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  • 1.
    Aagaard, Knut E.
    et al.
    Helsingborg Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Björnsson, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Lunsjö, Karl
    Helsingborg Hosp, Sweden.
    Frobell, Richard
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    No differences in histopathological degenerative changes found in acute, trauma-related rotator cuff tears compared with chronic, nontraumatic tears2022In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 2521-2527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Acute trauma-related rotator cuff tears are believed to have better healing potential than chronic tears due to less degenerative changes of the tendons. However, the histopathological condition of tendons from trauma-related tears is not well investigated. The purpose of this study was to explore specific histopathological features in tendons from acute trauma-related full-thickness rotator cuff tears and to compare them to findings in tendons from nontraumatic, chronic tears. Methods In a prospective cohort study, 62 previously asymptomatic patients [14 women, median age 61 years (range 42-75)] with trauma-related full-thickness rotator cuff tears were consecutively included. Arthroscopic repair was performed within 30 (median, IQR 25-37) days after the injury. During surgery, tissue biopsies were harvested from the supraspinatus tendons in 53 (86%) of the patients. In addition, similar biopsies were harvested from 10 patients undergoing surgery for chronic tears without history of trauma. All tissue samples were examined by a well-experienced pathologist under light microscope. Tendon degeneration was determined using the Bonar score whereas immunostaining was used for proliferation (Ki67), inflammation (CD45), apoptosis (p53) and haemosiderin staining to study traces of bleeding. Results The median (IQR) Bonar score for the acute trauma-related biopsies was 10.5 (7.5-14.5) compared to 11 (5-12.8) for the control group with no statistically significant difference between the groups. No statistically significant between-group difference was found for the inflammatory index whereas tendons from patients with trauma-related full-thickness rotator cuff tears had statistically significantly higher apoptosis [3.1 (0.5-8.9) vs. 0.1 (0-1.5), p = 0.003] and proliferation [4.0 (1.8-6.9) vs. 0.4 (0-2.0), p = 0.001) indices than those undergoing surgery for chronic tears. Positive haemosiderin staining was found in 34% of tissue samples from patients with trauma-related tears compared to 10% in the control group (n.s). Conclusion This study suggests that there is no difference with regard to degenerative changes between supraspinatus tendons harvested from patients with acute, trauma-related rotator cuff tears and patients with nontraumatic, chronic tears.

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  • 2.
    Aagaard, Knut E.
    et al.
    Helsingborg Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lunsjo, Karl
    Helsingborg Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Frobell, Richard
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Björnsson Hallgren, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Factors associated with healing failure after early repair of acute, trauma-related rotator cuff tears2023In: Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery, ISSN 1058-2746, E-ISSN 1532-6500, Vol. 32, no 10, p. 2074-2081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Healing failure after rotator cuff repair is a challenging problem. Acute, trauma-related tears are considered a separate entity and are often treated surgically. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with healing failure in previously asymp-tomatic patients with trauma-related rotator cuff tears treated with early arthroscopic repair. Methods: This study included 62 consecutively recruited patients (23% women; median age, 61 years; age range, 42-75 years) with acute symptoms in a previously asymptomatic shoulder and a magnetic resonance imaging-verified full-thickness rotator cuff tear after shoulder trauma. All patients were offered, and underwent, early arthroscopic repair, during which a biopsy specimen was har-vested from the supraspinatus tendon and analyzed for signs of degeneration. Of the patients, 57 (92%) completed 1-year follow-up and underwent assessment of repair integrity on magnetic resonance images according to the Sugaya classification. Risk factors for heal-ing failure were investigated using a causal-relation diagram where age, body mass index, tendon degeneration (Bonar score), diabetes mellitus, fatty infiltration (FI), sex, smoking, tear location regarding integrity of the rotator cable, and tear size (number of ruptured tendons and tendon retraction) were included and analyzed. Results: Healing failure at 1 year was identified in 37% of patients (n = 21). A high degree of FI of the supraspinatus muscle (P = .01), a tear location including disruption of rotator cable integrity (P = .01), and old age (P = .03) were associated with healing failure. Tendon degeneration as determined by histopathology was not associated with healing failure at 1-year follow-up (P = .63). Conclusion: Older age, increased FI of the supraspinatus muscle, and a tear including disruption of the rotator cable increased the risk of healing failure after early arthroscopic repair in patients with trauma-related full-thickness rotator cuff tears. Level of evidence: Level I; Prospective Cohort Design; Prognosis Study

  • 3.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Bond University, Gold Coast, Australia.
    Allard, Michael
    Bond University, Gold Coast, Australia.
    Kierkegaard, Marie
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Academic Specialist Center, Stockholm Health Services, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    What biopsychosocial factors are associated with work ability in conservatively managed patients with cervical radiculopathy?: A cross-sectional analysis2020In: PM&R, ISSN 1934-1482, E-ISSN 1934-1563, PM R, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 64-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    No previous studies have investigated what biopsychosocial factors are associated with self‐reported work ability in conservatively managed patients with cervical radiculopathy.

    Objective

    To develop a theoretical model of factors and potential processes associated with variation in work ability based on a thorough assessment of biopsychosocial variables in conservatively managed patients with cervical radiculopathy.

    Design

    Cross‐sectional observational study.

    Setting

    Tertiary neurosurgery clinic.

    Patients

    A total of 144 conservatively managed patients with cervical pain and radiculopathy participated in the study.

    Methods

    From 64 biopsychosocial candidate variables, significant (P < .05) bivariate correlators with Work Ability Index (WAI) were entered as independent variables in a categorical regression. Elastic net regularization maintained the most parsimonious set of independent variables significantly associated with variation in WAI as the dependent variable. Process analysis of significant independent variable associations with WAI was performed.

    Main Outcome Measurement

    WAI.

    Results

    From 42 bivariate correlates of WAI, multivariate regression displayed a total of seven variables that were significantly (F [25,98] = 5.74, P < .05) associated with 65.8% of the variation in WAI. The Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Fear‐Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire Work subscale (FABQ‐W) were significant individual factors within the final regression model. Process analysis displayed FABQ‐W having a significant specific indirect association with the direct association between NDI and WAI, with the model associated with 77% of the variability in WAI (F [2,84] = 141.17, P < .001).

    Conclusion

    Of 64 candidate biopsychosocial factors, NDI and FABQ‐W were the most significant multivariate correlates with work ability. FABQ‐W has a significant indirect association with baseline NDI scores and perceived work ability. This warrants future research trialing work‐related fear avoidance interventions in conservatively managed patients with cervical radiculopathy.

    Level of Evidence

    III

  • 4.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Zhou, Caddie
    Ctr Registries Vastra Gotaland, Sweden.
    Rolfson, Ola
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Gunilla Limbäck
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Ctr Registries, Sweden.
    Analgesic prescriptions received by patients before commencing the BOA model of care for osteoarthritis: a Swedish national registry study with matched reference and clinical guideline benchmarking2022In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 93, p. 51-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Swedish clinical guidelines for osteoarthritis (OA) prioritize patient education, exercise, and-if necessary-weight reduction before considering adjunct pharmacological intervention. Contrariwise, we investigated the proportion and type of dispensed analgesic prescriptions in Sweden received by patients during 3 years before commencing non-pharmacological primary care interventions for OA (2008-2016) compared with the general population. Furthermore, we analyzed the proportion of analgesic prescriptions dispensed before (2008-2012) compared with after (2012-2016) guideline publication in terms of concordance with clinical guideline recommendations. Patients and methods - Patients with hip or knee OA (n = 72,069) from the Better Management of OA national quality register receiving non-pharmacological interventions in primary care between 2008 and 2016 were included (OA cohort). An age, sex, and residence matched reference cohort (n = 216,207) was formed from the Swedish Total Population Register. Based on a period 3 years prior to inclusion in the OA cohort, Swedish Prescribed Drug Register data was linked to both the OA and reference cohorts. Results - Compared with the reference cohort, a distinctly larger proportion of the OA cohort had dispensed prescriptions for most types of analgesics, increasing exponentially each year prior to commencing non-pharmacological intervention. Since guideline publication, the proportion of the OA cohort having no dispensed prescription analgesics prior to non-pharmacological primary care intervention concordantly increased by 5.0% (95% CI 4.2-5.9). Furthermore, dispensed prescriptions concordantly decreased for non-selective NSAIDs -8.6% (CI -9.6 to -7.6), weak opioids -6.8% (CI -7.7 to -5.9), glucosamine -9.5% (CI -9.8 to -8.8). and hyaluronic acid -1.6% (CI -1.8 to -1.5) but discordantly increased for strong opioids 2.8% (CI 2.1-3.4) and glucocorticoid intra-articular injection for hip OA 2.1% (CI 1.0-3.1). Interpretation - In Sweden, dispensed prescription of analgesics commonly occurred before initiating non-pharmacological primary care interventions for OA but reduced modestly after guideline publication, which prioritizes non-pharmacological before pharmacological interventions. Additional modest improvements occurred in the stepped-care prioritization of analgesic prescription types. However, future strategies are required to curb an increase of strong opioids prescription for OA and glucocorticoid intra-articular injection for hip OA.

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  • 5.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine.
    Limbäck-Svensson, Gunilla
    Västra Götalandsregionen, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Zhou, Caddie
    Västra Götalandsregionen, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rolfson, Ola
    Västra Götalandsregionen, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dispenced prescriptions of analgesics prior to entering an osteoarthritis care program. a national registry linkage study2020In: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, ISSN 1063-4584, E-ISSN 1522-9653, Vol. 28, p. S59-S60Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 6.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Henefalk, G.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Randomised trial of bisphosphonate-coated dental implants: Radiographic follow-up after five years of loading2016In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 45, no 12, p. 1564-1569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The results of a randomised trial with bisphosphonate-coated dental implants have been reported previously. Each patient received one coated and one uncoated implant in a double-blind split-mouth design study. After 6 months of osseointegration, resonance frequency analysis indicated better fixation of the coated implants. Reduced marginal bone resorption was also shown. However, it was not known whether the advantage of the bisphosphonate coating would persist over time. The radiographic results at 5 years after implant installation are reported herein. A blinded investigator measured marginal resorption on fresh radiographs obtained for 14 of the 16 patients (two had died) and compared these with the post-implantation images. Non-parametric statistics were used. All implants functioned well. The median marginal bone loss for control implants was found to be 0.70 mm, which is less than usually reported in the literature. The bisphosphonate-coated implants showed even less resorption (median 0.20 mm). The median difference within each pair of implants after 5 years of use was 0.34 mm (95% confidence interval 0.00-0.75 mm; P = 0.04). The present data suggest that bisphosphonate-coated implants enable prolonged preservation of the marginal bone.

  • 7.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Henefalk, Gustav
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Impact of a zoledronate coating on early post-surgical implant stability and marginal bone resorption in the maxilla-A split-mouth randomized clinical trial.2019In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, ISSN 0905-7161, E-ISSN 1600-0501, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 49-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this clinical study was to evaluate the effect of a bisphosphonate coating on a titanium implant on the implant stability quotient (ISQ) and the radiographic marginal bone levels at implants during early healing (2-8 weeks).

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a randomized double-blind trial with internal controls, 16 patients received a dental implant coated with zoledronate and one uncoated implant as a control. The coated and uncoated implants which were visually indistinguishable were bone level titanium implants with a moderately rough surface and a microthreaded neck. ISQ values were obtained at insertion and at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks. Radiographs were obtained at insertion and at 8 weeks. The primary outcome was the difference in ISQ values between the coated implants and the control implants at 4 and 6 weeks, corrected for insertion values. The secondary outcome was loss of marginal bone level from insertion to 8 weeks.

    RESULTS: Implant stability quotient values remained largely constant over the 8 weeks, and there was no significant difference between coated and uncoated implants at any time point. There was 0.12 (SD 0.10) mm marginal bone loss at the control implants and 0.04 (SD 0.08) mm at the coated implants. The difference was 0.17 mm; SD 0.14; p < 0.006). On blind qualitative scoring, 13 of the 15 control implants and two of 15 coated implants showed small marginal bone defects (p = 0.003).

    CONCLUSIONS: There were no statistically significant differences observed in ISQ values between the coated and uncoated implants during the early healing. There was less marginal bone loss at the coated implants.

  • 8.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Editorial Material: Is surgery for the subacromial pain syndrome ever indicated? in ACTA ORTHOPAEDICA, vol 86, issue 6, pp 639-6402015In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 86, no 6, p. 639-640Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

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  • 9.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Post-traumatic stiff elbow2018In: EFORT open reviews, ISSN 2058-5241, Vol. 3, no 5, p. 210-216Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Post-traumatic and post-operative stiffness of the elbow joint is relatively common and may in pronounced cases markedly interfere with normal upper extremity function.Soft-tissue contractures and heterotopic bone formation are two major causes of limited movement.Extensive recent research has elucidated many of the pathways contributing to these conditions, but the exact mechanisms are still unknown.In the early phase of soft-tissue contractures conservative treatment may be valuable, but in longstanding cases operative treatment is often necessary.Several different options are available depending on the severity of the condition and the underlying offending structures. Surgical treatment may allow significant gains in movement but rarely complete restoration, and complications are not uncommon.The following presentation reviews the recent literature on pathomechanisms and treatment alternatives. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2018;3 DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.3.170062.

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  • 10.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Örebro University, Sweden.
    What keeps a shoulder stable - Is there an ideal method for anterior stabilisation?2024In: SHOULDER & ELBOW, ISSN 1758-5732, Vol. 16, no 1Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The gleno-humeral joint is by far the most mobile in the human body but also afflicted by dislocations, predominantly anterior. Surgical stabilisation is often successful but failures not uncommon. The following review describes potential causes of failure and highlights the need of adapting surgical methods to pathomorphology.

  • 11.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Nestorson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Scheer, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Extensive soft tissue lesions in redislocated after simple elbow dislocations2017In: Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery, ISSN 1058-2746, E-ISSN 1532-6500, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 1294-1297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The majority of simple elbow dislocations (no associated fractures) can be treated nonoperatively with a short period of immobilization followed by guided aftercare. This case series describes the soft tissue injuries in a rare subset of patients in whom the elbow redislocated despite adequate immobilization. Methods: During a 6-year period, 8 patients were identified. They were all treated with reduction and casting in 90 degrees of flexion or more. At 1 week of follow-up, redislocation had occurred in all patients and open soft tissue repair was performed. The injuries were documented and the patients were followed up clinically and with radiographs. Results: Extensive soft tissue injuries, including both collateral ligament injuries and muscle origin avulsions from either or both sides, were found in all patients. The functional result at follow-up was satisfactory in all patients. Conclusion: Vast soft tissue injuries including both collateral ligaments and muscle origins should be expected in the event of early severe instability of a dislocated elbow joint. (C) 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. All rights reserved.

  • 12.
    Allen, K. D.
    et al.
    Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA; Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA; Durham Dept Vet Affairs Hlth Care Syst, NC 27705 USA.
    Huffman, K.
    Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA; Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.
    Cleveland, R. J.
    Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA; Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.
    van der Esch, M.
    Amsterdam Univ Appl Sci, Netherlands.
    Abbott, J. H.
    Univ Otago, New Zealand.
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Bennell, K.
    Univ Melbourne, Australia.
    Bowden, J. L.
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia.
    Eyles, J.
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia.
    Healey, E. L.
    Keele Univ, England.
    Holden, M. A.
    Keele Univ, England.
    Jayakumar, P.
    Univ Texas Austin, TX 78712 USA.
    Koenig, K.
    Univ Texas Austin, TX 78712 USA.
    Lo, G.
    Baylor Coll Med, TX 77030 USA; Michael E DeBakey VA Med Ctr, TX USA.
    Losina, E.
    Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA.
    Miller, K.
    Univ Wisconsin Madison, WI USA.
    Osteras, N.
    Diakonhjemmet Hosp, Norway.
    Pratt, C.
    Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia.
    Quicke, J. G.
    Chancery Exchange, England; Keele Univ, England.
    Sharma, S.
    Univ New South Wales, Australia; Ctr Pain IMPACT, Australia.
    Skou, S. T.
    Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark; Naestved Slagelse Ringsted Hosp, Denmark.
    Tveter, A. T.
    Diakonhjemmet Hosp, Norway.
    Woolf, A.
    Royal Cornwall Hosp, England.
    Yu, S. P.
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia.
    Hinman, R. S.
    Univ Melbourne, Australia.
    Evaluating Osteoarthritis Management Programs: outcome domain recommendations from the OARSI Joint Effort Initiative2023In: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, ISSN 1063-4584, E-ISSN 1522-9653, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 954-965Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To develop sets of core and optional recommended domains for describing and evaluating Osteoarthritis Management Programs (OAMPs), with a focus on hip and knee Osteoarthritis (OA). Design: We conducted a 3-round modified Delphi survey involving an international group of researchers, health professionals, health administrators and people with OA. In Round 1, participants ranked the importance of 75 outcome and descriptive domains in five categories: patient impacts, implementation outcomes, and characteristics of the OAMP and its participants and clinicians. Domains ranked as "important" or "essential" by & GE;80% of participants were retained, and participants could suggest addi-tional domains. In Round 2, participants rated their level of agreement that each domain was essential for evaluating OAMPs: 0 = strongly disagree to 10 = strongly agree. A domain was retained if & GE;80% rated it & GE;6. In Round 3, participants rated remaining domains using same scale as in Round 2; a domain was recommended as "core" if & GE;80% of participants rated it & GE;9 and as "optional" if & GE;80% rated it & GE;7. Results: A total of 178 individuals from 26 countries participated; 85 completed all survey rounds. Only one domain, "ability to participate in daily activities", met criteria for a core domain; 25 domains met criteria for an optional recommendation: 8 Patient Impacts, 5 Implementation Outcomes, 5 Participant Characteristics, 3 OAMP Characteristics and 4 Clinician Characteristics. Conclusion: The ability of patients with OA to participate in daily activities should be evaluated in all OAMPs. Teams evaluating OAMPs should consider including domains from the optional recommended set, with representation from all five categories and based on stakeholder priorities in their local context. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Osteoarthritis Research Society International.

  • 13.
    Amirhosseini, Mehdi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Göran
    Division of Pathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mechanical instability and titanium particles induce similar transcriptomic changes in a rat model for periprosthetic osteolysis and aseptic loosening2017In: Bone Reports, ISSN 2352-1872, Vol. 7, p. 17-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wear debris particles released from prosthetic bearing surfaces and mechanical instability of implants are two main causes of periprosthetic osteolysis. While particle-induced loosening has been studied extensively, mechanisms through which mechanical factors lead to implant loosening have been less investigated. This study compares the transcriptional profiles associated with osteolysis in a rat model for aseptic loosening, induced by either mechanical instability or titanium particles. Rats were exposed to mechanical instability or titanium particles. After 15 min, 3, 48 or 120 h from start of the stimulation, gene expression changes in periprosthetic bone tissue was determined by microarray analysis. Microarray data were analyzed by PANTHER Gene List Analysis tool and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Both types of osteolytic stimulation led to gene regulation in comparison to unstimulated controls after 3, 48 or 120 h. However, when mechanical instability was compared to titanium particles, no gene showed a statistically significant difference (fold change = ± 1.5 and adjusted p-value = 0.05) at any time point. There was a remarkable similarity in numbers and functional classification of regulated genes. Pathway analysis showed several inflammatory pathways activated by both stimuli, including Acute Phase Response signaling, IL-6 signaling and Oncostatin M signaling. Quantitative PCR confirmed the changes in expression of key genes involved in osteolysis observed by global transcriptomics. Inflammatory mediators including interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1ß, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)2, prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase (Ptgs)2 and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) showed strong upregulation, as assessed by both microarray and qPCR. By investigating genome-wide expression changes we show that, despite the different nature of mechanical implant instability and titanium particles, osteolysis seems to be induced through similar biological and signaling pathways in this rat model for aseptic loosening. Pathways associated to the innate inflammatory response appear to be a major driver for osteolysis. Our findings implicate early restriction of inflammation to be critical to prevent or mitigate osteolysis and aseptic loosening of orthopedic implants.

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  • 14.
    Anderson, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Herngren, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Risto, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Limited angular remodelling after in-situ fixation for slipped capital femoral epiphysis2024In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 25, no 1, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundIn Sweden, most children with slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) are operated on with a single smooth pin or a short-threaded screw, allowing further growth of the femoral neck. Using the Swedish Pediatric Orthopaedic Quality registry, SPOQ, we investigated whether angular remodelling occurs adjacent to the proximal femoral epiphysis after fixation of SCFE using implants, allowing continued growth of the femoral neck.MethodsDuring 2008-2010 a total national population of 155 children were reported to the SPOQ registry. Following our strict inclusion criteria, radiographs of 51 hips were further assessed. The lateral Head Shaft Angle (HSA), the Notzli 3-point alpha-angle, the anatomic alpha-angle, and the Anterior Offset Ratio (AOR) on the first postoperative radiographs and at follow-up were measured to describe the occurrence of remodelling. Slip severity was categorised as mild, moderate or severe according to postoperative HSA.ResultsMean and SD values for the change in HSA were 3,7 degrees (5,0 degrees), for 3-point alpha-angle 6,8 degrees (8,9 degrees), and anatomic alpha-angle 13,0 degrees (16,3 degrees). The overall increase in AOR was 0,038 (0.069). There were no significant differences between the slip severity groups.ConclusionsWe found limited angular remodelling after in situ fixation with smooth pins or short threaded screws for SCFE. The angular remodelling and the reduction of the CAM deformity was less than previously described after fixation of SCFE with similar implants. Results about the same magnitude with non-growth sparing techniques suggest that factors other than longitudinal growth of the femoral neck are important for angular remodelling.

  • 15.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Österberg, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tagesson, Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Gauffin, Håkan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Webster, Kate E.
    La Trobe University, Australia.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Satisfaction With Knee Function After Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Is Associated With Self-Efficacy, Quality of Life, and Returning to the Preinjury Physical Activity2016In: Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopy And Related, ISSN 0749-8063, E-ISSN 1526-3231, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 1631-1638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To assess whether patient-reported outcomes (psychological factors, appraisals of knee function, and physical activity participation) were associated with satisfaction with knee function after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Methods: Participants who were aged 18 to 45 years and a minimum 12 months post primary ACL reconstruction completed a questionnaire battery evaluating knee self-efficacy, knee-related quality of life, self-reported function, and physical activity participation. Participants responses to the question "If you were to spend the rest of your life with your knee just the way it has been in the last week, would you feel.... (7-point ordinal scale; 1 = happy, 7 = unhappy)" were categorized as satisfied, mostly satisfied, or dissatisfied and used as the primary outcome. Ordinal regression was used to examine associations between independent variables and the primary outcome. Results: A total of 177 participants were included at an average of 3 years after primary ACL reconstruction. At follow-up, 44% reported they would be satisfied, 28% mostly satisfied, and 28% dissatisfied with the outcome of ACL reconstruction. There were significant differences in psychological responses and appraisal of knee function between the 3 groups (P = .001), and significantly more people in the satisfied group had returned to their preinjury activity (58%) than in the mostly satisfied (28%) and dissatisfied (26%) groups (P = .001). Multivariable analysis demonstrated that the odds of being satisfied increased by a factor of 3 with higher self-efficacy, greater knee-related quality of life, and returning to the preinjury activity. Conclusions: People who had returned to their preinjury physical activity and who reported higher knee-related self-efficacy and quality of life were more likely to be satisfied with the outcome of ACL reconstruction.

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  • 16.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Apropå! En arrogant organisation2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 17.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Atypical fractures, a biased perspective2016In: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 47, no 1, p. S28-S30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When stress fractures started to show up in the femurs of elderly ladies, it was soon evident that bisphosphonate use lay behind, and the absolute risk increase due to bisphosphonate use was reasonably well estimated already in 2008. Thereafter followed a period of confusion: the term atypical fracture was introduced, with a definition so vague that the true stress fractures tended to disappear in a cloud of ambiguity. This cast doubt on the association with bisphosphonates. The association was then re-established by large epidemiological studies based on radiographic adjudication. Atypical fractures are largely caused by bisphosphonates. With a correct indication, bisphosphonates prevent many more fractures than they cause, at least during the first years of use. With an incorrect indication they are likely to cause more harm than good. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Beslut att operera kopplat till ortopeders attityder till kirurgi2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114, no 41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 19.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Editorial Material: ACADEMIC AUTHORSHIP How I was nearly duped into "authoring" a fake paper in BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, vol 351, issue h6605, pp2015In: BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 351, no h6605Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 20.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Editorial Material: Why do we operate proximal humeral fractures?2015In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 86, no 3, p. 279-279Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Placeboeffekten är övervärderad: »Återgång till medelvärdet« kan förklara förbättring efter skenbehandling – men misstolkas ofta2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Aspenberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Malouf, Jorge
    Hospital San Pablo, Spain.
    Tarantino, Umberto
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Garcia-Hernandez, Pedro A.
    University Hospital, Mexico.
    Corradini, Costantino
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Overgaard, Soren
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark; University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Stepan, Jan J.
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Borris, Lars
    University Hospital, Denmark.
    Lespessailles, Eric
    CHR Orleans, France; University of Orleans, France.
    Frihagen, Frede
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Papavasiliou, Kyriakos
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Petto, Helmut
    Eli Lilly, Austria.
    Ramon Caeiro, Jose
    University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
    Marin, Fernando
    Eli Lilly Research Centre, England.
    Effects of Teriparatide Compared with Risedronate on Recovery After Pertrochanteric Hip Fracture Results of a Randomized, Active-Controlled, Double-Blind Clinical Trial at 26 Weeks2016In: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American volume, ISSN 0021-9355, E-ISSN 1535-1386, Vol. 98, no 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Osteoporosis drugs might affect fracture-healing. We therefore studied the effects of teriparatide in comparison with risedronate on recovery after pertrochanteric hip fractures. Methods: The study was a randomized, multicenter, active-controlled, 78-week trial comparing teriparatide (20 mg/day) with risedronate (35 mg/week) initiated within 2 weeks after fixation of a low-trauma pertrochanteric hip fracture (AO/OTA 31-A1 or 31-A2). The main inclusion criteria were a bone mineral density T-score of amp;lt;=-22.0 and 25-OH-vitamin D of amp;gt;= 9.2 ng/mL. During the first 26 weeks, patients received study medication with oral or injectable placebo plus calcium and vitamin D in a double-blinded fashion. Secondary (Timed Up-and-Go [TUG] test, hip pain, Short Form [SF]-36 health status, and safety) and exploratory (radiographic outcomes and ability to walk) 26-week end points are reported. Results: Of the 224 patients who were randomized, 171 (86 teriparatide, 85 risedronate) were included in the analysis. The mean age was 77 +/- 8 years, 77% were female, and 26% had a prior history of low-trauma fracture. The teriparatide group completed the TUG test in a shorter time at 6, 12, 18, and 26 weeks (differences of 25.7, -4.4, -3.1, and -3.1 seconds, respectively; p = 0.021 for the overall difference). They also reported less pain on a visual analog scale immediately after the TUG test at 12 and 18 weeks (adjusted absolute differences of 10.6 and 11.9 mm, respectively; p amp;lt; 0.05). There were no significant between-group differences in the SF-36 score, Charnley hip pain score, ability to walk, or use of walking aids during follow-up. Radiographic healing at 6, 12, and 26 weeks, mechanical failure of the implant (teriparatide, 7; risedronate, 8), loss of reduction (teriparatide, 2; risedronate, 4), and nonunion (0 cases) were not significantly different. Mild hypercalcemia and hyperuricemia were more frequent with teriparatide. Conclusions: Teriparatide was associated with less pain and a shorter time to complete the TUG test between 6 and 26 weeks compared with risedronate. Other fracture-recovery outcomes were similar. The results should be interpreted with caution as these were secondary end points.

  • 23.
    Aspenberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rydholm, Anders
    Lund, Sweden.
    Svensson, Olle
    Umeå, Sweden.
    Artrosskolan: evidensen måste stärkas2018In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 115Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Aspenberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Schepull, Torsten
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Substantial creep in healing human Achilles tendons: A pilot study2015In: MLTJ Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal, ISSN 2240-4554, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 151-155Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: healing after rupture of the Achilles tendon can be described in terms of mechanical properties of the new-formed tissue, constituting the tendon callus. In previous human studies, the elastic modulus and the density remained almost constant during 3 months after mobilization started, and then improved up to one year. So far, time-dependent deformation of the healing human tendon has not been reported.

    Methods: in a series of 16 patients, operated with Achilles tendon suture, we implanted tantalum beads into the tendon and measured the distance between them repeatedly during 3 min of constant loading, using an ordinary image intensifier. The patients unloaded their leg for 30 min before the test. To avoid bias, all images were investigated in a randomized and blinded order.

    Results: total strain during 3 min of constant loading at 7 weeks post injury amounted to 5%, and at 19 weeks to 3%. About half of the strain, after the loading was applied, occurred during the second and third min. Considerable strain also occurred just before loading, when the patient was told that a load would be applied, but before this was actually done.

    Conclusion: the measurements were crude, and this study should be seen as a pilot. Still, viscoelastic properties seem to dominate the mechanical behavior the healing Achilles tendon from start of mobilization to 19 weeks, at least when tested after 30 min rest. This deserves further studies with more precise methods.

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  • 25.
    Bargoria, Victor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Moi Univ, Kenya.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Enheten för folkhälsa.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Halje, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Christer A.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bermon, Stephane
    World Athlet, Monaco.
    Running for your life: A qualitative study of champion long-distance runners strategies to sustain excellence in performance and health2020In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, ISSN 1440-2440, E-ISSN 1878-1861, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 715-720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    To investigate champion long-distance runners’ strategies for managing injury and illness symptoms and staying well.

    Design

    Qualitative research study.

    Methods

    Twelve long-distance runners were interviewed immediately after having competed in World Championships finals. Thematic analysis was used to categorise and structure the data. The results were presented as primary themes and overarching constructs representing connections between the primary themes.

    Results

    The champion runners’ basic tactic to manage symptoms of ill health was characterized by rapid adjustment of sports load and a strong incentive to learn from experience and professional advice. This tactic was named here educated flexibility. A secondary exigency tactic was associated with reaching short-term goals and a consequential acceptance of health hazards. The runners used economic and other environmental strain to explain use of the exigency tactic. Most champion runners’ long-term strategy to stay well included both tactics successfully combined to maintain a performance level assuring a regular income. Avoidance of letting environmental strain and health problems create vicious circles was at the centre of these strategies.

    Conclusions

    Champion runners’ main strategy to stay well and sustain their superiority in performance was characterized by constantly paying attention to symptoms of ill health, listening to medical advice, and not letting environmental strain interfere with adjustment of sports load. Many top-level runners originate from global regions where formal education programs and health insurance plans are poorly regulated and supported. Bio-psychosocial models including empowerment at individual and systems levels should be considered when health services are planned for professional runners.

  • 26.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Abaloparatide versus teriparatide: a head to head comparison of effects on fracture healing in mouse models2018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 6, p. 674-677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Teriparatide accelerates fracture healing in animals and probably in man. Abaloparatide is a new drug with similar although not identical effects on the teriparatide receptor. Given at 4 times the teriparatide dose in a human osteoporosis trial, abaloparatide increased bone density more than teriparatide, and both reduced fracture risk. We investigated in mice whether abaloparatide stimulates fracture healing, and if it does so with the suggested dose effect relation (4:1). Patients and methods - In a validated mouse model for metaphyseal healing (burr hole with screw pull-out), 96 mice were randomly allocated to 11 groups: control (saline), teriparatide or abaloparatide, where teriparatide and abaloparatide were given at 5 different doses each. In a femoral shaft osteotomy model, 24 mice were randomly allocated to 3 groups: control (saline), teriparatide (15 mu g/kg) or abaloparatide (60 mu g/kg). Each treatment was given daily via subcutaneous injections. Results were evaluated by mechanical testing and microCT. Results - In the metaphyseal model, a dose-dependent increase in screw pull-out force could be seen. In a linear regression analysis (r = 0.78) each increase in ln(dose) by 1 (regardless of drug type) was associated with an increase in pull-out force by 1.50 N (SE 0.18) (p amp;lt; 0.001). Changing drug from teriparatide to abaloparatide increased the force by 1.41 N (SE 0.60; p = 0.02). In the diaphyseal model, the callus density was 23% (SD 10), 38% (SD 10), and 47% (SD 2) for control, for teriparatide and abaloparatide respectively. Both drugs were significantly different from controls (p = 0.001 and p = 0.008), but not from each other. Interpretation - Both drugs improve fracture healing, but in these mouse models, the potency per mu g of abaloparatide seems only 2.5 times that of teriparatide, rather than the 4:1 relation chosen in the clinical abaloparatide-teriparatide comparison trial.

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  • 27.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Osteoblast precursors and inflammatory cells arrive simultaneously to sites of a trabecular-bone injury2018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 4, p. 457-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Fracture healing in the shaft is usually described as a sequence of events, starting with inflammation, which triggers mesenchymal tissue formation in successive steps. Most clinical fractures engage cancellous bone. We here describe fracture healing in cancellous bone, focusing on the timing of inflammatory and mesenchymal cell type appearance at the site of injury. Material and methods - Rats received a proximal tibial drill hole, A subgroup received clodronate-containing liposomes before or after surgery. The tibiae were analyzed with micro-CT and immunohistochemistry 1 to 7 days after injury. Results - Granulocytes (myeloperoxidase) appeared in moderate numbers within the hole at day 1 and then gradually disappeared. Macrophage expression (CD68) was seen on day 1, increased until day 3, and then decreased. Mesenchymal cells (vimentin) had already accumulated in the periphery of the hole on day 1. Mesenchymal cells dominated in the entire lesion on day 3, now producing extracellular matrix. A modest number of preosteoblasts (RUNX2) were seen on day 1 and peaked on day 4. Osteoid was seen on day 4 in the traumatized region, with a distinct border to the uninjured surrounding marrow. Clodronate liposomes given before the injury reduced the volume of bone formation at day 7, but no reduction in macrophage numbers could be detected. Interpretation - The typical sequence of events in shaft fractures was not seen. Mesenchymal cells appeared simultaneously with granulocyte and macrophage arrival. Clodronate liposomes, known to reduce macrophage numbers, seemed to be associated with the delineation of the volume of tissue to be replaced by bone.

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  • 28.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dietrich, Franciele
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tätting, Love
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Eliasson, Pernilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Depletion of cytotoxic (CD8+) T cells impairs implant fixation in rat cancellous bone2019In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research, ISSN 0736-0266, E-ISSN 1554-527X, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 805-811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As cytotoxic (CD8(+)) T cells seem to impair shaft fracture healing, we hypothesized that depletion of CD8(+) cells would instead improve healing of cancellous bone. Additionally, we also tested if CD8-depletion would influence the healing of ruptured Achilles tendons. Rats received a single injection of either anti-CD8 antibodies or saline and put through surgery 24 h later. Three different surgical interventions were performed as follows: (1) a drill hole in the proximal tibia with microCT (BV/TV) to assess bone formation; (2) a screw in the proximal tibia with mechanical evaluation (pull-out force) to assess fracture healing; (3) Achilles tendon transection with mechanical evaluation (force-at-failure) to assess tendon healing. Furthermore, CD8-depletion was confirmed with flow cytometry on peripheral blood. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed depletion of CD8(+) cells (p amp;lt; 0.001). Contrary to our hypothesis, depletion of CD8(+) cells reduced the implant pull-out force by 19% (p amp;lt; 0.05) and stiffness by 34% (p amp;lt; 0.01), although the bone formation in the drill holes was the same as in the controls. Tendon healing was unaffected by CD8-depletion. Our results suggest that CD8(+) cells have an important part in cancellous bone healing.

  • 29.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Anti-RANKL treatment improves screw fixation in cancellous bone in rats2015In: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 990-995Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bisphosphonates improve implant fixation in randomised clinical trials of knee prostheses, hip prostheses and dental implants. However, a limited amount of bone resorption is required for bisphosphonates to exert an effect. Anti-RANKL treatment does not have this limitation, and we therefore tested whether if they might be more effective for improvement of implant fixation. This is of interest, as anti-RANKL treatment with denosumab is now in common clinical use. Male SD rats received a stain-less steel screw in the right proximal tibia and a drill hole in the left (n = 42). They were randomised to subcutaneous injections of either alendronate (20 mu g/kg/day), alendronate (200 mu g/kg/day), osteoprotegerin with an Fc tag (OPG-Fc; 8 mg/kg, twice weekly), or saline control. After 4 weeks, the fixation of the steel screw was measured by pull-out test. The tibia with the drill hole was evaluated with mu CT. OPG-Fc increased the pull-out force compared to saline controls by 153% (p less than 0.001). There was no significant difference between OPG-Fc and the alendronate groups. OPG-Fc increased the bone density (BV/TV) in the previous drill hole compared to controls 7-fold (p less than 0.001). This increase was higher than with any alendronate dose (p less than 0.001). OPG-Fc increased the bone density of the L5 vertebral body, but there was no significant difference between OPG-Fc and alendronate. Our results suggest that screw fixation in cancellous bone can be dramatically improved by an antiRANKL agent. The effect was comparable to very high bisphosphonate doses. Screw insertion in cancellous bone elicits a metaphyseal fracture healing response, and our findings might be relevant not only for implant fixation, but also for fracture healing in cancellous bone.

  • 30.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Experimental models for cancellous bone healing in the rat Comparison of drill holes and implanted screws2015In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 86, no 6, p. 745-750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Cancellous bone appears to heal by mechanisms different from shaft fracture healing. There is a paucity of animal models for fractures in cancellous bone, especially with mechanical evaluation. One proposed model consists of a screw in the proximal tibia of rodents, evaluated by pull-out testing. We evaluated this model in rats by comparing it to the healing of empty drill holes, in order to explain its relevance for fracture healing in cancellous bone. To determine the sensitivity to external influences, we also compared the response to drugs that influence bone healing. Methods - Mechanical fixation of the screws was measured by pull-out test and related to the density of the new bone formed around similar, but radiolucent, PMMA screws. The pull-out force was also related to the bone density in drill holes at various time points, as measured by microCT. Results - The initial bone formation was similar in drill holes and around the screw, and appeared to be reflected by the pull-out force. Both models responded similarly to alendronate or teriparatide (PTH). Later, the models became different as the bone that initially filled the drill hole was resorbed to restore the bone marrow cavity, whereas on the implant surface a thin layer of bone remained, making it change gradually from a trauma-related model to an implant fixation model. Interpretation - The similar initial bone formation in the different models suggests that pull-out testing in the screw model is relevant for assessment of metaphyseal bone healing. The subsequent remodeling would not be of clinical relevance in either model.

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  • 31.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Ressner, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Koziorowski, Jacek
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Malmqvist, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Shining dead bone-cause for cautious interpretation of [F-18]NaF PET scans2018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 124-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose — [18F]Fluoride ([18F]NaF) PET scan is frequently used for estimation of bone healing rate and extent in cases of bone allografting and fracture healing. Some authors claim that [18F]NaF uptake is a measure of osteoblastic activity, calcium metabolism, or bone turnover. Based on the known affinity of fluoride to hydroxyapatite, we challenged this view.

    Methods — 10 male rats received crushed, frozen allogeneic cortical bone fragments in a pouch in the abdominal wall on the right side, and hydroxyapatite granules on left side. [18F]NaF was injected intravenously after 7 days. 60 minutes later, the rats were killed and [18F]NaF uptake was visualized in a PET/CT scanner. Specimens were retrieved for micro CT and histology.

    Results — MicroCT and histology showed no signs of new bone at the implant sites. Still, the implants showed a very high [18F]NaF uptake, on a par with the most actively growing and remodeling sites around the knee joint.

    Interpretation — [18F]NaF binds with high affinity to dead bone and calcium phosphate materials. Hence, an [18F]NaF PET/CT scan does not allow for sound conclusions about new bone ingrowth into bone allograft, healing activity in long bone shaft fractures with necrotic fragments, or remodeling around calcium phosphate coated prostheses

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  • 32.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Tätting, Love
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Schilcher, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Marrow compartment contribution to cortical defect healing2018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 119-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Healing of shaft fractures is commonly described as regards external callus. We wanted to clarify the role of the bone marrow compartment in the healing of stable shaft fractures. Patients and methods - A longitudinal furrow was milled along the longitudinal axis of the femoral shaft in mice. The exposed bone marrow under the furrow was scooped out. The mice were then randomized to no further treatment, or to receiving 2 silicone plugs in the medullary canal distal and proximal to the defect. The plugs isolated the remaining marrow from contact with the defect. Results were studied with histology and flow cytometry. Results - Without silicone plugs, the marrow defect was filled with new bone marrow-like tissue by day 5, and new bone was seen already on day 10. The new bone was seen only at the level of the cortical injury, where it seemed to form simultaneously in the entire region of the removed cortex. The new bone seemed not to invade the marrow compartment, and there was a sharp edge between new bone and marrow. The regenerated marrow was similar to uninjured marrow, but contained considerably more cells. In the specimens with plugs, the marrow compartment was either filled with loose scar tissue, or empty, and there was only minimal bone formation, mainly located around the edges of the cortical injury. Interpretation - Marrow regeneration in the defect seemed to be a prerequisite for normal cortical healing. Shaft fracture treatment should perhaps pay more attention to the local bone marrow.

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  • 33.
    Björkman, Ann-Sofi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Gauffin, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Koskinen, Seppo
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Science, Intervention, and Technology, Division for Radiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sensitivity of DECT in ACL tears. A prospective study with arthroscopy as reference method2022In: Acta Radiologica Open, E-ISSN 2058-4601, Vol. 11, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: CT is often used for fracture evaluation following knee trauma and to diagnose ACL injuries would also be valuable. Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of dual energy CT (DECT) for detection of ACL tears in acute and subacute knee injuries. Material and Methods: Patients with suspected ACL injury were imaged with DECT and MRI. Clinically blinded DECT images were independently read twice by two radiologists. ACL was classified as normal or abnormal. Arthroscopy served as reference method. Sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) were calculated, and diagnostic performance between DECT and MRI was assessed. Results: 48 patients (26 M, 22 F, mean age 23 years, range 15-37 years) were imaged with a mean of 25 days following trauma. Of these, 21 patients underwent arthroscopy with a mean of 195 days after trauma. Arthroscopy revealed 19 ACL tears and 2 ACLs with no tear. The combined sensitivity was 76.3% (95% CI 66.8-85.9) and 86.8 (95% CI 71.9-95.6) for DECT and MRI, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between these two methods (p = .223). The positive predictive value (PPV) was 93.5 (95% CI 84.3-98.2) and 91.7 (95% CI 77.5-98.3) for DECT and MRI, respectively. Conclusion: DECT has lower sensitivity to detect an ACL rupture than MRI, but the difference is not statistically significant. The PPV is high in both methods.

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  • 34.
    Björkman, Ann-Sofi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Malusek, Alexandr
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Gauffin, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Koskinen, Seppo
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Terveystalo Inc, Finland; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Spectral photon-counting CT: Image quality evaluation using a metal-containing bovine bone specimen2023In: European Journal of Radiology, ISSN 0720-048X, E-ISSN 1872-7727, Vol. 168, article id 111110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To find the optimal imaging parameters for a photon-counting detector CT (PCD-CT) and to compare it to an energy-integrating detector CT (EID-CT) in terms of image quality and metal artefact severity using a metal-containing bovine knee specimen. Methods: A bovine knee with a stainless-steel plate and screws was imaged in a whole-body research PCD-CT at 120 kV and 140 kV and in an EID dual-source CT (DSCT) at Sn150 kV and 80/Sn150 kV. PCD-CT virtual monoenergetic 72 and 150 keV images and EID-CT images processed with and without metal artefact reduction algorithms (iMAR) were compared. Four radiologists rated the visualisation of bony structures and metal artefact severity. The Friedman test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test with Bonferronis correction were used. P-values of &lt;= 0.0001 were considered statistically significant. Distributions of HU values of regions of interest (ROIs) in artefact-affected areas were analysed.Results: PCD-CT 140 kV 150 keV images received the highest scores and were significantly better than EID-CT Sn150 kV images. PCD-CT 72 keV images were rated significantly lower than all the others. HU-value variation was larger in the 120 kV and the 72 keV images. The ROI analysis revealed no large difference between scanners regarding artefact severity.Conclusion: PCD-CT 140 kV 150 keV images of a metal-containing bovine knee specimen provided the best image quality. They were superior to, or as good as, the best EID-CT images; even without the presumed advantage of tin filter and metal artefact reduction algorithms. PCD-CT is a promising method for reducing metal artefacts.

  • 35.
    Björnsson Hallgren, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Neither critical shoulder angle nor acromion index were related with specific pathology 20 years later!2021In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 2648-2655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The critical shoulder angle (CSA) and the acromion index (AI) are measurements of acromial shape reported as predictors of degenerative rotator cuff tears (RCT) and glenohumeral osteoarthritis (GH OA). Whether they are the cause or effect of shoulder pathologies is uncertain since pre-morbid radiographs most often are lacking. The main aim of this study was to investigate if CSA or AI were related to the development of RCT or GH OA after 20 years. A secondary aim was to investigate if the CSA and AI had changed over time. Methods In the hospital archive, 273 preoperative plain shoulder radiographs were found of patients scheduled for elective surgery other than cuff repair and arthroplasty. Forty-five images fulfilled the strict criteria published by Suter and Henninger (2015) and were used to measure CSA and AI with two independent assessors. No patient had any sign of OA in the index radiographs or any information in the medical records indicating RCT. After a median of 20 (16-22) years, 30 of these patients were radiologically re-examined with bilateral true frontal views and ultrasound of the rotator cuff. There were 19 men (20 study shoulders) and 11 females (12 study shoulders). Results Mean age at follow-up was 56 (32-78) years. There was no correlation between CSA (r = 0.02) (n.s) or AI (r = - 0.13) (n.s) in the primary radiographs and OA at follow-up. Nor was any correlation found between index CSA (r = 0.12) (n.s) or AI (r = - 0.13) (n.s) and RCT at follow-up. Mean difference in CSA was - 1.7 (- 10-3) degrees and mean AI difference was - 0.04 (- 0.13-0.09) between the first and the second radiographs, 20 years later. Bilaterally, mean CSA was 32 and AI 0.61 at follow-up. Conclusion In this study, no correlation between the CSA, AI and development of OA or RCT could be found. The mean CSA and AI decreased over a 20-year period but the difference was very small. No difference was found between the study shoulders and the contralaterals. These findings question previously reported etiological associations between scapular anatomy and the development of OA or RCT and thereby the use of these calculations as the basis of treatment.

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  • 36.
    Björnsson Hallgren, Hanna C
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Adolfsson, Lars E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Petersson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Holmgren, Theresa M
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Specific exercises for subacromial pain: Good results maintained for 5 years2017In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 88, no 6, p. 600-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose — We have previously shown that specific exercises reduced the need for surgery in subacromial painpatients at 1-year follow-up. We have now investigated whetherthis result was maintained after 5 years and compared the outcomesof surgery and non-surgical treatment.Patients and methods — 97 patients were included in the previouslyreported randomized study of patients on a waiting list forsurgery. These patients were randomized to specifi c or unspecifi cexercises. After 3 months of exercises the patients were asked ifthey still wanted surgery and this was also assessed at the present5-year follow-up. The 1-year assessment included Constant–Murley score, DASH, VAS at night, rest and activity, EQ-5D, andEQ-VAS. All these outcome assessments were repeated after 5years in 91 of the patients.Results — At the 5-year follow-up more patients in the specifi cexercise group had declined surgery, 33 of 47 as compared with16 of 44 (p = 0.001) in the unspecifi c exercise group. The meanConstant–Murley score continued to improve between the 1- and5-year follow-ups in both surgically and non-surgically treatedgroups. On a group level there was no clinically relevant changebetween 1 and 5 years in any of the other outcome measuresregardless of treatment.Interpretation — This 5-year follow-up of a previously publishedrandomized controlled trial found that specifi c exercisesreduced the need for surgery in patients with subacromial pain.Patients not responding to specifi c exercises may achieve similargood results with surgery. These fi ndings emphasize that a specifi cexercise program may serve as a selection tool for surgery.

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  • 37.
    Björnsson Hallgren, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Holmgren, Theresa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Good outcome after repair of trauma-related anterosuperior rotator cuff tearsda prospective cohort study2021In: Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery, ISSN 1058-2746, E-ISSN 1532-6500, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 1636-1646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Anterosuperior rotator cuff tears with a displaced long head of the biceps tendon are most often trauma-related, and patients with these conditions often present with severe pain and shoulder dysfunction. Repair of the subscapularis and supraspinatus and a biceps tenodesis or a tenotomy are the recommended treatments based on retrospective studies. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate clinical and structural treatment outcome in a cohort of trauma-related anterosuperior injuries in patients with previously healthy shoulders. Materials and methods: Patients seeking care for a suspected rotator cuff injury after shoulder trauma were screened according to a protocol including clinical examination, baseline scoring with Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC) and numeric rating scale of pain, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Those with anterosuperior injuries were offered surgical treatment, structured postoperative physiotherapy, and inclusion in the present study with 1-year follow-up, including MRI, baseline scores, Constant-Murley score, and Patient Global Impression of Change. Thirty-three patients (78% men) with a mean age of 59 (40-76) years were included. Results: All patients had a biceps pulley lesion, a displaced biceps tendon, and incomplete full-thickness subscapularis and supraspinatus tears. Six patients declined surgery. At follow-up, the operated patients reached a median WORC score of 86% and a median change from baseline to follow-up of 50% (P = .0001). Pain decreased (P = .0001) at rest, at night, and during activity. The median Constant-Murley score was 86% of the contralateral nonoperated shoulder, 58% of the contralateral abduction strength recovered after surgery, and 86% reported that they were recovered or much improved. All repairs and tenodeses healed except for 2 supraspinatus tendons. The 6 nonoperated patients reached a median WORC score of 90, a change in the median value from baseline to follow-up of 31, but reported more pain, and a smaller proportion considered themselves as recovered or much improved. In all patients, the 1-year MRIs had signal changes in the upper muscular portion of subscapularis, consistent with fatty infiltration, regardless of operative or nonoperative treatment. Conclusion: Anterosuperior rotator cuff injury with an associated pulley lesion and displaced long head of the biceps tendon may be treated successfully with surgery as the majority of patients in our cohort clinically recovered or were much improved without pain after a year. With a 1-year perspective, nonoperatively treated patients may also reach a reasonable clinical outcome. Independently of treatment or tendon healing, residual subscapularis muscle injury was seen, which may have long-term implications. (C) 2020 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. All rights reserved.

  • 38.
    Blomgran, Parmis
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomgran, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    A possible link between loading, inflammation and healing: Immune cell populations during tendon healing in the rat2016In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, no 29824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Loading influences tendon healing, and so does inflammation. We hypothesized that the two are connected. 48 rats underwent Achilles tendon transection. Half of the rats received Botox injections into calf muscles to reduce mechanical loading. Cells from the regenerating tissue were analyzed by flow cytometry. In the loaded group, the regenerating tissue contained 83% leukocytes (CD45(+)) day 1, and 23% day 10. The M1/M2 macrophage ratio (CCR7/CD206) peaked at day 3, while T helper (CD3(+)CD4(+)) and T-reg cells (CD25(+) Foxp3(+)) increased over time. With Botox, markers associated with down-regulation of inflammation were more common day 5 (CD163, CD206, CD25, Foxp3), and M1 or M2 macrophages and T-reg cells were virtually absent day 10, while still present with full loading. The primary variable, CCR7/CD206 ratio day 5, was higher with full loading (p = 0.001) and the T-reg cell fraction was lower (p amp;lt; 0.001). Free cage activity loading is known to increase size and strength of the tendon in this model compared to Botox. Loading now appeared to delay the switch to an M2 type of inflammation with more T-reg cells. It seems a prolonged M1 phase due to loading might make the tendon regenerate bigger.

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  • 39.
    Blomgran, Parmis
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomgran, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Cox-2 inhibition and the composition of inflammatory cell populations during early and mid-time tendon healing2017In: Muscles, ligaments and Tendons journal, ISSN 2240-4554, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 223-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: During early tendon healing, the cells within the regenerating tissue are, to a large part, inflammatory leukocytes (CD45+). In a rat Achilles tendon healing model, the inflammation resolves between 5 and 10 days. In the same model, Cox inhibitors (NSAIDs) impair healing when given during the first 5 days, but have a positive effect if given later. We tested the hypothesis that a Cox inhibitor would exert these effects by influencing inflammation, and thereby the composition of the inflammatory cell subpopulations.Methods: Achilles tendon transection was performed in 44 animals. Animals were randomized to either parecoxib or saline injections. Healing was evaluated by mechanical testing day 7 after surgery and by flow cytometry day 3 and 10.Results: Cross-sectional area, peak force and stiffness were reduced by parecoxib 31, 33, and 25% respectively (p=0.005, p=0.002, and p=0.005). By flow cytometry, there was a strong effect of time (p<0.001) on virtually all inflammatory cell subpopulations (CD45, CD11b, CD68, CCR7, CD163, CD206, CD3, CD4), but no significant effect of parecoxib at any time point.Conclusion: The results suggest that the negative effects of Cox inhibitors on tendon healing might be exerted mainly via mechanisms not directly related to inflammatory cells.

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  • 40.
    Blomgran, Parmis
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hammerman, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Systemic corticosteroids improve tendon healing when given after the early inflammatory phase2017In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 12468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammation initiates tendon healing and then normally resolves more or less completely. Unresolved inflammation might disturb the remodeling process. We hypothesized that suppression of inflammation during the early remodeling phase by systemic dexamethasone treatment can improve healing. 36 rats underwent Achilles tendon transection and were randomized to dexamethasone or saline on days 0-4 after surgery (early inflammatory phase), and euthanasia day 7. Another 54 rats received injections days 5-9 (early remodeling phase) and were euthanized day 12 for mechanical, histological and flow cytometric evaluation. Dexamethasone treatment days 0-4 reduced the cross-sectional area, peak force and stiffness by day 7 to less than half (p amp;lt; 0.001 for all), while material properties (peak stress and elastic modulus) were not significantly affected. In contrast, dexamethasone treatment days 5-9 increased peak force by 39% (p = 0.002) and stiffness by 58% (p amp;lt; 0.001). The cross-sectional area was reduced by 42% (p amp;lt; 0.001). Peak stress and elastic modulus were more than doubled (p amp;lt; 0.001 for both). Semi-quantitative histology at day 12 showed that late dexamethasone treatment improved collagen alignment, and flow cytometry revealed reduced numbers of CD8a(+) cytotoxic T cells in the tendon callus. These results suggest that downregulation of lingering inflammation during the early remodeling phase can improve healing.

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  • 41.
    Blomgran, Parmis
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hammerman, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomgran, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Role of Macrophages During early Achilles Tendon Healing2021In: MLTJ-MUSCLES LIGAMENTS AND TENDONS JOURNAL, ISSN 2240-4554, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 15-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Macrophages are a heterogeneous cell population that plays an important role in the initiation of the inflammatory response to trauma as well as its resolution during healing. However, their role during Achilles tendon healing is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate if macrophage reduction by using clodronate liposome inject ion would influence the mechanical properties of the healing tendon. Methods. The right Achilles tendon of 46 rats were transected and left to heal spontaneously (day 0). The reduction of macrophages during the inflammatory phase of tendon healing was studied by injecting clodronate liposomes day - 3, - 1 and 1. To study the early remodeling phase, clodronate was injected day 3, 5 and 7. The controls received saline and the rats were evaluated by mechanical testing day 7 and 12, respectively. Results. Clodronate injections during the inflammatory phase increased transverse area (p = 0.006) and stiffness (p = 0.044) day 7. In contrast, no significant effects were seen at day 12. Flow cytometry evaluation confirmed reduction of mature and polarized macrophages. Conclusions. Reduction of macrophages during the inflammatory phase of Achilles tendon healing influenced the mechanical properties, suggesting a regulatory role of macrophages during this phase.

  • 42.
    Bogl, H. P.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Schilcher, J.
    Gavle Central Hospital, Sweden.
    Undisturbed local bone formation capacity in patients with atypical femoral fractures: a case series2017In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 2439-2444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We excised the fracture site in 8 patients with incomplete atypical femoral fractures by drilling an 11-mmdiameter hole. New bone formation could be seen in the hole within a normal time frame. Delayed healing of these fractures might be unrelated to an impaired capacity to form bone. Introduction Incomplete atypical femoral fractures (undisplaced cracks) heal slowly or not at all, and often progress to a complete fracture with minimal trauma. The impaired healing has been attributed to an impaired biologic healing capacity related to bisphosphonate use, or, alternatively, to the mechanical environment within the fracture crack. This study aimed to investigate the capacity for bone formation after resection of the fracture site. Methods Between 2008 and 2014, we recruited eight patients with incomplete atypical femoral fractures. All used oral bisphosphonates before the fracture for on average 8 years (range 4 to 15) and complained of thigh pain. The fractures were stabilized with reamed cephalomedullary nails. During surgery, the fracture site in the lateral cortex was resected with a cylindrical drill (diameter 11.5 mm). The cylindrical cortical defect allowed radiographic evaluation of new bone formation, and the patients were followed clinically and radiologically for 24 months (range 15 to 92). Results After 3 months, newly formed bone could be seen in the cortical defects in all patients. After 13-26 months, the previous defects showed continuous cortical bone. At final follow-up, all patients reported full recovery of pre-surgical complaints. No complications occurred and no reoperations were performed. Conclusions New bone formation occurred within a time frame that appears normal for healing of cortical bone defects. This suggests that the capacity to form new bone is intact.

  • 43.
    Brandt, Jonathan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Capio Specialistvard Motala, Sweden.
    Ledin, Hakan
    Capio Specialistvard Motala, Sweden.
    Ranstam, Jonas
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Roos, Ewa
    Univ So Denmark, Denmark.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Schilcher, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Single postoperative infusion of zoledronic acid to improve patient-reported outcome after hip or knee replacement: study protocol for a randomised, controlled, double-blinded clinical trial2020In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 10, no 9, article id e040985Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction In Sweden, roughly 3000 patients are reoperated each year due to pain and loss of function related to a loosened hip or knee prosthesis. These reoperations are strenuous for the patient, technically demanding and costly for the healthcare system. Any such reoperation that can be prevented would be of great benefit. Bisphosphonates are drugs that inhibit osteoclast function. Several clinical trials suggest that bisphosphonates lead to improved implant fixation and one small study even indicates better functional outcome. Furthermore, in epidemiological studies, bisphosphonates have been shown to decrease the rate of revision for aseptic loosening by half. Thus, there are several indirect indications that bisphosphonates could improve patient-reported outcome, but no firm evidence. Methods and analysis This is a pragmatic randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, academic clinical trial of a single postoperative dose of zoledronic acid, in patients younger than 80 years undergoing primary total hip or knee replacement for osteoarthritis. Participants will be recruited from two orthopaedic departments. All surgeries will be performed, and study drugs given at Motala Hospital, Sweden. The primary endpoint is to investigate between-group differences in the Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score and the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score at 3-year follow-up. Secondary outcomes will be investigated at 1 year, 3 years and 6 years, and stratified for hip and knee implants. These secondary endpoints are supportive, exploratory or explanatory. A total of 1000 patients will be included in the study. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board in Linkoping (DNR 2015/286-31). The study will be reported in accordance with the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement for pharmacological trials. The results will be submitted for publication in peer-reviewed academic journals and disseminated to patient organisations and the media.

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  • 44.
    Bratengeier, Cornelia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology.
    Bakker, Astrid D.
    Department of Oral Cell Biology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam Movement Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Liszka, Aneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology.
    Schilcher, Jörg
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology.
    The release of osteoclast-stimulating factors on supraphysiological loading by osteoprogenitors coincides with expression of genes associated with inflammation and cytoskeletal arrangement2022In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 21578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supraphysiological loading induced by unstable orthopedic implants initiates osteoclast formation, which results in bone degradation. We aimed to investigate which mechanosensitive cells in the peri-implant environment produce osteoclast-stimulating factors and how the production of these factors is stimulated by supraphysiological loading. The release of osteoclast-stimulating factors by different types of isolated bone marrow-derived hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells from six osteoarthritic patients was analyzed after one hour of supraphysiological loading (3.0 ± 0.2 Pa, 1 Hz) by adding their conditioned medium to osteoclast precursors. Monocytes produced factors that enhanced osteoclastogenesis by 1.6 ± 0.07-fold and mesenchymal stem cells by 1.4 ± 0.07-fold. Medium from osteoprogenitors and pre-osteoblasts enhanced osteoclastogenesis by 1.3 ± 0.09-fold and 1.4 ± 0.03-fold, respectively, where medium from four patients elicited a response and two did not. Next generation sequencing analysis of osteoprogenitors revealed that genes encoding for inflammation-related pathways and cytoskeletal rearrangements were regulated differently between responders and non-responders. Our data suggest that released osteoclast-stimulating soluble factors by progenitor cells in the bone marrow after supraphysiological loading may be related to cytoskeletal arrangement in an inflammatory environment. This connection could be relevant to better understand the aseptic loosening process of orthopedic implants.

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  • 45.
    Brink, Rob C.
    et al.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, G05.228, University Medical Center Utrecht, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands..
    Vavruch, Ludvig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Schlösser, Tom P. C.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, G05.228, University Medical Center Utrecht, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands..
    Abul-Kasim, Kasim
    Division of Neuroradiology, Diagnostic Centre for Imaging and Functional Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden..
    Ohlin, Acke
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden..
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Castelein, René M.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, G05.228, University Medical Center Utrecht, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands. r.m.castelein@umcutrecht.nl..
    Vrtovec, Tomaž
    Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia..
    Three-dimensional pelvic incidence is much higher in (thoraco)lumbar scoliosis than in controls2019In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 544-550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The pelvic incidence (PI) is used to describe the sagittal spino-pelvic alignment. In previous studies, radiographs were used, leading to less accuracy in establishing the three-dimensional (3D) spino-pelvic parameters. The purpose of this study is to analyze the differences in the 3D sagittal spino-pelvic alignment in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) subjects and non-scoliotic controls.

    Methods

    Thirty-seven female AIS patients that underwent preoperative supine low-dose computed tomography imaging of the spine, hips and pelvis as part of their general workup were included and compared to 44 non-scoliotic age-matched female controls. A previously validated computerized method was used to measure the PI in 3D, as the angle between the line orthogonal to the inclination of the sacral endplate and the line connecting the center of the sacral endplate with the hip axis.

    Results

    The PI was on average 46.8° ± 12.4° in AIS patients and 41.3° ± 11.4° in controls (p = 0.025), with a higher PI in Lenke type 5 curves (50.6° ± 16.2°) as compared to controls (p = 0.042), whereas the Lenke type 1 curves (45.9° ± 12.2°) did not differ from controls (p = 0.141).

    Conclusion

    Lenke type 5 curves show a significantly higher PI than controls, whereas the Lenke type 1 curves did not differ from controls. This suggests a role of pelvic morphology and spino-pelvic alignment in the pathogenesis of idiopathic scoliosis. Further longitudinal studies should explore the exact role of the PI in the initiation and progression of different AIS types.

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  • 46. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Bögl, Hans Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Department of Orthopaedics, Gävle Hospital, Region Gävleborg, Gävle; Centre for Research and Development (CFUG), Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle.
    Atypical femoral fractures: Another brick in the wall: On aspects of healing, treatment strategies and surveillance2021Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Atypical femoral fractures are stress fractures of the femoral subtrochanteric and diaphyseal region. It is a common notion that these fractures heal poorly, if at all. In this thesis we show that patients with atypical femoral fractures have a good capacity to generate bone and therefore heal fractures. In daily practice, these patients have a higher risk for reoperation when compared with patients with a normal femoral fracture. However, this risk is less likely to be dependent on the type of fracture than other factors such as age, gender, comorbidities and survival. Using an implant that protects the fragile proximal femur, the risk for reoperations can be attenuated dramatically. An intramedullary nail with fixation of the femoral neck protects the femur from subsequent hip fractures – the most common complication in elderly patients with any type of femoral shaft fracture.

    Atypical femoral fractures are difficult to identify in the population. Erroneous diagnosis coding, poor reporting of adverse drug reactions and low accuracy of radiology reports make the identification and surveillance a difficult task. The Swedish Fracture Register has provided the option to register this special fracture since 2015. With its physician-based registration process, it enables researchers and treating physicians to identify and follow these rare fractures longitudinally.

    List of papers
    1. Undisturbed local bone formation capacity in patients with atypical femoral fractures: a case series
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Undisturbed local bone formation capacity in patients with atypical femoral fractures: a case series
    2017 (English)In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 2439-2444Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We excised the fracture site in 8 patients with incomplete atypical femoral fractures by drilling an 11-mmdiameter hole. New bone formation could be seen in the hole within a normal time frame. Delayed healing of these fractures might be unrelated to an impaired capacity to form bone. Introduction Incomplete atypical femoral fractures (undisplaced cracks) heal slowly or not at all, and often progress to a complete fracture with minimal trauma. The impaired healing has been attributed to an impaired biologic healing capacity related to bisphosphonate use, or, alternatively, to the mechanical environment within the fracture crack. This study aimed to investigate the capacity for bone formation after resection of the fracture site. Methods Between 2008 and 2014, we recruited eight patients with incomplete atypical femoral fractures. All used oral bisphosphonates before the fracture for on average 8 years (range 4 to 15) and complained of thigh pain. The fractures were stabilized with reamed cephalomedullary nails. During surgery, the fracture site in the lateral cortex was resected with a cylindrical drill (diameter 11.5 mm). The cylindrical cortical defect allowed radiographic evaluation of new bone formation, and the patients were followed clinically and radiologically for 24 months (range 15 to 92). Results After 3 months, newly formed bone could be seen in the cortical defects in all patients. After 13-26 months, the previous defects showed continuous cortical bone. At final follow-up, all patients reported full recovery of pre-surgical complaints. No complications occurred and no reoperations were performed. Conclusions New bone formation occurred within a time frame that appears normal for healing of cortical bone defects. This suggests that the capacity to form new bone is intact.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    SPRINGER LONDON LTD, 2017
    Keywords
    Atypical femoral fracture; Bisphosphonates; Fracture healing; Osteoporosis
    National Category
    Orthopaedics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-139913 (URN)10.1007/s00198-017-4058-4 (DOI)000406275400023 ()28474166 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [VR 2012-1878]; Linkping University, Ostergtland County Council; Swedish Society of Medicine

    Available from: 2017-08-23 Created: 2017-08-23 Last updated: 2021-04-26Bibliographically approved
    2. Increased rate of reoperation in atypical femoral fractures is related to patient characteristics and not fracture type. A nationwide cohort study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increased rate of reoperation in atypical femoral fractures is related to patient characteristics and not fracture type. A nationwide cohort study
    Show others...
    2020 (English)In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 951-959Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Atypical femoral fractures are burdened with a high rate of reoperation. In our nationwide analysis, the increased rate of reoperation was related to patient background characteristics, such as age and health status, rather than fracture type. Introduction Patients with atypical fractures are complex to treat and burdened with a high risk of reoperation. We hypothesized that patients with surgically treated, complete atypical fractures have a higher risk of any reoperation and reoperation related to healing complications than patients with common femoral shaft fractures but that this increase would become insignificant when adjusted for predefined characteristics. Methods A cohort of 163 patients with atypical fractures and 862 patients with common femoral shaft or subtrochanteric fractures treated from 2008 to 2010 and who had follow-up radiographs and register data available until 31 December 2014 was included. Reoperations were identified by a complementary review of radiographs and register data and were used to calculate risks for any reoperation and reoperations related to healing complications. Results Patients with atypical fractures were more likely to be reoperated for any reason, age-adjusted OR 1.76 (95% CI, 1.08 to 2.86). However, patients with common fractures had a shorter follow-up due to a threefold higher death rate. Accordingly, in a multivariable-adjusted time-to-event model, the increased risk lost statistical significance for any reoperations, cause-specific HR 1.34 (95% CI, 0.85 to 2.13), and for reoperations related to healing complications, HR 1.32 (95% CI, 0.58 to 3.0). Continued use of bisphosphonate in the first year after the fracture did not affect the reoperation rate. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the increased risk of reoperation after an atypical femur fracture is largely explained by patient characteristics and not fracture type.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    SPRINGER LONDON LTD, 2020
    Keywords
    Atypical femoral fracture; Bisphosphonates; Complications; Osteoporosis; Reoperation risk
    National Category
    Orthopaedics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-165527 (URN)10.1007/s00198-019-05249-3 (DOI)000527927900015 ()31932963 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|RegionGavleborgRegion Auvergne-Rhone-AlpesRegion Bourgogne-Franche-ComteRegion Hauts-de-FranceRegion Nouvelle-Aquitaine [CFUG-651191]; ALF Grant, Ostergotland County Council (SE) [LIO-698411]

    Available from: 2020-05-06 Created: 2020-05-06 Last updated: 2021-05-05
    3. Reduced Risk of Reoperation Using Intramedullary Nailing with Femoral Neck Protection in Low-Energy Femoral Shaft Fractures
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduced Risk of Reoperation Using Intramedullary Nailing with Femoral Neck Protection in Low-Energy Femoral Shaft Fractures
    Show others...
    2020 (English)In: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American volume, ISSN 0021-9355, E-ISSN 1535-1386, Vol. 102, no 17, p. 1486-1494Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Sweden, approximately 1 in 4 women who are &gt;= 50 years of age will sustain a hip fracture. Patients treated for a femoral shaft fracture are likely to have an even higher risk. We hypothesized that intramedullary nails protecting the femoral neck reduce the risk of subsequent hip fracture and allow the patient to avoid a challenging reoperation. Methods: Between 2008 and 2010, 5,475 fractures of the femoral shaft, in patients who were &gt;= 55 years of age, were registered in a national registry in Sweden. Of these patients, 897 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. We used radiographs and register data to identify the reasons for and the types of reoperation that occurred between the index surgical procedure and December 31, 2014. The categories of implants were determined through a review of radiographs as intramedullary nails with and without femoral neck protection. Reoperations related to peri-implant fractures (including hip fractures) were analyzed as a subgroup of all major reoperations. Multivariable-adjusted, cause-specific hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated to compare the risk of reoperation between cases with nails with and without femoral neck protection. Results: Among the 897 patients, a total of 82 reoperations were performed. In 640 patients who were treated with intramedullary nails with femoral neck protection, there were 7 peri-implant fractures (no hip fractures) and 27 major reoperations. Among the 257 patients who were treated with intramedullary nails without femoral neck protection, 14 peri-implant hip fractures and 24 major reoperations were identified. Patients who received nails with femoral neck protection had a lower hazard for any peri-implant fracture (multivariable-adjusted cause-specific HR, 0.19 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.07 to 0.5]) and major reoperation (multivariable-adjusted cause-specific HR, 0.51 [95% CI, 0.28 to 0.92]). Conclusions: Intramedullary nails with femoral neck protection in the treatment of low-energy femoral shaft fractures prevent secondary hip fractures and decrease the overall risk of reoperation for 4 to 6 years postoperatively.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, 2020
    National Category
    Orthopaedics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-171002 (URN)10.2106/JBJS.20.00160 (DOI)000576277200007 ()32701713 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|ALF Grants; Region Ostergotland

    Available from: 2020-11-01 Created: 2020-11-01 Last updated: 2021-09-02
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  • 47.
    Bögl, Hans Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Gavle Cent Hosp, Sweden.
    Michaelsson, K.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Zdolsek, Georg
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Hoijer, J.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Schilcher, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Increased rate of reoperation in atypical femoral fractures is related to patient characteristics and not fracture type. A nationwide cohort study2020In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 951-959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atypical femoral fractures are burdened with a high rate of reoperation. In our nationwide analysis, the increased rate of reoperation was related to patient background characteristics, such as age and health status, rather than fracture type. Introduction Patients with atypical fractures are complex to treat and burdened with a high risk of reoperation. We hypothesized that patients with surgically treated, complete atypical fractures have a higher risk of any reoperation and reoperation related to healing complications than patients with common femoral shaft fractures but that this increase would become insignificant when adjusted for predefined characteristics. Methods A cohort of 163 patients with atypical fractures and 862 patients with common femoral shaft or subtrochanteric fractures treated from 2008 to 2010 and who had follow-up radiographs and register data available until 31 December 2014 was included. Reoperations were identified by a complementary review of radiographs and register data and were used to calculate risks for any reoperation and reoperations related to healing complications. Results Patients with atypical fractures were more likely to be reoperated for any reason, age-adjusted OR 1.76 (95% CI, 1.08 to 2.86). However, patients with common fractures had a shorter follow-up due to a threefold higher death rate. Accordingly, in a multivariable-adjusted time-to-event model, the increased risk lost statistical significance for any reoperations, cause-specific HR 1.34 (95% CI, 0.85 to 2.13), and for reoperations related to healing complications, HR 1.32 (95% CI, 0.58 to 3.0). Continued use of bisphosphonate in the first year after the fracture did not affect the reoperation rate. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the increased risk of reoperation after an atypical femur fracture is largely explained by patient characteristics and not fracture type.

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  • 48.
    Bögl, Hans Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Gävle Hospital, Gävle.
    Zdolsek, Georg
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Barnisin, Lukas
    Department of Orthopedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Möller, Michael
    Department of Orthopedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg; Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Schilcher, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Surveillance of atypical femoral fractures in a nationwide fracture register2022In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 93, p. 229-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - To continuously assess the incidence of atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) in the population is important, to allow the evaluation of the risks and benefits associated with osteoporosis treatment. Therefore, we investigated the possibility to use the Swedish Fracture Register (SFR) as a surveillance tool for AFFs in the population and to explore means of improvement. Patients and methods - All AFF registrations in the SFR from January 1, 2015 to December 31, 2018 were enrolled in the study. For these patients, radiographs were obtained and combined with radiographs from 176 patients with normal femoral fractures, to form the study cohort. All images were reviewed and classified into AFFs or normal femur fractures by 2 experts in the field (gold-standard classification) and 1 orthopedic resident educated on the specific radiographic features of AFF (educated-user classification). Furthermore, we estimated the incidence rate of AFFs in the population captured by the register through comparison with a previous cohort and calculated the positive predictive value (PPV) and, where possible, the inter-observer agreement (Cohen's kappa) between the different classifications. Results - Of the 178 available patients with AFF in the SFR, 104 patients were classified as AFF using the goldstandard classification, and 89 using the educated-user classification. The PPV increased from 0.58 in the SFR classification to 0.93 in the educated-user classification. The interobserver agreement between the gold-standard classification and the educated-user classification was 0.81. Interpretation - With a positive predictive value of 0.58 the Swedish Fracture Register outperforms radiology reports and reports to the Swedish Medical Products Agency on adverse drug reactions as a diagnostic tool to identify atypical femoral fractures.

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  • 49.
    Bögl, Hans Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Gavle Cent Hosp, Sweden.
    Zdolsek, Georg
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Michaelsson, Karl
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Hoijer, Jonas
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Schilcher, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Reduced Risk of Reoperation Using Intramedullary Nailing with Femoral Neck Protection in Low-Energy Femoral Shaft Fractures2020In: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American volume, ISSN 0021-9355, E-ISSN 1535-1386, Vol. 102, no 17, p. 1486-1494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Sweden, approximately 1 in 4 women who are &gt;= 50 years of age will sustain a hip fracture. Patients treated for a femoral shaft fracture are likely to have an even higher risk. We hypothesized that intramedullary nails protecting the femoral neck reduce the risk of subsequent hip fracture and allow the patient to avoid a challenging reoperation. Methods: Between 2008 and 2010, 5,475 fractures of the femoral shaft, in patients who were &gt;= 55 years of age, were registered in a national registry in Sweden. Of these patients, 897 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. We used radiographs and register data to identify the reasons for and the types of reoperation that occurred between the index surgical procedure and December 31, 2014. The categories of implants were determined through a review of radiographs as intramedullary nails with and without femoral neck protection. Reoperations related to peri-implant fractures (including hip fractures) were analyzed as a subgroup of all major reoperations. Multivariable-adjusted, cause-specific hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated to compare the risk of reoperation between cases with nails with and without femoral neck protection. Results: Among the 897 patients, a total of 82 reoperations were performed. In 640 patients who were treated with intramedullary nails with femoral neck protection, there were 7 peri-implant fractures (no hip fractures) and 27 major reoperations. Among the 257 patients who were treated with intramedullary nails without femoral neck protection, 14 peri-implant hip fractures and 24 major reoperations were identified. Patients who received nails with femoral neck protection had a lower hazard for any peri-implant fracture (multivariable-adjusted cause-specific HR, 0.19 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.07 to 0.5]) and major reoperation (multivariable-adjusted cause-specific HR, 0.51 [95% CI, 0.28 to 0.92]). Conclusions: Intramedullary nails with femoral neck protection in the treatment of low-energy femoral shaft fractures prevent secondary hip fractures and decrease the overall risk of reoperation for 4 to 6 years postoperatively.

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  • 50.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsing-Strid, Emma
    University Health Care Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Holmgren, Theresa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Practitioner experiences from the structured implementation of evidence-based practice in primary care physiotherapy: A qualitative study2019In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 622-629Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale, Aims, and Objectives

    To provide best available care, the practitioners in primary health care (PHC) must have adequate knowledge about effective interventions. The implementation of such interventions is challenging. A structured implementation strategy developed by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, was used for the implementation of an evidence‐based assessment and treatment programme for patients with subacromial pain among physiotherapists in PHC. To further develop strategies for implementation of evidence‐based practices, it was deemed important to study the implementation from the practitioners' perspective. The aim of this study was to explore the practitioners' experiences from the implementation.

    Methods

    A qualitative design with focus group discussions was applied. The implementation in terms of perceptions of process and outcome was evaluated by focus group discussions with, in total, 16 physiotherapists in the target group. Data were analysed using the method qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    The components of the strategy were viewed positively, and the applicability and evidence base behind the programme were appreciated. The programme was perceived to be adopted, and the practitioners described a changed behaviour and increased confidence in handling patients with subacromial pain. Both patient‐ and provider‐related challenges to the implementation were mentioned.

    Conclusions

    The practitioners' experiences from the implementation were mainly positive. A strategy with collaboration between academy and practice, and with education and implementation teams as facilitators, resulted in changes in practice. Critical voices concerned interprofessional collaboration and that the programme was focused explicitly on the shoulder, not including other components of physical function.

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