to functional recovery after LDP compared with ODP.MethodsLAPOP is a prospective randomized, nonblinded, parallel-group, single-center superiority trial. Sixty patients with lesions in the pancreatic body or tail that are found by a multidisciplinary tumor board to need surgical resection will be randomized to receive LDP or ODP. The primary outcome variable is postoperative hospital stay, and secondary outcomes include functional recovery (defined as no need for intravenous medications or fluids and as the ability of an ambulatory patient to perform activities of daily life), perioperative bleeding, complications, need for pain medication, and quality of life comparison.DiscussionThe LAPOP trial will test the hypothesis that LDP reduces postoperative hospital stay compared with ODP.Trial registrationISRCTN, 26912858. Registered on 28 September 2015.

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  • 48.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sparrelid, E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Isaksson, B.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Associating Liver Partition and Portal Vein Ligation for Primary Hepatobiliary Malignancies and Non-Colorectal Liver Metastases2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1457-4969, E-ISSN 1799-7267, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 158-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy may increase the possibility of radical resection in the case of liver malignancy. Concerns have been raised about the high morbidity and mortality associated with the procedure, particularly when applied for diagnoses other than colorectal liver metastases. The aim of this study was to analyze the initial experience with associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy in cases of non-colorectal liver metastases and primary hepatobiliary malignancies in Scandinavia. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of all associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy procedures performed at two Swedish university hospitals for non-colorectal liver metastases and primary hepatobiliary malignancies was performed. The primary focus was on the safety of the procedure. Results and Conclusion: Ten patients were included: four had hepatocellular cancer, three had intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, one had a Klatskin tumor, one had ocular melanoma metastasis, and one had a metastasis from a Wilms tumor. All patients completed both operations, and the highest grade of complication (according to the Clavien-Dindo classification) was 3A, which was observed in one patient. No 90-day mortality was observed. Radical resection (R0) was achieved in nine patients, while the resection was R2 in one patient. The low morbidity and mortality observed in this cohort compared with those of earlier reports on associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy for diagnoses other than colorectal liver metastases may be related to the selection of patients with limited comorbidity. In addition, procedures other than associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy had been avoided in most of the patients. In conclusion, associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy can be applied to primary hepatobiliary malignancies and non-colorectal liver metastases with acceptable rates of morbidity and mortality.

  • 49.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sparrelid, E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Rosok, B.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Pomianowska, E.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Bjornbeth, B. A.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Isaksson, B.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy in patients with colorectal liver metastases - Intermediate oncological results2016In: European Journal of Surgical Oncology, ISSN 0748-7983, E-ISSN 1532-2157, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 531-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) not amenable for resection have grave prognosis. One limiting factor for surgery is a small future liver remnant (FLR). Early data suggests that associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) effectively increases the volume of the FLR allowing for resection in a larger fraction of patients than conventional two-stage hepatectomy (TSH) with portal vein occlusion (PVO). Oncological results of the treatment are lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the intermediate oncological outcomes after ALPPS in patients with CRLM. Material and methods: Retrospective analysis of all patients with CRLM operated with ALPPS at the participating centres between December 2012 and May 2014. Results: Twenty-three patients (16 male, 7 female), age 67 years (28-80) were operated for 6.5 (1-38) metastases of which the largest was 40 nun (14-130). Six (27.3%) patients had extra-hepatic metastases, 16 (72.7%) synchronous presentation. All patients received chemotherapy, 6 cycles (3-25) preoperatively and 16 (70%) postoperatively. Ten patients (43%) were rescue ALPPS after failed PVO. Severe complications occurred in 13.6% and one (4.5%) patient died within 90 days of surgery. After a median follow-up of 22.5 months from surgery and 33.5 months from diagnosis of liver metastases estimated 2 year overall survival was 59% (from surgery) and 73% (from diagnosis). Liver only recurrences (n = 8), were treated with reresection/ablation (n = 7) while lung recurrences were treated with chemotherapy. Conclusion: The overall survival, rate of severe complications and perioperative mortality associated with ALPPS for patients with CRLM is comparable to TSH. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 50.
    Blomquist, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Wennerholm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Motivation and Life Circumstances Affecting Living Habits Prior to Gastrointestinal Cancer Surgery- An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis2023In: Inquiry, ISSN 0046-9580, E-ISSN 1945-7243, Vol. 60, article id 00469580231170544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to explore the patients experiences to get insights into their living habits prior to gastrointestinal cancer surgery. An interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) approach was used. Six in-depth interviews with participants recruited from a hospital in southeast Sweden. The IPA analysis identified 3 themes: The influence of the cancer diagnosis on awareness and motivation, Life circumstances affecting living habits, and Activities bringing mental strength. The participants expressed their motivation level and circumstances in life. Various types of activities and support promoted physical and mental health. Motivation level and circumstances in life both influence living habits. Various kinds of activities and support promote patients physical and mental health. Nurses need to investigate patients experiences when developing person-centered support to achieve health-promoting behavior prior to cancer surgery.

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