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  • 1.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Mobäck, Caroline
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Jakobsson, Sandra
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Germany.
    Hoffmann, Johannes J. M. L.
    Abbott GmbH and Co KG, Germany.
    Iron depletion in blood donors - Have extended erythrocyte and reticulocyte parameters diagnostic utility?2015In: Transfusion and apheresis science, ISSN 1473-0502, E-ISSN 1878-1683, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 76-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Blood donation is associated with iron depletion, but donor iron status is not usually investigated, as such tests are cumbersome and costly. It would therefore be desirable to have simple, fast and inexpensive tests that give information on a donors risk of developing iron depletion. In a pilot study we investigated whether novel erythrocyte and reticulocyte parameters can serve this goal. Methods: In regular blood donors extended red cell parameters were measured using the Abbott CELL-DYN Sapphire hematology analyzer and conventional biochemical tests of iron status. Donors were compared with a regionally matched group of non-donating controls. Results: In the controls, the reference ranges of extended RBC parameters were well comparable to published data. Donors had significantly more microcytic RBC than controls (median 0.9 vs 0.6%), lower serum ferritin concentration (median 43 vs 91 mg/L) and higher soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index (median 1.60 vs 1.27). Overall 18-28% of the donors were iron depleted. Moreover, 3.3% of donors had iron-restricted erythropoiesis. Microcytic RBC and reticulocyte mean cell hemoglobin content predicted iron depletion with 70% and 64% sensitivities and specificities of 72% and 78%, respectively. When combined these two parameters increased the sensitivity to 82%. Conclusions: Our results in Swedish blood donors confirm a high prevalence of iron depletion, despite iron supplementation used by about half of the donors. Microcytic RBC and MCHr appeared to be helpful in identifying iron-depleted donors, who might benefit from iron supplementation. We recommend larger prospective investigations in order to confirm and extend the findings of this pilot study. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Abdelhadi, Saly
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nordlind, Klas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Johansson, Bjoern
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Holst, Mikael
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Loenndahl, Louise
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide in atopic dermatitis and correlation with distress2024In: Immunopharmacology and immunotoxicology, ISSN 0892-3973, E-ISSN 1532-2513, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 67-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundAtopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, inflammatory, often severely itching skin disorder. It may worsen due to stress, depression, or anxiety. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) may be involved in inflammation signaling. CGRP has also been suggested in relation to stress, depression, and anxiety. This study aimed to investigate the expression of CGRP in the skin of patients with AD.MethodsTwenty-seven adult patients with AD, characterized with clinical and psychodemographic parameters, were investigated regarding CGRP expression in skin biopsies, using an immunohistochemical technique.ResultsThe total number of CGRP-positive nerve-like fibers was found to be higher in lesional skin than in non-lesional skin. Moreover, more inflammatory cells of dendritic shape intruded into the epidermis in lesional skin compared to non-lesional skin. Keratinocytes showing expression of CGRP were also found in lesional skin. Interestingly, the number of CGRP-positive nerve-like fibers in lesional skin correlated with depressive and anxiety scores. Correlation with depressive score was also found for round CGRP-positive inflammatory cells in the epidermis.ConclusionsCGRP may have a role in both the inflammatory process and distress, in AD.

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  • 3.
    Adori, Csaba
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Daraio, Teresa
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kuiper, Raoul
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Barde, Swapnali
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Horvathova, Lubica
    Slovak Acad Sci, Slovakia.
    Yoshitake, Takashi
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ihnatko, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Georg August Univ Gottingen, Germany.
    Valladolid-Acebes, Ismael
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Vercruysse, Pauline
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Wellendorf, Ashley M.
    Cincinnati Childrens Hosp Med Ctr, OH 45229 USA.
    Gramignoli, Roberto
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bozoky, Bela
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Kehr, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Cancelas, Jose A.
    Cincinnati Childrens Hosp Med Ctr, OH 45229 USA; Univ Cincinnati, OH 45267 USA.
    Mravec, Boris
    Slovak Acad Sci, Slovakia; Comenius Univ, Slovakia.
    Jorns, Carl
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Sweden.
    Ellis, Ewa
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Mulder, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Uhlen, Mathias
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Bark, Christina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hökfelt, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Disorganization and degeneration of liver sympathetic innervations in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease revealed by 3D imaging2021In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 7, no 30, article id eabg5733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hepatic nerves have a complex role in synchronizing liver metabolism. Here, we used three-dimensional (3D) immunoimaging to explore the integrity of the hepatic nervous system in experimental and human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We demonstrate parallel signs of mild degeneration and axonal sprouting of sympathetic innervations in early stages of experimental NAFLD and a collapse of sympathetic arborization in steatohepatitis. Human fatty livers display a similar pattern of sympathetic nerve degeneration, correlating with the severity of NAFLD pathology. We show that chronic sympathetic hyperexcitation is a key factor in the axonal degeneration, here genetically phenocopied in mice deficient of the Rac-1 activator Vav3. In experimental steatohepatitis, 3D imaging reveals a severe portal vein contraction, spatially correlated with the extension of the remaining nerves around the portal vein, enlightening a potential intrahepatic neuronal mechanism of portal hypertension. These fundamental alterations in liver innervation and vasculature uncover previously unidentified neuronal components in NAFLD pathomechanisms.

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  • 4.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hosp Trust, Norway.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Norway.
    Dietary Supplementation with Selenium and Coenzyme Q(10) Prevents Increase in Plasma D-Dimer While Lowering Cardiovascular Mortality in an Elderly Swedish Population2021In: Nutrients, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 13, no 4, article id 1344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A low intake of selenium is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. This could be reduced by supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q(10). D-dimer, a fragment of fibrin mirroring fibrinolysis, is a biomarker of thromboembolism, increased inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and is associated with cardiovascular mortality in ischemic heart disease. The objective was to examine the impact of selenium and coenzyme Q(10) on the level of D-dimer, and its relationship to cardiovascular mortality. D-dimer was measured in 213 individuals at the start and after 48 months of a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial with selenium yeast (200 mu g/day) and coenzyme Q(10) (200 mg/day) (n = 106) or placebo (n = 107). The follow-up time was 4.9 years. All included individuals were low in selenium (mean 67 mu g/L, SD 16.8). The differences in D-dimer concentration were evaluated by the use of T-tests, repeated measures of variance and ANCOVA analyses. At the end, a significantly lower D-dimer concentration was observed in the active treatment group in comparison with those on placebo (p = 0.006). Although D-dimer values at baseline were weakly associated with high-sensitive CRP, while being more strongly associated with soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 and sP-selectin, controlling for these in the analysis there was an independent effect on D-dimer. In participants with a D-dimer level above median at baseline, the supplementation resulted in significantly lower cardiovascular mortality compared to those on placebo (p = 0.014). All results were validated with a persisting significant difference between the two groups. Therefore, supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q(10) in a group of elderly low in selenium and coenzyme Q(10) prevented an increase in D-dimer and reduced the risk of cardiovascular mortality in comparison with the placebo group. The obtained results also illustrate important associations between inflammation, endothelial function and cardiovascular risk.

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  • 5.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alexander, J.
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Norway.
    Aaseth, J.
    Innlandet Hosp Trust, Norway.
    Larsson, A.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Significant decrease of von Willebrand factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 by providing supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 to an elderly population with a low selenium status2020In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 59, p. 3581-3590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Endothelial dysfunction and inflammation are conditions which fuel atherosclerosis and ischaemic heart disease. We have previously reported reduced cardiovascular (CV) mortality following supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 to 443 elderly individuals with low selenium status (mean 67 mu g/L) for 4 years. Here, we wanted to evaluate a possible association between the supplementation and the plasma concentrations of the von Willebrand factor (vWf), and the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), as they, besides other functions, are also strongly associated with endothelial function. Methods In this sub-study, 308 individuals (active substance: 157, placebo: 151) were included. Blood samples were drawn after 6 and 36 months and vWf and PAI-1 were determined in plasma by ELISA. Changes in concentrations of the biomarkers were evaluated by the use of T tests, repeated measures of variance, and ANCOVA analyses. Results The active treatment group presented a lower level of vWf after 36 months compared with the placebo group (1.08 U/mL vs. 5.10 U/mL; p = 0.0007). The results were validated through the repeated measures of variance evaluation. The PAI-1 levels showed an equally significant decrease in the active group (26.2 ng/mL vs. 49.2 ng/mL; p = 0.0002) and were also validated through repeated measures of variance evaluation. Conclusion In this sub-study on elderly receiving selenium and coenzyme Q10, or placebo we found significantly lower levels of vWf and PAI-1 in the active treatment group as compared to the placebo group. We interpret this as a better endothelial function because of the intervention, which accords with a previous finding of reduced CV mortality.

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  • 6.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway; Hedmark University of Coll, Norway.
    Svensson, Erland
    Swedish Def Research Agency, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Levels of sP-selectin and hs-CRP Decrease with Dietary Intervention with Selenium and Coenzyme Q10 Combined: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial2015In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 9, p. e0137680-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Objectives Inflammation and oxidative stress are central in many disease states. The major anti-oxidative enzymes contain selenium. The selenium intake in Europe is low, and supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q(10) , important anti-oxidants, was evaluated in a previous study. The aim of this study was to evaluate response on the inflammatory biomarkers C-reactive protein, and sP-selectin, and their possible impact on cardiovascular mortality. Subjects/Methods 437 elderly individuals were included in the study. Clinical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography and blood samples were drawn. The intervention time was 48 months, and median follow-up was 5.2 years. The effects on inflammation/atherosclerosis were evaluated through analyses of CRP and sP-selectin. Evaluations of the effect of the intervention was performed using repeated measures of variance. All mortality was registered, and endpoints of mortality were assessed by Kaplan-Meier plots. Results The placebo group showed a CRP level of 4.8 ng/mL at the start, and 5.1 ng/mL at the study end. The active supplementation group showed a CRP level of 4.1 ng/mL at the start, and 2.1 ng/mL at the study end. SP-selectin exhibited a level of 56.6mg/mL at the start in the placebo group and 72.3 mg/mL at the study end, and in the active group the corresponding figures were 55.9 mg/mL and 58.0 mg/mL. A significantly smaller increase was demonstrated through repeated measurements of the two biomarkers in those on active supplementation. Active supplementation showed an effect on the CRP and sP-selectin levels, irrespective of the biomarker levels. Reduced cardiovascular mortality was demonstrated in both those with high and low levels of CRP and sP-selectin in the active supplementation group. Conclusion CRP and sP-selectin showed significant changes reflecting effects on inflammation and atherosclerosis in those given selenium and coenzyme Q(10) combined. A reduced cardiovascular mortality could be demonstrated in the active group, irrespective of biomarker level. This result should be regarded as hypothesis-generating, and it is hoped it will stimulate more research in the area.

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  • 7.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry.
    Individual long-term variation of platelet reactivity in patients with dual antiplatelet therapy after myocardial infarction.2019In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 572-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a large inter-individual variation in response to clopidogrel treatment, and previous studies have indicated higher risk of thrombotic events in those with high residual platelet reactivity (HPR). Less is known about individual variation over time. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to investigate intra-individual variation in platelet reactivity. Platelet aggregation in whole blood was assessed in 77 patients, at 3 days, 8 days and 6 months after admission for acute myocardial infarction and loading dose of clopidogrel. All patients were treated with aspirin and clopidogrel through 6-month follow-up. We found a significant increase in median ADP-stimulated aggregation from third to eighth day (195 vs. 250 AU*min, p-value = 0.001) but not from day 8 to 6 months (250 vs. 223 AU*min, p-value = 0.666). There was no significant change in the overall rate of HPR (15.6% vs 20.8%, p-value 0.503) or low platelet reactivity (LPR) (37.7% vs 33.8%, p-value = 0.609) from day 8 to 6-month follow-up. In contrast, more than one in four changed HPR status, 15.6% from non-HPR to HPR and 10.4% HPR to non-HPR. A shift in LPR status appeared even more frequent, occurring in about one of three patients. In spite of similar median aggregation and rate of HPR during 6-month follow-up, about one in four of the patients changed HPR status and one in three changed LPR status. This may be important information for a concept of risk stratification based on a single aggregation value early after an acute coronary syndromes.

  • 8.
    Ali Abdi, Abshir
    et al.
    East Africa University, Somalia.
    Osman, Abdimajid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Prevalence of common hereditary risk factors for thrombophilia in Somalia and identification of a novel Gln544Arg mutation in coagulation factor V2017In: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis, ISSN 0929-5305, E-ISSN 1573-742X, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 536-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thrombophilia, commonly manifested as venous thromboembolism (VTE), is a worldwide concern but little is known on its genetic epidemiology in many parts of the globe particularly in the developing countries. Here we employed TaqMan genotyping and pyrosequencing to evaluate the prevalence of known common nucleotide polymorphisms associated with thrombophilia in a Somali population in the Puntland region of Somalia. We also employed next generation sequencing (NGS) to investigate other genetic variants in a Somali patient with deep venous thrombosis (DVT). As expected, we found no existence of factor V Leiden (rs6025) and prothrombin G20210A (rs1799963) in the Somali population. The G allele of ABO [261G/delG] polymorphism (rs8176719) was found at a frequency of 29%, similar to that observed in other African populations. We found the lowest so far reported frequency of MTHFR C677T (rs1801133) polymorphism in the Somali population (T allele frequency 1.5%). A novel and deleterious single nucleotide variation in exon 11 of coagulation factor V (c.1631A amp;gt; G) causing Gln544Arg exchange in factor V was identified in a 29 years old Somali female with DVT. The same patient was heterozygous to VKORC1 Asp36Tyr polymorphism (rs61742245) that predisposes to warfarin resistance. In conclusion, this study shows that common hereditary factors for thromboembolism found in Caucasians are either less frequent or absent in the Somali population-similar to the situation in other Africans. NGS is possibly a better choice to detect genetic risk variants for thrombosis in this ethnic group.

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  • 9.
    Ali, Abshir A.
    et al.
    East Africa Univ, Somalia.
    Aalto, Mikko
    Bosaso Gen Hosp, Somalia.
    Jonasson, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    Osman, Abdimajid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Genome-wide analyses disclose the distinctive HLA architecture and the pharmacogenetic landscape of the Somali population2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 5652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    African populations are underrepresented in medical genomics studies. For the Somali population, there is virtually no information on genomic markers with significance to precision medicine. Here, we analyzed nearly 900,000 genomic markers in samples collected from 95 unrelated individuals in the North Eastern Somalia. ADMIXTURE program for estimation of individual ancestries revealed a homogenous Somali population. Principal component analysis with PLINK software showed approximately 60% East African and 40% West Eurasian genes in the Somali population, with a close relation to the Cushitic and Semitic speaking Ethiopian populations. We report the unique features of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) in the Somali population, which seem to differentiate from all other neighboring regions compared. Current study identified high prevalence of the diabetes type 1 (T1D) predisposing HLA DR-DQ haplotypes in Somalia. This finding may explain the increased T1D risk observed among Somali children. In addition, ethnic Somalis were found to host the highest frequencies observed thus far for several pharmacogenetic variants, including UGT1A4*2. In conclusion, we report that the Somali population displays genetic traits of significance to health and disease. The Somali dataset is publicly available and will add more information to the few genomic datasets available for African populations.

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  • 10.
    Andelin, M.
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden..
    Kropff, J.
    Department of Endocrinology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Matuleviciene, V.
    Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Joseph, J.I.
    Department of Anaesthesiology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA..
    Attvall, S.
    Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hirsch, I.B.
    University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
    Imberg, H.
    Statistiska Konsultgruppen, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Dahlqvist, S.
    Department of Medicine, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Klonoff, D.
    Diabetes Research Institute, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, San Mateo, CA, USA..
    Haraldsson, B.
    Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    DeVries, J.H.
    Department of Endocrinology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Lind, M.
    Department of Medicine, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden lind.marcus@telia.com..
    Assessing the Accuracy of Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) Calibrated With Capillary Values Using Capillary or Venous Glucose Levels as a Reference.2016In: Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, E-ISSN 1932-2968, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 876-884Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Using the standard venous reference for the evaluation of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems could possibly negatively affect measured CGM accuracy since CGM are generally calibrated with capillary glucose and venous and capillary glucose concentrations differ. We therefore aimed to quantify the effect of using capillary versus venous glucose reference samples on estimated accuracy in capillary calibrated CGM.less thanbr /greater thanMethods: We evaluated 41 individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) using the Dexcom G4 CGM system over 6 days. Patients calibrated their CGM devices with capillary glucose by means of the HemoCue system. During 2 visits, capillary and venous samples were simultaneously measured by HemoCue and compared to concomitantly obtained CGM readings. The mean absolute relative difference (MARD) was calculated using capillary and venous reference samples.less thanbr /greater thanResults: Venous glucose values were 0.83 mmol/L (15.0 mg/dl) lower than capillary values over all glycemic ranges, P less than .0001. Below 4 mmol/l (72 mg/dl), the difference was 1.25 mmol/l (22.5 mg/dl), P = .0001, at 4-10 mmol/l (72-180 mg/dl), 0.67 mmol/l (12.0 mg/dl), P less than .0001 and above 10 mmol/l (180 mg/dl), 0.95 mmol/l (17.1 mg/dl), P less than .0001. MARD was 11.7% using capillary values as reference compared to 13.7% using venous samples, P = .037. Below 4 mmol/l (72 mg/dl) MARD was 16.6% and 31.8%, P = .048, at 4-10 mmol/l (72-180 mg/dl) 12.1% and 12.6%, P = .32, above 10 mmol/l (180 mg/dl) 8.7% and 9.2%, P = .82.less thanbr /greater thanConclusion: Using capillary glucose concentrations as reference to evaluate the accuracy of CGM calibrated with capillary samples is associated with a lower MARD than using venous glucose as the reference. Capillary glucose concentrations were significantly higher than venous in all glycemic ranges.less thanbr /greater than (© 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.)

  • 11.
    Andersson, B.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Swolin-Eide, D.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kristroem, B.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Gelander, L.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Angered Hospital, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Albertsson-Wikland, K.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Seasonal variations in vitamin D in relation to growth in short prepubertal children before and during first year growth hormone treatment2015In: Journal of Endocrinological Investigation, ISSN 0391-4097, E-ISSN 1720-8386, Vol. 38, no 12, p. 1309-1317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose This study investigated the relationship between seasonal variations in 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) levels and growth in prepubertal children during both the pretreatment year and the first year of GH treatment. Methods The study included 249 short prepubertal children with a broad range of GH secretion, GH(max) during a 24 h profile median 23; range 1-127 mU/L, 191 boys (mean age +/- SD, 8.6 +/- 2.6 years), 58 girls (7.5 +/- 1.9 years) receiving GH treatment (mean 43 mu g/kg/day; range 17-99 mu g/kg/day). Serum 25(OH) D was measured using an automated IDS-iSYS immunoassay. Results 25(OH) D levels showed seasonal variation, and decreased significantly during GH treatment. 25(OH) D levels at start and first year reduction in 25(OH) D, correlated (-) with the first year growth response during treatment. The degree of GH secretion capacity within our study population of mainly non-GH deficient children and 25(OH) D sufficient (67 +/- 29 nmol/L) had no influence on 25(OH) D levels. Growth during GH treatment were independent of seasonal variations in 25(OH) D. Multiple regression analysis showed that 25(OH) D levels at treatment start, together with auxological data and IGF-binding protein-3(SDS), explained 61 % of the variation in first year gain in height(SDS). Conclusion 25(OH) D levels were associated with first year growth response to GH and may be a useful contribution to future growth prediction models.

  • 12.
    Andersson, Bjorn
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Swolin-Eide, Diana
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Short-term changes in bone formation markers following growth hormone (GH) treatment in short prepubertal children with a broad range of GH secretion2015In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 82, no 1, p. 91-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesGrowth hormone (GH) promotes longitudinal growth and bone modelling/remodelling. This study investigated the relationship between levels of bone formation markers and growth during GH treatment in prepubertal children with widely ranging GH secretion levels. MethodsThe study group comprised 113 short prepubertal children (mean ageSD, 937213years; 99 boys) on GH treatment (330 +/- 006g/kg/day) for 1year. Blood samples were taken at baseline and 1 and 2weeks, 1 and 3months, and 1year after treatment start. Intact amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PINP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP) and osteocalcin were measured using an automated IDS-iSYS immunoassay system. ResultsIntact amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PINP), BALP and osteocalcin, increased in the short-term during GH treatment. PINP after 1week (P=000077), and BALP and osteocalcin after 1month (Pless than00001 and P=00043, respectively). PINP levels at 1 and 3months correlated positively, and osteocalcin levels at 1week and percentage change after 1month correlated negatively, with first year growth response. No significant correlations were found between BALP and first year growth. Multiple regression analysis showed that bone marker levels together with auxological data and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 explained the variation in first year growth response to 36% at start, 32% after 2weeks and 48% at 3months. ConclusionShort-term increases in levels of the bone formation markers PINP, BALP and osteocalcin showed different temporal patterns, but all correlated with first year growth response during GH treatment. These markers may be a useful addition to existing prediction models for growth response.

  • 13.
    Andersson, Björn
    et al.
    Institution of Clinical Sciences/Pediatrics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Swolin-Eide, Diana
    Göteborg Pediatric Growth Research Center (GP-GRC), Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin
    Department of Physiology/Division of Endocrinology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Vitamin D status in children over three decades – do children get enough vitamin D?2016In: Bone Reports, ISSN 2352-1872, Vol. 5, p. 150-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vitamin D is a key player in the endocrine regulation of calcium and phosphate metabolism and plays a pivotal role in the acquisition of bone mass during childhood. This study investigated long-term data of vitamin D levels in children and adolescents between 1 and 18 years of age. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) was analyzed between 1982 and 2013 in 2048 Swedish Caucasian children (mean age ± SD, 8.59 ± 3.68 years; 1197 boys). Overall, 704 (34%) children had below recommended levels of 50 nmol/L; however, only 63 (3%) had levels below 25 nmol/L, i.e., vitamin D deficiency. No trend for decreased vitamin D levels over time was found in this population, with median 25(OH)D levels of 58.4 nmol/L, minimum–maximum 5.0–159.3 nmol/L. Younger children, independent of gender, had significantly higher levels 25(OH)D.

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  • 14.
    Andersson, Christoffer R.
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ström, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Örebro University, Sweden.
    Comparisons between commercial salivary testosterone enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 77, no 8, p. 582-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Measuring testosterone concentrations is of interest both in clinical situations and for research, the latter expanding rapidly during recent years. An increased demand for convenient methods has prompted a number of companies to develop enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits to measure testosterone concentrations in saliva. However, the inter-comparability of kits from different manufacturers have yet to be determined. Aim of study: The aim of this study was to compare commercially available ELISA kits from four different manufacturers (Salimetrics, IBL, DRG and Demeditec). Methods: Saliva was collected from 50 participants (25 men and 25 women). Each sample was analysed by the four ELISA kits. Results: The correlations between the ELISA kits from Demeditec, DRG and Salimetrics were moderate to high with r-values amp;gt;.77; however, proportional errors between the methods calls for caution. The ELISA kit from IBL malfunctioned and no results from this kit was obtained. Conclusions: Results from studies using the ELISA kits from Demeditec, DRG and Salimetrics are generally comparable; however, translation using the formulae presented in the current study could increase the accuracy of these comparisons.

  • 15.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Internal Medicine, County Council of Jönköping, Jönköping.
    Landberg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Consequences of high-sensitivity troponin T testing applied in a primary care population with chest pain compared with a commercially available point-of-care troponin T analysis: an observational prospective study2015In: BMC Research Notes, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:There is a demand for a highly sensitive and specific point-of care test to detect acute myocardial infarction (AMI). It is unclear if a high-sensitivity troponin assay will have enough discriminative power to become a decision support in primary care. The aim of this study was to evaluate a high-sensitivity troponin T assay performed in three primary health care centres in southeast Sweden and to compare the outcome with a point-of-care troponin T test.METHODS:This study included 115 patients who consulted their general practitioner for chest pain, dyspnoea on exertion, unexplained weakness and/or fatigue in the last 7days. Troponin T was analysed by a point-of-care test and a high-sensitivity method together with N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and creatinine. All patients were checked for AMI or unstable angina (UA) within 30days of study enrolment. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was carried out to examine possible connections between troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L, clinical variables and laboratory findings at baseline. In addition, 21 patients with troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L and no signs of AMI or UA were followed up for 2-3years.RESULTS:Three patients were diagnosed with AMI and three with UA. At the [greater than or equal to]15ng/L cut-off, the troponin T method had 100% sensitivity, 75% specificity for AMI and a positive predictive value of 10%. The troponin T point-of-care test missed one case of AMI and the detection limit was 50ng/L. Troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L was correlated to age [greater than or equal to]65years (odds ratio (OR), 10.9 95% CI 2.28-51.8) and NT-proBNP in accordance with heart failure (OR 8.62 95% CI 1.61-46.1). Fourteen of the 21 patients, without signs of AMI or UA at baseline, still had increased troponin T at follow-up after 2-3years.CONCLUSIONS:A high-sensitivity troponin T assay could become useful in primary care as a point-of-care test for patients <65years. For patients older than 65-70years, a higher decision limit than [greater than or equal to]15ng/L should be considered and used in conjunction with clinical parameters and possibly with NT-proBNP.

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  • 16.
    Appelros, Peter
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Hals Berglund, Maria
    University Hospital Norrland, Sweden.
    Ström, Jakob O.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Long-Term Risk of Stroke after Transient Ischemic Attack2017In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, ISSN 1015-9770, E-ISSN 1421-9786, Vol. 43, no 1-2, p. 25-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the absence of active management, the stroke risk after a transient ischemic attack (TIA) may be high. Almost 10 years ago, the results of the EXPRESS and SOS-TIA studies called for a more rapid management of TIA patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the other stroke risks in the longer term, after the implementation of a more active approach to TIA. We also wanted to assess the predictive value of the ABCD2 score in this context. Methods: Riksstroke is the national stroke registry in Sweden. Data from Riksstrokes TIA module, and the national cause-of-death register, for the years 2011 and 2012 were used in this study. Stroke occurrence was monitored via Riksstroke. Coxs regression was used for risk evaluation. The predictive value of the ABCD2 score was assessed by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve. Results: A total of 15,068 TIA episodes occurred in 14,102 patients. The follow-up time varied between 0 and 819 days, with an average of 417 days. The mortality for all TIA patients during the follow-up time was 7.1%. Of the unique patients, 545 had one or more strokes (3.9%), corresponding to 34 events per 1,000 person years. Significant risk factors for stroke were: age, previous TIA, atrial fibrillation (AF), oral anticoagulant (OAC) treatment, hypertension treatment, and the ABCD2 items speech impairment, unilateral weakness, and diabetes mellitus. The ABCD2 score correlated with a subsequent stroke, but its predictive value was low. Conclusion: The risk of stroke is low after the acute phase of a TIA, probably lower than in previous studies. This may be due to better secondary prevention in recent years. Several risk factors predict stroke, notably hypertensive treatment, which may be inadequate; and AF, where OACs may be under-used. It is difficult to identify the role of the ABCD2 score in clinical practice. (C) 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 17.
    Backlund, Nils
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Brattsand, Goran
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Lundstedt, Staffan
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Aardal, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Bartuseviciene, Inga
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Berinder, Katarina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hoybye, Charlotte
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Burman, Pia
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Eden Engstrom, Britt
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Anders
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Blomgren, Anders
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ragnarsson, Oskar
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ruetschi, Ulrika
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Wahlberg, Jeanette
    Orebro Univ, Sweden; Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Dahlqvist, Per
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Salivary cortisol and cortisone in diagnosis of Cushings syndrome - a comparison of six different analytical methods2023In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, E-ISSN 1437-4331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Salivary cortisol and cortisone at late night and after dexamethasone suppression test (DST) are increasingly used for screening of Cushings syndrome (CS). We aimed to establish reference intervals for salivary cortisol and cortisone with three liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) techniques and for salivary cortisol with three immunoassays (IAs), and evaluate their diagnostic accuracy for CS.Methods: Salivary samples at 08:00 h, 23:00 h and 08:00 h after a 1-mg DST were collected from a reference population (n=155) and patients with CS (n=22). Sample aliquots were analyzed by three LC-MS/MS and three IA methods. After establishing reference intervals, the upper reference limit (URL) for each method was used to calculate sensitivity and specificity for CS. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by comparing ROC curves.Results: URLs for salivary cortisol at 23:00 h were similar for the LC-MS/MS methods (3.4-3.9 nmol/L), but varied between IAs: Roche (5.8 nmol/L), Salimetrics (4.3 nmol/L), Cisbio (21.6 nmol/L). Corresponding URLs after DST were 0.7-1.0, and 2.4, 4.0 and 5.4 nmol/L, respectively. Salivary cortisone URLs were 13.5-16.6 nmol/L at 23:00 h and 3.0-3.5 nmol/L at 08:00 h after DST. All methods had ROC AUCs =0.96.Conclusions: We present robust reference intervals for salivary cortisol and cortisone at 08:00 h, 23:00 h and 08:00 h after DST for several clinically used methods. The similarities between LC-MS/MS methods allows for direct comparison of absolute values. Diagnostic accuracy for CS was high for all salivary cortisol and cortisone LC-MS/MS methods and salivary cortisol IAs evaluated.

  • 18.
    Balla, Hajnal Zsuzsanna
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Orebro Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ström, Jakob O.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Effect of Beta-Blockers on Stroke Outcome: A Meta-Analysis2021In: Clinical Epidemiology, ISSN 1179-1349, E-ISSN 1179-1349, Vol. 13, p. 225-236Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Cardiovascular events and infections are common in the acute phase after stroke. It has been suggested that these complications may be associated with excessive sympathetic activation due to the stroke, and that beta-adrenergic antagonists (beta-blockers) therefore may be beneficial. Aim: The aim of the current meta-analysis was to investigate the association between beta-blocker treatment in acute stroke and the three outcomes: mortality, functional outcome and post-stroke infections. Methods: A literature search was performed using the keywords stroke, cerebrovascular disorders, adrenergic beta-antagonists, treatment outcome and mortality. Randomized clinical trials and observational studies were eligible for data extraction. Heterogeneity was investigated using I-2 statistics. Random effect model was used when heterogeneity presented among studies; otherwise, a fixed-effect model was used. Publication bias was assessed using Eggers test and by visually inspecting funnel plots. Results: A total of 20 studies were eligible for at least one of the three outcomes. Two of the included studies were randomized controlled trials and 18 were observational studies. Quality assessments indicated that the risk of bias was moderate. The meta-analysis found no significant association between treatment with beta-blockers and any of the three outcomes. The studies analyzed for the outcomes mortality and infection were heterogeneous, while studies analyzed for functional outcome were homogeneous. The articles analyzed for mortality showed signs of publication bias. Conclusion: The lack of significant effects in the current meta-analysis, comprising more than 100,000 patients, does not support the proposed beneficial effects of beta-blockers in the acute phase of stroke.

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  • 19.
    Balla, Hajnal Zsuzsanna
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ström, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Evaluation of commercial, wireless dermal thermometers for surrogate measurements of core temperature2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 79, no 1-2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extensive research has been devoted to developing methods for assessing core body temperature, and to determine which method is most accurate. A number of wireless dermal thermometers for home use are presently available, but their relation to core body temperature and suitability for use in clinical research has hitherto not been assessed. The current study aimed to evaluate such thermometers by comparing them to the results of a rectal thermometer. Four wireless dermal thermometers for home use (FeverSmart, iThermonitor, Quest Temp Sitter, and Thermochron iButton) were applied to 15 patients during 24 h, and rectal temperature was measured at four occasions. Pearson correlation revealed moderate correlation for the Feversmart (r = 0.75), iThermonitor (r = 0.79), and Thermochron iButton (r = 0.71) systems. The Quest Temp Sitter system malfunctioned repeatedly, and the correlation (r = 0.29) for this method should therefore be assessed with caution. All dermal thermometers rendered lower average temperatures than Terumo c405 (Feversmart -0.70 +/- 0.65 degrees C; iThermonitor -0.77 +/- 0.53 degrees C, Quest Temp Sitter -1.18 +/- 0.66 degrees C, and Thermochron iButton -0.87 +/- 0.65 degrees C). Sensitivity of the dermal thermometers for detecting core temperatures amp;gt;= 38.0 degrees C was low, ranging from 0.33 to 0.6, but improved to 0.60 to 0.80 after adjusting temperatures by the methods average deviation from rectal temperature. The results from the dermal thermometers tested here showed an insufficient correlation to core temperature to be used for core temperature monitoring in clinical research and practice. Unfortunately, other options for non-invasive temperature measurements are few. The two thermometers with the least unsatisfactory performance profile in our evaluations were the Feversmart and iThermonitor systems.

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  • 20.
    Barde, Swapnali
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ruegg, Joelle
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Centre Molecular Med, Sweden; Swedish Toxicol Science Research Centre Swetox, Sweden.
    Prudhomme, Jose
    Douglas Mental Health University of Institute, Canada.
    Ekström, Tomas J.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Centre Molecular Med, Sweden.
    Palkovits, Miklos
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Turecki, Gustavo
    Douglas Mental Health University of Institute, Canada; McGill University, Canada.
    Bagdy, Gyorgy
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Ihnatko, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Juhasz, Gabriella
    Semmelweis University, Hungary; University of Manchester, England.
    Diaz-Heijtz, Rochellys
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Mechawar, Naguib
    Douglas Mental Health University of Institute, Canada; McGill University, Canada.
    Hokfelt, Tomas G. M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Alterations in the neuropeptide galanin system in major depressive disorder involve levels of transcripts, methylation, and peptide2016In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ISSN 0027-8424, Vol. 113, no 52, p. E8472-E8481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a substantial burden to patients, families, and society, but many patients cannot be treated adequately. Rodent experiments suggest that the neuropeptide galanin (GAL) and its three G protein-coupled receptors, GAL(1-3), are involved in mood regulation. To explore the translational potential of these results, we assessed the transcript levels (by quantitative PCR), DNA methylation status (by bisulfite pyrosequencing), and GAL peptide by RIA of the GAL system in postmortem brains from depressed persons who had committed suicide and controls. Transcripts for all four members were detected and showed marked regional variations, GAL and galanin receptor 1 (GALR1) being most abundant. Striking increases in GAL and GALR3 mRNA levels, especially in the noradrenergic locus coeruleus and the dorsal raphe nucleus, in parallel with decreased DNA methylation, were found in both male and female suicide subjects as compared with controls. In contrast, GAL and GALR3 transcript levels were decreased, GALR1 was increased, and DNA methylation was increased in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of male suicide subjects, however, there were no changes in the anterior cingulate cortex. Thus, GAL and its receptor GALR3 are differentially methylated and expressed in brains of MDD subjects in a region- and sex-specific manner. Such an epigenetic modification in GALR3, a hyperpolarizing receptor, might contribute to the dysregulation of noradrenergic and serotonergic neurons implicated in the pathogenesis of MDD. Thus, one may speculate that a GAL(3) antagonist could have antidepressant properties by disinhibiting the firing of these neurons, resulting in increased release of noradrenaline and serotonin in forebrain areas involved in mood regulation.

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  • 21.
    Befekadu, Rahel
    et al.
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Grenegård, Magnus
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Christensen, Kjeld
    Karlstad Cent Hosp, Sweden.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Dynamic Changes in Pentraxin-3 and Neprilysin in ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction2022In: Biomedicines, E-ISSN 2227-9059, Vol. 10, no 2, article id 275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pentraxin-3 (PTX3) and neprilysin have been associated with increased morbidity and mortality in chronic inflammatory disease and heart failure, but these biomarkers have been studied less in patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We investigated the dynamic changes in these biomarkers, as well as the well-known C-reactive protein (CRP), in STEMI patients. PTX3, neprilysin and CRP were measured in samples from 165 STEMI patients, collected at the acute stage, 1-3 days after and 3 months after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and from 40 healthy donors. Patient survival was followed for approximately 8 years after the PCI. As compared with samples from healthy donors, plasma levels of CRP and PTX3 were significantly increased in the acute samples and 1-3 days after PCI, but not at 3 months. CRP levels peaked at 1-3 days, while PTX3 was similarly high in both acute and 1-3 days samples. For neprilysin, no significant differences were observed at the group level. We found no significant differences when comparing patients with patent versus occluded culprit vessels or between patients having a thrombus aspiration or not. However, we found a significant reduction in survival for individuals with PTX3 above the median, both for samples collected at the acute stage and 1-3 days after PCI (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.0008, respectively). For CRP, no significant differences were observed using this approach, but patients above the reference range for healthy donors in the acute samples showed significantly lower survival (p = 0.0476). Conclusions: Survival analysis suggests that PTX3 might be a promising marker to predict mortality in this patient population.

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  • 22.
    Befekadu, Rahel
    et al.
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Grenegård, Magnus
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Christensen, Kjeld
    Karlstad Cent Hosp, Sweden; Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 and 2 are associated with survival after ST segment elevation myocardial infarction2022In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 14762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) are suggested to play dual roles on physiological and pathophysiological actions of TNF-alpha. The aim of this study was to investigate the dynamic changes of these biomarkers in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Blood was collected from 165 STEMI patients at admission, 1-3 days and 3 months after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and from 40 healthy blood donors. sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 were measured with ELISA. The plasma levels of both sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 were significantly higher than in healthy donors at all three time points. We found no significant differences in sTNFR1 or sTNFR2 when comparing patients with patent versus occluded culprit vessels, or between patients having a thrombus aspiration or not. Survival analysis was performed comparing patients with levels of biomarkers above and below the median values at that time point. We found significant differences in survival for sTNFR2 in acute samples (p = 0.0151) and for both sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 in samples 1-3 days after PCI (p = 0.0054 and p = 0.0003, respectively). Survival analyses suggest that sTNFR1 or sTNFR2 could be promising markers to predict mortality in STEMI patients after PCI.

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  • 23.
    Bergemalm, Daniel
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Örebro University, Örebro.
    Kardeby, Caroline
    Cardiovascular Research Centre, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro.
    Hultenby, Kjell
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm.
    Eremo, Anna Göthlin
    Department of Clinical Research Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro.
    Sihlbom, Carina
    Proteomics Core Facility, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Bergström, Jörgen
    Proteomics Core Facility, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Palmblad, Jan
    Departments of Medicine and Hematology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm.
    Åström, Maria
    Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro.
    Platelet proteome and function in X-linked thrombocytopenia with thalassemia and in silico comparisons with gray platelet syndrome2021In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 106, no 11, p. 2947-2959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In X-linked thrombocytopenia with thalassemia (XLTT; OMIM 314050), caused by the mutation p.R216Q in exon 4 of the GATA1 gene, male hemizygous patients display macrothrombocytopenia, bleeding diathesis and a ß-thalassemia trait. Herein, we describe findings in two unrelated Swedish XLTT families with a bleeding tendency exceeding what is expected from the thrombocytopenia. Blood tests revealed low P-PAI-1 and P-factor 5, and elevated S-thrombopoietin levels. Transmission electron microscopy showed diminished numbers of platelet a- and dense granules. The proteomes of isolated blood platelets from 5 male XLTT patients, compared to 5 gender- and age matched controls, were explored. Quantitative mass spectrometry showed alterations of 83 proteins (fold change =±1.2, q&lt; .05). Of 46 downregulated proteins, 39 were previously reported to be associated with platelet granules. Reduced protein levels of PTGS1 and SLC35D3 were validated in megakaryocytes of XLTT bone marrow biopsies by immunohistochemistry. Platelet function testing by flow cytometry revealed low dense- and a-granule release and fibrinogen binding in response to ligation of receptors for ADP, the thrombin receptor PAR4 and the collagen receptor GPVI. Significant reductions of a number of a-granule proteins overlapped with a previous platelet proteomics investigation in the inherited macrothrombocytopenia gray platelet syndrome (GPS). In contrast, Ca2+ transporter proteins that facilitate dense granule release were downregulated in XLTT but upregulated in GPS. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed altered Coagulation System and Protein Ubiquitination pathways in the XLTT platelets. Collectively, the results revealed protein and functional alterations affecting platelet a- and dense granules in XLTT, probably contributing to bleeding.

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  • 24.
    Bian, Li
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Baghaei, Fariba
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Antovic, Jovan
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Fagerberg Blixter, Inger
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Hillarp, Andreas
    Klinikk for laboratorie­medisin, Sekjson for hemostase og trombose, Oslo Universitetssykehus, Norge.
    Strandberg, Karin
    Laboratorie­medicin, Medicinsk service, Region Skåne, Sverige.
    Willman, David
    Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå, Sverige.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology.
    Rutinmässig screening med APTT är inte indicerad före operation: [Routine screening with APTT is not indicated before surgery2022In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 119, article id 21240Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) is widely practiced in preoperative screening. The value of using this test to predict the risk of perioperative bleeding is not well documented in Sweden. In this article, a literature review is performed to determine whether unselected APTT testing can predict abnormal perioperative bleeding. The current literature does not support coagulation screening with APTT in routine perioperative bleeding assessment, as preoperative screening with APTT has a low sensitivity for detection of clinically significant bleeding disorder. While a comprehensive bleeding history is crucial, the APTT test should only be performed on patients with a history of increased bleeding tendency. The conclusion of this literature review is that patients with a negative bleeding history do not require routine screening with APTT prior to surgery, which, if implemented, would lead to a more cost-effective perioperative routine.

  • 25.
    Boknäs, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Laine, Cia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Hillarp, Andreas
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Macwan, Ankit
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Holmström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Associations between hemostatic markers and mortality in COVID-19-Compounding effects of D-dimer, antithrombin and PAP complex2022In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 213, p. 97-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this single-center cohort study, we applied a panel of laboratory markers to characterize hemostatic function in 217 consecutive patients that underwent testing for COVID-19 as they were admitted to Linkoping ¨ University Hospital between April and June 2020. In the 96 patients that tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19+), the cumulative incidences of death and venous thromboembolism were 24.0% and 19.8% as compared to 12.4% (p = 0.031) and 11.6% (p = 0.13) in the 121 patients that tested negative (COVID-19− ). In COVID-19+ patients, we found pronounced increases in plasma levels of von Willebrand factor (vWF) and fibrinogen. Excess mortality was observed in COVID-19+ patients with the following aberrations in hemostatic markers: high D-dimer, low antithrombin or low plasmin-antiplasmin complex (PAP) formation, with Odds Ratios (OR) for death of 4.7 (95% confidence interval (CI95) 1.7–12.9; p = 0.003) for D-dimer >0.5 mg/L, 5.9 (CI95 1.8–19.7; p = 0.004) for antithrombin (AT) ˂0.85 kIU/l and 4.9 (CI95 1.3–18.3; p = 0.019) for PAP < 1000 μg/L. Compounding increases in mortality was observed in COVID-19+ patients with combined defects in markers of fibrinolysis and coagulation, with ORs for death of 15.7 (CI95 4.3–57; p < 0.001) for patients with PAP <1000 μg/L and D-dimer >0.5 mg/L and 15.5 (CI95 2.8–87, p = 0.002) for patients with PAP <1000 μg/L and AT ˂0.85 kIU/L. We observed an elevated fraction of incompletely degraded D-dimer fragments in COVID-19+ patients with low PAP, indicating impaired fibrinolytic breakdown of cross-linked fibrin. 

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  • 26.
    Boknäs, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology. Australian Centre for Blood Diseases, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Macwan, Ankit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Södergren, Anna L.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro, Sweden.
    Platelet function testing at low platelet counts: When can you trust your analysis?2019In: RESEARCH AND PRACTICE IN THROMBOSIS AND HAEMOSTASIS, ISSN 2475-0379, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 285-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although flow cytometry is often brought forward as a preferable method in the setting of thrombocytopenia, the relative effects of low sample counts on results from flow cytometry-based platelet function testing (FC-PFT) in comparison with light transmission aggregometry (LTA) and multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) has not been reported. Objectives: To compare the effects of different sample platelet counts (10, 50, 100, and 200x10(9)L(-1)) on platelet activation measured with FC-PFT, LTA, and MEA using the same anticoagulant and agonist concentrations as for the commercial MEA test. Methods: Platelets were stimulated with two commonly used platelet agonists (ADP [6.5 mu molL(-1)] and PAR1-AP [TRAP, 32 mu molL(-1)]). The specified sample platelet counts were obtained by combining platelet-rich and platelet poor hirudinized plasma in different proportions with or without red blood cells. Results: For FC, P-selectin exposure and PAC-1 binding was reduced at 10x10(9)L(-1) after stimulation with PAR1-AP (by approximately 20% and 50%, respectively), but remained relatively unchanged when ADP was used as agonist (n=9). The platelet count-dependent effects observed with PAR1-AP were eliminated when samples were pre-incubated with apyrase, implying that reduced purinergic signaling was the main underlying factor (n=5). Both aggregometry-based PFTs showed a 50% reduction at 50x10(9)L(-1) and more than 80% reduction at 10x10(9)L(-1), irrespective of agonist used (n=7). Conclusions: Although FC-PFT is generally preferable to aggregometry-based PFTs in situations with low sample platelet counts, a careful optimization of experimental parameters is still required in order to eliminate platelet count-related effects.

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  • 27.
    Boknäs, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Faxälv, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Flow cytometry-based platelet function testing is predictive of symptom burden in a cohort of bleeders2018In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 512-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Platelet function disorders (PFDs) are common in patients with mild bleeding disorders (MBDs), yet the significance of laboratory findings suggestive of a PFD remain unclear due to the lack of evidence for a clinical correlation between the test results and the patient phenotype. Herein, we present the results from a study evaluating the potential utility of platelet function testing using whole-blood flow cytometry in a cohort of 105 patients undergoing investigation for MBD. Subjects were evaluated with a test panel comprising two different activation markers (fibrinogen binding and P-selectin exposure) and four physiologically relevant platelet agonists (ADP, PAR1-AP, PAR4-AP, and CRP-XL). Abnormal test results were identified by comparison with reference ranges constructed from 24 healthy controls or with the fifth percentile of the entire patient cohort. We found that the abnormal test results are predictive of bleeding symptom severity, and that the greatest predictive strength was achieved using a subset of the panel, comparing measurements of fibrinogen binding after activation with all four agonists with the fifth percentile of the patient cohort (p=0.00008, hazard ratio 8.7; 95% CI 2.5-40). Our results suggest that whole-blood flow cytometry-based platelet function testing could become a feasible alternative for the investigation of MBDs. We also show that platelet function testing using whole-blood flow cytometry could provide a clinically relevant quantitative assessment of platelet-related hemostasis.

  • 28.
    Braenden, Astrid
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Lebena, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olsen Faresjö, Åshild
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Coldevin, Marit
    Lovisenberg Diaconal Hosp, Norway.
    Stubberud, Jan
    Lovisenberg Diaconal Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Zeiner, Pal
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Melinder, Annika
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Excessive hair cortisol concentration as an indicator of psychological disorders in children2023In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 157, article id 106363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cortisol in hair is a new biomarker assessing long-term hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, which is related to emotion regulation. We compare hair cortisol concentrations (HCC), in clinically referred children with disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD) (n = 19), children with other types of psychological disorders (n = 48), and healthy subjects (n = 36). We also investigate the association between HCC and irritability, age, and sex. Our results show that children with DMDD or other types of psychological disorders have higher HCC than healthy subjects, p &lt; .001, ?(2)(p) = .39. No difference between children with DMDD and those with other types of psychological disorders was found, p = .91, nor an association between HCC and irritability in the clinical sample, p = .32. We found a significant negative correlation between HCC and age in those with DMDD, r = -0.54, p &lt; .05, but not in the normative sample, r = -0.20, p = .25. No differences in HCC between girls and boys were found in the normative sample, p = .49. Children in need of psychological treatment, including those with DMDD, seem to have dysregulated HPA-axis activity over time. Excessive accumulated cortisol concentrations in hair could be an indicator of a psychological disorder in children.

  • 29.
    Bransky, Avishay
    et al.
    PixCell Med Technol Ltd, Israel.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Aardal, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ben-Yosef, Yaara
    PixCell Med Technol Ltd, Israel.
    Christenson, Robert H.
    Univ Maryland, MD 21201 USA.
    A Novel Approach to Hematology Testing at the Point of Care2021In: JOURNAL OF APPLIED LABORATORY MEDICINE, ISSN 2576-9456, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 532-542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The need for rapid point-of-care (POC) diagnostics is now becoming more evident due to the increasing need for timely results and improvement in healthcare service. With the recent COVID-19 pandemic outbreak, POC has become critical in managing the spread of disease. Applicable diagnostics should be readily deployable, easy to use, portable, and accurate so that they fit mobile laboratories, pop-up treatment centers, field hospitals, secluded wards within hospitals, or remote regions, and can be operated by staff with minimal training. Complete blood count (CBC), however, has not been available at the POC in a simple-to-use device until recently. The HemoScreen, which was recently cleared by the FDA for POC use, is a miniature, easy-to-use instrument that uses disposable cartridges and may fill this gap. Content: The HemoScreens analysis method, in contrast to standard laboratory analyzers, is based on machine vision (image-based analysis) and artificial intelligence (AI). We discuss the different methods currently used and compare their results to the vision-based one. The HemoScreen is found to correlate well to laser and impedance-based methods while emphasis is given to mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin (MCH), and platelets (PLT) that demonstrate better correlation when the vision-based method is compared to itself due to the essential differences between the underlying technologies. Summary: The HemoScreen analyzer demonstrates lab equivalent performance, tested at different clinical settings and sample characteristics, and might outperform standard techniques in the presence of certain interferences. This new approach to hematology testing has great potential to improve quality of care in a variety of settings.

  • 30.
    Bukmann Larsen, Pia
    et al.
    Slagelse Hospital, Denmark.
    Storjord, Elin
    Nordland Hospital, Norway; UiT, Norway.
    Bakke, Asne
    Stavanger University Hospital, Norway.
    Bukve, Tone
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway.
    Christensen, Mikael
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Eikeland, Joakim
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Engeland Haugen, Vegar
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Husby, Kristin
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway.
    McGrail, Rie
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Meier Mikaelsen, Solveig
    Sykehuset Innlandet, Norway.
    Monsen, Grete
    Noklus, Norway.
    Fogh Moller, Mette
    Herning Hospital, Denmark.
    Nybo, Jan
    Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark.
    Revsholm, Jesper
    Randers Regional Hospital, Denmark.
    Johanne Risoy, Aslaug
    Noklus, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Skalsvik, Unni Marie
    Nordland Hospital, Norway.
    Strand, Heidi
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway.
    Serrano Teruel, Reyes
    Noklus, Norway.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    The microINR portable coagulometer: analytical quality and user-friendliness of a PT (INR) point-of-care instrument2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 115-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regular measurement of prothrombin time as an international normalized ratio PT (INR) is mandatory for optimal and safe use of warfarin. Scandinavian evaluation of laboratory equipment for primary health care (SKUP) evaluated the microINR portable coagulometer (microINR((R))) (iLine Microsystems S.L., Spain) for measurement of PT (INR). Analytical quality and user-friendliness were evaluated under optimal conditions at an accredited hospital laboratory and at two primary health care centres (PHCCs). Patients were recruited at the outpatient clinic of the Laboratory of Medical Biochemistry, St Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway (n=98) and from two PHCCs (n=88). Venous blood samples were analyzed under optimal conditions on the STA-R((R))Evolution with STA-SPA+reagent (Stago, France) (Owren method), and the results were compared to capillary measurements on the microINR((R)). The imprecision of the microINR((R)) was 6% (90% CI: 5.3-7.0%) and 6.3% (90% CI: 5.1-8.3) in the outpatient clinic and PHCC2, respectively for INR 2.5. The microINR((R)) did not meet the SKUP quality requirement for imprecision 5.0%. For INR amp;lt;2.5 at PHCC2 and at both levels in PHCC1, CV% was 5.0. The accuracy fulfilled the SKUP quality goal in both outpatient clinic and PHCCs. User-friendliness of the operation manual was rated as intermediate, defined by SKUP as neutral ratings assessed as neither good nor bad. Operation facilities was rated unsatisfactory, and time factors satisfactory. In conclusion, quality requirements for imprecision were not met. The SKUP criteria for accuracy was fulfilled both at the hospital and at the PHCCs. The user-friendliness was rated intermediate.

  • 31.
    Carlsson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Robotassisterad kirurgi ökar – trots osäker kostnadseffektivitet2016In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 113, no 48, p. 1-5Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Carlstedt, A.
    et al.
    Karlstad Cent Hosp, Sweden.
    Bringman, S.
    Sodertalje Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Egberth, M.
    Mora Hosp, Sweden.
    Emanuelsson, P.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Olsson, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Capio CFTK, Sweden.
    Petersson, U.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Palstedt, J.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Ersta Hosp, Sweden.
    Sandblom, G.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Stark, B.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Strigard, K.
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Tall, J.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Ersta Hosp, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology.
    Management of Diastasis of the Rectus Abdominis Muscles: Recommendations for Swedish National Guidelines2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1457-4969, E-ISSN 1799-7267, Vol. 110, no 3, p. 452-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Diastasis of the rectus abdominis muscle is a common condition. There are no generally accepted criteria for diagnosis or treatment of diastasis of the rectus abdominis muscle, which causes uncertainty for the patient and healthcare providers alike. Methods: The consensus document was created by a group of Swedish surgeons and based on a structured literature review and practical experience. Results: The proposed criteria for diagnosis and treatment of diastasis of the rectus abdominis muscle are as follows: (1) Diastasis diagnosed at clinical examination using a caliper or ruler for measurement. Diagnostic imaging by ultrasound or other imaging modality, should be performed when concurrent umbilical or epigastric hernia or other cause of the patients symptoms cannot be excluded. (2) Physiotherapy is the firsthand treatment for diastasis of the rectus abdominis muscle. Surgery should only be considered in diastasis of the rectus abdominis muscle patients with functional impairment, and not until the patient has undergone a standardized 6-month abdominal core training program. (3) The largest width of the diastasis should be at least 5 cm before surgical treatment is considered. In case of pronounced abdominal bulging or concomitant ventral hernia, surgery may be considered in patients with a smaller diastasis. (4) When surgery is undertaken, at least 2 years should have elapsed since last childbirth and future pregnancy should not be planned. (5) Plication of the linea alba is the firsthand surgical technique. Other techniques may be used but have not been found superior. Discussion: The level of evidence behind these statements varies, but they are intended to lay down a standard strategy for treatment of diastasis of the rectus abdominis muscle and to enable uniformity of management.

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  • 33.
    Chaireti, Roza
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Bystrom, Birgitta
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bremme, Katarina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Inflammatory and endothelial markers during the menstrual cycle2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 76, no 3, p. 190-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The menstrual cycle exhibits a pattern of repeated inflammatory activity. The present study aims to evaluate inflammatory and endothelial markers during the two phases of a menstrual cycle. Methods The study cohort consisted of 102 women with regular menstrual cycles. Inflammatory and endothelial markers (interleukin-6 [IL-6], pentraxin-3 [PTX-3], hs-C reactive protein [hs-CRP], sE-selectin, sP-selectin, intracellular and vascular cell adhesion molecules [ICAM-1 and VCAM-1] and cathepsins L, B and S) were measured during the early follicular and the late luteal phase of a normal menstrual cycle. Results Pentraxin-3 (PTX-3) and hs-CRP were significantly higher during the follicular phase compared to the luteal phase (p &lt; 0.001 respectively p = 0.025). The other inflammatory and endothelial markers, with the exception of cathepsin B, were higher, albeit not significantly, during the follicular phase. Conclusions Inflammatory activity, expressed mainly by members of the pentraxin family, is higher during the early follicular compared to the luteal phase. This could be associated to menstruation but the exact mechanisms behind this pattern are unclear and might involve the ovarian hormones or an effect on hepatocytes.

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  • 34.
    Chenna Narendra, Sudeep
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Prakash Chalise, Jaya
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Uppugunduri, Srinivas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Local but Not Systemic Administration of Uridine Prevents Development of Antigen-Induced Arthritis2015In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 10, p. e0141863-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Uridine has earlier been show to down modulate inflammation in models of lung inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of uridine in arthritis. Methods Arthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of mBSA in the knee of NMRI mice preimmunized with mBSA. Uridine was either administered locally by direct injection into the knee joint or systemically. Systemic treatment included repeated injections or implantation of a pellet continuously releasing uridine during the entire experimental procedure. Anti-mBSA specific immune responses were determined by ELISA and cell proliferation and serum cytokine levels were determined by Luminex. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify cells, study expression of cytokines and adhesion molecules in the joint. Results Local administration of 25-100 mg/kg uridine at the time of arthritis onset clearly prevented development of joint inflammation. In contrast, systemic administration of uridine (max 1.5 mg uridine per day) did not prevent development of arthritis. Protection against arthritis by local administration of uridine did not affect the anti-mBSA specific immune response and did not prevent the rise in serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines associated with the triggering of arthritis. In contrast, local uridine treatment efficiently inhibited synovial expression of ICAM-1 and CD18, local cytokine production and recruitment of leukocytes to the synovium. Conclusion Local, but not systemic administration of uridine efficiently prevented development of antigen- induced arthritis. The protective effect did not involve alteration of systemic immunity to mBSA but clearly involved inhibition of synovial expression of adhesion molecules, decreased TNF and IL-6 production and prevention of leukocyte extravasation. Further, uridine is a small, inexpensive molecule and may thus be a new therapeutic option to treat joint inflammation in RA.

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  • 35.
    Cibis, Merih
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Left Atrial 4D Blood Flow Dynamics and Hemostasis following Electrical Cardioversion of Atrial Fibrillation2017In: Frontiers in Physiology, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 8, article id 1052Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Electrical cardioversion in patients with atrial fibrillation is followed by a transiently impaired atrial mechanical function, termed atrial stunning. During atrial stunning, a retained risk of left atrial thrombus formation exists, which may be attributed to abnormal left atrial blood flow patterns. 4D Flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) enables blood flow assessment from the entire three-dimensional atrial volume throughout the cardiac cycle. We sought to investigate left atrial 4D blood flow patterns and hemostasis during left atrial stunning and after left atrial mechanical function was restored. Methods: 4D Flow and morphological CMR data as well as blood samples were collected in fourteen patients at two time-points: 2-3 h (Time-1) and 4 weeks (Time-2) following cardioversion. The volume of blood stasis and duration of blood stasis were calculated. In addition, hemostasis markers were analyzed. Results: From Time-1 to Time-2: Heart rate decreased (61 +/- 7 vs. 56 +/- 8 bpm, p = 0.01); Maximum change in left atrial volume increased (8 +/- 4 vs. 22 +/- 15%, p = 0.009); The duration of stasis (68 +/- 11 vs. 57 +/- 8%, p = 0.002) and the volume of stasis (14 +/- 9 vs. 9 +/- 7%, p = 0.04) decreased; Thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) decreased (5.2 +/- 3.3 vs. 3.3 +/- 2.2it.g/L, p = 0.008). A significant correlation was found between TAT and the volume of stasis (r(2) = 0.69, p amp;lt; 0.001) at Time-1 and between TAT and the duration of stasis (r(2) = 0.34, p = 0.04) at Time-2. Conclusion: In this longitudinal study, left atrial multidimensional blood flow was altered and blood stasis was elevated during left atrial stunning compared to the restored left atrial mechanical function. The coagulability of blood was also elevated during atrial stunning. The association between blood stasis and hypercoagulability proposes that assessment of left atrial 4D flow can add to the pathophysiological understanding of thrombus formation during atrial fibrillation related atrial stunning.

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  • 36.
    Claesson, Kjersti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Faxälv, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Counting the platelets: a robust and sensitive quantification method for thrombus formation2016In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, E-ISSN 2567-689X, Vol. 115, no 6, p. 1178-1190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flow chambers are common tools used for studying thrombus formation in vitro. However, the use of such devices is not standardised and there is a large diversity among the flow chamber systems currently used, and also in the methods used for quantifying the thrombus development. It was the study objective to evaluate a new method for analysis and quantification of platelet thrombus formation that can facilitate comparison of results between research groups. Whole blood was drawn over a collagen patch in commercial Ibid or in-house constructed PDMS flow chambers. Five percent of the platelets were fluorescently labelled and z-stack time-lapse images were captured during thrombus formation. Images were processed in a Python script in which the number of platelets and their respective x-, y- and z-positions were obtained. For comparison with existing methods the platelets were also labelled and quantified using fluorescence intensity and thrombus volume estimations by confocal microscopy. The presented method was found less sensitive to microscope and image adjustments and provides more details on thrombus development dynamics than the methods for measuring fluorescence intensity and thrombus volume estimation. The platelet count method produced comparable results with commercial and PDMS flow chambers, and could also obtain information regarding the stability of each detected platelet in the thrombus. In conclusion, quantification of thrombus formation by platelet count is a sensitive and robust method that enables measurement of platelet accumulation and platelet stability in an absolute scale that could be used for comparisons between research groups.

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  • 37.
    Connolly-Andersen, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Sundberg, Erik
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Baudin, Maria
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Johanna
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Dunne, Eimear
    Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Ireland.
    Kenny, Dermot
    Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Ireland.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Sofie
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Increased Thrombopoiesis and Platelet Activation in Hantavirus-Infected Patients2015In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0022-1899, E-ISSN 1537-6613, Vol. 212, no 7, p. 1061-1069Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Thrombocytopenia is a common finding during viral hemorrhagic fever, which includes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). The 2 main causes for thrombocytopenia are impaired thrombopoiesis and/or increased peripheral destruction of platelets. In addition, there is an increased intravascular coagulation risk during HFRS, which could be due to platelet activation. Methods. Thrombopoiesis was determined by quantification of platelet counts, thrombopoietin, immature platelet fraction, and mean platelet volume during HFRS. The in vivo platelet activation was determined by quantification of soluble P-selectin (sP-selectin) and glycoprotein VI (sGPVI). The function of circulating platelets was determined by ex vivo stimulation followed by flow cytometry analysis of platelet surface-bound fibrinogen and P-selectin exposure. Intravascular coagulation during disease was determined by scoring for disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and recording thromboembolic complications. Results. The levels of thrombopoietin, immature platelet fraction, and mean platelet volume all indicate increased thrombopoiesis during HFRS. Circulating platelets had reduced ex vivo function during disease compared to follow-up. Most interestingly, we observed significantly increased in vivo platelet activation in HFRS patients with intravascular coagulation (DIC and thromboembolic complications) as shown by sP-selectin and sGPVI levels. Conclusions. HFRS patients have increased thrombopoiesis and platelet activation, which contributes to intravascular coagulation.

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  • 38.
    Coskun, Abdurrahman
    et al.
    EFLM Task & Finish Grp Pract Approach Measurement, Italy; Acibadem Mehmet Ali Aydinlar Univ, Turkey.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. EFLM Task & Finish Grp Pract Approach Measurement, Italy.
    Oosterhuis, Wytze P.
    EFLM Task & Finish Grp Pract Approach Measurement, Italy; Reinier Haga Med Diagnost Ctr, Netherlands.
    Sandberg, Sverre
    EFLM Task & Finish Grp Pract Approach Measurement, Italy; Haraldsplass Diaconess Hosp, Norway; Univ Bergen, Norway.
    Measurement uncertainty for practical use2022In: Clinica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0009-8981, E-ISSN 1873-3492, Vol. 531, p. 352-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uncertainty is an inseparable part of all kinds of measurements performed in clinical laboratories. Accreditation standards including the ISO/IEC 17025:2017 and ISO 15189:2012 require that laboratories have routines for calculating the measurement uncertainty of reported results. Various guidelines such as CLSI EP29, Nordest 537, and ISO 20914:2019 have proposed methods for this purpose. However, due to the conceived complexity of the proposed calculation methods, these guidelines have not been generally and effectively applied in clinical laboratories. High workload and measurand heterogeneity favor a pragmatic utilitarian approach. The purpose of this paper is to describe such an approach, including its advantages and disadvantages. Measurement uncertainty should include the most influential factors affecting patients test results. Since patients samples for the same measurand can be analyzed in one laboratory or several laboratories using different measuring systems, the measurement uncertainty should be calculated using results obtained from analyzing the same internal quality control material if commutable or patients pooled/split samples.

  • 39.
    Davidson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindelof, Ann
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Wallen, Torbjorn
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Vastervik Hospital, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland.
    Point-of-care monitoring of warfarin treatment in community dwelling elderly - A randomised controlled study2015In: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, ISSN 1357-633X, E-ISSN 1758-1109, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 298-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to assess clinical effectiveness and costs of launching point-of-care monitoring of warfarin treatment in community dwelling frail elderly patients. A prospective multicentre controlled randomised study over 12 months comparing a point-of-care strategy with usual monitoring routines was carried out in primary healthcare centres and anticoagulation clinics in southeast Sweden. The subjects were community dwelling elderly across rural southeast Sweden on chronic warfarin treatment. Main outcome measures were time in therapeutic range (TTR), rate of treatment-related adverse events and costs. The study comprised 103 elderly people (61% women) mean age 86 yrs (range 75-98) treated with warfarin for median 9 yrs (range 1-18). Patients randomised to start point-of-care monitoring (n = 55) showed 75.9% in TTR before trial vs. 72.6% during trial (ns). The patients randomised to continue on usual monitoring routines (n = 48) showed 75.2% in TTR prior to trial vs. 72.9% during trial (ns). The point-of-care monitoring showed potential savings of SEK 624 per patient annually (based partly on effects that were not statistically significant). The study shows that point-of-care monitoring of warfarin treatment in community dwelling elderly in rural areas is as effective as usual monitoring routines and that it may offer savings to society.

  • 40.
    Davidson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Aldman, Ake
    Dept Surg, Sweden.
    Lennmarken, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Futurum, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Robot-assisted pelvic and renal surgery compared with laparoscopic or open surgery: Literature review of cost-effectiveness and clinical outcomes2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1457-4969, E-ISSN 1799-7267Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical experiences and cost-effectiveness by comparing robot-assisted surgery with laparoscopic- or open surgery for pelvic and renal operations. Methods: A narrative review was carried out. Results: When using robotic-assisted surgery, oncological and functional results are similar to after laparoscopic or open surgery. One exception may be a shorter survival in cancer of the cervix uteri. In addition, postoperative complications after robotic-assisted surgery are similar, bleeding and transfusion needs are less, and the hospital stay is shorter but the preparation of the operating theater before and after surgery and the operation times are longer. Finally, robot-assisted surgery has, in several studies, been reported to be not cost-effective primarily due to high investment costs. However, more recent studies provide improved cost-effectiveness estimates due to more effective preparation of the operating theater before surgery, improved surgeon experience, and decreased investment costs. Conclusions: Complications and functional and oncological outcomes after robot-assisted surgery are similar to open surgery and laparoscopic surgery. The cost-effectiveness of robot-assisted surgery is likely to equal or surpass the alternatives.

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  • 41.
    Deb, Suryyani
    et al.
    Maulana Abul Kazam Azad Univ Technol, India.
    Boknäs, Niklas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry.
    Sjöström, Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Tharmakulanathan, Anjana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Lotfi, Kourosh
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Varying effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on platelet function-A need for individualized CML treatment to minimize the risk for hemostatic and thrombotic complications?2020In: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 313-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since their introduction, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, eg, imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib, bosutinib, ponatinib) have revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, long-term treatment with TKIs is associated with serious adverse events including both bleeding and thromboembolism. Experimental studies have shown that TKIs can cause platelet dysfunction. Herein, we present the first side-by-side investigation comparing the effects of currently used TKIs on platelet function and thrombin generation when used in clinically relevant concentrations. A flow cytometry multiparameter protocol was used to study a range of significant platelet activation events (fibrinogen receptor activation, alpha granule, and lysosomal exocytosis, procoagulant membrane exposure, and mitochondrial permeability changes). In addition, thrombin generation was measured in the presence of TKIs to assess the effects on global hemostasis. Results show that dasatinib generally inhibited platelet function, while bosutinib, nilotinib, and ponatinib showed less consistent effects. In addition to these general trends for each TKI, we observed a large degree of interindividual variability in the effects of the different TKIs. Interindividual variation was also observed when blood from CML patients was studied ex vivo with whole blood platelet aggregometry, free oscillation rheometry (FOR), and flow cytometry. Based on the donor responses in the side-by-side TKI study, a TKI sensitivity map was developed. We propose that such a sensitivity map could potentially become a valuable tool to help in decision-making regarding the choice of suitable TKIs for a CML patient with a history of bleeding or atherothrombotic disease.

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  • 42.
    Diallo, Idrissa
    et al.
    CHU Quebec, Canada; Univ Laval, Canada.
    Benmoussa, Abderrahim
    CHU Quebec, Canada; Univ Laval, Canada.
    Laugier, Jonathan
    CHU Quebec, Canada; Univ Laval, Canada.
    Osman, Abdimajid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hitzler, Walter E.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Germany.
    Provost, Patrick
    CHU Quebec, Canada; Univ Laval, Canada.
    Platelet Pathogen Reduction Technologies Alter the MicroRNA Profile of Platelet-Derived Microparticles2020In: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine, E-ISSN 2297-055X, Vol. 7, article id 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite improvements in donor screening and increasing efforts to avoid contamination and the spread of pathogens in clinical platelet concentrates (PCs), the risks of transfusion-transmitted infections remain important. Relying on an ultraviolet photo activation system, pathogen reduction technologies (PRTs), such as Intercept and Mirasol, utilize amotosalen, and riboflavin (vitamin B2), respectively, to mediate inactivation of pathogen nucleic acids. Although they are expected to increase the safety and prolong the shelf life of clinical PCs, these PRTs might affect the quality and function of platelets, as recently reported. Upon activation, platelets release microparticles (MPs), which are involved in intercellular communications and regulation of gene expression, thereby mediating critical cellular functions. Here, we have used small RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) to document the effect of PRT treatment on the microRNA profiles of platelets and derived MPs. PRT treatment did not affect the microRNA profile of platelets. However, we observed a specific loading of certain microRNAs into platelet MPs, which was impaired by treatment with Intercept or its Additive solution (SSP+). Whereas, Intercept had an impact on the microRNA profile of platelet-derived MPs, Mirasol did not impact the microRNA profile of platelets and derived MPs, compared to non-treated control. Considering that platelet MPs are able to transfer their microRNA content to recipient cells, and that this content may exert biological activities, those findings suggest that PRT treatment of clinical PCs may modify the bioactivity of the platelets and MPs to be transfused and argue for further investigations into PRT-induced changes in clinical PC content and function.

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  • 43.
    Dock, Hua
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    DNA Methylation Inhibitor Zebularine Confers Stroke Protection in Ischemic Rats2015In: TRANSLATIONAL STROKE RESEARCH, ISSN 1868-4483, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 296-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    5-Aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) confers neuroprotection in ischemic mice by inhibiting DNA methylation. Zebularine is another DNA methylation inhibitor, less toxic and more stable in aqueous solutions and, therefore more biologically suitable. We investigated Zebularines effects on brain ischemia in a rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) model in order to elucidate its therapeutic potential. Male Wistar wild-type (WT) rats were randomly allocated to three treatment groups, vehicle, Zebularine 100 mu g, and Zebularine 500 mu g. Saline (10 mu L) or Zebularine (10 mu L) was administered intracerebroventricularly 20 min before 45-min occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. Reperfusion was allowed after 45-min occlusion, and the rats were sacrificed at 24-h reperfusion. The brains were removed, sliced, and stained with 2 % 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) before measuring infarct size. Zebularine (500 mu g) reduced infarct volumes significantly (p less than 0.05) by 61 % from 20.7 +/- 4.2 % in the vehicle treated to 8.1 +/- 1.6 % in the Zebularine treated. Zebularine (100 mu g) also reduced infarct volumes dramatically by 55 to 9.4 +/- 1.2 %. The mechanisms behind this neuroprotection is not yet known, but the results agree with previous studies and support the notion that Zebularine-induced inhibition of DNA methyltransferase ameliorates ischemic brain injury in rats.

  • 44.
    Edvardsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång.
    Sund-Levander, Märtha
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Rättsmedicinalverket, Linköping, Sweden.
    Clinical use of conventional reference intervals in the frail elderly2015In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 229-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale, aims and objectives

    Reference intervals provided by the laboratory are commonly established by measuring samples from apparently healthy subjects in the ages 18–65 years, excluding elderly individuals with chronic diseases and medication. The aim of our study was to establish whether current reference intervals for immune parameters and chemical biomarkers are valid for older individuals including those with chronic diseases, so-called frail elderly.

    Methods

    Data from our cohort of 138 non-infected nursing home residents (NHR), mean age 86.8 years, range 80–98, were compared with raw data, as basis for the development of reference intervals, obtained from reference populations, like blood donors (IgA, IgG, IgM, C3 and C4) and from the Nordic Reference Interval Project (NORIP) (alanine aminotransferase, albumin, aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine, gamma-glutamyl transferase, lactate dehydrogenase, phosphate, sodium and urea). Immune parameters were measured by nephelometry and in NORIP the measurements were performed by means of different routine methods, in more than 100 laboratories.

    Results

    Only nine individuals (7%) of NHR were found to be free from chronic disease. C3, C4 (P < 0.001) and IgG levels (P < 0.05) were higher, while IgM levels (P < 0.001) were lower in NHR compared with reference blood donors. Levels of alanine aminotransferase, phosphate (P < 0.001), albumin (P < 0.05) and sodium (P < 0.01) were lower while creatinine and urea levels were higher (P < 0.001) in NHR compared with NORIP subjects.

    Conclusion

    Comparing laboratory results from elderly people with conventional reference intervals can be misleading or even dangerous, as normal conditions may appear pathological, or vice versa and thus lead to unnecessary or even harmful treatment.

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  • 45.
    Ekman, Bertil
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Wahlberg Topp, Jeanette
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Landberg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Urine oligosaccharide pattern in patients with hyperprolactinaemia2015In: Glycoconjugate Journal, ISSN 0282-0080, E-ISSN 1573-4986, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 635-641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Free milk-type oligosaccharides are produced during pregnancy and lactation and may have an impact on several cells in the immune system. Our aim was to investigate if patients with isolated hyperprolactinaemia, not related to pregnancy, also have increased synthesis and urinary excretion of milk-type oligosaccharides and to compare the excretion pattern with that found during pregnancy. Urine samples were collected as morning sample from 18 patients with hyperprolactinaemia, 13 healthy controls with normal prolactin levels and four pregnant women. After purification, lactose and free oligosaccharides were analysed and quantified by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. The identity of peaks was confirmed by exoglycosidase treatment and comparison with oligosaccharide standards. Prolactin was measured in serum collected between 09 and 11 a.m. by a standardized immunochemical method. Patients with hyperprolactinaemia had higher urinary excretion of lactose than normoprolactinemic controls and urinary lactose correlated positively to prolactin levels (r = 0.51, p less than 0.05). Increased levels of the fucosylated oligosaccharides 2-fucosyl lactose and lacto-di-fucotetraose were found in urine from three and two patients, respectively. The acidic oligosaccharide 3-sialyl lactose was found in high amount in urine from two patients with prolactin of greater than 10,000 mU/l. However, pregnant women in their third trimester had the highest concentration of all these oligosaccharides and excretion increased during pregnancy. This study is first to show that both lactose and certain fucosylated and sialylated milk-type oligosaccharides are increased in some patients with hyperprolactinaemia. It remains to elucidate the functional importance of these findings.

  • 46.
    Ernersson, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bachrack Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Landberg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ekman, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Wahlberg, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Reduced Health Related Quality of Life, Increased Fatigue, and Daytime Sleepiness in Women with Hyperprolactinemia2023In: Hormone and Metabolic Research, ISSN 0018-5043, E-ISSN 1439-4286, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 266-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prolactin has many physiological effects and seems to be involved in the human quality of life and well- being. The aim of this study was to describe health related quality of life, fatigue and daytime sleepiness in women with untreated hyperprolactinemia. In total 32 women (mean age 37.0 +/- 10.9 years) with verified hyperprolactinemia completed a questionnaire including questions on fatigue, measured with the Swedish version of the Fatigue Impact Scale ( FIS), propensity to fall in sleep, measured with the Swedish version of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and Health related quality of life (HRQoL), measured by the Short-Form- 36 scale ( SF-36). For comparison Swe-dish normative data were used. The women were also interviewed regarding different symptoms related to hyperprolactinemia and the answers were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. HRQoL, as measured with SF-36, was significantly lower in all dimensions, except in physical function, compared to the Swedish reference population. Total FIS was 54.3 (41.1) and mean score on the ESS was 8.7 (4.2) indicating increased fatigue and deterioration in night sleep. The women felt very tired, and several of them rarely felt rested in the morning. The restless night sleep and the fatigue during the daytime got them to feel feeble and sometimes to find it difficult to concentrate, which affected both their mood and life in general. Women diagnosed with hyperprolactinemia reported deterioration in night sleep, increased rate of fatigue, and a reduced health related quality of life in comparison with the reference population.

  • 47.
    Ewerman, Lea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Landberg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hellberg, Sandra
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hovland, Mina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sundin, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekman, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Wahlberg, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Immunomodulating Effects Depend on Prolactin Levels in Patients with Hyperprolactinemia2020In: Hormone and Metabolic Research, ISSN 0018-5043, E-ISSN 1439-4286, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 228-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prolactin is known to have immune modulatory effects acting through the prolactin receptor, which is present on a variety of immune cells. Certain chemokines contribute to form the type of T helper (Th) preponderance in the immune response. The objective of this work was to assess if hyperprolactinemia not related to pregnancy is associated with changes in circulating levels of chemokines and other immunological markers. In this cross sectional study, 35 patients with hyperprolactinemia (5 men), and 102 healthy blood donors (19 men) were included. Serum levels of Th1- Th2- and Th17-associated chemokines, C-reactive protein, immunoglobulins, and the B cell attracting chemokine CXCL13 were assessed. The hyperprolactinemic group had significantly higher levels of Th2 associated CCL22 (p=0.022), Th17 associated CXCL1 (p=0.001), B cell attracting CXCL13 (p=0.003), and C-reactive protein (p&lt;0.001) compared to controls, and these proteins were also positively correlated with prolactin levels. While differences in CCL22, CXCL1, CXCL13, and C-reactive protein were present in patients with low or moderate hyperprolactinemia, no differences were observed at high (&gt;3600 mU/l) prolactin levels. To evaluate a possible dose-associated response to prolactin, an in vitro model was used, showing prolactin-induced increase in T-helper cell activation at moderate levels, while activation decreased at higher levels. Hyperprolactinemia seems to have several immunomodulatory effects and was associated with increased levels of chemokines associated with Th2 and Th17 responses and B cell attraction. However, patients with greatly increased prolactin had normal levels of chemokines, and in vitro, high levels of prolactin decreased T-helper cell activation.

  • 48.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Valla.
    Jones, Mike
    Macquarie Univ, Australia.
    Stomby, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ekholmen.
    Olsen Faresjö, Åshild
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Elevated levels of cortisol in hair precede acute myocardial infarction2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 22456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Long term stress exposure is typical for modern societies and might trigger different diseases. This case-control study reveals that persons who had suffered an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) had elevated cortisol concentrations in the month before the acute event. Middle-aged patients admitted to cardiology clinics with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (n=174) were compared to 3156 controls from a population-based cohort in southeast Sweden. The median Hair Cortisol Concentrations (HCC) for those who had suffered an AMI was 53.2 pg/mg compared to 22.2 pg/mg for the control group (p&lt;0.001). In bivariate analysis, higher levels of HCC were strongly (OR=5.69) and statistically significantly associated with current AMI status. The discrimination of cases with AMI from controls remained statistically significant (OR=5.04) even after controlling for established cardiovascular risk factors in a multivariate analysis. Middle-aged persons with acute myocardial infarction had significantly elevated cortisol levels during the month before the cardiac event. This was evident for both men and women. The biomarker cortisol concentration was independently and statistically significantly related to AMI. Chronic stress seems to be a new promising risk factor for AMI.

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  • 49.
    Faresjö, Åshild
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jullander, Miriam
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Götmalm, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Higher perceived stress and poorer health reflected in elevated cortisol concentrtions measured in extracts of hair from middle-aged healthy women2014In: BMC Psychology, ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 2, no 30, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The prevalence of mental strain and stress has increased in modern societies, resulting in increased public health problems. Stress can be measured either by biomarkers or by self-reports. A new biomarker that measures long-term biological stress is cortisol measured in timed hair extracts. Hair grows at approximately 1 cm per month, and retrospectively reflects average stress levels. However, the plausible relationship between perceived stress and self-reported health and this novel biomarker is yet not firmly established. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible relationship between perceived stress, self-reported health, and cortisol in hair extracts in healthy middle-aged women from two different occupations.

    Method

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in 112 middle-aged women working as nurses or librarians in a county in southeast Sweden. The women were invited to fill in a questionnaire covering stress, health, and life situation. The questionnaire included questions on health and disease symptoms, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale. A piece of hair was cut from the vertex posterior area of the head an analysed by a competitive radioimmunoassay method.

    Results

    Middle-aged women who reported high perceived stress (p = 0.031) or lower health (p = 0.029), or had signs of depressiveness (p = 0.016) had significantly higher cortisol concentrations adjusted for age. There were no significant differences in cortisol in hair concentrations or perceived stress between nurses and librarians. Two women with extremely high cortisol concentrations were considered as outliers, but during the interview at follow-up they reported experiences of serious life events in their work or social life during the retrospective time of the sample taken for cortisol measurement.

    Conclusions

    Higher cortisol concentrations measured in the hair of healthy and working middle-aged women were associated with higher perceived stress and generally poorer health and with depressiveness. These findings lend support to the general applicability of cortisol measured in hair extracts as a biomarker in population-based epidemiological studies.

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    fulltext
  • 50.
    Faxälv, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Boknäs, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ström, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Putting polyphosphates to the test: evidence against platelet-induced activation of factor XII2013In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 122, no 23, p. 3818-3824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent claim that stimulated platelets activate the intrinsic pathway of coagulation by the release of polyphosphates has been considered a breakthrough in hemostasis research. In little more than 3 years, the original publication by Muller et al has been cited greater than100 times. However, none of the citing articles has sought to independently validate this potentially paradigm-shifting concept. To this end, we performed extensive experimentation in vitro and in vivo in an attempt to verify the claim that factor XII (FXII) is primarily activated by stimulated platelets. In contrast to the original assertion, platelet-derived polyphosphates were found to be weak activators of FXII, with a FXIIa-generating activity of less than10% compared with equivalent concentrations of kaolin. Using different coagulation assays, it was shown that platelet contribution to whole blood coagulation was unrelated to the generation of activated FXII in vitro. Additionally, key results used to verify the hypothesis in the original study in vivo were found to be irreproducible. We conclude that platelet-derived polyphosphates are not physiologically relevant activators of FXII.

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