liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 141
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ahn, Song-Ee
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rimpiläinen, Sanna
    University of Gothenburg.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Fenwick, Tara
    University of Stirling.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Learning in Technology-Enhanced Medical Simulation:Locations and Knowings2015In: Professions & Professionalism, ISSN 1893-1049, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative study focuses on how knowings and learning take place in full-scale simulation training of medical and nursing students, by drawing upon actor-network theory (ANT). ANT situates materiality as a part of the social practic-es. Knowing and learning, according to ANT, are not simply cognitive or social phenomena, but are seen as emerging as effects of the relation between material assemblages and human actors being performed into being in particular locations. Data consists of observations of simulations performed by ten groups of students. The analysis focuses on the emerging knowings in the socio-material—arrangements of three locations involved in the simulation—the simulation room, the observation room and the reflection room. The findings indicate that medical knowing, affective knowing and communicative knowing are produced in different ways in the different locations and material arrangements of the simulation cycle.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Latorre, Malcolm
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Göransson, Nathanael
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Investigation into Deep Brain Stimulation Lead Designs: A Patient-Specific Simulation Study2016In: Brain Sciences, ISSN 2076-3425, E-ISSN 2076-3425, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode designs offer operation in voltage and current mode and capability to steer the electric field (EF). The aim of the study was to compare the EF distributions of four DBS leads at equivalent amplitudes (3 V and 3.4 mA). Finite element method (FEM) simulations (n = 38) around cylindrical contacts (leads 3389, 6148) or equivalent contact configurations (leads 6180, SureStim1) were performed using homogeneous and patient-specific (heterogeneous) brain tissue models. Steering effects of 6180 and SureStim1 were compared with symmetric stimulation fields. To make relative comparisons between simulations, an EF isolevel of 0.2 V/mm was chosen based on neuron model simulations (n = 832) applied before EF visualization and comparisons. The simulations show that the EF distribution is largely influenced by the heterogeneity of the tissue, and the operating mode. Equivalent contact configurations result in similar EF distributions. In steering configurations, larger EF volumes were achieved in current mode using equivalent amplitudes. The methodology was demonstrated in a patient-specific simulation around the zona incerta and a “virtual” ventral intermediate nucleus target. In conclusion, lead design differences are enhanced when using patient-specific tissue models and current stimulation mode.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Latorre, Malcolm
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Brain Stimulation Steering of the Electric Field: A Patient-Specific Simulation Study2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Influence of Virchow-Robin spaces in the Electric Field Distribution in Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Previous investigations have shown the appearance of cysts i.e. Virchow-Robin spaces (VR) in the basal ganglia and their relationship with parkinsonian symptoms [1-3]. Simulations [4]using the finite element method (FEM) suggests that VR affects the electric field around deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. The aim of the study was to evaluate how the electric field is modified by the presence of cysts in the STN. Methods: The effect of cysts on the electric field around the DBS lead placed in the STN was evaluated using FEM. 3D patient-specific brain models were built with COMSOL 5.2 (COMSOL AB, Sweden) and an in-house developed software [5] to convert a T2 weighted MRI of Parkinsonian patients (ethics approval no: 2012/434-3) into electrical conductivity matrix readable by FEM software. VR was classified as CSF [6]assigning a high electrical conductivity (2.0 S/m). The stimulation amplitudes were set to the clinically programmed values. Depending on the lead used, the stimulation was set to voltage control (3389) or current control (6180, ring mode). The coordinates corresponding to the lowest (first) electrode and the third higher up in the lead, taken from the postoperative CT electrode artefact, were used to localize the leads in the brain model [7]. The electric field was visualized with a 0.2V/mm isosurface. Results: Simulations showed that the electric field distribution is affected by the cysts. The higher conductivity at these regions in the vicinity of the electrode redistributes the electric field pushing it away from the cyst. The same effect occurs regardless of the operating mode or the lead design as long as the directional lead is configured in ring mode. Conclusions: The use of patient-specific models has shown the importance of considering nuances of the patients’ anatomy in the STN. This information can be used to determine the stimulation parameter and to support the analysis of side effects induced by the stimulation. The potential advantage of directional leads can also be assessed by including in the model patient-specific data.

  • 5.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Influence of Virchow-Robin spaces on the electric field distribution in subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation2021In: Clinical neurology and neurosurgery, ISSN 0303-8467, E-ISSN 1872-6968, Vol. 204, article id 106596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patient MRI from DBS implantations in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) were reviewed and it was found that around 10% had Virchow-Robin spaces (VRS). Patient-specific models were developed to evaluate changes in the electric field (EF) around DBS leads. The patients (n = 7) were implanted bilaterally either with the standard voltage-controlled lead 3389 or with the directional current-controlled lead 6180. The EF distribution was evaluated by comparing simulations using patient-specific models with homogeneous models without VRS. The EF, depicted with an isocontour of 0.2 V/mm, showed a deformation in the presence of the VRS around the DBS lead. For patient-specific models, the radial extension of the EF isocontours was enlarged regardless of the operating mode or the DBS lead used. The location of the VRS in relation to the active contact and the stimulation amplitude, determined the changes in the shape and extension of the EF. It is concluded that it is important to take the patients? brain anatomy into account as the high conductivity in VRS will alter the electric field if close to the DBS lead. This can be a cause of unexpected side effects.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Virchow-Robin spaces in subthalamic nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation - Influence in the electric field2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Baldvinsdottir, Bryndis
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Klurfan, Paula
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eneling, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ronne-Engstrom, Elisabeth
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lindvall, Peter
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Aineskog, Helena
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Frioriksson, Steen
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Alpkvist, Peter
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hillman, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Kronvall, Erik
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ola G.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Adverse events during endovascular treatment of ruptured aneurysms: A prospective nationwide study on subarachnoid hemorrhage in Sweden2023In: BRAIN AND SPINE, ISSN 2772-5294, Vol. 3, article id 102708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: A range of adverse events (AEs) may occur in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Endovascular treatment is commonly used to prevent aneurysm re-rupture.Research question: The aim of this study was to identify AEs related to endovascular treatment, analyze risk factors for AEs and how AEs affect patient outcome.Material and methods: Patients with aneurysmal SAH admitted to all neurosurgical centers in Sweden during a 3.5-year period (2014-2018) were prospectively registered. AEs related to endovascular aneurysm treatment were thromboembolic events, aneurysm re-rupture, vessel dissection and puncture site hematoma. Potential risk factors for the AEs were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression. Functional outcome was assessed at one year using the extended Glasgow outcome scale.Results: In total, 1037 patients were treated for ruptured aneurysms. Of which, 715 patients were treated with endovascular occlusion. There were 115 AEs reported in 113 patients (16%). Thromboembolic events were noted in 78 patients (11%). Aneurysm re-rupture occurred in 28 (4%), vessel dissection in 4 (0.6%) and puncture site hematoma in 5 (0.7%). Blister type aneurysm, aneurysm smaller than 5 mm and endovascular techniques other than coiling were risk factors for treatment-related AEs. At follow-up, 230 (32%) of the patients had unfavorable outcome. Patients suffering intraprocedural aneurysm re-rupture were more likely to have unfavorable outcome (OR 6.9, 95% CI 2.3-20.9).Discussion and conclusion: Adverse events related to endovascular occlusion of a ruptured aneurysm were seen in 16% of patients. Aneurysm re-rupture during endovascular treatment was associated with increased risk of unfavorable functional outcome.

  • 8.
    Baldvinsdottir, Bryndis
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Kronvall, Erik
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ronne-Engstrom, Elisabeth
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lindvall, Peter
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Aineskog, Helena
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Fridriksson, Steen
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Klurfan, Paula
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Alpkvist, Peter
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hillman, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Eneling, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Ola G.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Adverse events associated with microsurgial treatment for ruptured intracerebral aneurysms: a prospective nationwide study on subarachnoid haemorrhage in Sweden2023In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundAdverse events (AEs) or complications may arise secondary to the treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). The aim of this study was to identify AEs associated with microsurgical occlusion of ruptured aneurysms, as well as to analyse their risk factors and impact on functional outcome. MethodsPatients with aneurysmal SAH admitted to the neurosurgical centres in Sweden were prospectively registered during a 3.5-year period (2014-2018). AEs were categorised as intraoperative or postoperative. A range of variables from patient history and SAH characteristics were explored as potential risk factors for an AE. Functional outcome was assessed approximately 1 year after the bleeding using the extended Glasgow Outcome Scale. ResultsIn total, 1037 patients were treated for ruptured aneurysms, of which, 322 patients were treated with microsurgery. There were 105 surgical AEs in 97 patients (30%); 94 were intraoperative AEs in 79 patients (25%). Aneurysm rerupture occurred in 43 patients (13%), temporary occlusion of the parent artery >5 min in 26 patients (8%) and adjacent vessel injury in 25 patients (8%). High Fisher grade and brain oedema on CT were related to increased risk of AEs. At follow-up, 38% of patients had unfavourable outcome. Patients suffering AEs were more likely to have unfavourable outcome (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.10 to 4.69). ConclusionIntraoperative AEs occurred in 25% of patients treated with microsurgery for ruptured intracerebral aneurysm in this nationwide survey. Although most operated patients had favourable outcome, AEs were associated with increased risk of unfavourable outcome.

  • 9.
    Bartek, Jiri Jr.
    et al.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Laugesen, Christian
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Mirza, Sadia
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Forsse, Axel
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Petersen, Michael Anders
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Corell, Alba
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Dyhrfort, Philip Wilhelm
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Redebrandt, Henrietta Nittby
    Lund Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Reen, Linus
    Lund Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Zolfaghari, Shaian
    Lund Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Tobieson, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Carlsvärd, Björn
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Bergholt, Bo
    Arhus Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Bashir, Asma
    Arhus Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Soerensen, Preben
    Alborg Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Bilgin, Arzu
    Alborg Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Johansson, Conny
    Umea Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lindvall, Peter
    Umea Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Forander, Petter
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Bellander, Bo-Michael
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Springborg, Jacob B.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Jakola, Asgeir S.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden.
    Scandinavian Multicenter Acute Subdural Hematoma (SMASH) Study: Study Protocol for a Multinational Population-Based Consecutive Cohort2019In: Neurosurgery, ISSN 0148-396X, E-ISSN 1524-4040, Vol. 84, no 3, p. 799-803Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Traumatic acute subdural hematomas (ASDHs) are associated with high rate of morbidity and mortality, especially in elderly individuals. However, recent reports indicate that the morbidity and mortality rates might have improved. OBJECTIVE To evaluate postoperative (30-d) mortality in younger vs elderly (70 yr) patients with ASDH. Comparing younger and elderly patients, the secondary objectives are morbidity patterns of care and 6 mo outcome according to Glasgow outcome scale (GOS). Finally, in patients with traumatic ASDH, we aim to provide prognostic variables. METHODS This is a large-scale population-based Scandinavian study including all neurosurgical departments in Denmark and Sweden. All adult (18 yr) patients surgically treated between 2010 and 2014 for a traumatic ASDH in Denmark and Sweden will be included. Identification at clinicaltrials.gov is NCT03284190. EXPECTED OUTCOMES We expect to provide data on potential differences between younger vs elderly patients in terms of mortality and morbidity. We hypothesize that elderly patients selected for surgery have a similar pattern of care as compared with younger patients. We will provide functional outcome in terms of GOS at 6 mo in younger vs elderly patients undergoing ASDH evacuation. Finally, clinical useful prognostic factors for favorable (GOS 4-5) vs unfavorable (GOS 1-3) will be identified. DISCUSSION An improved understanding of the clinical outcome, treatment and resource allocation, clinical course, and the prognostic factors of traumatic ASDH will allow neurosurgeons to make better treatment decisions.

  • 10.
    Bartek, Jiri
    et al.
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nittby-Redebrandt, Henrietta
    Skånes universitetssjukhus Lund, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Rickard
    Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå, Sweden.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hesselager, Göran
    Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jakola, Asgeir
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Sweden.
    Neurokirurgin alltjämt kärnan i behandlingen av hjärntumörer: [Neurosurgery still pivotal in the diagnostics and treatment of brain tumor patients]2023In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 120Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Treatment of adult patients with brain tumors is a multi-disciplinary effort involving several medical disciplines: neurosurgery, oncology, neurology, neuropathology, neuroradiology, and rehabilitation medicine. While the brain tumor field has gone through vast diagnostical changes during the last decade, the hopes of similar achievements in the systemic treatment of these patients with new methods have so far not been fulfilled. As such, neurosurgery still has a pivotal role in the diagnostics and treatment of brain tumor patients. Improved preoperative evaluation of the tumor and adjacent anatomical and functional brain areas, together with advanced microsurgical techniques, intraoperative mapping and monitoring, as well as new minimally invasive techniques, makes brain tumor surgery safer. Indeed, it is now possible to safely operate patients previously considered to have too unfavorable risk-benefit ratio. This article aims at presenting an overview of current neurosurgical treatments of brain tumors.

  • 11.
    Bruhn, H.
    et al.
    Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Strandeus, M.
    Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Lind, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Improved survival of Swedish glioblastoma patients treated according to Stupp2018In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 138, no 4, p. 332-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesThe median survival in glioblastoma (GBM) patients used to be less than 1year. Surgical removal of the tumor with subsequent concomitant radiation/temozolomide (the Stupp regimen) has been shown to prolong survival. The Stupp protocol was implemented in the county of Jonkoping in 2006. The purpose of this study was to examine if the Stupp treatment has prolonged overall survival, in an unselected patient cohort with histologically verified GBM. Material and MethodThis study includes all patients from the county of Jonkoping, with a diagnosis of GBM from January 2001 to December 2012. Patients were divided into 2 cohorts, 2001-2005 and 2006-2012, that is before and after implementation of the Stupp regimen. By reviewing the medical case notes, the dates of the histological diagnosis and of death were identified. The median and mean overall survival and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were calculated and compared between the 2 cohorts. ResultsThe mean survival was 110days longer in the cohort treated according to the Stupp regimen. Four patients in the 2006-2012 cohort and 1 patient in the 2001-2005 cohort are still alive. When comparing survival in patients with radical surgery vs biopsy, those that underwent radical surgery survived longer. The significance was slightly greater in the 2001-2005 cohort (mean 163 vs 344days, Pamp;lt;.001) than in the 2006-2012 cohort (mean 220 vs 397days, P=.02). ConclusionSurvival significantly improved after the implementation of the Stupp regimen in the study region of Sweden.

  • 12.
    Bruhn, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Blystad, Ida
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Malmström, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Närvårdskliniken.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Neurologiska kliniken i Linköping.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umea Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lind, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Initial cognitive impairment predicts shorter survival of patients with glioblastoma2022In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 145, no 1, p. 94-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Seizures as presenting symptom of glioblastoma (GBM) are known to predict prolonged survival, whereas the clinical impact of other initial symptoms is less known. Our main objective was to evaluate the influence of different presenting symptoms on survival in a clinical setting. We also assessed lead times, tumour size and localization. Methods Medical records of 189 GBM patients were reviewed regarding the first medical appointment, presenting symptom/s, date of diagnostic radiology and survival. Tumour size, localization and treatment data were retrieved. Overall survival was calculated using Kaplan-Meier and Mann-Whitney U test. Cox regression was used for risk estimation. Results Cognitive impairment as the initial symptom was often misinterpreted in primary health care leading to a delayed diagnosis. Initial global symptoms (66% of all patients) were associated with reduced survival compared to no global symptoms (median 8.4 months vs. 12.6 months). Those with the most common cognitive dysfunctions: change of behaviour, memory impairment and/or disorientation had a reduced median survival to 6.4 months. In contrast, seizures (32%) were associated with longer survival (median 11.2 months vs. 8.3 months). Global symptoms were associated with larger tumours than seizures, but tumour size had no linear association with survival. The setting of the first medical appointment was evenly distributed between primary health care and emergency units. Conclusion Patients with GBM presenting with cognitive symptoms are challenging to identify, have larger tumours and reduced survival. In contrast, epileptic seizures as the first symptom are associated with longer survival and smaller tumours.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Carey, N.
    et al.
    Univ Surrey, England.
    Alkhamees, Nouf
    Princess Noura Bint Abdul Rahman Univ, Saudi Arabia.
    Cox, Anna
    Univ Surrey, England.
    Sund-Levander, Märtha
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mold, Freda
    Univ Surrey, England.
    Exploring views and experiences of how infections are detected and managed in practice by nurses, care workers and managers in nursing homes in England and Sweden: a survey protocol2020In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 10, no 10, article id e038390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction In order to avoid unnecessary hospital admission and associated complications, there is an urgent need to improve the early detection of infection in nursing home residents. Monitoring signs and symptoms with checklists or aids called decision support tools may help nursing home staff to detect infection in residents, particularly during the current COVID-19 pandemic. We plan to conduct a survey exploring views and experiences of how infections are detected and managed in practice by nurses, care workers and managers in nursing homes in England and Sweden. Methods and analysis An international cross-sectional descriptive survey, using a pretested questionnaire, will be used to explore nurses, care workers and managers views and experiences of how infections are detected and managed in practice in nursing homes. Data will be analysed descriptively and univariate associations between personal and organisational factors explored. This will help identify important factors related to awareness, knowledge, attitudes, belief and skills likely to affect future implementation of a decision support tool for the early detection of infection in nursing home residents. Ethics and dissemination This study was approved using the self-certification process at the University of Surrey and Linkoping University ethics committee (Approval 2018/514-32) in 2018. Study findings will be disseminated through community/stakeholder/service user engagement events in each country, publication in academic peer-reviewed journals and conference presentations. A LAY summary will be provided to participants who indicate they would like to receive this information. This is the first stage of a plan of work to revise and evaluate the Early Detection of Infection Scale (EDIS) tool and its effect on managing infections and reducing unplanned hospital admissions in nursing home residents. Implementation of the EDIS tool may have important implications for the healthcare economy; this will be explored in cost-benefit analyses as the work progresses.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Carstam, Louise
    et al.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Smits, Anja
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Corell, Alba
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Reg Canc Ctr Stockholm Gotland, Sweden; Univ Umea, Sweden.
    Bartek, Jiri Jr.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Jakola, Asgeir Store
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; St Olavs Univ Hosp HF, Norway.
    Neurosurgical patterns of care for diffuse low-grade gliomas in Sweden between 2005 and 20152019In: Neuro-Oncology Practice, ISSN 2054-2577, E-ISSN 2054-2585, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 124-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. In the last decade, increasing evidence has evolved for early and maximal safe resection of diffuse low-grade gliomas (LGGs) regarding survival. However, changes in clinical practice are known to occur slowly and we do not know if the scientific evidence has yet resulted in changes in neurosurgical patterns of care. Methods. The Swedish Brain Tumor Registry was used to identify all patients with a first-time histopathological diagnosis of LGG between 2005 and 2015. For analysis of surgical treatment patterns, we subdivided assessed time periods into 2005-2008, 2009-2012, and 2013-2015. Population-based data on patient and disease characteristics, surgical management, and outcomes were extracted. Results. A total of 548 patients with diffuse World Health Organization grade II gliomas were identified: 142 diagnosed during 2005-2008, 244 during 2009-2012, and 162 during 2013-2015. Resection as opposed to biopsy was performed in 64.3% during 2005-2008, 74.2% during 2009-2012, and 74.1% during 2013-2015 (P =.08). There was no difference among the 3 periods regarding overall survival (P =.11). However, post hoc analysis of data from the 4 (out of 6) centers that covered all 3 time periods demonstrated a resection rate of 64.3% during 2005-2008, 77.4% during 2009-2012, and 75.4% during 2013-2015 (P =.02) and longer survival of patients diagnosed 2009 and onward (P =.04). Conclusion. In this nationwide, population-based study we observed a shift over time in favor of LGG resection. Further, a positive correlation between the more active surgical strategy and longer survival is shown, although no causality can be claimed because of possible confounding factors.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Dock, Hua
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    DNA Methylation Inhibitor Zebularine Confers Stroke Protection in Ischemic Rats2015In: TRANSLATIONAL STROKE RESEARCH, ISSN 1868-4483, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 296-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    5-Aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) confers neuroprotection in ischemic mice by inhibiting DNA methylation. Zebularine is another DNA methylation inhibitor, less toxic and more stable in aqueous solutions and, therefore more biologically suitable. We investigated Zebularines effects on brain ischemia in a rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) model in order to elucidate its therapeutic potential. Male Wistar wild-type (WT) rats were randomly allocated to three treatment groups, vehicle, Zebularine 100 mu g, and Zebularine 500 mu g. Saline (10 mu L) or Zebularine (10 mu L) was administered intracerebroventricularly 20 min before 45-min occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. Reperfusion was allowed after 45-min occlusion, and the rats were sacrificed at 24-h reperfusion. The brains were removed, sliced, and stained with 2 % 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) before measuring infarct size. Zebularine (500 mu g) reduced infarct volumes significantly (p less than 0.05) by 61 % from 20.7 +/- 4.2 % in the vehicle treated to 8.1 +/- 1.6 % in the Zebularine treated. Zebularine (100 mu g) also reduced infarct volumes dramatically by 55 to 9.4 +/- 1.2 %. The mechanisms behind this neuroprotection is not yet known, but the results agree with previous studies and support the notion that Zebularine-induced inhibition of DNA methyltransferase ameliorates ischemic brain injury in rats.

  • 16.
    Edvardsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Health care Center Finspång.
    Sund-Levander, Märtha
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Division of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Sweden.
    Elevated levels of CRP and IL-8 are related to reduce survival time: 1-year follow-up measurements of different analytes in frail elderly nursing home residents2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 79, no 5, p. 288-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are only few studies with specific focus on predictors of survival in nursing home residents (NHRs). The aim was to study whether 1-year changes in complete blood count (including hemoglobin, red blood cells, erythrocyte volume fraction, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, white blood cells count and platelet count), C-reactive protein and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), IL-1Ra, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10, are associated with 8-year survival in elderly NHRs, aged amp;gt;= 80 years. Complete blood count, C-reactive protein and interleukins were measured at baseline, after 6 and 12 months from 167 NHRs aged 80-101 years, mean age 88 +/- 4.5 years, 75% of whom were women. Dates of death were collected from the National Death Register 8 years after baseline. Levels of hemoglobin, red blood cells and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration were lower after 1-year, but higher for mean corpuscular volume and IL-1 beta, compared to baseline or 6 month follow-up. In the Cox regression model with a time-dependent covariate, raised levels of C-reactive protein and IL-8 were associated with reduced survival time. Elevated levels of C-reactive protein and IL-8 during 1-year follow-up were related to reduce lengths of survival in elderly NHRs.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Edvardsson, Maria
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Finspång. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sund-Levander, Märtha
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Classification of ≥80-year-old individuals into healthy, moderately healthy, and frail based on different frailty scores affects the interpretation of laboratory results2022In: Asian Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 2091-0576, E-ISSN 2091-0576, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 63-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Interpretation laboratory analyses are crucial when assessing the patient’s condition. Reference intervals from apparently healthy and disease-free individuals may cause problems when outcomes from elderly patients with chronic diseases and on medications are being interpreted. Elderly individuals are a heterogeneous group ranging from individuals managing their daily life independently to individuals with diseases and impairment, in need of nursing care around the clock, that is, frail; a term widely used although there is no consensus on the definition.

    Aims and Objectives: The aim of the study was to study the effect of classification of elderly into healthy, moderately healthy, and frail, based on activities of daily living (ADL) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) or frailty index (FI), on the interpretation of outcomes regarding: Albumin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatinine, and gamma-glutamyltransferase (γ-GT) levels.

    Materials and Methods: Individuals ≥80 years (n=568) were classified either on ADL and MMSE or number of deficits, (FI).

    Results: Individuals classified as frail based on FI had lower mean levels for ALT, creatinine and γ-GT than individuals classified based on ADL and MMSE (P<0.05).

    Conclusion: The model to define health status to some extent affected laboratory analyte levels in ≥80 years old, classified as healthy, moderately healthy, and frail based on ADL and MMSE versus FI.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Eleftheriou, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Neurologiska kliniken i Linköping.
    Amezcua, Salvador
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus presenting with epileptic seizure as a cardinal symptom: A case presentation2020In: INTERDISCIPLINARY NEUROSURGERY-ADVANCED TECHNIQUES AND CASE MANAGEMENT, ISSN 2214-7519, Vol. 19, article id 100618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus is usually regarded as a disease characterised by gait and balance disturbance, cognitive dysfunction and urinary symptoms. We report a rare case where iNPH should be considered as a cause of seizures.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Elmi Terander, Adrian
    et al.
    Stockholm Spine Center, Sweden.
    Corell, Alba
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Sweden.
    Shahidi, Saeed
    Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Sweden.
    Richter, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Sköld, Mattias
    Akademiska sjukhuset, Sweden.
    Svensdotter, Emma
    Skånes universitetssjukhus, Sweden.
    Spinal neurokirurgi på grund av radikulopati och myelopat: [Spinal neurosurgery radiculopathy and myelopathy]2023In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of spinal neurosurgery covers degenerative conditions and trauma as well as tumors, malformations and vascular disorders of spine and spinal cord. This article focuses on the Swedish spinal neurosurgical care regarding radiculopathy and myelopathy. Disc herniation, foraminal stenosis, spinal stenosis and spinal cord compression due to degenerative disorders or tumors are discussed. Treatment options such as anterior cervical decompression and fusion, posterior forami-notomy, laminectomy and approaches to spinal intradural tumors are briefly presented. The aim is to present symptoms, diagnostics and treatment options of common conditions to facilitate early detection and referral to neurosurgical centers to avoid delayed dia-gnosis and neurological impairment.

  • 20.
    Eneling, Johanna
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Karlsson, Per M.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Rossitti, Sandro
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sphenopalatine arteriovenous fistula complicating transsphenoidal pituitary surgery: A rare cause of delayed epistaxis treatable by endovascular embolization.2016In: Surgical Neurology International, ISSN 2152-7806, E-ISSN 2152-7806, Vol. 7, no Suppl 41, p. S1053-S1056Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Vascular injuries in transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas are uncommon but can result in serious disability or death.

    CASE DESCRIPTION:

    A 46-year-old man, who underwent resection of a pituitary adenoma with suprasellar extension via a transsphenoidal approach, presented with massive epistaxis five days postoperatively. Angiography revealed an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) between the right sphenopalatine artery and a deep vein draining to the right internal jugular vein, as well as contrast agent extravasation at the fistula point. The AVF was catheterized and successfully occluded with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Transsphenoidal pituitary surgery can be complicated by massive epistaxis from a lesion of a small branch of the external carotid artery. Airway protection through intubation and investigation with conventional digital subtraction angiography is recommended. The treatment of choice is endovascular embolization because it can be done immediately at the angiography suite.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Engstrom, Elisabeth Ronne
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Baldvinsdottir, Bryndis
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Aineskog, Helena
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Alpkvist, Peter
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Eneling, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Fridriksson, Steen
    Gothenburg Univ, Sweden.
    Hillman, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Klurfan, Paula
    Gothenburg Univ, Sweden.
    Kronvall, Erik
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lindvall, Peter
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Von Vogelsang, Ann-Christin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ola G.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    The impact of previous health on the mortality after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: analysis of a prospective Swedish multicenter study2023In: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 165, no 2, p. 443-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose There is an an increasing awareness of the importance of health and lifestyle for stroke diseases like spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). However, the importance of pre-existing medical conditions for clinical course and mortality after SAH has not been studied. The aim of the present study was to identify pre-existing conditions contributing to mortality after SAH.Methods Data were extracted from a Swedish national prospective study on patients with SAH. Variables were defined for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), clinical condition at admission, and for 10 pre-existing medical conditions. Models predicting mortality in three time intervals with all possible subsets of these variables were generated, compared and selected using Akaikes information criterion.Results 1155 patients with ruptured aneurysms were included. The mortality within 1 week was 7.6%, 1 month 14.3%, and 1 year 18.7%. The most common pre-existing medical conditions were smoking (57.6%) and hypertension (38.7%). The models best predicting mortality within 1 week and from 1 week to 1 month included only the level of consciousness at admission and age, and these two variables were present in all the models among the top 200 in Akaike score for each time period. The most predictive model for mortality between 1 month and 1 year added previous stroke, diabetes, psychiatric disease, and BMI as predictors.Conclusion Mortality within the first month was best predicted simply by initial level of consciousness and age, while mortality within from 1 month to 1 year was significantly influenced by pre-existing medical conditions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Fahlström, Andreas
    et al.
    Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Redebrandt, Henrietta Nittby
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurosurgery, Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Zeberg, Hugo
    Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Bartek, Jiri
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bartley, Andreas
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tobieson, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Erkki, Maria
    Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hessington, Amel
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Troberg, Ebba
    Skane University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Mirza, Sadia
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tsitsopoulos, Parmenion P.
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; Skane University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    A grading scale for surgically treated patients with spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage: the Surgical Swedish ICH Score2020In: Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0022-3085, E-ISSN 1933-0693, Vol. 133, no 3, p. 800-807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE

    The authors aimed to develop the first clinical grading scale for patients with surgically treated spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH).

    METHODS

    A nationwide multicenter study including 401 ICH patients surgically treated by craniotomy and evacuation of a spontaneous supratentorial ICH was conducted between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2015. All neurosurgical centers in Sweden were included. All medical records and neuroimaging studies were retrospectively reviewed. Independent predictors of 30-day mortality were identified by logistic regression. A risk stratification scale (the Surgical Swedish ICH [SwICH] Score) was developed using weighting of independent predictors based on strength of association.

    RESULTS

    Factors independently associated with 30-day mortality were Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score (p = 0.00015), ICH volume ≥ 50 mL (p = 0.031), patient age ≥ 75 years (p = 0.0056), prior myocardial infarction (MI) (p = 0.00081), and type 2 diabetes (p = 0.0093). The Surgical SwICH Score was the sum of individual points assigned as follows: GCS score 15–13 (0 points), 12–5 (1 point), 4–3 (2 points); age ≥ 75 years (1 point); ICH volume ≥ 50 mL (1 point); type 2 diabetes (1 point); prior MI (1 point). Each increase in the Surgical SwICH Score was associated with a progressively increased 30-day mortality (p = 0.0002). No patient with a Surgical SwICH Score of 0 died, whereas the 30-day mortality rates for patients with Surgical SwICH Scores of 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 5%, 12%, 31%, and 58%, respectively.

    CONCLUSIONS

    The Surgical SwICH Score is a predictor of 30-day mortality in patients treated surgically for spontaneous supratentorial ICH. External validation is needed to assess the predictive value as well as the generalizability of the Surgical SwICH Score.

  • 23.
    Fahlström, Andreas
    et al.
    Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tobieson, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Redebrandt, Henrietta Nittby
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurosurgery, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Zeberg, Hugo
    Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bartek, Jiri
    Department of Medicine and Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Neurosurgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Neurosurgery, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bartley, Andreas
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Erkki, Maria
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery, Umeå University, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hessington, Amel
    Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Troberg, Ebba
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurosurgery, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Mirza, Sadia
    Department of Medicine and Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tsitsopoulos, Parmenion P.
    Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurosurgery, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Differences in neurosurgical treatment of intracerebral haemorrhage: a nation-wide observational study of 578 consecutive patients2019In: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 161, no 5, p. 955-965Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Supratentorial intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) carries an excessive mortality and morbidity. Although surgical ICH treatment can be life-saving, the indications for surgery in larger cohorts of ICH patients are controversial and not well defined. We hypothesised that surgical indications vary substantially among neurosurgical centres in Sweden.

    Objective

    In this nation-wide retrospective observational study, differences in treatment strategies among all neurosurgical departments in Sweden were evaluated.

    Methods

    Patient records, neuroimaging and clinical outcome focused on 30-day mortality were collected on each operated ICH patient treated at any of the six neurosurgical centres in Sweden from 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2015.

    Results

    In total, 578 consecutive surgically treated ICH patients were evaluated. There was a similar incidence of surgical treatment among different neurosurgical catchment areas. Patient selection for surgery was similar among the centres in terms of patient age, pre-operative level of consciousness and co-morbidities, but differed in ICH volume, proportion of deep-seated vs. lobar ICH and pre-operative signs of herniation (p < .05). Post-operative patient management strategies, including the use of ICP-monitoring, CSF-drainage and mechanical ventilation, varied among centres (p < .05). The 30-day mortality ranged between 10 and 28%.

    Conclusions

    Although indications for surgical treatment of ICH in the six Swedish neurosurgical centres were homogenous with regard to age and pre-operative level of consciousness, important differences in ICH volume, proportion of deep-seated haemorrhages and pre-operative signs of herniation were observed, and there was a substantial variability in post-operative management. The present results reflect the need for refined evidence-based guidelines for surgical management of ICH.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 24.
    Fransson, Marcus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Helldén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Östholm Balkhed, Åse
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Dernroth, Dzeneta
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ha, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Kågedal, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Case Report: Subtherapeutic Vancomycin and Meropenem Concentrations due to Augmented Renal Clearance in a Patient With Intracranial Infection Caused by Streptococcus intermedius2021In: Frontiers in Pharmacology, E-ISSN 1663-9812, Vol. 12, article id 728075Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Streptococcus intermedius occasionally causes brain abscesses that can be life-threatening, requiring prompt antibiotic and neurosurgical treatment. The source is often dental, and it may spread to the eye or the brain parenchyma. We report the case of a 34-year-old man with signs of apical periodontitis, endophthalmitis, and multiple brain abscesses caused by Streptococcus intermedius. Initial treatment with meropenem and vancomycin was unsuccessful due to subtherapeutic concentrations, despite recommended dosages. Adequate concentrations could be reached only after increasing the dose of meropenem to 16 g/day and vancomycin to 1.5 g x 4. The patient exhibited high creatinine clearance consistent with augmented renal clearance, although iohexol and cystatin C clearances were normal. Plasma free vancomycin clearance followed that of creatinine. A one-day dose of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole led to an increase in serum creatinine and a decrease in both creatinine and urea clearances. These results indicate that increased tubular secretion of the drugs was the cause of suboptimal antibiotic treatment. The patient eventually recovered, but his left eye needed enucleation. Our case illustrates that augmented renal clearance can jeopardize the treatment of serious bacterial infections and that high doses of antibiotics are needed to achieve therapeutic concentrations in such cases. The mechanisms for regulation of kidney tubular transporters of creatinine, urea, vancomycin, and meropenem in critically ill patients are discussed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25.
    Fransson, Marcus
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Nilsson, Martin
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Ginstman, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Svår traumatisk hjärnskada2020In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    De flesta är ense om att:

    handläggning ska sträva efter att nå normala fysiologiska förhållanden

    tidig administrering av tranexamsyra minskar mortaliteten

    steroider och hypotermibehandling inte har en roll ihandläggningen

    effekten av blodförtunnande behandling ska reverseras.

    Åsikterna går isär vad gäller:

    val mellan hyperton koksaltlösning och mannitol vidförhöjt intrakraniellt tryck

    val av bedömningsskala för medvetandegrad.

  • 26.
    Fytagoridis, Anders
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Umeå University, Sweden; University of Queensland, Australia.
    Heard, Tomas
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Samuelsson, Jennifer
    Umeå University, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Jiltsova, Elena
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Skyrman, Simon
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Skoglund, Thomas
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Coyne, Terry
    University of Queensland, Australia; Brizbrain and Spine, Australia.
    Silburn, Peter
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Surgical Replacement of Implantable Pulse Generator in Deep Brain Stimulation: Adverse Events and Risk Factors in a Multicenter Cohort2016In: Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, ISSN 1011-6125, E-ISSN 1423-0372, Vol. 94, no 4, p. 235-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a growing treatment modality, and most DBS systems require replacement of the implantable pulse generator (IPG) every few years. The literature regarding the potential impact of adverse events of IPG replacement on the longevity of DBS treatments is rather scarce. Objective: To investigate the incidence of adverse events, including postoperative infections, associated with IPG replacements in a multicenter cohort. Methods: The medical records of 808 patients from one Australian and five Swedish DBS centers with a total of 1,293 IPG replacements were audited. A logistic regression model was used to ascertain the influence of possible predictors on the incidence of adverse events. Results: The overall incidence of major infections was 2.3% per procedure, 3.7% per patient and 1.7% per replaced IPG. For 28 of 30 patients this resulted in partial or complete DBS system removal. There was an increased risk of infection for males (OR 3.6, p = 0.026), and the risk of infection increased with the number of prior IPG replacements (OR 1.6, p amp;lt; 0.005). Conclusions: The risk of postoperative infection with DBS IPG replacement increases with the number of previous procedures. There is a need to reduce the frequency of IPG replacements. (C) 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 27.
    Ginstman, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Altered levels of transthyretin in human cerebral microdialysate after subarachnoid haemorrhage using proteomics; a descriptive pilot study2023In: Proteome Science, E-ISSN 1477-5956, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundSubarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is one of the most severe forms of stroke in which delayed cerebral ischemia is one of the major complications. Neurointensive care aims at preventing and treating such complications and identification of biomarkers of early signs of ischemia might therefore be helpful.MethodsWe aimed at describing proteome profile in cerebral microdialysate in four patients with aneurysmal SAH using two dimensional gel electrophoresis in combination with mass spectrometry in search for new biomarkers for delayed cerebral ischemia and to investigate if there were temporal fluctuations in those biomarkers over time after aneurysmal bleed.ResultsThe results showed transthyretin in nine different proteoforms (1001, 1102, 2101, 3101, 4101, 4102, 5001, 5101, 6101) in cerebral microdialysate samples from four patients having sustained SAH. Several proteoforms show highly differing levels and pooled analysis of all samples showed varying optical density related to time from aneurysmal bleed, indicating a temporal evolution.ConclusionsTransthyretin proteoforms have not earlier been shown in cerebral microdialysate after SAH and we describe differing levels based on proteoform as well as time from subarachnoid bleed. Transthyretin is well known to be synthetized in choroid plexus, whilst intraparenchymal synthesis remains controversial. The results need to be confirmed in larger studies in order to further describe transthyretin.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 28.
    Gren, Magnus
    et al.
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Shahim, Pashtun
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Lautner, Ronald
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Wilson, David H.
    Quanterix, Lexington, MA, USA,.
    Andreasson, Ulf
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Norgren, Niklas
    UmanDiagnostics, Umeå, Sweden.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden; Department of Molecular Neuroscience, Reta Lila Weston Laboratories, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
    Blood biomarkers indicate mild neuroaxonal injury and increased amyloid β production after transient hypoxia during breath-hold diving2016In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 30, no 10, p. 1226-1230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To determine whether transient hypoxia during breath-hold diving causes neuronal damage or dysfunction or alters amyloid metabolism as measured by certain blood biomarkers.

    Design: Sixteen divers competing in the national Swedish championship in breath-hold diving and five age-matched healthy control subjects were included. Blood samples were collected at baseline and over a course of 3 days where the divers competed in static apnea (STA), dynamic apnea without fins (DYN1) and dynamic apnea with fins (DYN2).

    Main outcomes: Biomarkers reflecting brain injury and amyloid metabolism were analysed in serum (S-100β, NFL) and plasma (T-tau, Aβ42) using immunochemical methods.

    Results: Compared to divers’ baseline, Aβ42 increased after the first event of static apnea (p = 0.0006). T-tau increased (p = 0.001) in STA vs baseline and decreased after one of the dynamic events, DYN2 (p = 0.03). Further, T-tau correlated with the length of the apneic time during STA (ρ = 0.7226, p = 0.004) and during DYN1 (ρ = 0.66, p = 0.01).

    Conclusion: The findings suggest that transient hypoxia may acutely increase the levels of Aβ42 and T-tau in plasma of healthy adults, further supporting that general hypoxia may cause mild neuronal dysfunction or damage and stimulate Aβ production.

  • 29.
    Gustafsson, B. M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping. Hogland Hosp, Sweden.
    Sund-Levander, Märtha
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Parents experiences of investigations and interventions by Child Healthcare, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Child and Youth Habilitation2022In: Children's health care, ISSN 0273-9615, E-ISSN 1532-6888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines parents experiences of support, investigation and treatment from child healthcare/psychiatry and habilitation in children with ESSENCE symptoms (neurodevelopmental symptoms). Data were collected through focus interviews, with 13 parents. A conventional qualitative analysis revealed four main categories: confidence, information, competence and collaboration, affecting parents. While waiting for an investigation parents experience anxiety, frustration, lack of information and confidence and doubts about their parenting ability, which also affects the child. The categories were interpreted using Bronfenbrenners bioecological model to illustrate the effects on the familys interaction with the context. Parents demand a greater insight and participation in the ongoing process and improved collaboration between the various professionals

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Göransson, Nathanael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Johannes
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Postoperative lead movement after deep brain stimulation surgery and changes of stimulation area2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Lead movement after deep brain stimulation (DBS) may occur and influence the area of stimulation. The cause of the displacement is not fully understood. The aim of the study was to investigate differences in lead position between the day after surgery and approximately one month postoperatively and also simulate the electric field (EF) around the active contacts.

    Methods

    23 patients with movement disorders underwent DBS surgery (37 leads). CT at the two time points were co-fused respectively with the stereotactic images in Surgiplan. The coordinates (x, y, z) of the lead tips were compared between the two dates (paired t-test). 8 of these patients were selected for the EF simulation in Comsol Multiphysics.

    Results

    There was a significant discrepancy (mean ± s.d.) on the left lead: x (0.44 ± 0.72, p < 0.01), y (0.64 ± 0.54, p < 0.001), z (0.62 ± 0.71, p < 0.001).  On the right lead, corresponding values were: x (-0.11 ± 0.61, n.s.), y (0.71 ± 0.54, p < 0.001), z (0.49 ± 0.81, p < 0.05).  No correlation was found between bilateral (n =14) vs. unilateral DBS, gender (n = 17 male) and age < 60 years (n = 8).  The lead movement affected the EF spread (Fig. 1).

    Conclusion

    The left lead tip displayed a tendency to move lateral, anterior and inferior and the right a tendency to move anterior and inferior. Lead movement after DBS can be a factor to consider before starting the stimulation. The differences in the area of stimulation might affect clinical outcome.

  • 31.
    Göransson, Nathanael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Johansson, Johannes
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Postoperative Lead Movement after Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery and the Change of Stimulation Volume2021In: Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, ISSN 1011-6125, E-ISSN 1423-0372, Vol. 99, no 3, p. 221-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Lead movement after deep brain stimulation may occur and influence the affected volume of stimulation. The aim of the study was to investigate differences in lead position between the day after surgery and approximately 1 month postoperatively and also simulate the electric field (EF) around the active contacts in order to investigate the impact of displacement on affected volume. Methods: Twenty-three patients with movement disorders underwent deep brain stimulation surgery (37 leads). Computed tomography at the 2 time points were co-fused respectively with the stereotactic images in Surgiplan. The coordinates (x, y, and z) of the lead tips were compared between the 2 dates. Eleven of these patients were selected for the EF simulation in Comsol Multiphysics. Postoperative changes of EF spread in the tissue due to conductivity changes in perielectrode space and due to displacement were evaluated by calculating the coverage coefficient and the Sorensen-Dice coefficient. Results: There was a significant displacement (mean +/- SD) on the left lead: x (0.44 +/- 0.72, p &lt; 0.01), y (0.64 +/- 0.54, p &lt; 0.001), and z (0.62 +/- 0.71, p &lt; 0.001). On the right lead, corresponding values were: x (-0.11 +/- 0.61, ns), y (0.71 +/- 0.54, p &lt; 0.001), and z (0.49 +/- 0.81, p &lt; 0.05). The anchoring technique was a statistically significant variable associated with displacement. No correlation was found between bilateral (n = 14) versus unilateral deep brain stimulation, gender (n = 17 male), age &lt;60 years (n = 8), and calculated air volume. The simulated stimulation volume was reduced after 1 month because of the perielectrode space. When considering perielectrode space and displacement, the volumes calculated the day after surgery and approximately 1 month later were partly overlapped. Conclusion: The left lead tip displayed a tendency to move lateral, anterior, and inferior and the right a tendency to move anterior and inferior. The anchoring technique was associated to displacement. New brain territory was affected due to the displacement despite considering the reduced stimulated volume after 1 month. Postoperative changes in perielectrode space and small lead movements are reasons for delaying programming to 4 weeks following surgery.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 32.
    Haj-Hosseini, Neda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hildesjö, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Richter, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fluorescence spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography for brain tumor detection2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resection of brain tumor is a challenging task as the tumor does not have clear borders and the malignant types specifically have often a diffuse and infiltrative pattern of growth. Recently, neurosurgical microscopes have been modified to incorporate fluorescence modules for detection of tumor when 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is used as a contrast. We have in combination with the fluorescence microscopes implemented and evaluated a fluorescence spectroscopy based handheld probe for detecting the 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in the gliomas in 50 patients intraoperatively. The results show a significantly high sensitivity for differentiating tumor from the healthy tissue and distinguished fluorescence intensity levels in the tumor cell infiltration zone around the tumor. However, knowledge on association of the quantified fluorescence signals specifically in the intermediate inflammatory zone with the infiltrative tumor cells can be complemented with volumetric tissue imaging and a higher precision histopathological analysis. In this work, a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with central wavelength of 1325nm has been used to image the tissue volume that the fluorescence is collected from and is evaluated against histopathological analysis for a higher precision slicing. The results show that although healthy brain has a homogenous microstructure in the OCT images, the brain tumor shows a distinguished texture in the images correlated with the PpIX fluorescence intensity and histopathology.

  • 33.
    Haj-Hosseini, Neda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Milos, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Richter, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A Multipurpose Guidance Probe for Stereotactic Biopsy Procedures2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Haj-Hosseini, Neda
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Milos, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Richter, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hildesjö, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Detection of brain tumor using fluorescence and optical coherence tomography2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resection of brain tumor is a challenging task as the tumor does not have clear borders and the malignant types specifically have often a diffuse and infiltrative pattern of growth. We have previously implemented and evaluated a fluorescence spectroscopy based handheld probe for detecting the 5-aminolevulinic acid induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in the gliomas. To add another dimension to the brain tumor detection and volumetric analysis of the tissue that exhibits fluorescence, optical coherence tomography was investigated on tumor specimens.

    Material and Methods:

    A fluorescence microscopy and a spectroscopy system as reported previously were used for detecting the fluorescence signals [1, 2]. A total of 50 patients have been included for intraoperative assessment of the tumor borders using the fluorescence techniques. A spectral domain OCT imaging system (TELESTO II, Thorlabs, Inc., NJ, USA) with central wavelength of 1325 nm was used to study the tissue microstructure post operatively. The system has a resolution of 13 and 5.5 μm in the lateral and axial directions, respectively. Tissue specimens from three patients undergoing brain tumor surgery were studied using the OCT system.

    Results and Conclusion:

    Using fluorescence spectroscopy the tumor could be detected with a sensitivity of 0.84 which was significantly higher than that of the surgical microscope (0.30). Brain tissue appeared rather homogeneous in the OCT images however the highly malignant tissue showed a clear structural difference from the non-malignant or low malignant brain tumor tissue which could be related to the fluorescence signal intensities.

  • 35.
    Haj-Hosseini, Neda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Richter, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stereotactic Brain Tumor Optical Biopsy2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To provide guidance for targeting diagnostic tumor tissue and to avoid vessel rupture during the biopsy procedure an application specific fiber optic probe was devel-oped. The setup incorporated an in-house developed fluorescence spectroscopy system for 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) induced protopophyrin IX (PpIX) for detection in the tumor, and laser Doppler flowmeter (LDF) system for measurement of blood perfusion. Fluorescence and blood flow were recorded millimeter-wise towards the pre-calculated target. In conclusion, the optical probe made real-time detection of tumor possible and has a potential for vessel detection during the biopsy procedures. Moreover, the PpIX fluorescence, autofluorescence and blood flow in the tumor could be studied at precise positions in the brain and the tumor. In the next step, further anal-ysis will be added.

  • 36.
    Haj-Hosseini, Neda
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Richter, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Low dose 5-aminolevulinic acid: Implications in spectroscopic measurements during brain tumor surgery2015In: Photodiagnosis and Photodynamic Therapy, ISSN 1572-1000, E-ISSN 1873-1597, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 209-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) as an intraoperative fluorescence contrast has been proven to improve the resection of glioblastoma and contribute to prolonged patient survival. ALA accumulates as protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in the tumor cells and is administered in an advised dose of 20 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) for brain tumor resection using fluorescence surgical microscopes. PpIX fluorescence availability and intensities of a four folds lower ALA dose (5 mg/kg b.w.) has been investigated in glioblastomas and skin using a spectroscopy system adapted for surgical guidance.

    Methods

    A total of 30 adult patients diagnosed with high grade gliomas were included in the analysis. ALA was orally administered in doses of 5 mg/kg b.w. (n = 15) dissolved in orange juice or 20 mg/kg b.w. (n = 15) dissolved in water. A fluorescence spectroscopy system with a handheld fiber-optical probe was used for performing the quantitative fluorescence measurements.

    Results

    The binominal comparison of the diagnostic performance parameters showed no significant statistical difference (p > 0.05). The median fluorescence values in tumor were 2-3 times higher for the high ALA dose group. No PpIX was detected in the skin of the patients in the low dose group (0/4) while PpIX was detected in the skin of the majority of the patients in the high ALA dose group (13/14).

    Conclusions

    Application of 5 mg/kg ALA was evaluated as equally reliable as the higher dose regarding the diagnostic performance when guidance was performed using a spectroscopic system. Moreover, no PpIX was detected in the skin of the patients.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 37.
    Haj-Hosseini, Neda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Richter, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Kobayashi Frisk, Lisa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fluorescence Guidance for Brain Tumor Biopsies2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To provide guidance during stereotactic biopsy in brain tumors, fluorescence spectroscopy was used in ten patients. It was shown that the fiber optical probe could provide real-time guidance with clear fluorescence in all patients.

  • 38.
    Haj-Hosseini, Neda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Richter, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Milos, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    5-ALA fluorescence and laser Doppler flowmetry for guidance in a stereotactic brain tumor biopsy2018In: Biomedical Optics Express, E-ISSN 2156-7085, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 2284-2296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fiber optic probe was developed for guidance during stereotactic brain biopsy procedures to target tumor tissue and reduce the risk of hemorrhage. The probe was connected to a setup for the measurement of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) induced fluorescence and microvascular blood flow. Along three stereotactic trajectories, fluorescence (n = 109) and laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) (n = 144) measurements were done in millimeter increments. The recorded signals were compared to histopathology and radiology images. The median ratio of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence and autofluorescence (AF) in the tumor was considerably higher than the marginal zone (17.3 vs 0.9). The blood flow showed two high spots (3%) in total. The proposed setup allows simultaneous and real-time detection of tumor tissue and microvascular blood flow for tracking the vessels.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 39.
    Haj-Hosseini, Neda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Richter, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Optical guidance during stereotactic brain tumor biopsy2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Haj-Hosseini, Neda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering.
    Richter, Johan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Optical Guidance for Brain Tumor Stereotactic Biopsy2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Haj-Hosseini, Neda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Richter, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Optical guidance for stereotactic brain tumor biopsy procedures-preliminary clinical evaluation2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During stereotactic biopsy on suspected tumors in the brain, tissue samples are harvested to determine the malignancy. To provide guidance for finding the diagnostic tumor sites and to avoid vessel rupture, an application specific probe was developed. The setup incorporated spectroscopy for detection of 5-aminolevulinic acid induced protoporphyrin (PpIX) fluorescence and blood flow using laser Doppler flowmetry. The PpIX fluorescence was significantly different in the tumor compared to the gliotic marginal zone (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the systems made real-time tumor detection and vessel tracking possible. Moreover, the autofluorescence and blood perfusion could be studied in the tumor.

  • 42.
    Heenkenda, Menikae Kanchena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry.
    Malmström, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Närvårdskliniken.
    Lysiak, Malgorzata
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mudaisi, Munila
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bratthall, Charlotte
    Dist Hosp, Sweden.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Strandeus, Michael
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Åkesson, Lisa
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    Uppugunduri, Srinivas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Osman, Abdimajid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Assessment of genetic and non-genetic risk factors for venous thromboembolism in glioblastoma - The predictive significance of B blood group2019In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 183, p. 136-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common problem among patients with glioblastoma multi-forme (GBM) and with some other cancers. Here, we evaluated genetic and non-genetic potential risk factors for VTE among GBM patients. Materials and methods: A cohort of 139 patients treated with concomitant radiotherapy and temozolomide were included in the study. Next generation sequencing and genotyping approaches were applied to assess genetic risk factors in the haemostatic system. Clinical data including surgery, reoperation as well as blood group and patient information such as age and gender were available from patient records. Logistic regression analysis was performed to asses VTE risk. Results: In the study 47 patients (34%) were diagnosed for VTE during the course of their disease. When genetic and non-genetic potential risk factors were evaluated, only B blood group was found to be significantly associated with VTE incidence (odds ratio [OR] = 6.91; confidence interval [CI] = 2.19-24.14; P = 0.001). In contrast, A and O blood groups did not correlate with VTE risk. Frontal lobe tumor location also seemed to slightly increase VTE risk compared to other brain sites (OR = 3.14; CI = 1.1-10.7) although the significance level was at borderline (P = 0.05). Current study identified B blood group as the component in non-O blood groups that is responsible for increased VTE risk. Conclusion: In conclusion, these results suggest for the first time that B blood group is predictive for VTE incidence among patients with glioblastoma, information that may be potentially valuable when selecting GBM patients who are at risk for VTE for anticoagulant prophylaxis.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 43.
    Hellqvist, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Neurologiska kliniken i Linköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dizdar (Segrell), Nil
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Neurologiska kliniken i Linköping.
    Sund-Levander, Märtha
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad Univ, Sweden.
    Self-Management Education for Persons with Parkinsons Disease and Their Care Partners: A Quasi-Experimental Case-Control Study in Clinical Practice2020In: Parkinson's Disease, ISSN 2090-8083, E-ISSN 2042-0080, Vol. 2020, article id 6920943Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Parkinsons disease is a neurodegenerative condition with both physical and mental consequences that affect many aspects of everyday life. Persons with Parkinsons disease and their care partners want guidance from healthcare services in order to develop skills to adjust to life with a long-term condition. The Swedish National Parkinson School is a dyadic self-management programme to support both persons with Parkinsons disease and care partners. Objective. To assess the outcomes of the Swedish National Parkinson School as reported by participants. Design. A quasi-experimental case-control study in clinical care using self-reported questionnaires. Participants. Swedish National Parkinson School was offered by health care professionals working in clinical care. Participants in the programme were also asked to participate in the study. A matched control group was recruited for a comparison of findings. In total, 92 persons with Parkinsons disease and 55 care partners were included. Settings. Five Swedish geriatric and neurologic outpatient clinics. Method. Data were collected during 2015-2017, before and after participation in the National Parkinson School or before and after seven weeks of standard care. Outcomes were assessed using generic and Parkinsons specific questionnaires. Descriptive statistics were used to describe baseline characteristics. Mann-Whitney U and Chi(2) tests were used to test for between-group differences and within-group differences were tested by the Wilcoxon signed-ranks test. Results. Improvements regarding health status, constructive attitudes and approaches, and skill and technique acquisition were found after the intervention among persons with Parkinsons disease. No changes were found among care partners. Conclusion. The findings indicate that the Swedish National Parkinson School may improve health status and self-management among persons with Parkinsons disease, but further studies are needed to better understand the effects of the programme.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 44.
    Hellqvist, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Neurologiska kliniken i Linköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hagell, Peter
    The PRO‐CARE Group, School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Dizdar, Nil
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Neurologiska kliniken i Linköping.
    Sund-Levander, Märtha
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Effects of self-management education for persons with Parkinson's disease and their care partners: A qualitative observational study in clinical care2020In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 741-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Persons with Parkinson's disease and their care partners want support from healthcare to develop the skills to handle everyday life with disease. Earlier findings indicate that participants of the self‐management program Swedish National Parkinson School experience several benefits of the program. The purpose of this qualitative observational study was to explore if participants had implemented the strategies of self‐monitoring included in the program, and use them to communicate health care status and needs in clinical encounters. Data was collected 3–15 months after participation in the program and analysed using constant comparative analysis. Three categories were evident: “Self‐observation in everyday life”, “Self‐care activities to promote health” and “Managing emotional impact of Parkinson's Disease”. Categories were linked together in a core category that highlight the use of self‐management strategies described by participants during clinical encounters. Results confirmed that persons with Parkinson's disease and care partners use the techniques of self‐observation in their everyday lives. Observations of effects in clinical care can be a valuable approach to evaluate the outcomes educational interventions and their benefits for individuals and health care.

    This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 45.
    Hermansen, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Nacka Specialistsjukhus, Sweden.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    A more than 20-year follow-up of pain and disability after anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery for degenerative disc disease and comparisons between two surgical techniques2023In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundFollow-ups more than 20 years after neck surgery are extremely rare. No previous randomized studies have investigated differences in pain and disability more than 20 years after ACDF surgery using different techniques. The purpose of this study was to describe pain and functioning more than 20 years after anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery, and to compare outcomes between the Cloward Procedure and the carbon fiber fusion cage (CIFC).MethodsThis study is a 20 to 24-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial. Questionnaires were sent to 64 individuals, at least 20 years after ACDF due to cervical radiculopathy. Fifty individuals (mean age 69, 60% women, 55% CIFC) completed questionnaires. Mean time since surgery was 22.4 years (range 20,5-24). Primary outcomes were neck pain and neck disability index (NDI). Secondary outcomes were frequency and intensity of neck and arm pain, headache, dizziness, self-efficacy, health related quality of life or global outcome. Clinically relevant improvements were defined as 30 mm decrease in pain and a decrease in disability of 20 percentage units. Between-group differences over time were analyzed with mixed design ANOVA and relationships between main outcomes and psychosocial factors were analyzed by Spearman s rho.ResultsNeck pain and NDI score significantly improved over time (p &lt; .001), with no group differences in primary or secondary outcomes. Eighty-eight per cent of participants experienced improvements or full recovery, 71% (pain) and 41% (NDI) had clinically relevant improvements. Pain and NDI were correlated with lower self-efficacy and quality of life.ConclusionThe results from this study do not support the idea that fusion technique affects long-term outcome of ACDF. Pain and disability improved substantially over time, irrespective of surgical technique. However, the majority of participants reported residual disability not to a negligible extent. Pain and disability were correlated to lower self-efficacy and quality of life.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 46.
    Hermansen, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Reg Jönkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dizziness and balance outcomes after two different postoperative rehabilitation approaches following neck surgery: analyses of a multicenter randomized controlled trial2023In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 750-760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Dizziness and balance problems are common symptoms in patients with cervical radiculopathy. Objective To evaluate the effect of neck surgery postoperatively combined with either structured rehabilitation or standard approach in patients with cervical radiculopathy and dizziness and/or balance problems, and investigate factors influencing dizziness and balance at 6-month follow-up.

    Methods Individuals (n = 149) with cervical radiculopathy and dizziness and/or balance problems were randomized preoperatively to structured postoperative rehabilitation or standard postoperative approach. Outcomes were intensity of dizziness and subjective balance, and clinical measures of balance.

    Results Self-reported measures improved at three months (p &lt; 0.001 to p = .007) and the standing balance at six months (p = .008). No between-group differences. Baseline values, neck pain, and physical activity level explained 23-39% of the variance in 6-month outcomes for self-reported measures. Baseline values and physical activity level explained 71% of the variance in walking balance, and lower baseline scores were significantly associated with standing balance impairments (OR 0.876).

    Conclusion Patients improved significantly in dizziness and subjective balance intensity shortly after surgery, and in standing balance at 6 months, independent of postoperative rehabilitation. Neck pain, physical activity, and neck muscle function influenced dizziness and balance, although preoperative values and neck pain were of most importance for 6-month outcomes.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 47.
    Hollertz, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Vastervik Hosp, Sweden.
    Lindblad, M.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Halldestam, Ingvar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Edholm, David
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Outcome of microscopically non-radical oesophagectomy for oesophageal and oesophagogastric junctional cancer: nationwide cohort study2021In: BJS Open, E-ISSN 2474-9842, Vol. 5, no 3, article id zrab038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Microscopically non-radical (R1) oesophageal cancer resection has been associated with worse survival. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for R1 resection and to investigate how this affects long-term survival. Methods: The Swedish National Register for Oesophageal and Gastric Cancer was used to identify all patients who underwent oesophageal cancer resection with curative intent between 2006 and 2017. Risk factors for R1 resection were assessed by multivariable logistic regression analysis, and factors predicting 5-year survival identified by multivariable Cox regression. Results: The study included 1460 patients. Surgical margins were involved microscopically in 142 patients (9.7 per cent). The circumferential resection margin was involved in 114 (7.8 per cent), the proximal margin in 53 (3.6 per cent), and the distal margin in 29 (2.0 per cent). In 30 specimens (2.1 per cent), two or all three margins were involved. Independent risk factors for R1 resection were male sex, low BMI, absence of neoadjuvant treatments, and clinical T4 disease. The 5-year survival rate for the entire cohort was 42.2 per cent, but only 18.0 per cent for those who had an R1 resection. Independent risk factors for death within 5 years of resection were male sex, age above 60 years, normal BMI, ASA fitness grade III, intermediate-level education, R1 resection (hazard ratio 1.80, 95 per cent c.i. 1.40 to 2.32), clinical T3 disease, and clinical lymph node metastasis. Conclusion: R1 resection is common and predicts poor 5-year survival. Absence of neoadjuvant treatment is a risk factor for R1 resection.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 48.
    Hossain, Iftakher
    et al.
    Turku Univ Hosp, Finland; Univ Cambridge, England.
    Younsi, Alexander
    Univ Heidelberg Hosp, Germany.
    Leon, Ana Maria Castano
    Hosp Univ 12 Octubre, Spain.
    Lippa, Laura
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Italy.
    Toth, Peter
    Univ Pecs, Hungary.
    Terpolilli, Nicole
    Munich Univ Hosp, Germany.
    Tobieson, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Latini, Francesco
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Raabe, Andreas
    Univ Bern, Switzerland.
    Depreitere, Bart
    Univ Hosp Leuven, Belgium.
    Rostami, Elham
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Huge variability in restrictions of mobilization for patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage- A European survey of practice2023In: BRAIN AND SPINE, ISSN 2772-5294, Vol. 3, article id 101731Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: One of the major goals of neurointensive care is to prevent secondary injuries following aSAH. Bed rest and patient immobilization are practiced in order to decrease the risk of DCI. Research question: To explore the current practices in place concerning the management of patients with aSAH, specifically, protocols and habits regarding restrictions of mobilization and HOB positioning. Material and methods: A survey was designed, modified, and approved by the panel of the Trauma & Critical Care section of the EANS to cover the practice of restrictions of patient mobilization and HOB positioning in patients with aSAH. Results: Twenty-nine physicians from 17 countries completed the questionnaire. The majority (79.3%) stated that non-secured aneurysm and the presence of an EVD were the factors related to the establishment of restriction of mobilization. The average duration of the restriction varied widely ranging between 1 and 21 days. The presence of an EVD (13.8%) was found to be the main reason to recommend restriction of HOB elevation. The average duration of restriction of HOB positioning ranged between 3 and 14 days. Rebleeding or complications related to CSF over-drainage were found to be related to these restrictions. Discussion and conclusion: Restriction of patient mobilization regimens vary widely in Europe. Current limited evidence does not support an increased risk of DCI rather the early mobilization might be beneficial. Large prospective studies and/or the initiative of a RCT are needed to understand the significance of early mobilization on the outcome of patients with aSAH.

  • 49.
    Ingberg, Edvin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Dock, Hua
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Ström, Jakob O.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Effect of laser Doppler flowmetry and occlusion time on outcome variability and mortality in rat middle cerebral artery occlusion: inconclusive results2018In: BMC Neuroscience, E-ISSN 1471-2202, Vol. 19, article id 24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Stroke is among the leading causes of death and disability. Although intense research efforts have provided promising treatment options in animals, most clinical trials in humans have failed and the therapeutic options are few. Several factors have been suggested to explain this translational difficulty, particularly concerning methodology and study design. Consistent infarcts and low mortality might be desirable in some, but not all, studies. Here, we aimed to investigate whether the use of laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and the occlusion time (60 vs. 45 min) affected outcome variability and mortality in a rat stroke model. Eighty ovariectomized female Wistar rats were subjected to ischemic stroke using intraluminal filament middle cerebral artery occlusion with or without LDF and with occlusion times of 45 or 60 min. Outcome was evaluated by triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining of brain slices to measure infarct size and a modified sticky tape test. Results: Neither LDF nor occlusion times of 45 versus 60 min significantly affected mortality, outcome variability or outcome severity. Conclusions: Due to the unexpectedly high mortality and variability the statistical power was very low and thus the results were inconclusive.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 50.
    Ingberg, Edvin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Dock, Hua
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Ström, Jakob O
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Vårdvetenskapligt Forskningscentrum/Centre for Health Sciences, Örebro University Hospital, Region Örebro Län, Örebro, Sweden / School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden..
    Method parameters’ impact on mortality and variability in mouse stroke experiments: a meta-analysis2016In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although hundreds of promising substances have been tested in clinical trials, thrombolysis currently remains the only specifi c pharmacological treatment for ischemic stroke. Poor quality, e.g. low statistical power, in the preclinical studies has been suggested to play an important role in these failures. Therefore, it would be attractive to use animal models optimized to minimize unnecessary mortality and outcome variability, or at least to be able to power studies more exactly by predicting variability and mortality given a certain experimental setup. The possible combinations of methodological parameters are innumerous, and an experimental comparison of them all is therefore not feasible. As an alternative approach, we extracted data from 334 experimental mouse stroke articles and, using a hypothesis-driven meta-analysis, investigated the method parameters’ impact on infarct size variability and mortality. The use of Swiss and C57BL6 mice as well as permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery rendered the lowest variability of the infarct size while the emboli methods increased variability. The use of Swiss mice increased mortality. Our study offers guidance for researchers striving to optimize mouse stroke models.

123 1 - 50 of 141
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf