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  • 1.
    Abdalla, Maie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Landerholm, Kalle
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Andersson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Risk of Rectal Cancer After Colectomy for Patients With Ulcerative Colitis: A National Cohort Study2017In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 1055-1060, article id e2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND amp; AIMS: Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have an increased risk of rectal cancer, therefore reconstruction with an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) generally is preferred to an ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) after subtotal colectomy. Similarly, completion proctectomy is recommended for patients with ileostomy and a diverted rectum, although this approach has been questioned because anti-inflammatory agents might reduce cancer risk. We performed a national cohort study in Sweden to assess the risk of rectal cancer in patients with UC who have an IRA, IPAA, or diverted rectum after subtotal colectomy.

    METHODS: We collected data from the Swedish National Patient Register for a cohort of 5886 patients with UC who underwent subtotal colectomy with an IRA, IPAA, or diverted rectum from 1964 through 2010. Patients who developed rectal cancer were identified from the Swedish National Cancer Register. The risk of rectal cancer was compared between this cohort and the general population by standardized incidence ratio analysis.

    RESULTS: Rectal cancer occurred in 20 of 1112 patients (1.8%) who received IRA, 1 of 1796 patients (0.06%) who received an IPAA, and 25 of 4358 patients (0.6%) with a diverted rectum. Standardized incidence ratios for rectal cancer were 8.7 in patients with an IRA, 0.4 in patients with an IPAA, and 3.8 in patients with a diverted rectum. Risk factors for rectal cancer were primary sclerosing cholangitis in patients with an IRA (hazard ratio, 6.12), and colonic severe dysplasia or cancer before subtotal colectomy in patients with a diverted rectum (hazard ratio, 3.67).

    CONCLUSIONS: In an analysis of the Swedish National Patient Register, we found that the risk for rectal cancer after colectomy in patients with UC is low, in relative and absolute terms, after reconstruction with an IPAA. An IRA and diverted rectum are associated with an increased risk of rectal cancer, compared with the general population, but the absolute risk is low. Patients and their health care providers should consider these findings in making decisions to leave the rectum intact, perform completion proctectomy, or reconstruct the colon with an IRA or IPAA.

  • 2.
    Abdalla, Maie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Norblad, Rickard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Olsson, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Landerholm, Kalle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Söderholm D., Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Anorectal Function After Ileo-Rectal Anastomosis Is Better than Pelvic Pouch in Selected Ulcerative Colitis Patients2019In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: With a lifelong perspective, 12% of ulcerative colitis patients will need a colectomy. Further reconstruction via ileo-rectal anastomosis or pouch can be affected by patients' perspective of their quality of life after surgery.

    AIM: To assess the function and quality of life after restorative procedures with either ileo-rectal anastomosis or ileal pouch-anal anastomosis in relation to the inflammatory activity on endoscopy and in biopsies.

    METHOD: A total of 143 UC patients operated with subtotal colectomy and ileo-rectal anastomosis or pouches between 1992 and 2006 at Linköping University Hospital were invited to participate. Those who completed the validated questionnaires (Öresland score, SF-36, Short Health Scale) were offered an endoscopic evaluation including multiple biopsies. Associations between anorectal function and quality of life with type of restorative procedure and severity of endoscopic and histopathologic grading of inflammation were evaluated.

    RESULTS: Some 77 (53.9%) eligible patients completed questionnaires, of these 68 (88.3%) underwent endoscopic evaluation after a median follow-up of 12.5 (range 3.5-19.4) years after restorative procedure. Patients with ileo-rectal anastomosis reported better overall Öresland score: median = 3 (IQR 2-5) for ileo-rectal anastomosis (n = 38) and 10 (IQR 5-15) for pouch patients (n = 39) (p < 0.001). Anorectal function (Öresland score) and endoscopic findings (Baron-Ginsberg score) were positively correlated in pouch patients (tau: 0.28, p = 0.006).

    CONCLUSION: Patients operated with ileo-rectal anastomosis reported better continence compared to pouches. Minor differences were noted regarding the quality of life. Ileo-rectal anastomosis is a valid option for properly selected ulcerative colitis patients if strict postoperative endoscopic surveillance is carried out.

  • 3.
    Ahlberg, Eva-Lena
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development.
    Elfström, Johan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development.
    Borgstedt Risberg, Madeleine
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development.
    Öhrn, Annica
    Region Östergötland, Regional Board.
    Andersson, Christer
    Region Östergötland, Regional Board.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Learning From Incident Reporting?: Analysis of Incidents Resulting in Patient Injuries in a Web-Based System in Swedish Health Care2017In: Journal of patient safety, ISSN 1549-8417, E-ISSN 1549-8425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Incident reporting (IR) systems have the potential to improve patient safety if they enable learningfrom the reported risks and incidents. The aim of this study was to investigate incidents registered in an IR system in a Swedish county council.

    Methods The study was conducted in the County Council of Östergötland, Sweden. Data were retrieved from the IR system, which included 4755 incidents occurring in somatic care that resulted in patient injuries from 2004 to 2012. One hundred correctly classified patient injuries were randomly sampled from 3 injury severity levels: injuries leading to deaths, permanent harm, and temporary harm. Three aspects were analyzed: handling of the incident, causes of the incident, and actions taken to prevent its recurrence.

    Results Of the 300 injuries, 79% were handled in the departments where they occurred. The department head decided what actions should be taken to prevent recurrence in response to 95% of the injuries. A total of 448 causes were identified for the injuries; problems associated with procedures, routines, and guidelines were most common. Decisions taken for 80% of the injuries could be classified using the IR system documentation and root cause analysis. The most commonly pursued type of action was change of work routine or guideline.

    Conclusions The handling, causes, and actions taken to prevent recurrence were similar for injuries of different severity levels. Various forms of feedback (information, education, and dialogue) were an integral aspect of the IR system. However, this feedback was primarily intradepartmental and did not yield much organizational learning.

  • 4.
    Ahle, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Drott, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Elfvin, Anders
    Department of Pediatrics, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Roland E.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Maternal, fetal and perinatal factors associated with necrotizing enterocolitis in Sweden: A national case-control study2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e0194352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To analyze associations of maternal, fetal, gestational, and perinatal factors with necrotizing enterocolitis in a matched case-control study based on routinely collected, nationwide register data.

    Study design

    All infants born in 1987 through 2009 with a diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis in any of the Swedish national health care registers were identified. For each case up to 6 controls, matched for birth year and gestational age, were selected. The resulting study population consisted of 720 cases and 3,567 controls. Information on socioeconomic data about the mother, maternal morbidity, pregnancy related diagnoses, perinatal diagnoses of the infant, and procedures in the perinatal period, was obtained for all cases and controls and analyzed with univariable and multivariable logistic regressions for the whole study population as well as for subgroups according to gestational age.

    Results

    In the study population as a whole, we found independent positive associations with necrotizing enterocolitis for isoimmunization, fetal distress, cesarean section, neonatal bacterial infection including sepsis, erythrocyte transfusion, persistent ductus arteriosus, cardiac malformation, gastrointestinal malformation, and chromosomal abnormality. Negative associations were found for maternal weight, preeclampsia, maternal urinary infection, premature rupture of the membranes, and birthweight. Different patterns of associations were seen in the subgroups of different gestational age.

    Conclusion

    With some interesting exceptions, especially in negative associations, the results of this large, population based study, are in keeping with earlier studies. Although restrained by the limitations of register data, the findings mirror conceivable pathophysiological processes and underline that NEC is a multifactorial disease.

  • 5.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindblom, Gunnar
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Skoog, Susann
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    PET/CT versus conventional CT for detection of lymph node metastases in patients with locally advanced bladder cancer.2015In: BMC urology, ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 87-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: We studied patients treated with radical cystectomy for locally advanced bladder cancer to compare the results of both preoperative positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and conventional CT with the findings of postoperative histopathological evaluation of lymph nodes.

    METHODS: Patients who had bladder cancer and were candidates for cystectomy underwent preoperative PET/CT using 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and conventional CT. The results regarding lymph node involvement were independently evaluated by two experienced radiologists and were subsequently compared with histopathology results, the latter of which were reassessed by an experienced uropathologist (HO).

    RESULTS: There were 54 evaluable patients (mean age 68 years, 47 [85 %] males and 7 [15 %] females) with pT and pN status as follows: < pT2-14 (26 %), pT2-10 (18 %), and > pT2-30 (56 %); pN0 37 (69 %) and pN+ 17 (31 %). PET/CT showed positive lymph nodes in 12 patients (22 %), and 7 of those cases were confirmed by histopathology; the corresponding results for conventional CT were 11 (20 %) and 7 patients (13 %), respectively. PET/CT had 41 % sensitivity, 86 % specificity, 58 % PPV, and 76 % NPV, whereas the corresponding figures for conventional CT were 41 %, 89 %, 64 %, and 77 %. Additional analyses of the right and left side of the body or in specified anatomical regions gave similar results.

    CONCLUSIONS: In this study, PET/CT and conventional CT had similar low sensitivity in detecting and localizing regional lymph node metastasis in bladder cancer.

  • 6.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    M2-macrophage infiltration and macrophage traits of tumor cells in urinary bladder cancer2018In: Urologic Oncology, ISSN 1078-1439, E-ISSN 1873-2496, Vol. 36, no 4, article id 159.e19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) constitute a subset of nonneoplastic cells in tumor stroma and influence cancer progression in solid tumors. The clinical significance of TAMs in urinary bladder cancer(UBC) is controversial.

    Methods

    We prospectively studied 103 patients with stage pT1–T4 UBC treated with cystectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Tumor sections were immunostained with M2-specific macrophage marker CD163 and proliferation marker Ki-67. The expression of these markers in cancer cells as well as macrophage infiltration (MI) in tumor stroma was analyzed in relation to clinical data and outcome.

    Results

    The mean rate of CD163 and Ki-67 expressed by cancer cells were 35% and 78%, respectively. With borderline significance, MI was associated with lower rate of lymph node metastasis (P = 0.06). CD163 expression in cancer cells was proportional to MI (P<0.014). Patients with CD163-positive tumors and strong MI had significantly longer cancer-specific survival (CSS) (76 months), compared to patient with CD163-positive tumors and weak MI (28 months) (P = 0.02).

    Conclusions

    M2-specific MI tends to be inversely correlated with LN metastasis and improved CSS in UBC. MI might have protective impact in CD163-positive tumors. Expression of CD163 in cancer cells is significantly correlated with MI and might have a tumor promoting impact.

  • 7.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    The expression profile of p14, p53 and p21 in tumour cells is associated with disease-specific survival and the outcome of postoperative chemotherapy treatment in muscle-invasive bladder cancer2018In: Urologic Oncology, ISSN 1078-1439, E-ISSN 1873-2496, Vol. 36, no 12, p. 530.e7-530.e18, article id 530.e7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: We investigated the effects of alterations in the biological markers p14, p53, p21, and p16 in relation to tumour cell proliferation, T-category, N- category, lymphovascular invasion, and the ability to predict prognosis in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) treated with cystectomy and, if applicable, chemotherapy.

    Materials and methods: We prospectively studied patients with urinary bladder cancer pathological stage pT1 to pT4 treated with cystectomy, pelvic lymph node dissection and postoperative chemotherapy. Tissue microarrays from paraffin-embedded cystectomy tumour samples were examined for expression of immunostaining of p14, p53, p21, p16 and Ki-67 in relation to other clinical and pathological factors as well as cancer-specific survival.

    Results: The median age of the 110 patients was 70 years (range 51-87 years), and 85 (77%) were male. Pathological staging was pT1 to pT2 (organ-confined) in 28 (25%) patients and pT3 to pT4 (non-organ-confined) in 82 (75%) patients. Lymph node metastases were found in 47 patients (43%). P14 expression was more common in tumours with higher T-stages (P = 0.05). The expression of p14 in p53 negative tumours was associated with a significantly shorter survival time (P=0.003). Independently of p53 expression, p14 expression was associated with an impaired response to chemotherapy (P=0.001). The expression of p21 in p53 negative tumours was associated with significantly decrease levels of tumour cell proliferation detected as Ki-67 expression (P=0.03).

    Conclusions: The simultaneous expression of the senescence markers involved in the p53-pathway shows a more relevant correlation to the pathological outcome of MIBC than each protein separately. P14 expression in tumours with non-altered (p53-) tumours is associated with poor prognosis. P14 expression is associated with impaired response to chemotherapy. P21 expression is related to decreased tumour cell proliferation.

  • 8.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Endocrine and Sarcoma Surgery Unit, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna Stockholm, Sweden .
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Radio-guided sentinel lymph node detection and lymph node mapping in invasive urinary bladder cancer: a prospective clinical study.2017In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 120, no 3, p. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the possibility of detecting sentinel lymph nodes (SNs) in patients with urinary bladder cancer (BCa) intra-operatively and whether the histopathological status of the identified SNs reflected that of the lymphatic field.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied 103 patients with BCa pathological stage T1-T4 who were treated with cystectomy and pelvic lymph node (LN) dissection during 2005-2011 at the Department of Urology, Linköping University Hospital. Radioactive tracer Nanocoll 70 MBq and blue dye were injected into the bladder wall around the primary tumour before surgery. SNs were detected ex vivo during the operation with a handheld Geiger probe (Gamma Detection System; Neoprobe Corp., Dublin, OH, USA). All LNs were formalin-fixed, sectioned three times, mounted on slides and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. An experienced uropathologist evaluated the slides.

    RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 69 years, and 80 (77%) were male. Pathological staging was T1-12 (12%), T2-20 (19%), T3-48 (47%) and T4-23 (22%). A mean (range) number of 31 (7-68) nodes per patient were examined, totalling 3 253 nodes. LN metastases were found in 41 patients (40%). SNs were detected in 83 of the 103 patients (80%). Sensitivity and specificity for detecting metastatic disease by SN biopsy (SNB) varied between LN stations, with average values of 67% and 90%, respectively. LN metastatic density (LNMD) had a significant prognostic impact; a value of ≥8% was significantly related to shorter survival. Lymphovascular invasion (LVI) occurred in 65% of patients (n = 67) and was significantly associated with shorter cancer-specific survival (P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: We conclude that SNB is not a reliable technique for peri-operative localization of LN metastases during cystectomy for BCa; however, LNMD has a significant prognostic value in BCa and may be useful in the clinical context and in BCa oncological and surgical research. LVI was also found to be a prognostic factor.

  • 9.
    Almby, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Edholm, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Anastomotic Strictures After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass: a Cohort Study from the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry2019In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 172-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundRoux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the most common bariatric procedure worldwide. Anastomotic stricture is a known complication of RYGB. The aim was to explore the incidence and outcomes of strictures within the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry (SOReg).MethodSOReg included prospective data from 36,362 patients undergoing bariatric surgery in the years 2007-2013. Outcomes were recorded at 30-day and at 1-year follow-up according to the standard SOReg routine. The medical charts of patients suffering from stricture after RYGB were requested and assessed.SettingNational bariatric surgery registryResultsAnastomotic stricture within 1year of surgery was confirmed in 101 patients representing an incidence of 0.3%. Risk factors for stricture were patient age above 60years (odds ratio (OR), 6.2 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.7-14.3), circular stapled gastrojejunostomy (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.4-5.5), postoperative anastomotic leak (OR 8.9 95%, CI 4.7-17.0), and marginal ulcer (OR 30.0, 95% CI 19.2-47.0). Seventy-five percent of the strictures were diagnosed within 70days of surgery. Two dilatations or less was sufficient to successfully treat 50% of patients. Ten pecent of patients developed perforation during dilatation, and the risk of perforating at each dilatation was 3.8%. Perforation required surgery in six cases but there was no mortality. Strictures in SOReg may be underreported, which could explain the low incidence in the study.ConclusionMost strictures present within 2months and are successfully treated with two dilatations or less. Dilating a strictured gastrojejunostomy entails a risk of perforation (3.8%).

  • 10.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Muhrbeck, Måns
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Veen, Harald
    Int Comm Red Cross, Switzerland.
    Osman, Zaher
    Int Comm Red Cross, Switzerland.
    von Schreeb, Johan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hospital Workload for Weapon-Wounded Females Treated by the International Committee of the Red Cross: More Work Needed than for Males2018In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 93-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Civilians constitute 33-51% of victims in armed conflicts. Several reports on civilian injuries exist, but few have focused on injuries afflicting females. We analyzed routinely collected data on weapon-related injuries from the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) hospital in northwestern Pakistan in order to define injury patterns and types of surgical treatment for females. A total of 3028 patient files (376 females) from consecutively admitted patients to the ICRC-hospital in Peshawar from February 2009 to May 2012 were included. Information regarding injury-mechanism, time since injury, vital parameters at admission, type of injury, treatment and basic outcome was extracted from the files and analyzed. Comparisons between gender and age-groups were done by cross-table analyses or nonparametric tests. Females were younger than males (20 vs. 25 years), arrived sooner after injury (24 vs. 48 h) (p amp;lt; 0.001 for both) and were victims of bombs and missiles more frequently (64.4 vs. 54.6%) (p amp;lt; 0.001). Vital parameters such as systolic blood pressure (110 vs. 113 mmHg) and pulse rate (100 vs. 86) were more affected at admission (p amp;lt; 0.001 for both). Females were subjected to surgery (83.0 vs. 77.4%) (p amp;lt; 0.05) and were given blood transfusions more often (18.8 vs. 13.6%) (p amp;lt; 0.01). No differences in amputations or in-hospital mortality were found. Females treated at the ICRC-hospital in northwestern Pakistan are markedly affected by indiscriminate weapons such as bombs and missiles. Their average consumption of surgery is greater than for males, and this might be relevant in planning for staffing and facility needs in similar contexts.

  • 11.
    Bahlmann, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Halldestam, Ingvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Goal-directed therapy during transthoracic oesophageal resection does not improve outcome: Randomised controlled trial2019In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 153-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Goal-directed therapy (GDT) is expected to be of highest benefit in high-risk surgery. Therefore, GDT is recommended during oesophageal resection, which carries a high risk of postoperative complications.

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to confirm the hypothesis that GDT during oesophageal resection improves outcome compared with standard care.

    DESIGN: A randomised controlled study.

    SETTING: Two Swedish university hospitals, between October 2011 and October 2015.

    PATIENTS: Sixty-four patients scheduled for elective transthoracic oesophageal resection were randomised. Exclusion criteria included colonic interposition and significant aortic or mitral valve insufficiency.

    INTERVENTION: A three-step GDT protocol included stroke volume optimisation using colloid boluses as assessed by pulse-contour analysis, dobutamine infusion if cardiac index was below 2.5 l min m and norepinephrine infusion if mean arterial blood pressure was below 65 mmHg.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The incidence of complications per patient at 5 and 30 days postoperatively as assessed using a predefined list.

    RESULTS: Fifty-nine patients were available for analysis. Patients in the intervention group received more colloid fluid (2190 ± 875 vs. 1596 ± 759 ml, P < 0.01) and dobutamine more frequently (27/30 vs. 9/29, P < 0.01). The median [interquartile range, IQR] incidence of complications per patient 5 days after surgery was 2 [0 to 3] in the intervention group and 1 [0 to 2] in the control group (P = 0.10), and after 30 days 4 [2 to 6] in the intervention group and 2 [1 to 4] in the control group (P = 0.10).

    CONCLUSION: Goal-directed therapy during oesophageal resection did not result in a reduction of the incidence of postoperative complications.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01416077.

  • 12.
    Bausch, Birke
    et al.
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Schiavi, Francesca
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Ni, Ying
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patocs, Attila
    Semmelweis University, Hungary; Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Ngeow, Joanne
    National Cancer Centre Singapore, Singapore; Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Wellner, Ulrich
    University of Lubeck, Germany.
    Malinoc, Angelica
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Taschin, Elisa
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Barbon, Giovanni
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Lanza, Virginia
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Stenman, Adam
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Larsson, Catharina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Svahn, Fredrika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Chen, Jin-Lian
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Marquard, Jessica
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Fraenkel, Merav
    Hadassah Hebrew University, Israel.
    Walter, Martin A.
    University Hospital, Switzerland.
    Peczkowska, Mariola
    Institute Cardiol, Poland.
    Prejbisz, Aleksander
    Institute Cardiol, Poland.
    Jarzab, Barbara
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre and Institute Oncol, Poland.
    Hasse-Lazar, Kornelia
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre and Institute Oncol, Poland.
    Petersenn, Stephan
    Centre Endocrine Tumors, Germany.
    Moeller, Lars C.
    University of Duisburg Essen, Germany.
    Meyer, Almuth
    HELIOS Klin, Germany.
    Reisch, Nicole
    Ludwigs Maximilians University of Munich, Germany.
    Trupka, Arnold
    City Hospital, Germany.
    Brase, Christoph
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Galiano, Matthias
    University Hospital Erlangen, Germany.
    Preuss, Simon F.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Kwok, Pingling
    University of Regensburg, Germany.
    Lendvai, Nikoletta
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Berisha, Gani
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Makay, Ozer
    Ege University, Turkey.
    Boedeker, Carsten C.
    HELIOS Hanseklinikum Stralsund, Germany.
    Weryha, Georges
    University of Nancy, France.
    Racz, Karoly
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Januszewicz, Andrzej
    Institute Cardiol, Poland.
    Walz, Martin K.
    Kliniken Essen Mitte, Germany; Kliniken Essen Mitte, Germany.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Opocher, Giuseppe
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Eng, Charis
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA; Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Neumann, Hartmut P. H.
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Clinical Characterization of the Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma Susceptibility Genes SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 for Gene-Informed Prevention2017In: JAMA Oncology, ISSN 2374-2437, E-ISSN 2374-2445, Vol. 3, no 9, p. 1204-1212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Effective cancer prevention is based on accurate molecular diagnosis and results of genetic family screening, genotype-informed risk assessment, and tailored strategies for early diagnosis. The expanding etiology for hereditary pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas has recently included SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 as susceptibility genes. Clinical management guidelines for patients with germline mutations in these 4 newly included genes are lacking. OBJECTIVE To study the clinical spectra and age-related penetrance of individuals with mutations in the SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 genes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS This study analyzed the prospective, longitudinally followed up European-American-Asian Pheochromocytoma-Paraganglioma Registry for prevalence of SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 germline mutation carriers from 1993 to 2016. Genetic predictive testing and clinical investigation by imaging from neck to pelvis was offered to mutation-positive registrants and their relatives to clinically characterize the pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma diseases associated with mutations of the 4 new genes. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Prevalence and spectra of germline mutations in the SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 genes were assessed. The clinical features of SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 disease were characterized. RESULTS Of 972 unrelated registrants without mutations in the classic pheochromocytoma- and paraganglioma-associated genes (632 female [65.0%] and 340 male [35.0%]; age range, 8-80; mean [SD] age, 41.0 [13.3] years), 58 (6.0%) carried germline mutations of interest, including 29 SDHA, 20 TMEM127, 8 MAX, and 1 SDHAF2. Fifty-three of 58 patients (91%) had familial, multiple, extra-adrenal, and/or malignant tumors and/or were younger than 40 years. Newly uncovered are 7 of 63 (11%) malignant pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas in SDHA and TMEM127 disease. SDHA disease occurred as early as 8 years of age. Extra-adrenal tumors occurred in 28 mutation carriers (48%) and in 23 of 29 SDHA mutation carriers (79%), particularly with head and neck paraganglioma. MAX disease occurred almost exclusively in the adrenal glands with frequently bilateral tumors. Penetrance in the largest subset, SDHA carriers, was 39% at 40 years of age and is statistically different in index patients (45%) vs mutation-carrying relatives (13%; P amp;lt; .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 genes may contribute to hereditary pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. Genetic testing is recommended in patients at clinically high risk if the classic genes are mutation negative. Gene-specific prevention and/or early detection requires regular, systematic whole-body investigation.

  • 13.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Bojmar, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Nitrite, a novel method to decrease ischemia/reperfusion injury in the rat liver2015In: World Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 1007-9327, E-ISSN 2219-2840, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 1775-1783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate whether nitrite administered prior to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) reduces liver injury.

    METHODS: Thirty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to 3 groups, including sham operated (n = 8), 45-min segmental ischemia of the left liver lobe (IR, n = 14) and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) preceded by the administration of 480 nmol of nitrite (n = 14). Serum transaminases were measured after 4 h of reperfusion. Liver microdialysate (MD) was sampled in 30-min intervals and analyzed for glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glycerol as well as the total nitrite and nitrate (NOx). The NOx was measured in serum.

    RESULTS: Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) at the end of reperfusion was higher in the IR group than in the nitrite group (40 ± 6.8 μkat/L vs 22 ± 2.6 μkat/L, P = 0.022). Similarly, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was also higher in the I/R group than in the nitrite group (34 ± 6 μkat vs 14 ± 1.5 μkat, P = 0.0045). The NOx in MD was significantly higher in the nitrite group than in the I/R group (10.1 ± 2.9 μM vs 3.2 ± 0.9 μM, P = 0.031) after the administration of nitrite. During ischemia, the levels decreased in both groups and then increased again during reperfusion. At the end of reperfusion, there was a tendency towards a higher NOx in the I/R group than in the nitrite group (11.6 ± 0.7 μM vs 9.2 ± 1.1 μM, P = 0.067). Lactate in MD was significantly higher in the IR group than in the nitrite group (3.37 ± 0.18 mM vs 2.8 ± 0.12 mM, P = 0.01) during ischemia and the first 30 min of reperfusion. During the same period, glycerol was also higher in the IRI group than in the nitrite group (464 ± 38 μM vs 367 ± 31 μM, P = 0.049). With respect to histology, there were more signs of tissue damage in the I/R group than in the nitrite group, and 29% of the animals in the I/R group exhibited necrosis compared with none in the nitrite group. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) transcription increased between early ischemia (t = 15) and the end of reperfusion in both groups.

    CONCLUSION: Nitrite administered before liver ischemia in the rat liver reduces anaerobic metabolism and cell necrosis, which could be important in the clinical setting.

  • 14.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kullman, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Early endoscopic treatment of blunt traumatic pancreatic injury2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 1435-1443Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is a rare and challenging situation. In many cases, there are other associated injuries that mandate urgent operative treatment. Morbidity and mortality rates are high and complications after acute pancreatic resections are common. The diagnosis of pancreatic injuries can be difficult and often requires multimodal approach including Computed Tomography scans, Magnetic resonance imaging and Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP). The objective of this paper is to review the application of endoprothesis in the settings of pancreatic injury. A review of the English literature available was conducted and the experience of our centre described. While the classical recommended treatment of Grade III pancreatic injury (transection of the gland and the pancreatic duct in the body/tail) is surgical resection this approach carries high morbidity. ERCP was first reported as a diagnostic tool in the settings of pancreatic injury but has in recent years been used increasingly as a treatment option with promising results. This article reviews the literature on ERCP as treatment option for pancreatic injury and adds further to the limited number of cases reported that have been treated early after the trauma.

  • 15.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lundgren, L
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    A Personal Computer Freeware as a Tool for Surgeons to Plan Liver Resections.2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1457-4969, E-ISSN 1799-7267, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 153-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The increase in liver surgery and the proportion of resections done on the margin to postoperative liver failure make preoperative calculations regarding liver volume important. Earlier studies have shown good correlation between calculations done with ImageJ and specimen weight as well as volume calculations done with more robust systems. The correlation to actual volumes of resected liver tissue has not been investigated, and this was the aim of this study.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 30 patients undergoing well-defined liver resections were included in this study. Volumes calculated with ImageJ were compared to volume measurements done after the retrieval of resected liver tissue.

    RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: A strong correlation between calculated and measured liver volume was found with sample concordance correlation coefficient (ρc) = 0.9950. The knowledge on the nature of liver resections sets liver surgeons in a unique position to be able to accurately predict the volumes to be resected and, therefore, also the volume that will remain after surgery. This becomes increasingly important with the evolvement of methods to extend the boundaries of liver surgery. ImageJ is a reliable tool to preoperatively assess liver volume.

  • 16.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hjalmarsson, Claes
    Blekinge Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Laparoscopic versus open distal pancreatectomy (LAPOP): study protocol for a single center, nonblinded, randomized controlled trial2019In: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 20, article id 356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundEarlier nonrandomized studies have suggested that laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP) is advantageous compared with open distal pancreatectomy (ODP) regarding hospital stay, blood loss, and recovery. Only one randomized study has been conducted showing reduced time to functional recovery after LDP compared with ODP.MethodsLAPOP is a prospective randomized, nonblinded, parallel-group, single-center superiority trial. Sixty patients with lesions in the pancreatic body or tail that are found by a multidisciplinary tumor board to need surgical resection will be randomized to receive LDP or ODP. The primary outcome variable is postoperative hospital stay, and secondary outcomes include functional recovery (defined as no need for intravenous medications or fluids and as the ability of an ambulatory patient to perform activities of daily life), perioperative bleeding, complications, need for pain medication, and quality of life comparison.DiscussionThe LAPOP trial will test the hypothesis that LDP reduces postoperative hospital stay compared with ODP.Trial registrationISRCTN, 26912858. Registered on 28 September 2015.

  • 17.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sparrelid, E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Isaksson, B.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Associating Liver Partition and Portal Vein Ligation for Primary Hepatobiliary Malignancies and Non-Colorectal Liver Metastases2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1457-4969, E-ISSN 1799-7267, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 158-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy may increase the possibility of radical resection in the case of liver malignancy. Concerns have been raised about the high morbidity and mortality associated with the procedure, particularly when applied for diagnoses other than colorectal liver metastases. The aim of this study was to analyze the initial experience with associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy in cases of non-colorectal liver metastases and primary hepatobiliary malignancies in Scandinavia. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of all associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy procedures performed at two Swedish university hospitals for non-colorectal liver metastases and primary hepatobiliary malignancies was performed. The primary focus was on the safety of the procedure. Results and Conclusion: Ten patients were included: four had hepatocellular cancer, three had intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, one had a Klatskin tumor, one had ocular melanoma metastasis, and one had a metastasis from a Wilms tumor. All patients completed both operations, and the highest grade of complication (according to the Clavien-Dindo classification) was 3A, which was observed in one patient. No 90-day mortality was observed. Radical resection (R0) was achieved in nine patients, while the resection was R2 in one patient. The low morbidity and mortality observed in this cohort compared with those of earlier reports on associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy for diagnoses other than colorectal liver metastases may be related to the selection of patients with limited comorbidity. In addition, procedures other than associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy had been avoided in most of the patients. In conclusion, associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy can be applied to primary hepatobiliary malignancies and non-colorectal liver metastases with acceptable rates of morbidity and mortality.

  • 18.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sparrelid, E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Rosok, B.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Pomianowska, E.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Bjornbeth, B. A.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Isaksson, B.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy in patients with colorectal liver metastases - Intermediate oncological results2016In: European Journal of Surgical Oncology, ISSN 0748-7983, E-ISSN 1532-2157, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 531-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) not amenable for resection have grave prognosis. One limiting factor for surgery is a small future liver remnant (FLR). Early data suggests that associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) effectively increases the volume of the FLR allowing for resection in a larger fraction of patients than conventional two-stage hepatectomy (TSH) with portal vein occlusion (PVO). Oncological results of the treatment are lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the intermediate oncological outcomes after ALPPS in patients with CRLM. Material and methods: Retrospective analysis of all patients with CRLM operated with ALPPS at the participating centres between December 2012 and May 2014. Results: Twenty-three patients (16 male, 7 female), age 67 years (28-80) were operated for 6.5 (1-38) metastases of which the largest was 40 nun (14-130). Six (27.3%) patients had extra-hepatic metastases, 16 (72.7%) synchronous presentation. All patients received chemotherapy, 6 cycles (3-25) preoperatively and 16 (70%) postoperatively. Ten patients (43%) were rescue ALPPS after failed PVO. Severe complications occurred in 13.6% and one (4.5%) patient died within 90 days of surgery. After a median follow-up of 22.5 months from surgery and 33.5 months from diagnosis of liver metastases estimated 2 year overall survival was 59% (from surgery) and 73% (from diagnosis). Liver only recurrences (n = 8), were treated with reresection/ablation (n = 7) while lung recurrences were treated with chemotherapy. Conclusion: The overall survival, rate of severe complications and perioperative mortality associated with ALPPS for patients with CRLM is comparable to TSH. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 19.
    Bondi, J.
    et al.
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway; Drammen Hospital, Norway.
    Avdagic, J.
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway; Innlandet Hospital, Norway.
    Karlbom, U.
    Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Kalman, Thordis Disa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Saltyte Benth, J.
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Naimy, N.
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway.
    Oresland, T.
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Randomized clinical trial comparing collagen plug and advancement flap for trans-sphincteric anal fistula2017In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 104, no 9, p. 1160-1166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The role of a collagen plug for treating anal fistula is not well established. A randomized prospective multicentre non-inferiority study of surgical treatment of trans-sphincteric cryptogenic fistulas was undertaken, comparing the anal fistula plug with the mucosal advancement flap with regard to fistula recurrence rate and functional outcome. Methods: Patients with an anal fistula were evaluated for eligibility in three centres, and randomized to either mucosal advancement flap surgery or collagen plug, with clinical follow-up at 3 and 12 months. The primary outcome was the fistula recurrence rate. Anal pain (visual analogue scale), anal incontinence (St Marks score) and quality of life (Short Form 36 questionnaire) were also reported. Results: Ninety-four patients were included; 48 were allocated to the plug procedure and 46 to advancement flap surgery. The median follow-up was 12 (range 9-24) months. The recurrence rate at 12 months was 66 per cent (27 of 41 patients) in the plug group and 38 per cent (15 of 40) in the flap group (P = 0.006). Anal pain was reduced after operation in both groups. Anal incontinence did not change in the follow-up period. Patients reported an increased quality of life after 3 months. There were no differences between the groups with regard to pain, incontinence or quality of life. Conclusion: There was a considerably higher recurrence rate after the anal fistula plug procedure than following advancement flap repair.

  • 20.
    Butwicka, Agnieszka
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Med Univ Warsaw, Poland.
    Sariaslan, Amir
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Olen, Ola
    Stockholm South Gen Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Frisen, Louise
    Child and Adolescent Psychiat Res Ctr, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lichtenstein, Paul
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    No association between urbanisation, neighbourhood deprivation and IBD: a population-based study of 4 million individuals2019In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 68, no 5, p. 947-948Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 21.
    Carlander, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery and Center for Clinical Research Uppsala University.
    Wagner, Philippe
    Department of Surgery and Center for Clinical Research Uppsala University, Västmanland County Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Nordenström, Erik
    Department of Surgery, Lund University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jansson, Svante
    Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Bergkvist, Leif
    Department of Surgery and Center for Clinical Research Uppsala University, Västmanland County Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Johansson, Kenth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department Surgery, Västervik Hospital, Västervik,Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Risk of Complications with Energy-Based Surgical Devices in Thyroid Surgery: A National Multicenter Register Study2016In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Energy-based surgical devices (EBD) combining cutting and coagulation are increasingly used in thyroid surgery. However, there is a lack of information about potential benefits and risk of complications outside controlled trials. The aims of this national multicenter register study were to describe the use of EDB, their potential effect on complication rates, and on operation time.

    Materials and methods

    The Scandinavian Quality Register for Thyroid and Parathyroid surgery includes 35 surgical units in Sweden and covered 88 % of the thyroid procedures performed during 2008–2009. The use of the EBD was specifically registered for 12 months, and 1297 patients were included. Surgically related complications and operation time were evaluated. The clamp-and-tie group (C-A-T) constituted the control group for comparison with procedures where EBD was used.

    Results

    The thyroid procedures performed included C-A-T (16.6 %), bipolar electrosurgery (ES: 56.5 %), electronic vessel sealing (EVS: 12.2 %), and ultrasonic dissection (UD: 14.5 %). Mean operative time was longer with EVS (p < 0.001) and shorter with UD (p < 0.05) than in the other groups. The bipolar ES group and the EVS group had higher incidence of calcium treatment at discharge and after 6 weeks than the UD group. No significant difference in nerve injury was found between the groups. There was a significant more frequent use of topical hemostatic agents in the EBD group compared to C-A-T.

    Conclusion

    In this national multicenter study, the use of UD shortened and EVS increased operating time. There was a higher risk of calcium treatment at discharge and after 6 weeks after use of EVS and bipolar ES than after UD use. There was a significant more frequent use of topical hemostatic agents in the EBD groups compared to C-A-T.

  • 22.
    Carlsson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Robotassisterad kirurgi ökar – trots osäker kostnadseffektivitet2016In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 113, no 48, p. 1-5Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Casado Bedmar, Maria Teresa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Heil, Stéphanie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Keita, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Upregulation of intestinal mucosal mast cells expressing VPAC1 in close proximity to vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in inflammatory bowel disease and murine colitis2019In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 31, no 3, article id e13503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Mast cells (MCs) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) have been proposed as regulators of the intestinal barrier and inflammation. Our aim was to map the distribution in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and murine colitis.

    Methods

    MCs, VIP, and VIP‐receptors (VPACs) were quantified by immunofluorescence and enzyme‐immunoassay (EIA) in ileal tissues (villus epithelium (VE) and adjacent VE, ie, VE next to the follicle‐associated epithelium, (FAE)) from Crohn's disease (CD; n = 16) and non‐IBD patients, and in colonic specimens of ulcerative colitis (UC; n = 12) and healthy controls (HCs). In addition, VIP levels were measured in plasma from HCs, non‐IBD, and IBD in remission (CD n = 30; UC n = 30). Colon, ileum, and plasma from mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)‐induced colitis and control mice were analyzed likewise.

    Key Results

    FAE‐adjacent VE in ileum of CD possessed more MCs (P < 0.05) and MCs expressing VPAC1 (P < 0.05), but not VPAC2, compared to controls. Both adjacent and regular VE of CD had more MCs co‐localizing/in close proximity to VIP (P < 0.05). In UC colon, more MCs (P < 0.0005), MCs close to VIP (P < 0.0005), and MCs expressing VPAC1 (P < 0.05) were found compared to controls. VIP levels were elevated in plasma from CD and UC compared to controls (P < 0.0005). Colon of DSS mice showed more MCs and MCs close to VIP (P < 0.05) compared to control mice. In vitro experiments revealed MCs expressing VPACs and internalized VIP after 120 minutes of VIP‐stimulation.

    Conclusions and Inferences

    Communication between MCs and VIP is upregulated during IBD and mice colitis. In CD patients, the epithelium next to FAE seems to be more involved than the surrounding VE, suggesting increased MC‐VIP‐interactions in this intestinal region.

  • 24.
    Christerson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Keita, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tinnerfelt Winberg, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Gustafson-Svard, Christina
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Possible Involvement of Intracellular Calcium-Independent Phospholipase A2 in the Release of Secretory Phospholipases from Mast Cells: Increased Expression in Ileal Mast Cells of Crohns Disease2019In: CELLS, ISSN 2073-4409, Vol. 8, no 7, article id 672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased activity of secretory phospholipases A(2) (sPLA(2)) type-II was previously observed in ileum of Crohns disease (CD). Our aims were to explore the involvement of calcium-independent (i)PLA(2 beta) in the release of sPLA(2)s from the human mast cell (MC) line (HMC-1) and investigate expressions of cytosolic (c)PLA(2) alpha, iPLA(2)beta, sPLA(2)-IIA and sPLA(2)-V in MCs of CD ileum. The release of sPLA(2) was investigated in HMC-1 by immunocytochemistry and ELISA. The expression intensities of PLA(2)s in mucosal MCs, and the proportion of PLA(2)-positive MCs, were investigated in normal ileum and in ileum from patients with CD by immunohistochemistry. The calcium ionophore-stimulated release of sPLA(2)-IIA and sPLA(2)-V from HMC-1 was reduced by the iPLA(2)-inhibitor bromoenol lactone. All four PLA(2)s were detectable in mucosal MCs, both in normal ileum and in CD, but the proportion of iPLA(2)beta-containing mucosal MCs and the expression intensity of sPLA(2)-IIA was increased in CD. Results indicate that iPLA(2)beta is involved in the secretion of sPLA(2)s from HMC-1, and suggest that iPLA(2)beta-mediated release of sPLA(2) from intestinal MCs may contribute to CD pathophysiology. Ex vivo studies on isolated mucosal mast cells are however needed to clarify the precise role of MC PLA(2)s in the inflammatory processes of CD.

  • 25.
    Christofer Juhlin, C.
    et al.
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Stenman, Adam
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Haglund, Felix
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Clark, Victoria E.
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Brown, Taylor C.
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Baranoski, Jacob
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Bilguvar, Kaya
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Goh, Gerald
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svahn, Fredrika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Rubinstein, Jill C.
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Caramuta, Stefano
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Yasuno, Katsuhito
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Guenel, Murat
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Backdahl, Martin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Prasad, Manju L.
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Korah, Reju
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Lifton, Richard P.
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Yale Centre Mendelian Genom, CT USA.
    Carling, Tobias
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Whole-exome sequencing defines the mutational landscape of pheochromocytoma and identifies KMT2D as a recurrently mutated gene2015In: Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer, ISSN 1045-2257, E-ISSN 1098-2264, Vol. 54, no 9, p. 542-554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As subsets of pheochromocytomas (PCCs) lack a defined molecular etiology, we sought to characterize the mutational landscape of PCCs to identify novel gene candidates involved in disease development. A discovery cohort of 15 PCCs wild type for mutations in PCC susceptibility genes underwent whole-exome sequencing, and an additional 83 PCCs served as a verification cohort for targeted sequencing of candidate mutations. A low rate of nonsilent single nucleotide variants (SNVs) was detected (6.1/sample). Somatic HRAS and EPAS1 mutations were observed in one case each, whereas the remaining 13 cases did not exhibit variants in established PCC genes. SNVs aggregated in apoptosis-related pathways, and mutations in COSMIC genes not previously reported in PCCs included ZAN, MITF, WDTC1, and CAMTA1. Two somatic mutations and one constitutional variant in the well-established cancer gene lysine (K)-specific methyltransferase 2D (KMT2D, MLL2) were discovered in one sample each, prompting KMT2D screening using focused exome-sequencing in the verification cohort. An additional 11 PCCs displayed KMT2D variants, of which two were recurrent. In total, missense KMT2D variants were found in 14 (11 somatic, two constitutional, one undetermined) of 99 PCCs (14%). Five cases displayed somatic mutations in the functional FYR/SET domains of KMT2D, constituting 36% of all KMT2D-mutated PCCs. KMT2D expression was upregulated in PCCs compared to normal adrenals, and KMT2D overexpression positively affected cell migration in a PCC cell line. We conclude that KMT2D represents a recurrently mutated gene with potential implication for PCC development. (c) 2015 The Authors. Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 26.
    Da Silva, Stéphanie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Keita, Åsa V.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Mohlin, Sofie
    Translational Cancer Research, Cancer Center at Medicon Village, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Påhlman, Sven
    Translational Cancer Research, Cancer Center at Medicon Village, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Théodorou, Vassilia
    Toxalim UMR 1331 INRA/INP/UPS Neuro-Gastroenterology and Nutrition Unit, Toulouse, France.
    Påhlman, Ingrid
    Albireo AB, Arvid Wallgrens Backe, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mattson, Jan P.
    Albireo AB, Arvid Wallgrens Backe, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Söderholm, Johan D.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    A novel topical PPARγ agonist induces PPARγ-activity in ulcerative colitis mucosa and prevents and reverses inflammation in induced-colitis models2018In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 792-805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) exerts anti-inflammatory effects and is therefore a potential target in ulcerative colitis (UC). A novel PPARγ agonist (AS002) developed for local action was evaluated ex vivo in biopsies from UC patients and in vivo in mice with low-grade dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)- and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis.Methods: Colonic biopsies from UC patients (n = 18) and healthy controls (n = 6) were incubated with AS002 or rosiglitazone (positive control) to measure mRNA expression of the PPARγ-responsive gene ADIPOPHILIN and protein levels of UC-related cytokines (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). AS002 absorption was determined in the colonic mucosa of UC patients. DSS-colitis mice received PPARγ agonists or vehicle daily by intrarectal administration starting 2 days before induction of colitis (preventive) or from days 3 to 8 (curative). Myeloperoxidase (MPO) and cytokine levels in colonic mucosa were determined. In addition, AS002 effects were studied in TNBS colitis.Results: AS002 displayed an absorption pattern of a lipophilic drug totally metabolized in the mucosa. AS002 and rosiglitazone increased ADIPOPHILIN mRNA expression (3-fold) and decreased TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-13 levels in human UC biopsies. In DSS, in both preventive and curative treatment and in TNBS colitis, AS002 protected against macroscopic and histological damage and lowered MPO and TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-13 levels.Conclusions: AS002 triggers anti-inflammatory PPARγ activity in the human colonic mucosa of UC patients and prevents and reverses colitis in mice. Our data suggest that AS002 has potential for topical maintenance treatment of UC, which warrants further studies in vivo in patients.

  • 27.
    Dam-Larsen, Sanne
    et al.
    Koege Hospital, Denmark.
    Darkahi, Bahman
    Enkoping Hospital, Sweden.
    Glad, Arne
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark.
    Gleditsch, Dagfinn
    Drammen Hospital, Norway.
    Gustavsson, Lena
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Halttunen, Jorma
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Johansson, Karl-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Pischel, Andreas
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Reiertsen, Ola
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway.
    Tornqvist, Bjorn
    Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Zebski, Hubert
    Department Gastroenterol, Germany.
    Best practice in placement of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy with jejunal extension tube for continuous infusion of levodopa carbidopa intestinal gel in the treatment of selected patients with Parkinsons disease in the Nordic region2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 1500-1507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Continuous infusion of levodopa carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) is associated with a significant improvement in the symptoms and quality of life of selected patients with advanced Parkinsons disease. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy with jejunal extension (PEG/J) was first described in 1998 and has become the most common and standard technique for fixing the tubing in place for LCIG infusion. Material and methods. A workshop was held in Stockholm, Sweden, to discuss the PEG/J placement for the delivery of LCIG in Parkinsons disease patients with the primary goal of providing guidance on best practice for the Nordic countries. Results. Suggested procedures for preparation of patients for PEG/J placement, aftercare, troubleshooting and redo-procedures for use in the Nordic region are described and discussed. Conclusions. LCIG treatment administered through PEG/J-tubes gives a significant increase in quality of life for selected patients with advanced Parkinsons disease. Although minor complications are common, serious complications are infrequent, and the tube insertion procedures have a good safety record. Further development of delivery systems and evaluation of approaches designed to reduce the demand for redo endoscopy are required.

  • 28.
    de Leede, E. M.
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Sibinga Mulder, B. G.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Bastiaannet, E.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Poston, G. J.
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Aintree, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Sahora, K.
    Department of Surgery and Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Medical University of Vienna/ABCSG Pancreatic Cancer Registry, Austria.
    Van Eycken, E.
    Belgian Cancer Registry, Brussels, Belgium.
    Valerianova, Z.
    Bulgarian National Cancer Registry/National Oncological Hospital, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Mortensen, M. B.
    Department of Surgery, Odense University Hospital/Danish Pancreas Cancer Group, Denmark.
    Dralle, H.
    Department of Surgery, University of Halle-Wittenberg/Pancreatic Cancer Register, Halle, Germany.
    Primic-Zakelj, M.
    Epidemiology and Cancer Registry/Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Borras, J. M.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ryzhov, A.
    National Cancer Registry of Ukraine/National Institute of Cancer, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Lemmens, V. E.
    Department of Research, Netherlands Cancer Registry/Comprehensive Cancer Centre The Netherlands (IKNL), Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Mieog, J. S. D.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Boelens, P. G.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    van de Velde, C. J. H.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Bonsing, B. A.
    Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Common variables in European pancreatic cancer registries: The introduction of the EURECCA pancreatic cancer project2016In: European Journal of Surgical Oncology, ISSN 0748-7983, E-ISSN 1532-2157, Vol. 42, no 9, p. 1414-1419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Quality assurance of cancer care is of utmost importance to detect and avoid under and over treatment. Most cancer data are collected by different procedures in different countries, and are poorly comparable at an international level. EURECCA, acronym for European Registration of Cancer Care, is a platform aiming to harmonize cancer data collection and improve cancer care by feedback. After the prior launch of the projects on colorectal, breast and upper GI cancer, EURECCAs newest project is collecting data on pancreatic cancer in several European countries. Methods: National cancer registries, as well as specific pancreatic cancer audits/registries, were invited to participate in EURECCA Pancreas. Participating countries were requested to share an overview of their collected data items. Of the received datasets, a shared items list was made which creates insight in similarities between different national registries and will enable data comparison on a larger scale. Additionally, first data was requested from the participating countries. Results: Over 24 countries have been approached and 11 confirmed participation: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Denmark, Germany, The Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Ukraine and United Kingdom. The number of collected data items varied between 16 and 285. This led to a shared items list of 25 variables divided into five categories: patient characteristics, preoperative diagnostics, treatment, staging and survival. Eight countries shared their first data. Conclusions: A list of 25 shared items on pancreatic cancer coming from eleven participating registries was created, providing a basis for future prospective data collection in pancreatic cancer treatment internationally.

  • 29.
    DHaese, J. G.
    et al.
    Hospital University of Munich, Germany.
    Neumann, J.
    University of Munich, Germany.
    Weniger, M.
    Hospital University of Munich, Germany.
    Pratschke, S.
    Hospital University of Munich, Germany.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ardiles, V.
    Italian Hospital Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Chapman, W.
    Washington University, MO 63110 USA.
    Hernandez-Alejandro, R.
    University of Western Ontario, Canada.
    Soubrane, O.
    Beaujon Hospital, France.
    Robles-Campos, R.
    Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Spain.
    Stojanovic, M.
    University of Clin Centre, Serbia.
    Dalla Valle, R.
    Parma University Hospital, Italy.
    Chan, A. C. Y.
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Coenen, M.
    University of Munich, Germany.
    Guba, M.
    Hospital University of Munich, Germany.
    Werner, J.
    Hospital University of Munich, Germany.
    Schadde, E.
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Angele, M. K.
    Hospital University of Munich, Germany.
    Should ALPPS be Used for Liver Resection in Intermediate-Stage HCC?2016In: Annals of Surgical Oncology, ISSN 1068-9265, E-ISSN 1534-4681, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 1335-1343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extended liver resections in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are problematic due to hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Associating liver partition with portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) has been promoted as a novel method to induce hypertrophy for patients with extensive colorectal liver metastases, but outcomes in HCC have not been well investigated. All patients registered in the international ALPPS Registry (http://www.alpps.org) from 2010 to 2015 were studied. Hypertrophy of the future liver remnant, perioperative morbidity and mortality, age, overall survival, and other parameters were compared between patients with HCC and patients with colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). The study compared 35 patients with HCC and 225 patients with CRLM. The majority of patients undergoing ALPPS for HCC fall into the intermediate-stage category of the Barcelona clinic algorithm. In this study, hypertrophy was rapid and extensive for the HCC patients, albeit lower than for the CRLM patients (47 vs. 76 %; p &lt; 0.002). Hypertrophy showed a linear negative correlation with the degrees of fibrosis. The 90-day mortality for ALPPS used to treat HCC was almost fivefold higher than for CRLM (31 vs. 7 %; p &lt; 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that patients older than 61 years had a significantly reduced overall survival (p &lt; 0.004). The ALPPS approach induces a considerable hypertrophic response in HCC patients and allows resection of intermediate-stage HCC, albeit at the cost of a 31 % perioperative mortality rate. The use of ALPPS for HCC remains prohibitive for most patients and should be performed only for a highly selected patient population younger than 60 years with low-grade fibrosis.

  • 30.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Kjellgren, Karin I.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Oxaliplatin-Induced Neurotoxic Side Effects and Their Impact on Daily Activities2019In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Oxaliplatin (OXA) is frequently used in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, and OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects are common. Reports on real-time patient-reported neurotoxic side effects and impact on the patient's daily activities are sparse in existing studies. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify and assess patient-reported OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects and their impact on the patient's daily activities, during and after chemotherapy. Methods: In a multicenter prospective longitudinal study, 46 chemo-naïve patients with colorectal cancer treated with postoperative adjuvant OXA-based chemotherapy were monitored during treatment and at 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month follow-ups. Patients were recruited from September 2013 to June 2016. In total, 370 Oxaliplatin-Associated Neurotoxicity Questionnaire responses were available for analysis. A mobile phone-based system was used to receive real-time assessments. Results: All patients reported neurotoxic side effects and impact on daily activities during treatment. The side effects changed in character and body location over time and had an impact on the daily activities. Conclusions: The high prevalence of OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects significantly interfered with the patients' daily activities. We found significant differences between baseline data and follow-up time points for neurotoxicity, and the patients had not returned to baseline after 1 year. Implications for Practice: The real-time assessment using mobile phone technology seems to be a valuable tool for monitoring patient-reported neurotoxicity and interventions for tailored care. Effectively identifying neurotoxicity and its impact on the patient's daily activities is important in supportive cancer care.

  • 31.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Kjellgren, Karin I.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Neurotoxic Side Effects Early in the Oxaliplatin Treatment Period in Patients With Colorectal Cancer2018In: Oncology Nursing Forum, ISSN 0190-535X, E-ISSN 1538-0688, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 690-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To identify and describe experiences of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) who have neurotoxic side effects early in the oxaliplatin treatment period, and how neurotoxicity affects their daily lives.

    PARTICIPANTS & SETTING: 10 patients with stage II-III CRC were included. All were treated with adjuvant oxaliplatin postoperatively and assessed neurotoxicity via a platform-independent mobile phone-based system. Patients were recruited from two hospitals in southern Sweden from November 2013 to August 2014.

    METHODOLOGIC APPROACH: Qualitative interview study conducted through open-ended, face-to-face, qualitative interviews. Thematic analysis was used.

    FINDINGS: A main theme was identified.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Nurses have an obligation to communicate the importance of early detection of neurotoxicity. Mobile phone technology seems to be a valuable tool for monitoring patient-reported neurotoxicity to improve communication and supportive care.

  • 32.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wilhelmson, Maria
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kolorektal cancer patienters upplevelser av att besvara symtom via ett mobiltelefonbaserat system2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wilhelmsson, Maria
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Mobiltelefon - Framtidens sätt att följa cancerpatienter? Kolorektal cancer patienters upplevelser av att besvara symtom via ett mobiltelefonbaserat system2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Dutta, Ravi Kumar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Genetics of primary hyperaldosteronism2016In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 23, no 10, p. R437-R454Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypertension is a common medical condition and affects approximately 20% of the population in developed countries. Primary aldosteronism is the most common form of secondary hypertension and affects 8-13% of patients with hypertension. The two most common causes of primary aldosteronism are aldosterone-producing adenoma and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. Familial hyperaldosteronism types I, II and III are the known genetic syndromes, in which both adrenal glands produce excessive amounts of aldosterone. However, only a minority of patients with primary aldosteronism have one of these syndromes. Several novel susceptibility genes have been found to be mutated in aldosterone-producing adenomas: KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3, CTNNB1, CACNA1D, CACNA1H and ARMC5. This review describes the genes currently known to be responsible for primary aldosteronism, discusses the origin of aldosterone-producing adenomas and considers the future clinical implications based on these novel insights.

  • 35.
    Eberhardson, M.
    et al.
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Soderling, J. K.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Neovius, M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Cars, T.
    Public Healthcare Serv, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Ludvigsson, J. F.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Askling, J.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ekbom, A.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Olen, O.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Sachs Childrens Hospital, Sweden.
    Anti-TNF treatment in Crohns disease and risk of bowel resection-a population based cohort study2017In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 589-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: TNF inhibitors (TNFi) have been shown to reduce the need for surgery in Crohns disease, but few studies have examined their effect beyond the first year of treatment. Aim: To conduct a register-based observational cohort study in Sweden 2006-2014 to investigate the risk of bowel resection in bowel surgery naive TNFi-treated Crohns disease patients and whether patients on TNFi amp;gt;= 12 months are less likely to undergo bowel resection than patients discontinuing treatment before 12 months. Methods: We identified all individuals in Sweden with Crohns disease through the Swedish National Patient Register 1987-2014 and evaluated the incidence of bowel resection after first ever dispensation of adalimumab or infliximab from 2006 and up to 7 years follow-up. Results: We identified 1856 Crohns disease patients who had received TNFi. Among these patients, 90% treatment retention was observed at 6 months after start of TNFi and 65% remained on the drug after 12 months. The cumulative rates of surgery in Crohns disease patients exposed to TNFi years 1-7 were 7%, 13%, 17%, 20%, 23%, 25% and 28%. Rates of bowel resection were similar between patients with TNFi survival amp;lt; 12 months and amp;gt;= 12 months respectively (P=.27). No predictors (eg, sex, age, extension or duration of disease) for bowel resection were identified. Conclusions: The risk of bowel resection after start of anti-TNF treatment is higher in regular health care than in published RCTs. Patients on sustained TNFi treatment beyond 12 months have bowel resection rates similar to those who discontinue TNFi treatment earlier.

  • 36.
    Edholm, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Institution of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Early intake of solid food after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and complications. A cohort study from the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry2018In: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, ISSN 1550-7289, E-ISSN 1878-7533, Vol. 14, no 9, p. 1256-1260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the most common bariatric procedure worldwide. There are few studies investigating how early return to solid food affects complications. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore how oral intake was resumed in RYGB patients and how the postoperative food regimen affects outcomes, such as complications and length of stay. Setting: Retrospective nationwide registry study. Methods: The Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry included prospective data from RYGB patients operated in 2009 to 2014. A questionnaire assessed the postoperative reintroduction of solid food applied at each bariatric center. The postoperative regimen was established in 23,589 patients. Outcomes were recorded at 30-day follow-up according to the standard Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry routine. Results: Nine percent of patients (n = 2074) returned to solid food within the first week after surgery. Most commonly solid food was resumed in week 4 (37%, n=8659). Median length of stay was 2 days for all. Of all, 2.8% suffered from a severe complication (amp;gt;Clavien-Dindo 3a). After adjusting for the annual volume of procedures at hospitals, there was no correlation that the timing of solid food affected complication rates. The odds ratio for a severe complication was significantly lower for intermediate- (odds ratio .64 95% confidence interval .48.85) or high (odds ratio .52 95% confidence interval .42.66) volume centers. The rate of leaks and small bowel obstructions were evenly distributed between the different postoperative food regimens. Conclusion: Early return to solid food after RYGB did not affect the risk of severe complications. Patients operated at centers with an annual volume of amp;gt; 100 procedures have a lower risk of severe complications. (C) 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 37.
    Edholm, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Response to "Association between early intake of solid food after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and complications"2019In: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, ISSN 1550-7289, E-ISSN 1878-7533, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 358-358Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 38.
    Edholm, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Circular- and Linear-Stapled Gastro-jejunostomy in Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass2019In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 1946-1953Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To compare circular stapler (CS) with linear stapler (LS) in a meta-analysis concerning operative time, anastomotic leaks, wound infections, strictures, and length of stay. Pubmed, Medline, and Scopus were searched for articles published since 2006. Four hundred and five articles were assessed, and 13 articles of which only one was a randomized controlled trial were included in all 49,331 patients from different regions of the world. The pooled analysis shows that operative time was shorter in LS than in CS (weighted mean difference 36.2min; 95% CI 34.7-37.6.; pamp;lt;0.0001). No difference was seen concerning leaks or strictures. The relative risk (RR) of leakage after LS was 80% of the risk after CS; however, the 95% confidence interval (CI) showed overlap (0.58-1.11). The RR of anastomotic stricture after LS was 74% of the risk after CS; however, 95% CI (0.52-1.05) showed overlap. Wound infections were less common after LS than after CS; RR was 27% (95% CI 0.21-0.33). Length of stay (LOS) was 0.65days shorter after LS than after CS (95% CI 0.51-0.78). LS compared with CS results in shorter operative time, less wound infections, and shorter length of stay, but no difference was seen concerning risks of leaks or strictures.

  • 39.
    Elawa, Sherif
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Intestinal obstruction following harvest of VRAM-flap for reconstruction of a large perineal defect2015In: Case Reports in Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2332-0885, Vol. 2, no 3-4, p. 88-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A patient with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum was operated with abdominoperineal resection and perineal reconstruction with a vertical rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. Six days postoperatively, there was herniation of the small bowel, between the anterior and posterior rectus sheaths, to a subcutaneous location.

  • 40.
    Enne, Marcelo
    et al.
    Ipanema Federal Hospital, Brazil.
    Schadde, Erik
    Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Switzerland; Rush University, IL 60612 USA.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hernandez Alejandro, Roberto
    University of Rochester, NY USA.
    Steinbruck, Klaus
    Bonsucesso Federal Hospital, Brazil.
    Viana, Eduardo
    Ipanema Federal Hospital, Brazil.
    Robles Campos, Ricardo
    Virgen Arrixaca University Hospital, Spain.
    Malago, Massimo
    Royal Free Hospital, England.
    Clavien, Pierre-Alain
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    De Santibanes, Eduardo
    Hospital Italiano Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Gayet, Brice
    Institute Mutualiste Montsouris, France.
    ALPPS as a salvage procedure after insufficient future liver remnant hypertrophy following portal vein occlusion2017In: HPB, ISSN 1365-182X, E-ISSN 1477-2574, Vol. 19, no 12, p. 1126-1129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A minimum future liver remnant (FLR) of 30% is required to avoid post hepatectomy liver failure (PHLF). Portal vein occlusion (PVO) is the main strategy to induce hypertrophy of the FLR, but some patients will not reach sufficient FLR hypertrophy to enable resection. Recently ALPPS has emerged as a "Salvage Procedure" for PVO failure. The aim of this study was to report the short term outcomes of ALPPS following PVO failure. Methods: A retrospective analysis of patients enrolled within the international ALPPS Registry between October 2012 and November 2015 (NCT01924741) was performed. Patients with documented PVO failure were included. The outcomes reported included feasibility, FLR growth rate and safety of ALPPS. Complications were recorded as per Clavien-Dindo classification. Results: From 510 patients enrolled in the Registry there were 22 patients with previous PVO failure. Two patients were excluded due to missing data and twenty patients were analysed. All of them completed the proposed ALPPS with a medium FLR increase of 88% (23-115%) between two stages and no 90-day mortality. Conclusion: In experienced centers, ALPPS following PVO failure is feasible and safe. The FLR hypertrophy was similar to other ALPPS series. ALPPS is a potential rescue strategy after PVO failure.

  • 41.
    Eriksson, Carl
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Marsal, Jan
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bergemalm, Daniel
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Vigren, Lina
    Ystad Hospital, Sweden.
    Bjork, Jan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Eberhardson, Michael
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Soderman, Charlotte
    St Goran Hospital, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro University, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Thorn, Mari
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Karlen, Per
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Hertervig, Erik
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Strid, Hans
    Södra Älvsborgs Sjukhus, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Almer, Sven
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Long-term effectiveness of vedolizumab in inflammatory bowel disease: a national study based on the Swedish National Quality Registry for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (SWIBREG)2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 52, no 6-7, p. 722-729Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of vedolizumab in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, these findings may not reflect the clinical practice. Therefore, we aimed to describe a vedolizumab-treated patient population and assess long-term effectiveness.Materials and methods: Patients initiating vedolizumab between 1 June 2014 and 30 May 2015 were identified through the Swedish National Quality Registry for IBD. Prospectively collected data on treatment and disease activity were extracted. Clinical remission was defined as Patient Harvey Bradshaw indexamp;lt;5 in Crohns disease (CD) and Patient Simple Clinical Colitis Activity indexamp;lt;3 in ulcerative colitis (UC).Results: Two-hundred forty-six patients (147CD, 92 UC and 7 IBD-Unclassified) were included. On study entry, 86% had failed TNF-antagonist and 48% of the CD patients had undergone1 surgical resection. After a median follow-up of 17 (IQR: 14-20) months, 142 (58%) patients remained on vedolizumab. In total, 54% of the CD- and 64% of the UC patients were in clinical remission at the end of follow-up, with the clinical activity decreasing (pamp;lt;.0001 in both groups). Faecal-calprotectin decreased in CD (pamp;lt;.0001) and in UC (p=.001), whereas CRP decreased in CD (p=.002) but not in UC (p=.11). Previous anti-TNF exposure (adjusted HR: 4.03; 95% CI: 0.96-16.75) and elevated CRP at baseline (adjusted HR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.10-4.35) seemed to be associated with discontinuation because of lack of response. Female sex was associated with termination because of intolerance (adjusted HR: 2.75; 95% CI: 1.16-6.48).Conclusion: Vedolizumab-treated patients represent a treatment-refractory group. A long-term effect can be achieved, even beyond 1 year of treatment.

  • 42.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Segelmark, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Frequency, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcome of Gastrointestinal Disease in Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis and Microscopic Polyangiitis2018In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 529-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Involvement of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a rare complication of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). The aim was to describe frequency, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of GI disease in a large series of patients in a single center. Methods. A database that includes all patients with GPA and MPA diagnosed since 1997 in a defined area of southeastern Sweden as well as prevalent older cases and tertiary referral patients was screened for patients with GI disease. Data were retrieved from the patients medical records, and GI manifestations of vasculitis were defined as proposed by Pagnoux, et al in 2005. Results. Fourteen (6.5%) of 216 consecutive patients with GPA/MPA had GI manifestations. Abdominal pain and GI bleeding were the most common symptoms. Radiology was important for detection of GI disease, while endoscopy failed to support the diagnosis in many patients. Because of perforation, 5 patients underwent hemicolectomy or small intestine resection. Primary anastomosis was created in 2/5 and enterostomy in 3/5 patients. One patient had a hemicolectomy because of lower GI bleeding. One sigmoid abscess was treated with drainage, and 1 intraabdominal bleeding condition with arterial coiling. Two patients died from GI disease. GPA and MPA patients with and without GI disease exhibited a similar overall survival. Conclusion. GI disease was found in 6.5% among 216 patients with GPA or MPA. Surgery was judged necessary only in cases with GI perforation or severe bleeding. Multidisciplinary engagement is strongly recommended.

  • 43.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Holm, Torbjörn
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pettersson, David
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Norrtalje Hospital, Sweden.
    Berglund, Åke
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Cedermark, Björn
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Radu, Calin
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Hemming
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Machado, Mikael
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hjern, Fredrik
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Syk, Ingvar
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Martling, Anna
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Optimal fractionation of preoperative radiotherapy and timing to surgery for rectal cancer (Stockholm III): a multicentre, randomised, non-blinded, phase 3, non-inferiority trial2017In: The Lancet Oncology, ISSN 1470-2045, E-ISSN 1474-5488, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 336-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Radiotherapy reduces the risk of local recurrence in rectal cancer. However, the optimal radiotherapy fractionation and interval between radiotherapy and surgery is still under debate. We aimed to study recurrence in patients randomised between three different radiotherapy regimens with respect to fractionation and time to surgery. Methods In this multicentre, randomised, non-blinded, phase 3, non-inferiority trial (Stockholm III), all patients with a biopsy-proven adenocarcinoma of the rectum, without signs of non-resectability or distant metastases, without severe cardiovascular comorbidity, and planned for an abdominal resection from 18 Swedish hospitals were eligible. Participants were randomly assigned with permuted blocks, stratified by participating centre, to receive either 5 x 5 Gy radiation dose with surgery within 1 week (short-course radiotherapy) or after 4-8 weeks (short-course radiotherapy with delay) or 25 x 2 Gy radiation dose with surgery after 4-8 weeks (long-course radiotherapy with delay). After a protocol amendment, randomisation could include all three treatments or just the two short-course radiotherapy treatments, per hospital preference. The primary endpoint was time to local recurrence calculated from the date of randomisation to the date of local recurrence. Comparisons between treatment groups were deemed non-inferior if the upper limit of a double-sided 90% CI for the hazard ratio (HR) did not exceed 1.7. Patients were analysed according to intention to treat for all endpoints. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00904813. Findings Between Oct 5, 1998, and Jan 31, 2013, 840 patients were recruited and randomised; 385 patients in the three-arm randomisation, of whom 129 patients were randomly assigned to short-course radiotherapy, 128 to short-course radiotherapy with delay, and 128 to long-course radiotherapy with delay, and 455 patients in the two-arm randomisation, of whom 228 were randomly assigned to short-course radiotherapy and 227 to short-course radiotherapy with delay. In patients with any local recurrence, median time from date of randomisation to local recurrence in the pooled short-course radiotherapy comparison was 33.4 months (range 18.2-62.2) in the short-course radiotherapy group and 19.3 months (8.5-39.5) in the short-course radiotherapy with delay group. Median time to local recurrence in the long-course radiotherapy with delay group was 33.3 months (range 17.8-114.3). Cumulative incidence of local recurrence in the whole trial was eight of 357 patients who received short-course radiotherapy, ten of 355 who received short-course radiotherapy with delay, and seven of 128 who received long-course radiotherapy (HR vs short-course radiotherapy: short-course radiotherapy with delay 1.44 [95% CI 0.41-5.11]; long-course radiotherapy with delay 2.24 [0.71-7.10]; p=0.48; both deemed non-inferior). Acute radiation-induced toxicity was recorded in one patient (amp;lt;1%) of 357 after short-course radiotherapy, 23 (7%) of 355 after short-course radiotherapy with delay, and six (5%) of 128 patients after long-course radiotherapy with delay. Frequency of postoperative complications was similar between all arms when the three-arm randomisation was analysed (65 [50%] of 129 patients in the short-course radiotherapy group; 48 [38%] of 128 patients in the short-course radiotherapy with delay group; 50 [39%] of 128 patients in the long-course radiotherapy with delay group; odds ratio [OR] vs short-course radiotherapy: short-course radiotherapy with delay 0.59 [95% CI 0.36-0.97], long-course radiotherapy with delay 0.63 [0.38-1.04], p=0.075). However, in a pooled analysis of the two short-course radiotherapy regimens, the risk of postoperative complications was significantly lower after short-course radiotherapy with delay than after short-course radiotherapy (144 [53%] of 355 vs 188 [41%] of 357; OR 0.61 [95% CI 0.45-0.83] p=0.001). Interpretation Delaying surgery after short-course radiotherapy gives similar oncological results compared with short-course radiotherapy with immediate surgery. Long-course radiotherapy with delay is similar to both short-course radiotherapy regimens, but prolongs the treatment time substantially. Although radiation-induced toxicity was seen after short-course radiotherapy with delay, postoperative complications were significantly reduced compared with short-course radiotherapy. Based on these findings, we suggest that short-course radiotherapy with delay to surgery is a useful alternative to conventional short-course radiotherapy with immediate surgery.

  • 44.
    Everhov, Asa H.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro Univ, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sachs, Michael C.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nordenvall, Caroline
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Söderling, Jonas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ekbom, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Neovius, Martin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden; Univ Nottingham, England; Columbia Univ Coll Phys and Surg, NY USA.
    Askling, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Olen, Ola
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Sachs Children and Youth Hosp, Sweden.
    Incidence and Treatment of Patients Diagnosed With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases at 60 Years or Older in Sweden2018In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 154, no 3, p. 518-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND amp; AIMS: Diagnosis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) is increasing among elderly persons (60 years or older). We performed a nationwide population-based study to estimate incidence and treatment of IBD. METHODS: We identified all incident IBD cases in Sweden from 2006 through 2013 using national registers and up to 10 matched population comparator subjects. We collected data on the patients health care contacts and estimated incidence rates, health service burden, pharmacologic treatments, extra-intestinal manifestations, and surgeries in relation to age of IBD onset (pediatric, amp;lt;18 years; adults, 18-59 years; elderly, amp;gt;= 60 years). RESULTS: Of 27,834 persons diagnosed with incident IBD, 6443 (23%) had a first diagnosis of IBD at 60 years or older, corresponding to an incidence rate of 35/100,000 person-years (10/100,000 person-years for Crohns disease, 19/100,000 person-years for ulcerative colitis, and 5/100,000 person-years for IBD unclassified). During a median follow-up period of 4.2 years (range, 0-9 years), elderly patients had less IBD-specific outpatient health care but more IBD-related hospitalizations and overall health care use than adult patients with IBD. Compared with patients with pediatric or adult-onset IBD, elderly patients used fewer biologics and immunomodulators but more systemic corticosteroids. Occurrence of extra-intestinal manifestations was similar in elderly and adult patients, but bowel surgery was more common in the elderly (13% after 5 years vs 10% in adults) (Pamp;lt;.001). The absolute risk of bowel surgery was higher in the elderly than in the general population, but in relative terms, the risk increase was larger in younger age groups. CONCLUSIONS: In a nationwide cohort study in Sweden, we associated diagnosis of IBD at age 60 years or older with a lower use of biologics and immunomodulators but higher absolute risk of bowel surgery, compared with diagnosis at a younger age. The large differences in pharmacologic treatment of adults and elderly patients are not necessarily because of a milder course of disease and warrant further investigation.

  • 45.
    Everhov, Asa H.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Khalili, Hamed
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA.
    Askling, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Nordenvall, Caroline
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Neovius, Martin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Soderling, Jonas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Olen, Ola
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Sachs Children and Youth Hosp, Sweden.
    Work Loss Before and After Diagnosis of Crohns Disease2019In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 1237-1247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The aim of this study was to examine work loss in patients with Crohns disease. Methods Using nationwide registers, we identified incident patients with Crohns disease (2007-2010) and population comparator subjects without inflammatory bowel disease, matched by age, sex, calendar year, health care region, and education level. We assessed the number of lost workdays due to sick leave and disability pension from 5 years before to 5 years after first diagnosis of Crohns disease or end of follow-up (September 30, 2015). Results Among the 2015 incident Crohns disease patients (median age, 35 years; 50% women), both the proportion with work loss and the mean annual number of lost workdays were larger 5 years before diagnosis (25%; mean, 45 days) than in the 10,067 comparators (17%; mean, 29 days). Increased work loss was seen during the year of diagnosis, after which it declined to levels similar to before diagnosis. Of all patients, 75% had no work loss 24-12 months before diagnosis. Of them, 84% had full work ability also 12-24 months after diagnosis. In patients with total work loss (8.3% of all) before diagnosis, 83% did not work after. Among those with full work ability before diagnosis, the absolute risk of having total work loss after diagnosis was 1.4% (0.43% in the comparators). Our results were consistent across several sensitivity analyses using alternative definitions for date of diagnosis. Conclusions Patients with Crohns disease had increased work loss several years before diagnosis, possibly explained by comorbidity or by diagnostic delay.

  • 46.
    Everhov, Asa H.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sachs, Michael C.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Malmborg, Petter
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nordenvall, Caroline
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Khalili, Hamed
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA.
    Elmberg, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ekbom, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Askling, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Gustav
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden; Univ Nottingham, England; Columbia Univ Coll Phys and Surg, NY USA.
    Olen, Ola
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Sachs Children and Youth Hosp, Sweden.
    Changes in inflammatory bowel disease subtype during follow-up and over time in 44,302 patients2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 55-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) register-based subtype classifications over a patients disease course and over time. Methods: We examined International Classification of Diseases coding in patients with amp;gt;= 2 IBD diagnostic listings in the National Patient Register 2002-2014 (n = 44,302). Results: 18% of the patients changed diagnosis (17% of adults, 29% of children) during a median follow-up of 3.8 years. Of visits with diagnoses of Crohns disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC), 97% were followed by the same diagnosis, whereas 67% of visits with diagnosis IBD-unclassified (IBD-U) were followed by another IBD-U diagnosis. Patients with any diagnostic change changed mostly once (47%) or twice (31%), 39% from UC to CD, 33% from CD to UC and 30% to or from IBD-U. Using a classification algorithm based on the first two diagnoses (incident classification), suited for prospective cohort studies, the proportion adult patients with CD, UC, and IBD-U 2002-2014 were 29%, 62%, and 10% (43%, 45%, and 12% in children). A classification model incorporating additional information from surgeries and giving weight to the last 5 years of visits (prevalent classification), suited for description of a study population at end of follow-up, classified 31% of adult cases as CD, 58% as UC and 11% as IBD-U (44%, 38%, and 18% in children). Conclusions: IBD subtype changed in 18% during follow-up. The proportion with CD increased and UC decreased from definition at start to end of follow-up. IBD-U was more common in children.

  • 47.
    Everhov, Åsa H.
    et al.
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Khalili, Hamed
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Harvard Med Sch, MA USA.
    Askling, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Univ Orebro, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Univ Orebro, Sweden.
    Nordenvall, Caroline
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Soderling, Jonas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Olen, Ola
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Sachs Children and Youth Hosp, Sweden.
    Neovius, Martin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sick Leave and Disability Pension in Prevalent Patients With Crohns Disease2018In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 12, no 12, p. 1418-1428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: Crohns disease may affect the ability to work and lead to permanent disability. We aimed to investigate work loss in prevalent patients. Methods: We identified patients with Crohns disease and general population comparators matched by sex, birth year, healthcare region and education. We assessed days of sick leave and disability pension retrieved from the Swedish Social Insurance Agency and estimated the absolute and relative risk of receiving disability pension [minimum 25% work impairment]. Results: In 2014, the 20 638 Crohns disease patients [median age 44 years] had more than twice as many mean lost workdays [disability pension: 44; sick leave: 19] as the 102 038 comparators [disability pension: 20; sick leave: 8], mean difference 35 days [95% confidence interval 33-37]. However, the majority had no lost workdays [68% of patients and 85% of comparators]. The proportion of patients receiving disability pension was 15% (6.5% in the comparators, risk ratio 2.34 [2.25-2.43]) and was higher in all subgroups, especially in female patients [28% vs 13% in the comparators], in those with amp;lt;= 9 years of education [41% vs 23%] and in ages 60-64 years [46% vs 25%]. The relative risk of disability pension within the patient cohort [adjusted for age, sex, region and education] was higher in patients with complicated disease behaviour, extraintestinal manifestations, need of surgery or treatment with biologics. The differences between patients and comparators remained when comparing other calendar years [2006-2013]. Conclusion: Work loss was found in approximately one-third of patients. The mean number of lost workdays was twice as high as in the comparators.

  • 48.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Patient Safety.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis.
    Lagerfelt, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Woisetschläger, Mischa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ahlström, Ulla
    Vårdcentralen Kungsgatan Linköping, Sweden Region Östergötland, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Modifierad brittisk modell kortade ledtid till datortomografi av kolon2015In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The British national Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has presented guidelines based on signs and symptoms which should raise a suspicion of colorectal cancer. A slightly modified version of these guidelines, adapted to Swedish conditions, named Swedish NICE (sNICE) criteria, was implemented at eight primary care centres. By following the sNICE criteria, cases with higher degree of suspicion of colorectal cancer were advised for computer tomography (CT) of the colon, whereas cases of low degree of suspicion were advised for the considerably less time and patient demanding CT of the abdomen. For patients with isolated anal symptoms without presence of sNICE criteria, active expectancy for six weeks was recommended, followed by renewed consideration. Results showed that the ratio between CT colon and CT abdomen was reduced from 2.2 to 1.1 after introduction of the sNICE criteria. Also, the proportion of patients undergoing CT colon within two weeks from admittance was increased from 3 to 25 %. We conclude that the sNICE criteria may be a useful supportive tool for the primary care physician.

  • 49.
    Floodeen, H.
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden; University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hagberg, L. A.
    Örebro County Council, Sweden.
    Matthiessen, P.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden; University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Costs and resource use following defunctioning stoma in low anterior resection for cancer - A long-term analysis of a randomized multicenter trial2017In: European Journal of Surgical Oncology, ISSN 0748-7983, E-ISSN 1532-2157, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 330-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Defunctioning stoma in low anterior resection (LAR) for rectal cancer can prevent major complications, but overall cost-effectiveness for the healthcare provider is unknown. This study compared inpatient healthcare resources and costs within 5 years of LAR between two randomized groups of patients undergoing LAR with and without defunctioning stoma. Method: Five-year follow-up of a randomized, multicenter trial on LAR (NCT 00636948) with (stoma; n = 116) or without (no stoma; n = 118) defunctioning stoma comparing inpatient healthcare resources and costs. Unplanned stoma formation, days with stoma, length of hospital stay, reoperations, and total associated inpatient costs were analyzed. Results: Average costs were (sic) 21.663 per patient with defunctioning stoma and (sic) 15.922 per patient without defunctioning stoma within 5 years of LAR, resulting in an average cost-saving of (sic) 5.741. There was no difference between groups regarding the total number of days with any stoma (stoma = 33 398 vs. no stoma = 34 068). The total number of unplanned reoperations were 70 (no stoma) and 32 (stoma); p amp;lt; 0.001. In the group randomized to no stoma at LAR, 30.5% (36/118) required an unplanned stoma later. Conclusion: Randomization to defunctioning stoma in LAR was more expensive than no stoma, despite the cost-savings associated with a reduced frequency of anastomotic leakage. Both groups required the same total number of days with a stoma within five years of LAR. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO similar to The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  • 50.
    Franzen, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Tibbling, Lita Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hagg, Mary Karin
    Hudiksvall Hosp, Sweden.
    Oral neuromuscular training relieves hernia-related dysphagia and GERD symptoms as effectively in obese as in non-obese patients2018In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 138, no 11, p. 1004-1008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many physicians insist patients lose weight before their hiatal hernia (HH) condition and related symptoms including intermittent esophageal dysphagia (IED) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be treated, but it is not proven that body mass index (BMI) has an impact on exercise-based treatment of HH-related symptoms. Aims/Objectives: To investigate whether BMI has significance on IQoro (R) neuromuscular training (IQNT) effectiveness in treating HH-related symptoms. Material and Methods: Eighty-six patients with sliding HH and enduring IED and GERD symptoms, despite proton pump inhibitor medication, were consecutively referred for 6 months IQNT comprising 11/2 minutes daily. They were grouped by BMI which was recorded before and after IQNT, as were their symptoms of IED, reflux, heartburn, chest pain, globus sensation, non-productive cough, hoarseness, and misdirected swallowing. They were also assessed on food swallowing ability, water swallowing capacity and lip force both before and after treatment. Results: After IQNT, all BMI groups showed significant improvement (p amp;lt; .001) of all assessments and symptoms; and heartburn, cough and misdirected swallowing were significantly more reduced in the severely obese. Conclusions and significance: IQNT can treat HH-related IED and GERD symptoms as successfully in moderately or severely obese patients as in those with normal bodyweight.

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