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  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Per I
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bloth, Björn
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Laboratory of Translational Neuropharmacology, Center of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Futurum Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council, Sweden.
    Svensson, Samuel P S
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zinc Induces a Bell-shaped Proliferative Dose-response Effect in Cultured Smooth Muscle Cells From Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.2015In: Urology, ISSN 0090-4295, E-ISSN 1527-9995, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 704.e15-704.e19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of zinc (Zn(2+)) concentrations on cultured benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation.

    METHODS: The effects of Zn(2+) were studied in primary cultures of human BPH SMC, stimulated with either 10-μM lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) or LPA in combination with 100-nM testosterone. Deoxyribonucleic acid replication and protein synthesis using [(3)H]-thymidine and [(35)S]-methionine incorporation were measured. Furthermore, studies were performed to evaluate if Zn(2+) could potentiate the inhibitory effect of phosphodiesterase-5 blockers, on BPH SMC proliferation.

    RESULTS: Zn(2+) generated a bell-shaped concentration response, both regarding deoxyribonucleic acid replication and protein synthesis in cultured BPH SMC. Below a threshold value (approximately 200 μM), a significant mitogenic effect was seen, whereas higher concentrations inhibited SMC proliferation after stimulation with LPA. This effect was even more pronounced after stimulation of LPA in combination with testosterone. Moreover, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, that is, sildenafil blocked LPA-stimulated BPH SMC proliferation. This antiproliferative effect, was significantly potentiated by coincubation with Zn(2+) in an additative manner.

    CONCLUSION: The bell-shaped concentration response of Zn(2+) on cultured BPH SMC proliferation suggests that changes in prostate Zn(2+) concentrations, during aging, diet, or inflammatory conditions, may be of importance in the pathogenesis of BPH.

  • 2.
    Aizawa, Naoki
    et al.
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Gandaglia, Giorgio
    IRCCS, Italy; Lund University, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Fujimura, Tetsuya
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Fukuhara, Hiroshi
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Montorsi, Francesco
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Homma, Yukio
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Igawa, Yasuhiko
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    URB937, a peripherally restricted inhibitor for fatty acid amide hydrolase, reduces prostaglandin E-2-induced bladder overactivity and hyperactivity of bladder mechano-afferent nerve fibres in rats2016In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 117, no 5, p. 821-828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To determine if inhibition of the endocannabinoid-degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) can counteract the changes in urodynamic variables and bladder afferent activities induced by intravesical prostaglandin E-2 (PGE(2)) instillation in rats. Materials and methods In female Sprague-Dawley rats we studied the effects of URB937, a peripherally restricted FAAH inhibitor, on single-unit afferent activity (SAA) during PGE(2)-induced bladder overactivity (BO). SAA measurements were made in urethane-anaesthetised rats and Ad-and C-fibres were identified by electrical stimulation of the pelvic nerve and by bladder distention. Cystometry (CMG) in conscious animals and during SAA measurements was performed during intravesical instillation of PGE(2) (50 or 100 mu M) after intravenous administration of URB937 (0.1 and 1 mg/kg) or vehicle. In separate experiments, the comparative expressions of FAAH and cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, in microsurgically removed L6 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) were studied by immunofluorescence. Results During CMG, 1 mg/kg URB937, but not vehicle or 0.1 mg/kg URB937, counteracted the PGE(2)-induced changes in urodynamic variables. PGE(2) increased the SAAs of C-fibres, but not Ad-fibres. URB937 (1 mg/kg) depressed Ad-fibre SAA and abolished the facilitated C-fibre SAA induced by PGE(2). The DRG nerve cells showed strong staining for FAAH, CB1 and CB2, with a mean (SEM) of 77 (2)% and 87 (3)% of FAAH-positive nerve cell bodies co-expressing CB1 or CB2 immunofluorescence, respectively. Conclusion The present results show that URB937, a peripherally restricted FAAH inhibitor, reduces BO and C-fibre hyperactivity in the rat bladder provoked by PGE(2), suggesting an important role of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in BO and hypersensitivity.

  • 3.
    Ali, Zaheer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Islam, Anik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sherrell, Peter
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Le-Moine, Mark
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lolas, Georgios
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Syrigos, Konstantinos
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Adjustable delivery of pro-angiogenic FGF-2 by alginate: collagen microspheres2018In: BIOLOGY OPEN, ISSN 2046-6390, Vol. 7, no 3, article id UNSP bio027060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Therapeutic induction of blood vessel growth (angiogenesis) in ischemic tissues holds great potential for treatment of myocardial infarction and stroke. Achieving sustained angiogenesis and vascular maturation has, however, been highly challenging. Here, we demonstrate that alginate: collagen hydrogels containing therapeutic, pro-angiogenic FGF-2, and formulated as microspheres, is a promising and clinically relevant vehicle for therapeutic angiogenesis. By titrating the amount of readily dissolvable and degradable collagen with more slowly degradable alginate in the hydrogel mixture, the degradation rates of the biomaterial controlling the release kinetics of embedded proangiogenic FGF-2 can be adjusted. Furthermore, we elaborate a microsphere synthesis protocol allowing accurate control over sphere size, also a critical determinant of degradation/release rate. As expected, alginate: collagen microspheres were completely biocompatible and did not cause any adverse reactions when injected in mice. Importantly, the amount of pro-angiogenic FGF-2 released from such microspheres led to robust induction of angiogenesis in zebrafish embryos similar to that achieved by injecting FGF-2-releasing cells. These findings highlight the use of microspheres constructed from alginate: collagen hydrogels as a promising and clinically relevant delivery system for pro-angiogenic therapy.

  • 4.
    Amundstuen Reppe, Linda
    et al.
    Nordic University, Norway; Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; St Olays Hospital, Norway.
    Lydersen, Stian
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Schjott, Jan
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Damkier, Per
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Rolighed Christensen, Hanne
    Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg University Hospital, Denmark.
    Peter Kampmann, Jens
    Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg University Hospital, Denmark.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Spigset, Olav
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; St Olays Hospital, Norway.
    Relationship Between Time Consumption and Quality of Responses to Drug-related Queries: A Study From Seven Drug Information Centers in Scandinavia2016In: Clinical Therapeutics, ISSN 0149-2918, E-ISSN 1879-114X, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 1738-1749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to assess the quality of responses produced by drug information centers (DICs) in Scandinavia, and to study the association between time consumption processing queries and the quality of the responses. Methods: We posed six identical drug-related queries to seven DICs in Scandinavia, and the time consumption required for processing them was estimated. Clinical pharmacologists (internal experts) and general practitioners (external experts) reviewed responses individually. We used mixed model linear regression analyses to study the associations between time consumption on one hand and the summarized quality scores and the overall impression of the responses on the other hand. Findings: Both expert groups generally assessed the quality of the responses as "satisfactory" to "good." A few responses were criticized for being poorly synthesized and less relevant, of which none were quality-assured using co-signatures. For external experts, an increase in time consumption was statistically significantly associated with a decrease in common quality score (change in score, -0.20 per hour of work; 95% CI, -0.33 to -0.06; P = 0.004), and overall impression (change in score, -0.05 per hour of work; 95% CI, -0.08 to -0.01; P = 0.005). No such associations were found for the internal experts assessment. Implications: To our knowledge, this is the first study of the association between time consumption and quality of responses to drug-related queries in DICs. The quality of responses were in general good, but time consumption and quality were only weakly associated in this setting. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier HS Journals, Inc.

  • 5.
    Amundstuen Reppe, Linda
    et al.
    Nordic University, Norway; Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; St Olavs Hospital, Norway.
    Spigset, Olav
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; St Olavs Hospital, Norway.
    Kampmann, Jens Peter
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark.
    Damkier, Per
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Rolighed Christensen, Hanne
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Schjott, Jan
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Quality assessment of structure and language elements of written responses given by seven Scandinavian drug information centres2017In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 73, no 5, p. 623-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify structure and language elements affecting the quality of responses from Scandinavian drug information centres (DICs). Six different fictitious drug-related queries were sent to each of seven Scandinavian DICs. The centres were blinded for which queries were part of the study. The responses were assessed qualitatively by six clinical pharmacologists (internal experts) and six general practitioners (GPs, external experts). In addition, linguistic aspects of the responses were evaluated by a plain language expert. The quality of responses was generally judged as satisfactory to good. Presenting specific advice and conclusions were considered to improve the quality of the responses. However, small nuances in language formulations could affect the individual judgments of the experts, e.g. on whether or not advice was given. Some experts preferred the use of primary sources to the use of secondary and tertiary sources. Both internal and external experts criticised the use of abbreviations, professional terminology and study findings that was left unexplained. The plain language expert emphasised the importance of defining and explaining pharmacological terms to ensure that enquirers understand the response as intended. In addition, more use of active voice and less compressed text structure would be desirable. This evaluation of responses to DIC queries may give some indications on how to improve written responses on drug-related queries with respect to language and text structure. Giving specific advice and precise conclusions and avoiding too compressed language and non-standard abbreviations may aid to reach this goal.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Marine L.
    et al.
    Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Bastholm-Rahmner, Pia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ovesjo, Marie-Louise
    Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Veg, Aniko
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Eiermann, Birgit
    Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Evaluation of usage patterns and user perception of the drug-drug interaction database SFINX2015In: International Journal of Medical Informatics, ISSN 1386-5056, E-ISSN 1872-8243, Vol. 84, no 5, p. 327-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate how prescribers and pharmacists use and perceive the drug-drug interaction database SFINX in their clinical work. Methods: A questionnaire was developed with questions aimed at the usage of SFINX, and the perceptions of the database. The questionnaire was sent out to all registered users of the web application of SFINX. The anonymous answers from the target users, prescribers and pharmacists were summarized using descriptive statistics. Statistical analysis was performed on age and gender differences for some questions regarding different usage patterns. Results: The questionnaire was sent to 11,763 registered SFINX users. The response rate was 23%, including 1871 answers from prescribers or pharmacists. SFINX was reported to be used at least weekly or more often by 45% of the prescribers and 51% of the pharmacists. Many prescribers reported using the database during the patient consultation (60%) or directly before or after (56%). Among the prescribers, 74% reported that the information received made them change their action at least sometimes. About 20% of the prescribers and 25% of the pharmacists considered the information as irrelevant sometimes or more often. Conclusion: Most prescribers and pharmacists reported using SFINX in direct association with a patient consultation. Information received by using SFINX makes prescribers and pharmacists change their handling of patients. DDI databases with relevant information about patient handling might improve drug treatment outcome. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Marine L
    et al.
    Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm,.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Kockum, Henrik
    3Department of.
    Eiermann, Birgit
    Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm,.
    High Prevalence of Drug-Drug Interactions in Primary Health Care is Caused by Prescriptions from other Healthcare Units.2018In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 122, no 5, p. 512-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drug-drug interactions are increasingly common, as patients are getting older and the number of drugs per patient is increasing. In this study, we investigated to which extent potential drug-drug interactions originated from single or multiple prescribers. All patients attending any of 20 primary healthcare centres were included in a retrospective observational cohort study. Data on all prescriptions to these patients, irrespectively of the prescriber, were collected for two 4-month periods. Potential drug interactions were identified using the drug-drug interaction database SFINX. Interactions were classified with respect to the workplace of the prescriber, and the prevalence of interactions according to origin was analysed. We found that the drug interactions were significantly more common when the drugs were prescribed from different healthcare centres, compared with drugs prescribed from the patients' primary healthcare centre only. One explanation for this increased risk of drug interactions could be that the prescribers at different primary healthcare centres do not share the same information concerning the total medication list of the patient.

  • 8.
    Andersson Sundell, K.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Anna K.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Beliefs about medicines are strongly associated with medicine-use patterns among the general population2016In: International journal of clinical practice (Esher), ISSN 1368-5031, E-ISSN 1742-1241, Vol. 70, no 3, p. 277-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimsTo investigate self-reported beliefs and perceived sensitivity to medicines and their effects in relation to self-reported use of medicines and herbal remedies. MethodsA survey sent to 13,931 randomly selected Swedish adults included the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire-General (BMQ-General) Questionnaire and the Perceived Sensitivity to Medicines Scale (PSM). The survey also asked about individuals use of prescribed and over-the-counter (OTC) medicines and herbal remedies in the past month. We examined all associations between scores on the BMQ-General subscales and PSM in relation to the use of medicines and herbal remedies, using analysis of covariance adjusted for potential confounders. ResultsAmong 7099 respondents, those using herbal remedies exclusively believed strongly that prescription and OTC medicines are harmful and overprescribed. Respondents using prescription and OTC medicines reported more positive beliefs [coefficient 0.67 (95% CI 0.47-0.87) and 0.70 (95% CI 0.51-0.90)] on the benefits of medicines compared with those using herbal remedies [-0.18 (95% CI -0.57-0.20)]. Perceived sensitivity to medicines was higher among those using herbal remedies only [1.25 (95% CI 0.46-2.03)] compared with those using no medicines (reference 0) or prescription [-0.44 (95% CI -0.84 to -0.05)] or OTC [-0.27 (95% CI -0.66-0.12)] medicines alone. ConclusionRespondents using prescription and/or OTC medicines reported stronger positive beliefs about the benefits of medicines in general, supporting the hypothesis that beliefs influence medicine use. Therefore, addressing beliefs and concerns about medicines during patient counselling may influence medicine use, particularly regarding unintentional non-adherence.

  • 9.
    Aronsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Department Pharmacology, Institution of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Booth, Shirley
    Department Pedagogical, Curricular and Professional Studies, Faculty of Education, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; School of Education, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zetterqvist, Ann
    Department Pedagogical, Curricular and Professional Studies, Faculty of Education, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tobin, Gunnar
    Department Pharmacology, Institution of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Reis, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The understanding of core pharmacological concepts among health care students in their final semester2015In: BMC Medical Education, ISSN 1472-6920, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The overall aim of the study was to explore health care students´ understanding of core concepts in pharmacology.

    Method

    An interview study was conducted among twelve students in their final semester of the medical program (n = 4), the nursing program (n = 4), and the specialist nursing program in primary health care (n  = 4) from two Swedish universities. The participants were individually presented with two pharmacological clinically relevant written patient cases, which they were to analyze and propose a solution to. Participants were allowed to use the Swedish national drug formulary. Immediately thereafter the students were interviewed about their assessments. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. A thematic analysis was used to identify units of meaning in each interview. The units were organized into three clusters: pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and drug interactions. Subsequent procedure consisted of scoring the quality of students´ understanding of core concepts. Non-parametric statistics were employed.

    Results

    The study participants were in general able to define pharmacological concepts, but showed less ability to discuss the meaning of the concepts in depth and to implement these in a clinical context. The participants found it easier to grasp concepts related to pharmacodynamics than pharmacokinetics and drug interactions.

    Conclusion

    These results indicate that education aiming to prepare future health care professionals for understanding of more complex pharmacological reasoning and decision-making needs to be more focused and effective.

  • 10.
    Bettiga, Arianna
    et al.
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Aureli, Massimo
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Colciago, Giorgia
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Murdica, Valentina
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Moschini, Marco
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Luciano, Roberta
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Canals, Daniel
    SUNY Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA.
    Hannun, Yusuf
    SUNY Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA.
    Hedlund, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Lavorgna, Giovanni
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Colombo, Renzo
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Bassi, Rosaria
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Samarani, Maura
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Montorsi, Francesco
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy; University of Vita Salute San Raffaele, Italy.
    Salonia, Andrea
    University of Vita Salute San Raffaele, Italy.
    Benigni, Fabio
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Bladder cancer cell growth and motility implicate cannabinoid 2 receptor-mediated modifications of sphingolipids metabolism2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 42157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inhibitory effects demonstrated by activation of cannabinoid receptors (CB) on cancer proliferation and migration may also play critical roles in controlling bladder cancer (BC). CB expression on human normal and BC specimens was tested by immunohistochemistry. Human BC cells RT4 and RT112 were challenged with CB agonists and assessed for proliferation, apoptosis, and motility. Cellular sphingolipids (SL) constitution and metabolism were evaluated after metabolic labelling. CB1-2 were detected in BC specimens, but only CB2 was more expressed in the tumour. Both cell lines expressed similar CB2. Exposure to CB2 agonists inhibited BC growth, down-modulated Akt, induced caspase 3-activation and modified SL metabolism. Baseline SL analysis in cell lines showed differences linked to unique migratory behaviours and cytoskeletal re-arrangements. CB2 activation changed the SL composition of more aggressive RT112 cells by reducing (p amp;lt; 0.01) Gb3 ganglioside (-50 +/- 3%) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P, -40 +/- 4%), which ended up to reduction in cell motility (-46 +/- 5%) with inhibition of p-SRC. CB2-selective antagonists, gene silencing and an inhibitor of SL biosynthesis partially prevented CB2 agonist-induced effects on cell viability and motility. CB2 activation led to ceramide-mediated BC cell apoptosis independently of SL constitutive composition, which instead was modulated by CB2 agonists to reduce cell motility.

  • 11.
    Brinkman, D. J.
    et al.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands; Research and Expertise Centre Pharmacotherapy Educ RECIPE, Netherlands.
    Tichelaar, J.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands; Research and Expertise Centre Pharmacotherapy Educ RECIPE, Netherlands.
    Schutte, T.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands; Research and Expertise Centre Pharmacotherapy Educ RECIPE, Netherlands.
    Benemei, S.
    University of Florence, Italy.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Chamontin, B.
    University of Toulouse, France.
    Christiaens, T.
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Likic, R.
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Maciulaitis, R.
    Lithuanian University of Health Science, Lithuania.
    Marandi, T.
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Monteiro, E. C.
    NOVA Medical Sch, Portugal.
    Papaioannidou, P.
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Pers, Y. M.
    University of Montpellier, France.
    Pontes, C.
    Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Raskovic, A.
    University of Novi Sad, Serbia.
    Regenthal, R.
    University of Leipzig, Germany.
    Sanz, E. J.
    University of La Laguna, Spain.
    Tamba, B. I.
    Gr T Popa University of Medical and Pharm, Romania.
    Wilson, K.
    University of Manchester, England.
    de Vries, T. P.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands; Research and Expertise Centre Pharmacotherapy Educ RECIPE, Netherlands.
    Richir, M. C.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands; Research and Expertise Centre Pharmacotherapy Educ RECIPE, Netherlands.
    van Agtmael, M. A.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands; Research and Expertise Centre Pharmacotherapy Educ RECIPE, Netherlands.
    Essential Competencies in Prescribing: A First European Cross-Sectional Study Among 895 Final-Year Medical Students2017In: Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0009-9236, E-ISSN 1532-6535, Vol. 101, no 2, p. 281-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    European medical students should have acquired adequate prescribing competencies before graduation, but it is not known whether this is the case. In this international multicenter study, we evaluated the essential knowledge, skills, and attitudes in clinical pharmacology and therapeutics (CPT) of final-year medical students across Europe. In a cross-sectional design, 26 medical schools from 17 European countries were asked to administer a standardized assessment and questionnaire to 50 final-year students. Although there were differences between schools, our results show an overall lack of essential prescribing competencies among final-year students in Europe. Students had a poor knowledge of drug interactions and contraindications, and chose inappropriate therapies for common diseases or made prescribing errors. Our results suggest that undergraduate teaching in CPT is inadequate in many European schools, leading to incompetent prescribers and potentially unsafe patient care. A European core curriculum with clear learning outcomes and assessments should be urgently developed.

  • 12.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Laine, Kari
    Medbase Ltd, Finland; Univ Turku, Finland.
    Korhonen, Tuomas
    Medbase Ltd, Finland; Univ Turku, Finland.
    Lahdesmaki, Janne
    Medbase Ltd, Finland; Turku Univ Hosp, Finland; Univ Turku, Finland.
    Shemeikka, Tero
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden.
    Julander, Margaretha
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden.
    Edlert, Maria
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden.
    Andersson, Marine L.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Development and pilot testing of PHARAO-a decision support system for pharmacological risk assessment in the elderly2018In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 74, no 3, p. 365-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study are to describe the development of PHARAO (Pharmacological Risk Assessment Online), a decision support system providing a risk profile for adverse events, associated with combined effects of multiple medicines, and to present data from a pilot study, testing the use, functionality, and acceptance of the PHARAO system in a clinical setting. About 1400 substances were scored in relation to their risk to cause any of nine common and/or serious adverse effects. Algorithms for each adverse effect score were developed to create individual risk profiles from the patients list of medication. The system was tested and integrated to the electronic medical record, during a 4-month period in two geriatric wards and three primary healthcare centers, and a questionnaire was answered by the users before and after the test period. A total of 732 substances were tagged with one or more of the nine risks, most commonly with the risk of sedation or seizures. During the pilot, the system was used 933 times in 871 patients. The most common signals generated by PHARAO in these patients were related to the risks of constipation, sedation, and bleeding. A majority of responders considered PHARAO easy to use and that it gives useful support in performing medication reviews. The PHARAO decision support system, designed as a complement to a database on drug-drug interactions used nationally, worked as intended and was appreciated by the users during a 4-month test period. Integration aspects need to be improved to minimize unnecessary signaling.

  • 13.
    Castiglione, Fabio
    et al.
    University of Leuven, Belgium; IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Dewulf, Karel
    University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Hakim, Lukman
    University of Leuven, Belgium; Airlangga University, Indonesia.
    Weyne, Emmanuel
    University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Montorsi, Francesco
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Russo, Andrea
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Boeri, Luca
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Bivalacqua, Trinity J.
    Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, MD 21205 USA.
    De Ridder, Dirk
    University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Joniau, Steven
    University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Albersen, Maarten
    University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Hedlund, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Lund University, Sweden.
    Adipose-derived Stem Cells Counteract Urethral Stricture Formation in Rats2016In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 70, no 6, p. 1032-1041Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A medical treatment for urethral stricture (US) is not yet available. Objective: To evaluate if local injection of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hADSC) prevents urethral fibrosis in a rat model of US. Design, setting, and participants: Male rats were divided into three groups: sham, US, and hADSC (n = 12 each). Sham rats received a vehicle injection in the urethral wall. US and hADSCs were incised and injected with the fibrosis-inducer transforming growth factor-beta 1 in the urethral wall. Intervention: One day later, hADSCs were injected in the urethral wall of hADSC rats whereas sham and US rats were injected with the vehicle. After 4 wk, the rats underwent cystometries and tissues were then harvested for functional and molecular analyses. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: Cystometry, microultrasound, histochemistry, organ bath studies, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and western blot. Results and limitations: US rats exhibited 49-51% shorter micturition intervals, 35-51% smaller micturition volumes and bladder capacity, 33-62% higher threshold pressures and flow pressures, and 35-37% lower bladder filling compliance compared with hADSC-treated rats and sham rats (p amp;lt; 0.05). By ultrasound, US rats had hyperechogenic and thick urethral walls with narrowed lumen compared with sham rats, whereas hADSC rats displayed less extensive urethral changes. Isolated detrusor from US rats exhibited 34-55% smaller contractions than detrusor from sham rats (p amp;lt; 0.05). Corresponding values were 11-35% for isolated detrusors from hADSC rats. Collagen and elastin protein expression were increased in the penile urethras of US rats compared with sham and hADSC groups (p amp;lt; 0.05). Endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase expressions were higher (p amp;lt; 0.05) in the hADSC group. Compared with US rats, hADSC rats demonstrated decreased expression of several fibrosis-related genes. Administration of hADSCs was performed at an early stage of US development, which we consider a limitation of the study. Conclusions: Local injection of hADSCs prevents stricture formation and urodynamic complications in a new rat model for US. Patient summary: Stem cell therapy is effective for preventing urethral stricture in an experimental setting. (C) 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 14.
    Chalise, Jaya Prakash
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Pallotta, Maria Teresa
    Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
    Chenna Narendra, Sudeep
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Iacono, Alberta
    Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
    Boon, Louis
    EPIRUS Biopharmaceuticals, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Grohmann, Ursula
    Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
    Magnusson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    IDO1 and TGF- 1 β mediate protective effects of IFN-α in antigen-induced arthritisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Interferon-α (IFN-α) prevents antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in mice by an unknown mechanism. Indoleamine 2, 3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) is an immunoregulator via enzymatic as well as signalling activity, which can be activated by TGF-β and further mediated via non canonical NF-κB signalling. We here investigated whether IDO1 and TGF-β are involved in IFN-α protective effects in AIA. Arthritis was induced in wt, Ido1-/- or Ifnar-/- mice, treated or not with IFN-α or kynurenine, the main IDO1 product, and antibodies neutralizing TGF-β or 1-methyltryptophan (1-MT), an inhibitor of IDO1 catalytic activity. IDO1 expression and enzymatic activity were determined by RT-PCR and HPLC, respectively. Proliferation was measured by 3H-Thymidine incorporation. Non-canonical NF-κB signalling was evaluated by ELISA and Western blot in plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) from treated mice. Protective effects of IFN-α in AIA were associated with increased IDO1 expression and kynurenine production in spleen cells, particularly at the time of mBSA sensitization. Lack of IDO1 ablated IFN-α protection and kynurenine prevented AIA in an IFNAR-independent manner. The IDO1 catalytic activity was crucial for IFN-α effects at the sensitization but not effector phase of AIA. The disease effector phase in mice treated with IFN-α was instead characterized by sustained IDO1 and TGF-β expression and activation of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway in pDCs. IFN-α protective effects in AIA involves IDO1 enzymatic and signalling activity in the disease sensitization and effector phase, respectively. Kynurenine, the main IDO1 metabolite, can be used as an alternative treatment to IFN-α in protecting mice from AIA.

  • 15.
    Chermá, Maria D.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
    Rydberg, Irene
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Woxler, Per
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Dependency in Linköping.
    Trygg, Tomas
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Dependency in Linköping.
    Hollertz, Olle
    Department of General Psychiatry, Västervik Hospital, Västervik, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Methylphenidate for Treating ADHD: A Naturalistic Clinical Study of Methylphenidate Blood Concentrations in Children and Adults With Optimized Dosage.2017In: European journal of drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics, ISSN 0378-7966, E-ISSN 2107-0180, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 295-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Methylphenidate (MPH), along with behavioral and psychosocial interventions, is the first-line medication to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in Sweden. The dose of MPH for good symptom control differs between patients. However, studies of MPH concentration measurement in ADHD treatment are limited.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe blood and oral fluid (OF) concentrations of MPH after administration of medication in patients with well-adjusted MPH treatment for ADHD, and to identify the most suitable matrix for accurate MPH concentration during treatment.

    METHODS: Patients were recruited from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP), General Psychiatry (GP), and the Department of Dependency (DD). Blood and OF samples were collected in the morning before MPH administration as well as 1 and 6 h after administration of the prescribed morning dose of MPH.

    RESULTS: Fifty-nine patients aged between 9 and 69 years, 76 % males. The daily dose of MPH varied from 18 to 180 mg, but the median daily dose per body weight was similar, approximately 1.0 mg/kg body weight. The median MPH concentration in blood 1 and 6 h after the morning dose was 5.4 and 9.3 ng/mL, respectively. Highly variable OF-to-blood ratios for MPH were found at all time points for all three groups.

    CONCLUSIONS: Weight is a reliable clinical parameter for optimal dose titration. Otherwise, MPH blood concentration might be used for individual dose optimization and for monitoring of the prescribed dose. Relying only on the outcome in OF cannot be recommended for evaluation of accurate MPH concentrations for treatment monitoring.

  • 16.
    Eriksson, Irene
    et al.
    Stockholm County Council, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wettermark, Bjorn
    Stockholm County Council, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Persson, Marie
    Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Edström, Morgan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Godman, Brian
    University of Liverpool, England; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; University of Strathclyde, Scotland.
    Lindhe, Anna
    Regional Vastra Gotaland, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Rickard E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ramstrom, Helena
    Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    von Eulerz, Mia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bergkvist Christensen, Anna
    Regional Skåne, Sweden.
    The Early Awareness and Alert System in Sweden: History and Current Status2017In: Frontiers in Pharmacology, ISSN 1663-9812, E-ISSN 1663-9812, Vol. 8, article id 674Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Over the past decades, early awareness and alert (FAA) activities and systems have gained importance and become a key early health technology assessment (HTA) tool. While a pioneer in HTA, Sweden had no national level EAA activities until 2010. We describe the evolution and current status of the Swedish EAA System. Methods: This was a historical analysis based on the knowledge and experience of the authors supplemented by a targeted review of published and gray literature as well as documents relating to EM activities in Sweden. Key milestones and a description of the current state of the Swedish FAA System is presented. Results: Initiatives to establish a system for the identification and assessment of emerging health technologies in Sweden date back to the 1980s. In the 1990s, the Swedish Agency for HTA and Assessment of Social Services (SBU) supported the development of EuroScan as one of its founder members. In the mid-2000s, an independent regional initiative, driven by the Stockholm County Drug and Therapeutics Committee, resulted in the establishment of a regional horizon scanning function. By 2009, this work had expanded to a collaboration between the four biggest counties in Sweden. The following year it was further expanded to the national level and since then the Swedish EAA System has been carrying out identification, filtration and prioritization of new medicines, early assessment of the prioritized medicines, and dissemination of information. In 2015, the EAA System was incorporated into the Swedish national process for managed introduction and follow-up of new medicines. Outputs from the EAA System are now used to select new medicines for inclusion in this process. Conclusions: The Swedish FAA System started as a regional initiative and rapidly grew to become a national level activity. An important feature of the system today is its complete integration into the national process for managed introduction and follow-up of new medicines. The system will continue to evolve as a response both to the changing landscape of health innovations and to new policy initiatives at the regional, national and international level.

  • 17.
    Folkesson, Maggie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sadowska, Natalia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vikingsson, Svante
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Carlhäll, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Wågsäter, Dick
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Differences in cardiovascular toxicities associated with cigarette smoking and snuff use revealed using novel zebrafish models2016In: Biology Open, ISSN 2046-6390, Vol. 5, no 7, p. 970-978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tobacco use is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease and the only avoidable risk factor associated with development of aortic aneurysm. While smoking is the most common form of tobacco use, snuff and other oral tobacco products are gaining popularity, but research on potentially toxic effects of oral tobacco use has not kept pace with the increase in its use. Here, we demonstrate that cigarette smoke and snuff extracts are highly toxic to developing zebrafish embryos. Exposure to such extracts led to a palette of toxic effects including early embryonic mortality, developmental delay, cerebral hemorrhages, defects in lymphatics development and ventricular function, and aneurysm development. Both cigarette smoke and snuff were more toxic than pure nicotine, indicating that other compounds in these products are also associated with toxicity. While some toxicities were found following exposure to both types of tobacco product, other toxicities, including developmental delay and aneurysm development, were specifically observed in the snuff extract group, whereas cerebral hemorrhages were only found in the group exposed to cigarette smoke extract. These findings deepen our understanding of the pathogenic effects of cigarette smoking and snuff use on the cardiovascular system and illustrate the benefits of using zebrafish to study mechanisms involved in aneurysm development.

  • 18.
    Frödin, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Lotfi, Kourosh
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Juliusson, G.
    Lund University, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Frequent and long-term follow-up of health-related quality of life following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation2015In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 898-910Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health-related quality of life (HRQL) was evaluated in 94 patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) after myeloablative (MAC, n=18) or reduced intensity conditioning (RIC, n=76). HRQL was assessed with the EORTC QLQ C-30 during the inpatient period as well as during the following 3years, i.e. at baseline and 12 times thereafter. Functional status and global quality of life decreased from baseline to weeks 2 and 3, especially role and social functions. Symptoms increased significantly during the first 3weeks, particularly appetite loss, nausea and vomiting, diarrhoea and fatigue. It took at least 1year for HRQL to return to the baseline level. The only function that improved significantly 3years after HSCT was role function. Patients treated with MAC experienced significantly worse HRQL at baseline than patients treated with RIC, as well as more pain, sleep disturbance and appetite loss in weeks 3 and 4. Patients with extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease experienced reduced HRQL. These results provide a clinically useful overview of patients HRQL during and after HSCT and indicate when they require increased support. The results demonstrate the importance of close follow-ups during the first year after HSCT to improve preventive or supportive interventions.

  • 19.
    Fuellhase, Claudius
    et al.
    University of Rostock, Germany; University of Munich, Germany.
    Schreiber, Andrea
    University of Munich, Germany; University of Munich, Germany.
    Giese, Armin
    University of Munich, Germany.
    Schmidt, Michael
    University of Munich, Germany.
    Montorsi, Francesco
    University of Milan, Italy; University of Vita San Raffaele, Italy.
    Gratzke, Christian
    University of Munich, Germany.
    La Croce, Giovanni
    University of Milan, Italy; Lund University, Sweden.
    Castiglione, Fabio
    University of Vita San Raffaele, Italy; Lund University, Sweden.
    Stief, Christian
    University of Munich, Germany.
    Hedlund, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. University of Milan, Italy.
    Spinal neuronal cannabinoid receptors mediate urodynamic effects of systemic fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibition in rats2016In: Neurourology and Urodynamics, ISSN 0733-2467, E-ISSN 1520-6777, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 464-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimsTo test if urodynamic effects from systemic Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) inhibition involve sacral spinal cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) or type 2 (CB2) receptors. MethodsMale rats with or without partial urethral obstruction were used for cystometry or immunohistochemistry. Urodynamic effects of intravenous (IV) 0.3mg/kg Oleoyl Ethyl Amide (OEtA; FAAH inhibitor), and intrathecal (IT) 5g rimonabant (CB1 antagonist) or 5g SR144528 (CB2 antagonist) were studied in awake rats. ResultsAfter administration of rimonabant or SR144528, non-obstructed rats with normal bladder function developed bladder overactivity (BO), which was counteracted by OEtA. OEtA also counteracted BO in obstructed rats. SR144528 did not affect bladder function in obstructed rats but counteracted the urodynamic effects of OEtA. Surprisingly, rimonabant (and AM251, another CB1 antagonist) reduced BO in obstructed rats, whereafter OEtA produced no additional urodynamic effects. CB1 expression increased in the sacral spinal cord of obstructed rats whereas no changes were observed for CB2 or FAAH. ConclusionsUrodynamic effects of systemic FAAH inhibition involve activities at spinal neuronal CB1 and CB2 receptors in normal and obstructed rats. Endogenous spinal CB receptor ligands seem to regulate normal micturition and BO. Altered spinal CB receptor functions may be involved in the pathogenesis of obstruction-induced BO. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:464-470, 2016. (c) 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 20.
    Fyrberg, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Lotfi, Kourosh
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    NUCLEOSIDE ANALOG ACTIVITY IN MALIGNANT MELANOMA CELL LINES2015In: Nucleosides, Nucleotides & Nucleic Acids, ISSN 1525-7770, E-ISSN 1532-2335, Vol. 34, no 9, p. 639-649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitochondrial deoxyguanosine kinase (dGK), is an enzyme responsible for activation of nucleoside analogs (NAs) to phosphorylated compounds which exert profound cytotoxicity, especially in hematological malignancies. Screening malignant melanoma cell lines against NAs revealed high sensitivity to several of them. This was believed to be due to the high levels of dGK expression in these cells. Downregulation of dGK in the melanoma cell line RaH5 using siRNA did not cause resistance to NAs as expected, but instead cells became more sensitive. This was probably partly due to the increased activity of another mitochondrial enzyme, thymidine kinase 2, seen in transfected cells.

  • 21.
    Gnosa, Sebastian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Capodanno, Alessandra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahl Ejby Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    AEG-1 knockdown in colon cancer cell lines inhibits radiation-enhanced migration and invasion in vitro and in a novel in vivo zebrafish model2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 49, p. 81634-81644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Radiotherapy is a well-established anti-cancer treatment. Although radiotherapy has been shown to significantly decrease the local relapse in rectal cancer patients, the rate of distant metastasis is still very high. Several studies have shown that radiation enhances migration and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether AEG-1 is involved in radiation-enhanced migration and invasion in vitro and in a novel in vivo zebrafish model.

    Materials and Methods We evaluated the involvement of AEG-1 in migration and invasion and radiation-enhanced migration and invasion by Boyden chamber assay in three colon cancer cell lines and respective AEG-1 knockdown cell lines. Furthermore, we injected the cells in zebrafish embryos and evaluated the amount of disseminated cells into the tail.

    Results Migration and invasion was decreased in all the AEG-1 knockdown cell lines. Furthermore, radiation enhanced migration and invasion, while AEG-1 knockdown could abolish this effect. The results from the zebrafish model confirmed the results obtained in vitro. MMP-9 secretion and expression were decreased in AEG-1 knockdown cells.

    Conclusion Our results demonstrate that AEG-1 knockdown inhibits migration and invasion, as well as radiation-enhanced migration and invasion. We speculate that this is done via the downregulation of the intrinsic or radiation-enhanced MMP-9 expression. The zebrafish model can be used to study early events in radiation-enhanced invasion.

  • 22.
    Green, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindqvist Appell, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Peterson, Curt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Genetiska test för optimal dosering på väg att bli klinisk rutin2013In: Onkologi i Sverige, no 3, p. 36-40Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Gyllensten, Hanna
    et al.
    Nordic School Public Health NHV, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Anna K
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Hakkarainen, Katja M.
    Nordic School Public Health NHV, Sweden; EPID Research, Finland.
    Svensson, Staffan
    Narhalsan Hjallbo Medical Centre, Finland.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Jonköping County Council, Sweden.
    Rehnberg, Clas
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Comparing Methods for Estimating Direct Costs of Adverse Drug Events2017In: Value in Health, ISSN 1098-3015, E-ISSN 1524-4733, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 1299-1310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To estimate how direct health care costs resulting from adverse drug events (ADEs) and cost distribution are affected by methodological decisions regarding identification of ADEs, assigning relevant resource use to ADEs, and estimating costs for the assigned resources. Methods: ADEs were identified from medical records and diagnostic codes for a random sample of 4970 Swedish adults during a 3-month study period in 2008 and were assessed for causality. Results were compared for five cost evaluation methods, including different methods for identifying ADEs, assigning resource use to ADEs, and for estimating costs for the assigned resources (resource use method, proportion of registered cost method, unit cost method, diagnostic code method, and main diagnosis method). Different levels of causality for ADEs and ADEs contribution to health care resource use were considered. Results: Using the five methods, the maximum estimated overall direct health care costs resulting from ADEs ranged from Sk10,000 (Sk = Swedish krona; similar to(sic)1,500 in 2016 values) using the diagnostic code method to more than Sk3,000,000 (similar to(sic)414,000) using the unit cost method in our study population. The most conservative definitions for ADEs contribution to health care resource use and the causality of ADEs resulted in average costs per patient ranging from Sk0 using the diagnostic code method to Sk4066 (similar to(sic)500) using the unit cost method. Conclusions: The estimated costs resulting from ADEs varied considerably depending on the methodological choices. The results indicate that costs for ADEs need to be identified through medical record review and by using detailed unit cost data. Copyright (C) 2017, International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • 24.
    Haage, Pernilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. National Board of Forensic Medicine, Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, Linköping Sweden.
    Kronstrand, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. National Board of Forensic Medicine, Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, Linköping Sweden.
    Carlsson, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. National Board of Forensic Medicine, Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, Linköping Sweden.
    Quantitation of the enantiomers of tramadol and its three main metabolites in human whole blood using LC-MS/MS.2016In: Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, ISSN 0731-7085, E-ISSN 1873-264X, Vol. 119, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The analgesic drug tramadol and its metabolites are chiral compounds, with the (+)- and (-)-enantiomers showing different pharmacological and toxicological effects. This novel enantioselective method, based on LC-MS/MS in reversed phase mode, enabled measurement of the parent compound and its three main metabolites O-desmethyltramadol, N-desmethyltramadol and N,O-didesmethyltramadol simultaneously. Whole blood samples of 0.5g were fortified with internal standards (tramadol-(13)C-D3 and O-desmethyl-cis-tramadol-D6) and extracted under basic conditions (pH 11) by liquid-liquid extraction. Chromatography was performed on a chiral alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) column preceded by an AGP guard column. The mobile phase consisted of 0.8% acetonitrile and 99.2% ammonium acetate (20mM, pH 7.2). A post-column infusion with 0.05% formic acid in acetonitrile was used to enhance sensitivity. Quantitation as well as enantiomeric ratio measurements were covered by quality controls. Validation parameters for all eight enantiomers included selectivity (high), matrix effects (no ion suppression/enhancement), calibration model (linear, weight 1/X(2), in the range of 0.25-250ng/g), limit of quantitation (0.125-0.50ng/g), repeatability (2-6%) and intermediate precision (2-7%), accuracy (83-114%), dilution integrity (98-115%), carry over (not exceeding 0.07%) and stability (stable in blood and extract). The method was applied to blood samples from a healthy volunteer administrated a single 100mg dose and to a case sample concerning an impaired driver, which confirmed its applicability in human pharmacokinetic studies as well as in toxicological and forensic investigations.

  • 25.
    Hedlund, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Editorial Material: Everyday Cold Exposure and Urgency in Translation in EUROPEAN UROLOGY2015In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 68, no 4, p. 662-663Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 26.
    Hedlund, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Gratzke, Christian
    University of Munich, Germany.
    The endocannabinoid system - a target for the treatment of LUTS?2016In: Nature reviews. Urology, ISSN 1759-4812, E-ISSN 1759-4820, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 463-470Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common in all age groups and both sexes, resulting in tremendous personal suffering and a substantial burden to society. Antimuscarinic drugs are the mainstay of symptom management in patients with LUTS, although their clinical utility is limited by the high prevalence of adverse effects, which often limit patients long-term adherence to these agents. Data from controversial studies in the 1990s revealed the positive effects of marijuana-based compounds on LUTS, and sparked an interest in the possibility of treating bladder disorders with cannabis. Increased understanding of cannabinoid receptor pharmacology and the discovery of endogenous ligands of these receptors has prompted debate and further research into the clinical utility of exogenous cannabinoid receptor agonists relative to the unwanted psychotropic effects of these agents. Currently, the endocannabinoid system is considered as a potential drug target for pharmacological management of LUTS, with a more favourable adverse event profile than antimuscarinic agents.

  • 27.
    Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik
    et al.
    St Olavs Hospital, Norway; Norwegian University of Science and Technology NTNU, Norway.
    Stenke, Leif
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Söderlund, Stina
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Dreimane, Arta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ehrencrona, Hans
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gedde-Dahl, Tobias
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Tore Gjertsen, Bjorn
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Hoglund, Martin
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Koskenvesa, Perttu
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Lotfi, Kourosh
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Majeed, Waleed
    Stavanger University Hospital, Norway.
    Markevarn, Berit
    Umeå University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ohm, Lotta
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Olsson-Stromberg, Ulla
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Remes, Kari
    Turku University, Finland.
    Suominen, Merja
    Kanta Hame Central Hospital, Finland.
    Simonsson, Bengt
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Porkka, Kimmo
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Mustjoki, Satu
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Richter, Johan
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Dasatinib induces fast and deep responses in newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukaemia patients in chronic phase: clinical results from a randomised phase-2 study (NordCML006)2015In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 94, no 3, p. 243-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We randomised 46 newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (median age 56) to receive dasatinib 100mg QD or imatinib 400mg QD and report outcome as an intention-to-treat analysis with 36months follow-up. Early cytogenetic and molecular responses were superior in the dasatinib group, with a tendency that imatinib patients caught up with time. For instance, MR3.0 was reached at 3months in 36% vs. 8% (P=0.02), at 12months in 81% vs. 46% (P=0.02) and at 18months in 73% vs. 65% (n.s.) of the patients in the two groups. In contrast, MR4.5 was consistently superior in the dasatinib group at all time points from 6months onwards, reaching 61% vs. 21% (Pless than0.05) at 36months. Sixty-four vs. 71% of the patients in the dasatinib and imatinib arms, respectively, remained on assigned drug. Dasatinib dose was frequently reduced, but with maintained excellent effect. One imatinib patient progressed to blastic phase, but no CML-related deaths occurred. In conclusion, our data compare favourably with those of the dasatinib registration study, DASISION. The fast and deep molecular responses induced by dasatinib compared with imatinib may be exploited to increase the proportion of patients who can achieve a treatment-free remission after treatment discontinuation.

  • 28.
    Hällgren, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Borgström, S.
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Kullberg, F.
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care , Central Hospital , Växjö Sweden.
    Wimmerstedt, A.
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Central Hospital, Växjö, Sweden.
    Oscarsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Nordlund, P.
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping Sweden.
    Lindholm, M-L.
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Bonnedahl, J.
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Brudin, L.
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar Sweden.
    Carlsson, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    High target attainment for β-lactam antibiotics in intensive care unit patients when actual minimum inhibitory concentrations are applied.2017In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 11p. 553-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are at risk for suboptimal levels of β-lactam antibiotics, possibly leading to poor efficacy. Our aim was to investigate whether the actual minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) compared to the more commonly used arbitrary epidemiological cut-off values (ECOFFs) would affect target attainment in ICU patients on empirical treatment with broad-spectrum β-lactam antibiotics and to identify risk factors for not reaching target. In a prospective, multicenter study, ICU patients ≥18 years old and treated with piperacillin/tazobactam, meropenem, or cefotaxime were included. Clinical and laboratory data were recorded. Serum trough antibiotic levels from three consecutive days were analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The target was defined as the free trough concentration above the MIC (100% fT). MIC was used as the target and, when available, the actual MIC (MIC) was applied. The median age of the patients was 70 years old, 52% (58/111) were males, and the median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 48.0 mL/min/1.73 m. The rate of patients reaching 100% fT greater than MIC was higher (89%, 31/35) compared to the same patients using MIC (60%, p = 0.002). In total, 55% (61/111) reached 100% fT greater than MIC. Increased renal clearance was independently associated to not reaching 100% fT greater than MIC. On repeated sampling, greater than77% of patients had stable serum drug levels around the MIC. Serum concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics vary extensively between ICU patients. The rate of patients not reaching target was markedly lower for the actual MIC than when the arbitrary MIC based on the ECOFF was used, which is important to consider in future studies. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • 29.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Editorial Material: A circadian prelude to regulation of angiogenesis and thrombosis by prolactin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in TRANSLATIONAL CANCER RESEARCH, vol 5, issue 1, pp 79-822016In: TRANSLATIONAL CANCER RESEARCH, ISSN 2218-676X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 79-82Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 30.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Editorial Material: When tumors are (co-) opting to resist anti-angiogenic treatment in TRANSLATIONAL CANCER RESEARCH, vol 5, issue , pp S1433-S14362016In: TRANSLATIONAL CANCER RESEARCH, ISSN 2218-676X, Vol. 5, p. S1433-S1436Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 31.
    Jia, Min
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Andreassen, Trygve
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Frost Bathen, Tone
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Sinha, Indranil
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Gao, Hui
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Zhao, Chunyan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Haldosen, Lars-Arne
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Girnita, Leonard
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Andreas Moestue, Siver
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Dahlman-Wright, Karin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Estrogen Receptor a Promotes Breast Cancer by Reprogramming Choline Metabolism2016In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 76, no 19, p. 5634-5646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha) is a key regulator of breast growth and breast cancer development. Here, we report how ER alpha impacts these processes by reprogramming metabolism in malignant breast cells. We employed an integrated approach, combining genome-wide mapping of chromatin-bound ER alpha with estrogeninduced transcript and metabolic profiling, to demonstrate that ER alpha reprograms metabolism upon estrogen stimulation, including changes in aerobic glycolysis, nucleotide and amino acid synthesis, and choline (Cho) metabolism. Cho phosphotransfse CHPT1, identified as a direct era-regulated gene, was required for estrogen- induced effects on Cho metabolism, including increased phosphatidylcholine synthesis. CHPT1 silencing inhibited anchorage- independent growth and cell proliferation, also suppressing early-stage metastasis of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells in a zebrafish xenograft model. Our results showed that era promotes metabolic alterations in breast cancer cells mediated by its target CHPT1, which this study implicates as a candidate therapeutic target. (C) 2016 AACR.

  • 32.
    Jonsson, Anna K.
    et al.
    National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, S-58758 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Lövborg, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Lohr, Wolfgang
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Ekman, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Rocklov, Joacim
    Umeå University, Sweden; Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Increased Risk of Drug-Induced Hyponatremia during High Temperatures2017In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 14, no 7, article id 827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between outdoor temperature in Sweden and the reporting of drug-induced hyponatremia to the Medical Products Agency (MPA). Methods: All individual adverse drug reactions (ADR) reported to MPA from 1 January 2010 to 31 October 2013 of suspected drug-induced hyponatremia and random controls were identified. Reports where the ADR had been assessed as having at least a possible relation to the suspected drug were included. Information on administered drugs, onset date, causality assessment, sodium levels, and the geographical origin of the reports was extracted. A case-crossover design was used to ascertain the association between heat exposure and drug-induced hyponatremia at the individual level, while linear regression was used to study its relationship to sodium concentration in blood. Temperature exposure data were obtained from the nearest observation station to the reported cases. Results: During the study period, 280 reports of hyponatremia were identified. More cases of drug-induced hyponatremia were reported in the warmer season, with a peak in June, while other ADRs showed an opposite annual pattern. The distributed lag non-linear model indicated an increasing odds ratio (OR) with increasing temperature in the warm season with a highest odds ratio, with delays of 1-5 days after heat exposure. A cumulative OR for a lag time of 1 to 3 days was estimated at 2.21 at an average daily temperature of 20 degrees C. The change in sodium per 1 degrees C increase in temperature was estimated to be -0.37 mmol/L (95% CI: -0.02, -0.72). Conclusions: Warm weather appears to increase the risk of drug-induced hyponatremia.

  • 33.
    Jönsson, Anna K
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet and Forens Chem, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Schill, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry. Region Jönköping, Sweden.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry. Region Jönköping, Sweden.
    Spigset, Olav
    St Olavs Univ Hosp, Norway; Norwegian Univ Sci and Technol, Norway.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Venous Thromboembolism During Treatment with Antipsychotics: A Review of Current Evidence2018In: CNS Drugs, ISSN 1172-7047, E-ISSN 1179-1934, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 47-64Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article summarises the current evidence on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) with the use of antipsychotics. An increasing number of observational studies indicate an elevated risk of VTE in antipsychotic drug users. Although the use of certain antipsychotics has been associated with VTE, current data can neither conclusively verify differences in occurrence rates of VTE between first- and second-generation antipsychotics or between individual compounds, nor identify which antipsychotic drugs have the lowest risk of VTE. The biological mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this adverse drug reaction are still to be clarified but hypotheses such as drug-induced sedation, obesity, increased levels of antiphospholipid antibodies, enhanced platelet aggregation, hyperhomocysteinaemia and hyperprolactinaemia have been suggested. Risk factors associated with the underlying psychiatric disorder may at least partly explain the increased risk. Physicians should be aware of this potentially serious and even sometimes fatal adverse drug reaction and should consider discontinuing or switching the antipsychotic treatment in patients experiencing a VTE. Even though supporting evidence is limited, prophylactic antithrombotic treatment should be considered in risk situations for VTE.

  • 34.
    Kalaiarasi, Arunachalam
    et al.
    Bharathidasan Univ, India.
    Sankar, Renu
    Bharathidasan Univ, India; Ohio State Univ, OH 44691 USA.
    Anusha, Chidambaram
    Bharathidasan Univ, India.
    Saravanan, Kandasamy
    Bharathidasan Univ, India.
    Aarthy, Kalyanasundaram
    Bharathidasan Univ, India.
    Karthic, Selvaraj
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Mathuram, Theodore Lemuel
    Univ Madras, India.
    Ravikumar, Vilwanathan
    Bharathidasan Univ, India.
    Copper oxide nanoparticles induce anticancer activity in A549 lung cancer cells by inhibition of histone deacetylase2018In: Biotechnology letters, ISSN 0141-5492, E-ISSN 1573-6776, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 249-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) promoting anticancer activity may be due to the regulation of various classes of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Green-synthesized CuO NPs significantly arrested total HDAC level and also suppressed class I, II and IV HDACs mRNA expression in A549 cells. A549 cells treated with CuO NPs downregulated oncogenes and upregulated tumor suppressor protein expression. CuO NPs positively regulated both mitochondrial and death receptor-mediated apoptosis caspase cascade pathway in A549 cells. Green-synthesized CuO NPs inhibited HDAC and therefore shown apoptosis mediated anticancer activity in A549 lung cancer cell line.

  • 35.
    Karlsson, Louise
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zackrisson, Anna Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
    Josefsson, M
    Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden; 3Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Björn
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Forensic Genetics andForensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kugelberg, Fredrik C
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
    Influence of CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 genotypes on venlafaxine metabolic ratios and stereoselective metabolism in forensic autopsy cases.2015In: The Pharmacogenomics Journal, ISSN 1470-269X, E-ISSN 1473-1150, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 165-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated whether polymorphisms in the CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 genes influence the metabolic ratios and enantiomeric S/R ratios of venlafaxine (VEN) and its metabolites O-desmethylvenlafaxine (ODV), N-desmethylvenlafaxine (NDV) and N,O-didesmethylvenlafaxine (DDV) in blood from forensic autopsy cases. In all, 94 postmortem cases found positive for VEN during toxicological screening were included. The CYP2D6 genotype was shown to significantly influence the ODV/VEN (P=0.003), DDV/NDV (P=0.010) and DDV/ODV (P=0.034) ratios. The DDV/ODV (P=0.013) and DDV/VEN (P=0.021) ratios were significantly influenced by the CYP2C19 genotype. The S/R ratios of VEN were significantly influenced by both CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 genotypes. CYP2D6 poor metabolizers (PMs) had lower S/R VEN ratios and CYP2C19 PMs had high S/R ratios of VEN in comparison. Our results show that the CYP2D6 genotype influences the O-demethylation whereas CYP2C19 influences the N-demethylation of VEN and its metabolites. In addition, we show a stereoselective metabolism where CYP2D6 favours the R-enantiomer whereas CYP2C19 favours the S-enantiomer.

  • 36.
    Karlsson, Sofia A.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Ingela
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Danell Boman, Marit
    University of Umeå Hospital, Sweden.
    Hakkarainen, Katja M.
    Nordic School Public Health NHV, Sweden; Jonköping County Council, Sweden.
    Lövborg, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Anna K
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    The impact of a changed legislation on reporting of adverse drug reactions in Sweden, with focus on nurses reporting2015In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 71, no 5, p. 631-636Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In March 2007, a legislative amendment was issued in Sweden compelling nurses to report all suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to the national pharmacovigilance system. The aims of this study were to describe the status of ADR reporting, before and after the implementation of the legislative changes, and to describe the general characteristics of suspected ADRs reported by nurses. The Swedish pharmacovigilance system during the study period constituted six regional centres responsible for the handling of all spontaneous ADR reports within their region. In this study, we identified all individual ADR reports from 2005 and 2010, analysed in depth the ADR reports from two regional centres and collated information about the reporter and the nature of the reported ADR. From the two regional centres, a total of 898 and 1074 reports were submitted in 2005 and 2010 respectively. Nurses submitted 31 % (275 reports) of the reports in 2005 and 24 % (260 reports) in 2010. Nurses reporting of serious ADRs was 3 % (seven reports) in 2005 and 7 % (17 reports) in 2010 with reporting of unlabelled ADRs at 4 % (11 reports) in 2005 and 17 % (45 reports) in 2010. Most of the serious and/or unlabelled reactions were related to vaccine administration (14 reports in 2005 and 36 reports in 2010). The overall ADR reporting by nurses did not appear to increase after the change in reporting legislation. The proportion of serious and/or unlabelled ADRs reported by nurses did however appear to increase during the same period. Taken together, our data suggests that further pro-active measures should be considered in order to involve nurses in the reporting of suspected ADRs.

  • 37.
    Kedia, George T.
    et al.
    Hannover Medical School, Germany.
    Ückert, Stefan
    Hannover Medical School, Germany; Institute for Biochemical Research and Analysis, Germany.
    Oelke, Matthias
    Hannover Medical School, Germany.
    Sonnenberg, Joachim E.
    Institute for Biochemical Research and Analysis, Germany.
    Sohn, Michael
    AGAPLESION Markus Hospital, Germany.
    Kuczyk, Markus A.
    Hannover Medical School, Germany.
    Hedlund, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. University Vita Salute San Raffaele, Italy.
    Expression and Distribution of Phosphodiesterase Isoenzymes in the Human Male Urethra2015In: Urology, ISSN 0090-4295, E-ISSN 1527-9995, Vol. 85, no 4, p. 964.e1-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the expression and distribution of phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoenzymes PDE1A, PDE2A, PDE4A, PDE4B, and PDE5A in human urethral tissue. METHODS Specimens of penile urethra were obtained from male subjects who had undergone male-to-female sex reassignment surgery. Using immunohistochemistry (immunofluorescence), the occurrence of PDE1A, PDE2A, PDE4A, PDE4B, and PDE5A, the neuronal nitric oxide synthase, calcitonin gene-related peptide, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide was examined in urethral sections. Cytosolic supernatants prepared from isolated human urethral tissue were subjected to Western blot analysis using specific anti-PDE antibodies. RESULTS Immunosignals specific for PDE1A, 4A, 4B, and 5A were observed in the urethral smooth musculature. The smooth muscle bundles were seen innervated by slender nerve fibers, characterized by the expression of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase, calcitonin gene-related peptide, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. The expression of the PDE isoenzymes mentioned was confirmed by Western blotting. CONCLUSION The results provide evidence for a significance of both the cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling in the control of human urethral smooth muscle. The selective inhibition of PDE isoenzymes might represent a pharmacologic option to influence the function of smooth musculature in the human outflow region.

  • 38.
    Khedidja, Hedna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hakkarainen, Katja M.
    EPID Research, Espoo, Finland, Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gyllensten, Hanna
    Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden, Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Anna K
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Andersson Sundell, Karolina
    Section of Social Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Petzold, Max
    Centre for Applied Biostatistics, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Adherence to Antihypertensive Therapy and Elevated Blood Pressure: Should We Consider the Use of Multiple Medications?2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 9, article id e0137451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Although a majority of patients with hypertension require a multidrug therapy, this is rarely considered when measuring adherence from refill data. Moreover, investigating the association between refill non-adherence to antihypertensive therapy (AHT) and elevated blood pressure (BP) has been advocated.

    Objective

    Identify factors associated with non-adherence to AHT, considering the multidrug therapy, and investigate the association between non-adherence to AHT and elevated BP.

    Methods

    A retrospective cohort study including patients with hypertension, identified from a random sample of 5025 Swedish adults. Two measures of adherence were estimated by the proportion of days covered method (PDC≥80%): (1) Adherence to any antihypertensive medication and, (2) adherence to the full AHT regimen. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to investigate the association between sociodemographic factors (age, sex, education, income), clinical factors (user profile, number of antihypertensive medications, healthcare use, cardiovascular comorbidities) and non-adherence. Moreover, the association between non-adherence (long-term and a month prior to BP measurement) and elevated BP was investigated.

    Results

    Non-adherence to any antihypertensive medication was higher among persons < 65 years (Odds Ratio, OR 2.75 [95% CI, 1.18–6.43]) and with the lowest income (OR 2.05 [95% CI, 1.01–4.16]). Non-adherence to the full AHT regimen was higher among new users (OR 2.04 [95% CI, 1.32–3.15]), persons using specialized healthcare (OR 1.63, [95% CI, 1.14–2.32]), and having multiple antihypertensive medications (OR 1.85 [95% CI, 1.25–2.75] and OR 5.22 [95% CI, 3.48–7.83], for 2 and ≥3 antihypertensive medications, respectively). Non-adherence to any antihypertensive medication a month prior to healthcare visit was associated with elevated BP.

    Conclusion

    Sociodemographic factors were associated with non-adherence to any antihypertensive medication while clinical factors with non-adherence to the full AHT regimen. These differing findings support considering the use of multiple antihypertensive medications when measuring refill adherence. Monitoring patients' refill adherence prior to healthcare visit may facilitate interpreting elevated BP.

  • 39.
    Khedidja, Hedna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hakkarainen, Katja M.
    Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden, EPID Research, Espoo, Finland.
    Gyllensten, Hanna
    Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Anna K
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Petzold, Max
    Centre for Applied Biostatistics, University of Gothenburg,, Gotenburg, Sweden.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Potentially inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug reactions in the elderly: a population-based study2015In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 71, no 12, p. 1525-1533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Potentially inappropriate prescriptions (PIPs) criteria are widely used for evaluating the quality of prescribing in elderly. However, there is limited evidence on their association with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) across healthcare settings. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of PIPs, defined by the Screening Tool of Older Persons’ potentially inappropriate Prescriptions (STOPP) criteria, in the Swedish elderly general population and to investigate the association between PIPs and occurrence of ADRs.

    Method

    Persons ≥65 years old were identified from a random sample of 5025 adults drawn from the Swedish Total Population Register. A retrospective cohort study was conducted among 813 elderly with healthcare encounters in primary and specialised healthcare settings during a 3-month period in 2008. PIPs were identified from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, medical records and health administrative data. ADRs were independently identified by expert reviewers in a stepwise manner using the Howard criteria. Multivariable logistic regression examined the association between PIPs and ADRs.

    Results

    Overall, 374 (46.0 %) persons had ≥1 PIPs and 159 (19.5 %) experienced ≥1 ADRs during the study period. In total, 29.8 % of all ADRs was considered caused by PIPs. Persons prescribed with PIPs had more than twofold increased odds of experiencing ADRs (OR 2.47; 95 % CI 1.65–3.69). PIPs were considered the cause of 60 % of ADRs affecting the vascular system, 50 % of ADRs affecting the nervous system and 62.5 % of ADRs resulting in falls.

    Conclusion

    PIPs are common among the Swedish elderly and are associated with increased odds of experiencing ADRs. Thus, interventions to decrease PIPs may contribute to preventing ADRs, in particular ADRs associated with nervous and vascular disorders and falls.

  • 40.
    Krishnan, Harini
    et al.
    SUNY Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA.
    Rayes, Julie
    Univ Birmingham, England.
    Miyashita, Tomoyuki
    Natl Canc Ctr, Japan; Univ Tokyo, Japan.
    Ishii, Genichiro
    Natl Canc Ctr, Japan; Univ Tokyo, Japan.
    Retzbach, Edward P.
    Rowan Univ, NJ USA.
    Sheehan, Stephanie A.
    Rowan Univ, NJ USA.
    Takemoto, Ai
    Japanese Fdn Canc Res, Japan.
    Chang, Yao-Wen
    Chang Gung Univ, Taiwan.
    Yoneda, Kazue
    Univ Occupat and Environm Hlth, Japan.
    Asai, Jun
    Kyoto Prefectural Univ Med, Japan.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Chalise, Lushun
    Nagoya Univ, Japan.
    Natsume, Atsushi
    Nagoya Univ, Japan.
    Goldberg, Gary S.
    Rowan Univ, NJ USA.
    Podoplanin: An emerging cancer biomarker and therapeutic target2018In: Cancer Science, ISSN 1347-9032, E-ISSN 1349-7006, Vol. 109, no 5, p. 1292-1299Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Podoplanin (PDPN) is a transmembrane receptor glycoprotein that is upregulated on transformed cells, cancer associated fibroblasts and inflammatory macrophages that contribute to cancer progression. In particular, PDPN increases tumor cell clonal capacity, epithelial mesenchymal transition, migration, invasion, metastasis and inflammation. Antibodies, CAR-T cells, biologics and synthetic compounds that target PDPN can inhibit cancer progression and septic inflammation in preclinical models. This review describes recent advances in how PDPN may be used as a biomarker and therapeutic target for many types of cancer, including glioma, squamous cell carcinoma, mesothelioma and melanoma.

  • 41.
    Lennikov, Anton
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Laboratory of Biomedical Cell Technologies, School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok, Russia.
    Mirabelli, Pierfrancesco
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Mukwaya, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schaupper, Mira
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thangavelu, Muthukumar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lachota, Mieszko
    Department of Immunology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.
    Ali, Zaheer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Selective IKK2 inhibitor IMD0354 disrupts NF-kappa B signaling to suppress corneal inflammation and angiogenesis2018In: Angiogenesis, ISSN 0969-6970, E-ISSN 1573-7209, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 267-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corneal neovascularization is a sight-threatening condition caused by angiogenesis in the normally avascular cornea. Neovascularization of the cornea is often associated with an inflammatory response, thus targeting VEGF-A alone yields only a limited efficacy. The NF-kappa B signaling pathway plays important roles in inflammation and angiogenesis. Here, we study consequences of the inhibition of NF-kappa B activation through selective blockade of the IKK complex I kappa B kinase beta (IKK2) using the compound IMD0354, focusing on the effects of inflammation and pathological angiogenesis in the cornea. In vitro, IMD0354 treatment diminished HUVEC migration and tube formation without an increase in cell death and arrested rat aortic ring sprouting. In HUVEC, the IMD0354 treatment caused a dose-dependent reduction in VEGF-A expression, suppressed TNF alpha-stimulated expression of chemokines CCL2 and CXCL5, and diminished actin filament fibers and cell filopodia formation. In developing zebrafish embryos, IMD0354 treatment reduced expression of Vegf-a and disrupted retinal angiogenesis. In inflammation-induced angiogenesis in the rat cornea, systemic selective IKK2 inhibition decreased inflammatory cell invasion, suppressed CCL2, CXCL5, Cxcr2, and TNF-alpha expression and exhibited anti-angiogenic effects such as reduced limbal vessel dilation, reduced VEGF-A expression and reduced angiogenic sprouting, without noticeable toxic effect. In summary, targeting NF-kappa B by selective IKK2 inhibition dampened the inflammatory and angiogenic responses in vivo by modulating the endothelial cell expression profile and motility, thus indicating an important role of NF-kappa B signaling in the development of pathologic corneal neovascularization.

  • 42.
    Liu, Caifeng
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Shandong University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Yunjian
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Sun Yat Sen University, Peoples R China.
    Lim, Sharon
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hosaka, Kayoko
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Yang, Yunlong
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Shenzhen University, Peoples R China.
    Pavlova, Tatiana
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Alkasalias, Twana
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hartman, Johan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Xing, Xiaoming
    Qingdao University, Peoples R China; Qingdao University, Peoples R China.
    Wang, Xinsheng
    Qingdao University, Peoples R China; Qingdao University, Peoples R China.
    Lu, Yongtian
    Shenzhen University, Peoples R China.
    Nie, Guohui
    Shenzhen University, Peoples R China.
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Shenzhen University, Peoples R China; Qingdao University, Peoples R China; Qingdao University, Peoples R China.
    A Zebrafish Model Discovers a Novel Mechanism of Stromal Fibroblast-Mediated Cancer Metastasis2017In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 23, no 16, p. 4769-4779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Cancer metastasis can occur at the early stage of tumor development when a primary tumor is at the microscopic size. In particular, the interaction of malignant cells with other cell types including cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) in promoting metastasis at the early stage of tumor development remains largely unknown. Here, we investigated the role of CAFs in facilitating the initial events of cancer metastasis when primary tumors were at microscopic sizes. Experimental Design: Multicolor-coded cancer cells and CAFs were coimplanted into the transparent zebrafish body and metastasis at a single-cell level was monitored in living animals. Healthy fibroblasts, tumor factor-educated fibroblasts, and CAFs isolated from various tumors were tested for their ability to facilitate metastasis. Results: We showed that CAFs promoted cancer cell metastasis at the very early stage during primary tumor development. When a primary tumor was at the microscopic size consisting of a few hundred cells, CAFs were able to hijack cancer cells for dissemination from the primary site. Surprisingly, a majority of metastatic cancer cells remained in tight association with CAFs in the circulation. Furthermore, stimulation of non-metastasis-promoting normal fibroblasts with TGF-B, FGF-2, HGF, and PDGF-BB led to acquisition of their metastatic capacity. Conclusions: Cancer metastasis occurs at the very early stage of tumor formation consisting of only a few hundred cells. CAFs are the key cellular determinant for metastasis. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insights on CAFs in promoting cancer metastasis and targeting CAFs for cancer therapy should be aimed at the early stage during cancer development. (C) 2017 AACR.

  • 43.
    Lolas, Georgios
    et al.
    Athens School Med, Greece.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bourantas, George C.
    University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Tsikourkitoudi, Vasiliki
    Athens School Med, Greece.
    Syrigos, Konstantinos
    Athens School Med, Greece.
    Modeling Proteolytically Driven Tumor Lymphangiogenesis2016In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0065-2598, E-ISSN 2214-8019, Vol. 936, p. 107-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the exception of a limited number of sites in the body, primary tumors infrequently lead to the demise of cancer patients. Instead, mortality and a significant degree of morbidity result from the growth of secondary tumors in distant organs. Tumor survival, growth and dissemination are associated with the formation of both new blood vessels (angiogenesis) and new lymph vessels (lymphagenesis or lymphangiogenesis). Although intensive research in tumor angiogenesis has been going on for the past four decades, experimental results in tumor lymphangiogenesis began to appear only in the last 10 years. In this chapter we expand the models proposed by Friedman, Lolas and Pepper on tumor lymphangiogenesis mediated by proteolytically and un-proteolytically processed growth factors (Friedman and Lolas G, Math Models Methods Appl Sci 15(01): 95-107, 2005; Pepper and Lolas G, Selected topics in cancer modeling: genesis, evolution, immune competition, and therapy. In: The lymphatic vascular system in lymphangiogenesis invasion and metastasis a mathematical approach. Birkhauser Boston, Boston, pp 1-22, 2008). The variables represent different cell densities and growth factors concentrations, and where possible the parameters are estimated from experimental and clinical data. The results obtained from computational simulations carried out on the model equations produce dynamic heterogeneous ("anarchic") spatio-temporal solutions. More specifically, we observed coherent masses of tumor clusters migrating around and within the lymphatic network. Our findings are in line with recent experimental evidence that associate cluster formation with the minimization of cell loss favoring high local extracellular matrix proteolysis and thus protecting cancer invading cells from an immunological assault driven by the lymphatic network.

  • 44.
    Mistretta, Francesco A.
    et al.
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy; Lund University, Sweden.
    Russo, Andrea
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Castiglione, Fabio
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Bettiga, Arianna
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Colciago, Giorgia
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Montorsi, Francesco
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy; University of Vita Salute San Raffaele, Italy.
    Brandolini, Laura
    Research Centre Dompe Farmaceutici SpA, Italy.
    Aramini, Andrea
    Research Centre Dompe Farmaceutici SpA, Italy.
    Bianchini, Gianluca
    Research Centre Dompe Farmaceutici SpA, Italy.
    Allegretti, Marcello
    Research Centre Dompe Farmaceutici SpA, Italy.
    Bovolenta, Silvia
    Axxam, Italy.
    Russo, Roberto
    University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Benigni, Fabio
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Hedlund, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy; Lund University, Sweden.
    DFL23448, A Novel Transient Receptor Potential Melastin 8-Selective Ion Channel Antagonist, Modifies Bladder Function and Reduces Bladder Overactivity in Awake Rats2016In: Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, ISSN 0022-3565, E-ISSN 1521-0103, Vol. 356, no 1, p. 200-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transient receptor potential melastin 8 ion channel (TRPM8) is implicated in bladder sensing but limited information on TRPM8 antagonists in bladder overactivity is available. This study characterizes a new TRPM8-selective antagonist (DFL23448 [5-(2-ethyl-2H-tetrazol-5-yl)-2-(3-fluorophenyl)-1,3-thiazol-4-ol]) and evaluates it in cold-induced behavioral tests and tests on bladder function and experimental bladder overactivity in vivo in rats. DFL23448 displayed IC50 values of 10 and 21 nM in hTRPM8 human embryonic kidney 293 cells activated by Cooling Agent 10 or cold, but it had limited activity (IC50 &gt; 10 mu M) at transient receptor potential vanilloids TRPV1, TRPA1, or TRPV4 or at various G protein-coupled receptors. In rats, DFL23448 administered intravenously or orally had a half-life of 37 minutes or 4.9 hours, respectively. DLF23448 (10 mg/kg i.v.) reduced icilin-induced "wet dog-like" shakes in rats. Intravesical DFL23448 (10 mg/l), but not vehicle, increased micturition intervals, micturition volume, and bladder capacity. During bladder overactivity by intravesical prostaglandin E-2 (PGE(2)), vehicle controls exhibited reductions in micturition intervals, micturition volumes, and bladder capacity by 37%-39%, whereas the same parameters only decreased by 12%-15% (P &lt; 0.05-0.01 versus vehicle) in DFL23448-treated rats. In vehicle-treated rats, but not in DFL23448-treated rats, intravesical PGE(2) increased bladder pressures. Intravenous DFL23448 at 10 mg/kg, but not 1 mg/kg DFL23448 or vehicle, increased micturition intervals, micturition volumes, and bladder capacity. During bladder overactivity by intravesical PGE(2), micturition intervals, micturition volumes, and bladder capacity decreased in vehicle- and 1 mg/kg DFL23448-treated rats, but not in 10 mg/kg DFL23448-treated rats. Bladder pressures increased less in rats treated with DFL23448 10 mg/kg than in vehicle-or 1 mg/kg DFL23448-treated rats. DFL23448 (10 mg/kg i.v.), but not vehicle, prevented cold stress-induced bladder overactivity. Our results support a role for bladder TRPM8-mediated signals in experimental bladder overactivity.

  • 45.
    Mosrati, Mohamed Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Willander, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Jakobsen Falk, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hermanson, Monica
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Höglund, Martin
    Division of Hematology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stockelberg, Dick
    Section for Hematology and Coagulation, Department of Internal Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wei, Yuan
    Section for Hematology and Coagulation, Department of Internal Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lotfi, Kourosh
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Association between TERT promoter polymorphisms and acute myeloid leukemia risk and prognosis2015In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 6, no 28, p. 25109-25120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT) promoter mutations are identified in many malignancies but not in hematological malignancies. Here we analyzed TERT and protection of telomeres 1 gene (POT1) mutations, and four different TERT SNVs in 226 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and 806 healthy individuals in a case referent design, where also overall survival was assessed. A significant association for increased risk of AML was found for TERT SNVs, rs2853669 (OR = 2.45, p = 0.00015) and rs2736100 (OR = 1.5, p = 0.03). The overall survival for patients with CC genotype of rs2853669 was significantly shorter compared to those with TT or TC genotypes (p = 0.036 and 0.029 respectively). The influence of TERT rs2853669 CC on survival was confirmed in multivariable Cox regression analysis as an independent risk biomarker in addition to high risk group, higher age and treatment. No hot spot TERT promoter mutations at -228Cgreater thanT or -250Cgreater thanT or POT1 mutations could be identified in this AML cohort. We show that rs2853669 CC may be a risk factor for the development of AML that may also be used as a prognostic marker to identify high risk normal karyotype -AML (NK-AML) patients, for treatment guidance.

  • 46.
    Mukwaya, Anthony
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lennikov, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Xeroudaki, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Mirabelli, Pierfrancesco
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lachota, Mieszko
    Department of Immunology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Peebo, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Time-dependent LXR/RXR pathway modulation characterizes capillary remodeling in inflammatory corneal neovascularization2018In: Angiogenesis, ISSN 0969-6970, E-ISSN 1573-7209, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 395-413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammation in the normally immune-privileged cornea can initiate a pathologic angiogenic response causing vision-threatening corneal neovascularization. Inflammatory pathways, however, are numerous, complex and are activated in a time-dependent manner. Effective resolution of inflammation and associated angiogenesis in the cornea requires knowledge of these pathways and their time dependence, which has, to date, remained largely unexplored. Here, using a model of endogenous resolution of inflammation-induced corneal angiogenesis, we investigate the time dependence of inflammatory genes in effecting capillary regression and the return of corneal transparency. Endogenous capillary regression was characterized by a progressive thinning and remodeling of angiogenic capillaries and inflammatory cell retreat in vivo in the rat cornea. By whole-genome longitudinal microarray analysis, early suppression of VEGF ligand-receptor signaling and inflammatory pathways preceded an unexpected later-phase preferential activation of LXR/RXR, PPAR alpha/RXR alpha and STAT3 canonical pathways, with a concurrent attenuation of LPS/IL-1 inhibition of RXR function and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathways. Potent downstream inflammatory cytokines such as Cxcl5, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and Ccl2 were concomitantly downregulated during the remodeling phase. Upstream regulators of the inflammatory pathways included Socs3, Sparc and ApoE. A complex and coordinated time-dependent interplay between pro- and anti-inflammatory signaling pathways highlights a potential anti-inflammatory role of LXR/RXR, PPAR alpha/RXR alpha and STAT3 signaling pathways in resolving inflammatory corneal angiogenesis.

  • 47.
    Mukwaya, Anthony
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindvall, Jessica M.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Xeroudaki, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Peebo, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Ali, Zaheer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lennikov, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    A microarray whole-genome gene expression dataset in a rat model of inflammatory corneal angiogenesis2016In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 3, article id UNSP 160103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In angiogenesis with concurrent inflammation, many pathways are activated, some linked to VEGF and others largely VEGF-independent. Pathways involving inflammatory mediators, chemokines, and micro-RNAs may play important roles in maintaining a pro-angiogenic environment or mediating angiogenic regression. Here, we describe a gene expression dataset to facilitate exploration of pro-angiogenic, pro-inflammatory, and remodelling/normalization-associated genes during both an active capillary sprouting phase, and in the restoration of an avascular phenotype. The dataset was generated by microarray analysis of the whole transcriptome in a rat model of suture-induced inflammatory corneal neovascularisation. Regions of active capillary sprout growth or regression in the cornea were harvested and total RNA extracted from four biological replicates per group. High quality RNA was obtained for gene expression analysis using microarrays. Fold change of selected genes was validated by qPCR, and protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. We provide a gene expression dataset that may be re-used to investigate corneal neovascularisation, and may also have implications in other contexts of inflammation-mediated angiogenesis.

  • 48.
    Mukwaya, Anthony
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Peebo, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Xeroudaki, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Ali, Zaheer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lennikov, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Factors regulating capillary remodeling in a reversible model of inflammatory corneal angiogenesis2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, p. 1-15, article id 32137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Newly formed microcapillary networks arising in adult organisms by angiogenic and inflammatory stimuli contribute to pathologies such as corneal and retinal blindness, tumor growth, and metastasis. Therapeutic inhibition of pathologic angiogenesis has focused on targeting the VEGF pathway, while comparatively little attention has been given to remodeling of the new microcapillaries into a stabilized, functional, and persistent vascular network. Here, we used a novel reversible model of inflammatory angiogenesis in the rat cornea to investigate endogenous factors rapidly invoked to remodel, normalize and regress microcapillaries as part of the natural response to regain corneal avascularity. Rapid reversal of an inflammatory angiogenic stimulus suppressed granulocytic activity, enhanced recruitment of remodelling macrophages, induced capillary intussusception, and enriched pathways and processes involving immune cells, chemokines, morphogenesis, axonal guidance, and cell motility, adhesion, and cytoskeletal functions. Whole transcriptome gene expression analysis revealed suppression of numerous inflammatory and angiogenic factors and enhancement of endogenous inhibitors. Many of the identified genes function independently of VEGF and represent potentially new targets for molecular control of the critical process of microvascular remodeling and regression in the cornea.

  • 49.
    Natanaelsson, Jennie
    et al.
    Nordic School Public Health NHV, Sweden.
    Hakkarainen, Katja M.
    Nordic School Public Health NHV, Sweden; EPID Research, Sweden.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Jonköping County Council, Sweden.
    Andersson Sundell, Karolina
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Petzold, Max
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rehnberg, Clas
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Anna K.
    National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Gyllensten, Hanna
    Nordic School Public Health NHV, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Direct and indirect costs for adverse drug events identified in medical records across care levels, and their distribution among payers2017In: Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, ISSN 1551-7411, E-ISSN 1934-8150, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 1151-1158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Adverse drug events (ADEs) cause considerable costs in hospitals. However, little is known about costs caused by ADEs outside hospitals, effects on productivity, and how the costs are distributed among payers. Objective: To describe the direct and indirect costs caused by ADEs, and their distribution among payers. Furthermore, to describe the distribution of patient out-of-pocket costs and lost productivity caused by ADEs according to socio-economic characteristics. Method: In a random sample of 5025 adults in a Swedish county, prevalence-based costs for ADEs were calculated. Two different methods were used: 1) based on resource use judged to be caused by ADEs, and 2) as costs attributable to ADEs by comparing costs among individuals with ADEs to costs among matched controls. Payers of costs caused by ADEs were identified in medical records among those with ADEs (n = 596), and costs caused to individual patients were described by socio-economic characteristics. Results: Costs for resource use caused by ADEs were (sic)505 per patient with ADEs (95% confidence interval (sic)345-665), of which 38% were indirect costs. Compared to matched controls, the costs attributable to ADEs were (sic)1631, of which (sic)410 were indirect costs. The local health authorities paid 58% of the costs caused by ADEs. Women had higher productivity loss than men ((sic)426 vs. (sic)109, p = 0.018). Out-of-pocket costs displaced a larger proportion of the disposable income among low-income earners than higher income earners (0.7% vs. 0.2%-0.3%). Conclusion: We used two methods to identify costs for ADEs, both identifying indirect costs as an important component of the overall costs for ADEs. Although the largest payers of costs caused by ADEs were the local health authorities responsible for direct costs, employers and patients costs for lost productivity contributed substantially. Our results indicate inequalities in costs caused by ADEs, by sex and income. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 50.
    Prakash Chalise, Jaya
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Teresa Pallotta, Maria
    University of Perugia, Italy.
    Chenna Narendra, Sudeep
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Iacono, Alberta
    University of Perugia, Italy.
    Namale, Joanitah
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Boon, Louis
    EPIRUS Biopharmaceut Netherlands BV, Netherlands.
    Grohmann, Ursula
    University of Perugia, Italy.
    Magnusson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    IDO1 and TGF-beta Mediate Protective Effects of IFN-alpha in Antigen-Induced Arthritis2016In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 197, no 8, p. 3142-3151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IFN-alpha prevents Ag-induced arthritis (AIA), and in this study we investigated the role of IDO1 and TGF-beta signaling for this anti-inflammatory property of IFN-alpha. Arthritis was induced by methylated BSA (mBSA) in mBSA-sensitized wild-type (WT), Ido1(-/-), or Ifnar(-/-) mice, treated or not with IFN-alpha or the IDO1 product kynurenine (Kyn). Enzymatic IDO1 activity, TGF-beta, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) were neutralized by 1-methyltryptophan and Abs against TGF-beta and pDC, respectively. IDO1 expression was determined by RT-PCR, Western blot, and FACS, and enzymatic activity by HPLC. Proliferation was measured by H-3-thymidine incorporation and TGF-beta by RT-PCR and ELISA. WT but not Ido1(-/-) mice were protected from AIA by IFN-alpha, and Kyn, the main IDO1 product, also prevented AIA, both in WTand Ifnar(-/-) mice. Protective treatment with IFN-alpha increased the expression of IDO1 in pDC during AIA, and Ab-mediated depletion of pDC, either during mBSA sensitization or after triggering of arthritis, completely abrogated the protective effect of IFN-alpha. IFN-alpha treatment also increased the enzymatic IDO1 activity (Kyn/tryptophan ratio), which in turn activated production of TGF-beta. Neutralization of enzymatic IDO1 activity or TGF-beta signaling blocked the protective effect of IFN-alpha against AIA, but only during sensitization and not after triggering of arthritis. Likewise, inhibition of the IDO1 enzymatic activity in the sensitization phase, but not after triggering of arthritis, subdued the IFN-alpha-induced inhibition of mBSA-induced proliferation. In conclusion, presence of IFN-alpha at Ag sensitization activates an IDO1/TGF-beta-dependent anti-inflammatory program that upon antigenic rechallenge prevents inflammation via pDC.

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