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  • 1.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Mobäck, Caroline
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Jakobsson, Sandra
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Germany.
    Hoffmann, Johannes J. M. L.
    Abbott GmbH and Co KG, Germany.
    Iron depletion in blood donors - Have extended erythrocyte and reticulocyte parameters diagnostic utility?2015In: Transfusion and apheresis science, ISSN 1473-0502, E-ISSN 1878-1683, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 76-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Blood donation is associated with iron depletion, but donor iron status is not usually investigated, as such tests are cumbersome and costly. It would therefore be desirable to have simple, fast and inexpensive tests that give information on a donors risk of developing iron depletion. In a pilot study we investigated whether novel erythrocyte and reticulocyte parameters can serve this goal. Methods: In regular blood donors extended red cell parameters were measured using the Abbott CELL-DYN Sapphire hematology analyzer and conventional biochemical tests of iron status. Donors were compared with a regionally matched group of non-donating controls. Results: In the controls, the reference ranges of extended RBC parameters were well comparable to published data. Donors had significantly more microcytic RBC than controls (median 0.9 vs 0.6%), lower serum ferritin concentration (median 43 vs 91 mg/L) and higher soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index (median 1.60 vs 1.27). Overall 18-28% of the donors were iron depleted. Moreover, 3.3% of donors had iron-restricted erythropoiesis. Microcytic RBC and reticulocyte mean cell hemoglobin content predicted iron depletion with 70% and 64% sensitivities and specificities of 72% and 78%, respectively. When combined these two parameters increased the sensitivity to 82%. Conclusions: Our results in Swedish blood donors confirm a high prevalence of iron depletion, despite iron supplementation used by about half of the donors. Microcytic RBC and MCHr appeared to be helpful in identifying iron-depleted donors, who might benefit from iron supplementation. We recommend larger prospective investigations in order to confirm and extend the findings of this pilot study. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway; Hedmark University of Coll, Norway.
    Svensson, Erland
    Swedish Def Research Agency, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Levels of sP-selectin and hs-CRP Decrease with Dietary Intervention with Selenium and Coenzyme Q10 Combined: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 9, p. e0137680-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Objectives Inflammation and oxidative stress are central in many disease states. The major anti-oxidative enzymes contain selenium. The selenium intake in Europe is low, and supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q(10) , important anti-oxidants, was evaluated in a previous study. The aim of this study was to evaluate response on the inflammatory biomarkers C-reactive protein, and sP-selectin, and their possible impact on cardiovascular mortality. Subjects/Methods 437 elderly individuals were included in the study. Clinical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography and blood samples were drawn. The intervention time was 48 months, and median follow-up was 5.2 years. The effects on inflammation/atherosclerosis were evaluated through analyses of CRP and sP-selectin. Evaluations of the effect of the intervention was performed using repeated measures of variance. All mortality was registered, and endpoints of mortality were assessed by Kaplan-Meier plots. Results The placebo group showed a CRP level of 4.8 ng/mL at the start, and 5.1 ng/mL at the study end. The active supplementation group showed a CRP level of 4.1 ng/mL at the start, and 2.1 ng/mL at the study end. SP-selectin exhibited a level of 56.6mg/mL at the start in the placebo group and 72.3 mg/mL at the study end, and in the active group the corresponding figures were 55.9 mg/mL and 58.0 mg/mL. A significantly smaller increase was demonstrated through repeated measurements of the two biomarkers in those on active supplementation. Active supplementation showed an effect on the CRP and sP-selectin levels, irrespective of the biomarker levels. Reduced cardiovascular mortality was demonstrated in both those with high and low levels of CRP and sP-selectin in the active supplementation group. Conclusion CRP and sP-selectin showed significant changes reflecting effects on inflammation and atherosclerosis in those given selenium and coenzyme Q(10) combined. A reduced cardiovascular mortality could be demonstrated in the active group, irrespective of biomarker level. This result should be regarded as hypothesis-generating, and it is hoped it will stimulate more research in the area.

  • 3.
    Ali Abdi, Abshir
    et al.
    East Africa University, Somalia.
    Osman, Abdimajid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Prevalence of common hereditary risk factors for thrombophilia in Somalia and identification of a novel Gln544Arg mutation in coagulation factor V2017In: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis, ISSN 0929-5305, E-ISSN 1573-742X, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 536-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thrombophilia, commonly manifested as venous thromboembolism (VTE), is a worldwide concern but little is known on its genetic epidemiology in many parts of the globe particularly in the developing countries. Here we employed TaqMan genotyping and pyrosequencing to evaluate the prevalence of known common nucleotide polymorphisms associated with thrombophilia in a Somali population in the Puntland region of Somalia. We also employed next generation sequencing (NGS) to investigate other genetic variants in a Somali patient with deep venous thrombosis (DVT). As expected, we found no existence of factor V Leiden (rs6025) and prothrombin G20210A (rs1799963) in the Somali population. The G allele of ABO [261G/delG] polymorphism (rs8176719) was found at a frequency of 29%, similar to that observed in other African populations. We found the lowest so far reported frequency of MTHFR C677T (rs1801133) polymorphism in the Somali population (T allele frequency 1.5%). A novel and deleterious single nucleotide variation in exon 11 of coagulation factor V (c.1631A amp;gt; G) causing Gln544Arg exchange in factor V was identified in a 29 years old Somali female with DVT. The same patient was heterozygous to VKORC1 Asp36Tyr polymorphism (rs61742245) that predisposes to warfarin resistance. In conclusion, this study shows that common hereditary factors for thromboembolism found in Caucasians are either less frequent or absent in the Somali population-similar to the situation in other Africans. NGS is possibly a better choice to detect genetic risk variants for thrombosis in this ethnic group.

  • 4.
    Andelin, M.
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden..
    Kropff, J.
    Department of Endocrinology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Matuleviciene, V.
    Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Joseph, J.I.
    Department of Anaesthesiology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA..
    Attvall, S.
    Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hirsch, I.B.
    University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
    Imberg, H.
    Statistiska Konsultgruppen, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Dahlqvist, S.
    Department of Medicine, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Klonoff, D.
    Diabetes Research Institute, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, San Mateo, CA, USA..
    Haraldsson, B.
    Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    DeVries, J.H.
    Department of Endocrinology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Lind, M.
    Department of Medicine, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden lind.marcus@telia.com..
    Assessing the Accuracy of Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) Calibrated With Capillary Values Using Capillary or Venous Glucose Levels as a Reference.2016In: Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, E-ISSN 1932-2968, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 876-884Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Using the standard venous reference for the evaluation of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems could possibly negatively affect measured CGM accuracy since CGM are generally calibrated with capillary glucose and venous and capillary glucose concentrations differ. We therefore aimed to quantify the effect of using capillary versus venous glucose reference samples on estimated accuracy in capillary calibrated CGM.less thanbr /greater thanMethods: We evaluated 41 individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) using the Dexcom G4 CGM system over 6 days. Patients calibrated their CGM devices with capillary glucose by means of the HemoCue system. During 2 visits, capillary and venous samples were simultaneously measured by HemoCue and compared to concomitantly obtained CGM readings. The mean absolute relative difference (MARD) was calculated using capillary and venous reference samples.less thanbr /greater thanResults: Venous glucose values were 0.83 mmol/L (15.0 mg/dl) lower than capillary values over all glycemic ranges, P less than .0001. Below 4 mmol/l (72 mg/dl), the difference was 1.25 mmol/l (22.5 mg/dl), P = .0001, at 4-10 mmol/l (72-180 mg/dl), 0.67 mmol/l (12.0 mg/dl), P less than .0001 and above 10 mmol/l (180 mg/dl), 0.95 mmol/l (17.1 mg/dl), P less than .0001. MARD was 11.7% using capillary values as reference compared to 13.7% using venous samples, P = .037. Below 4 mmol/l (72 mg/dl) MARD was 16.6% and 31.8%, P = .048, at 4-10 mmol/l (72-180 mg/dl) 12.1% and 12.6%, P = .32, above 10 mmol/l (180 mg/dl) 8.7% and 9.2%, P = .82.less thanbr /greater thanConclusion: Using capillary glucose concentrations as reference to evaluate the accuracy of CGM calibrated with capillary samples is associated with a lower MARD than using venous glucose as the reference. Capillary glucose concentrations were significantly higher than venous in all glycemic ranges.less thanbr /greater than (© 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.)

  • 5.
    Andersson, B.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Swolin-Eide, D.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kristroem, B.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Gelander, L.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Angered Hospital, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Albertsson-Wikland, K.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Seasonal variations in vitamin D in relation to growth in short prepubertal children before and during first year growth hormone treatment2015In: Journal of Endocrinological Investigation, ISSN 0391-4097, E-ISSN 1720-8386, Vol. 38, no 12, p. 1309-1317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose This study investigated the relationship between seasonal variations in 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) levels and growth in prepubertal children during both the pretreatment year and the first year of GH treatment. Methods The study included 249 short prepubertal children with a broad range of GH secretion, GH(max) during a 24 h profile median 23; range 1-127 mU/L, 191 boys (mean age +/- SD, 8.6 +/- 2.6 years), 58 girls (7.5 +/- 1.9 years) receiving GH treatment (mean 43 mu g/kg/day; range 17-99 mu g/kg/day). Serum 25(OH) D was measured using an automated IDS-iSYS immunoassay. Results 25(OH) D levels showed seasonal variation, and decreased significantly during GH treatment. 25(OH) D levels at start and first year reduction in 25(OH) D, correlated (-) with the first year growth response during treatment. The degree of GH secretion capacity within our study population of mainly non-GH deficient children and 25(OH) D sufficient (67 +/- 29 nmol/L) had no influence on 25(OH) D levels. Growth during GH treatment were independent of seasonal variations in 25(OH) D. Multiple regression analysis showed that 25(OH) D levels at treatment start, together with auxological data and IGF-binding protein-3(SDS), explained 61 % of the variation in first year gain in height(SDS). Conclusion 25(OH) D levels were associated with first year growth response to GH and may be a useful contribution to future growth prediction models.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Bjorn
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Swolin-Eide, Diana
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Short-term changes in bone formation markers following growth hormone (GH) treatment in short prepubertal children with a broad range of GH secretion2015In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 82, no 1, p. 91-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesGrowth hormone (GH) promotes longitudinal growth and bone modelling/remodelling. This study investigated the relationship between levels of bone formation markers and growth during GH treatment in prepubertal children with widely ranging GH secretion levels. MethodsThe study group comprised 113 short prepubertal children (mean ageSD, 937213years; 99 boys) on GH treatment (330 +/- 006g/kg/day) for 1year. Blood samples were taken at baseline and 1 and 2weeks, 1 and 3months, and 1year after treatment start. Intact amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PINP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP) and osteocalcin were measured using an automated IDS-iSYS immunoassay system. ResultsIntact amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PINP), BALP and osteocalcin, increased in the short-term during GH treatment. PINP after 1week (P=000077), and BALP and osteocalcin after 1month (Pless than00001 and P=00043, respectively). PINP levels at 1 and 3months correlated positively, and osteocalcin levels at 1week and percentage change after 1month correlated negatively, with first year growth response. No significant correlations were found between BALP and first year growth. Multiple regression analysis showed that bone marker levels together with auxological data and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 explained the variation in first year growth response to 36% at start, 32% after 2weeks and 48% at 3months. ConclusionShort-term increases in levels of the bone formation markers PINP, BALP and osteocalcin showed different temporal patterns, but all correlated with first year growth response during GH treatment. These markers may be a useful addition to existing prediction models for growth response.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Björn
    et al.
    Institution of Clinical Sciences/Pediatrics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Swolin-Eide, Diana
    Göteborg Pediatric Growth Research Center (GP-GRC), Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin
    Department of Physiology/Division of Endocrinology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Vitamin D status in children over three decades – do children get enough vitamin D?2016In: Bone Reports, ISSN 2352-1872, Vol. 5, p. 150-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vitamin D is a key player in the endocrine regulation of calcium and phosphate metabolism and plays a pivotal role in the acquisition of bone mass during childhood. This study investigated long-term data of vitamin D levels in children and adolescents between 1 and 18 years of age. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) was analyzed between 1982 and 2013 in 2048 Swedish Caucasian children (mean age ± SD, 8.59 ± 3.68 years; 1197 boys). Overall, 704 (34%) children had below recommended levels of 50 nmol/L; however, only 63 (3%) had levels below 25 nmol/L, i.e., vitamin D deficiency. No trend for decreased vitamin D levels over time was found in this population, with median 25(OH)D levels of 58.4 nmol/L, minimum–maximum 5.0–159.3 nmol/L. Younger children, independent of gender, had significantly higher levels 25(OH)D.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Christoffer R.
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ström, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Örebro University, Sweden.
    Comparisons between commercial salivary testosterone enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 77, no 8, p. 582-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Measuring testosterone concentrations is of interest both in clinical situations and for research, the latter expanding rapidly during recent years. An increased demand for convenient methods has prompted a number of companies to develop enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits to measure testosterone concentrations in saliva. However, the inter-comparability of kits from different manufacturers have yet to be determined. Aim of study: The aim of this study was to compare commercially available ELISA kits from four different manufacturers (Salimetrics, IBL, DRG and Demeditec). Methods: Saliva was collected from 50 participants (25 men and 25 women). Each sample was analysed by the four ELISA kits. Results: The correlations between the ELISA kits from Demeditec, DRG and Salimetrics were moderate to high with r-values amp;gt;.77; however, proportional errors between the methods calls for caution. The ELISA kit from IBL malfunctioned and no results from this kit was obtained. Conclusions: Results from studies using the ELISA kits from Demeditec, DRG and Salimetrics are generally comparable; however, translation using the formulae presented in the current study could increase the accuracy of these comparisons.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Internal Medicine, County Council of Jönköping, Jönköping.
    Landberg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Norrköping, Sweden.
    Consequences of high-sensitivity troponin T testing applied in a primary care population with chest pain compared with a commercially available point-of-care troponin T analysis: an observational prospective study2015In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:There is a demand for a highly sensitive and specific point-of care test to detect acute myocardial infarction (AMI). It is unclear if a high-sensitivity troponin assay will have enough discriminative power to become a decision support in primary care. The aim of this study was to evaluate a high-sensitivity troponin T assay performed in three primary health care centres in southeast Sweden and to compare the outcome with a point-of-care troponin T test.METHODS:This study included 115 patients who consulted their general practitioner for chest pain, dyspnoea on exertion, unexplained weakness and/or fatigue in the last 7days. Troponin T was analysed by a point-of-care test and a high-sensitivity method together with N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and creatinine. All patients were checked for AMI or unstable angina (UA) within 30days of study enrolment. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was carried out to examine possible connections between troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L, clinical variables and laboratory findings at baseline. In addition, 21 patients with troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L and no signs of AMI or UA were followed up for 2-3years.RESULTS:Three patients were diagnosed with AMI and three with UA. At the [greater than or equal to]15ng/L cut-off, the troponin T method had 100% sensitivity, 75% specificity for AMI and a positive predictive value of 10%. The troponin T point-of-care test missed one case of AMI and the detection limit was 50ng/L. Troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L was correlated to age [greater than or equal to]65years (odds ratio (OR), 10.9 95% CI 2.28-51.8) and NT-proBNP in accordance with heart failure (OR 8.62 95% CI 1.61-46.1). Fourteen of the 21 patients, without signs of AMI or UA at baseline, still had increased troponin T at follow-up after 2-3years.CONCLUSIONS:A high-sensitivity troponin T assay could become useful in primary care as a point-of-care test for patients <65years. For patients older than 65-70years, a higher decision limit than [greater than or equal to]15ng/L should be considered and used in conjunction with clinical parameters and possibly with NT-proBNP.

  • 10.
    Appelros, Peter
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Hals Berglund, Maria
    University Hospital Norrland, Sweden.
    Ström, Jakob O.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Long-Term Risk of Stroke after Transient Ischemic Attack2017In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, ISSN 1015-9770, E-ISSN 1421-9786, Vol. 43, no 1-2, p. 25-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the absence of active management, the stroke risk after a transient ischemic attack (TIA) may be high. Almost 10 years ago, the results of the EXPRESS and SOS-TIA studies called for a more rapid management of TIA patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the other stroke risks in the longer term, after the implementation of a more active approach to TIA. We also wanted to assess the predictive value of the ABCD2 score in this context. Methods: Riksstroke is the national stroke registry in Sweden. Data from Riksstrokes TIA module, and the national cause-of-death register, for the years 2011 and 2012 were used in this study. Stroke occurrence was monitored via Riksstroke. Coxs regression was used for risk evaluation. The predictive value of the ABCD2 score was assessed by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve. Results: A total of 15,068 TIA episodes occurred in 14,102 patients. The follow-up time varied between 0 and 819 days, with an average of 417 days. The mortality for all TIA patients during the follow-up time was 7.1%. Of the unique patients, 545 had one or more strokes (3.9%), corresponding to 34 events per 1,000 person years. Significant risk factors for stroke were: age, previous TIA, atrial fibrillation (AF), oral anticoagulant (OAC) treatment, hypertension treatment, and the ABCD2 items speech impairment, unilateral weakness, and diabetes mellitus. The ABCD2 score correlated with a subsequent stroke, but its predictive value was low. Conclusion: The risk of stroke is low after the acute phase of a TIA, probably lower than in previous studies. This may be due to better secondary prevention in recent years. Several risk factors predict stroke, notably hypertensive treatment, which may be inadequate; and AF, where OACs may be under-used. It is difficult to identify the role of the ABCD2 score in clinical practice. (C) 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 11.
    Barde, Swapnali
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ruegg, Joelle
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Centre Molecular Med, Sweden; Swedish Toxicol Science Research Centre Swetox, Sweden.
    Prudhomme, Jose
    Douglas Mental Health University of Institute, Canada.
    Ekström, Tomas J.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Centre Molecular Med, Sweden.
    Palkovits, Miklos
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Turecki, Gustavo
    Douglas Mental Health University of Institute, Canada; McGill University, Canada.
    Bagdy, Gyorgy
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Ihnatko, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Juhasz, Gabriella
    Semmelweis University, Hungary; University of Manchester, England.
    Diaz-Heijtz, Rochellys
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Mechawar, Naguib
    Douglas Mental Health University of Institute, Canada; McGill University, Canada.
    Hokfelt, Tomas G. M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Alterations in the neuropeptide galanin system in major depressive disorder involve levels of transcripts, methylation, and peptide2016In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ISSN 0027-8424, Vol. 113, no 52, p. E8472-E8481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a substantial burden to patients, families, and society, but many patients cannot be treated adequately. Rodent experiments suggest that the neuropeptide galanin (GAL) and its three G protein-coupled receptors, GAL(1-3), are involved in mood regulation. To explore the translational potential of these results, we assessed the transcript levels (by quantitative PCR), DNA methylation status (by bisulfite pyrosequencing), and GAL peptide by RIA of the GAL system in postmortem brains from depressed persons who had committed suicide and controls. Transcripts for all four members were detected and showed marked regional variations, GAL and galanin receptor 1 (GALR1) being most abundant. Striking increases in GAL and GALR3 mRNA levels, especially in the noradrenergic locus coeruleus and the dorsal raphe nucleus, in parallel with decreased DNA methylation, were found in both male and female suicide subjects as compared with controls. In contrast, GAL and GALR3 transcript levels were decreased, GALR1 was increased, and DNA methylation was increased in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of male suicide subjects, however, there were no changes in the anterior cingulate cortex. Thus, GAL and its receptor GALR3 are differentially methylated and expressed in brains of MDD subjects in a region- and sex-specific manner. Such an epigenetic modification in GALR3, a hyperpolarizing receptor, might contribute to the dysregulation of noradrenergic and serotonergic neurons implicated in the pathogenesis of MDD. Thus, one may speculate that a GAL(3) antagonist could have antidepressant properties by disinhibiting the firing of these neurons, resulting in increased release of noradrenaline and serotonin in forebrain areas involved in mood regulation.

  • 12.
    Bukmann Larsen, Pia
    et al.
    Slagelse Hospital, Denmark.
    Storjord, Elin
    Nordland Hospital, Norway; UiT, Norway.
    Bakke, Asne
    Stavanger University Hospital, Norway.
    Bukve, Tone
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway.
    Christensen, Mikael
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Eikeland, Joakim
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Engeland Haugen, Vegar
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Husby, Kristin
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway.
    McGrail, Rie
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Meier Mikaelsen, Solveig
    Sykehuset Innlandet, Norway.
    Monsen, Grete
    Noklus, Norway.
    Fogh Moller, Mette
    Herning Hospital, Denmark.
    Nybo, Jan
    Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark.
    Revsholm, Jesper
    Randers Regional Hospital, Denmark.
    Johanne Risoy, Aslaug
    Noklus, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Skalsvik, Unni Marie
    Nordland Hospital, Norway.
    Strand, Heidi
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway.
    Serrano Teruel, Reyes
    Noklus, Norway.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    The microINR portable coagulometer: analytical quality and user-friendliness of a PT (INR) point-of-care instrument2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 115-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regular measurement of prothrombin time as an international normalized ratio PT (INR) is mandatory for optimal and safe use of warfarin. Scandinavian evaluation of laboratory equipment for primary health care (SKUP) evaluated the microINR portable coagulometer (microINR((R))) (iLine Microsystems S.L., Spain) for measurement of PT (INR). Analytical quality and user-friendliness were evaluated under optimal conditions at an accredited hospital laboratory and at two primary health care centres (PHCCs). Patients were recruited at the outpatient clinic of the Laboratory of Medical Biochemistry, St Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway (n=98) and from two PHCCs (n=88). Venous blood samples were analyzed under optimal conditions on the STA-R((R))Evolution with STA-SPA+reagent (Stago, France) (Owren method), and the results were compared to capillary measurements on the microINR((R)). The imprecision of the microINR((R)) was 6% (90% CI: 5.3-7.0%) and 6.3% (90% CI: 5.1-8.3) in the outpatient clinic and PHCC2, respectively for INR 2.5. The microINR((R)) did not meet the SKUP quality requirement for imprecision 5.0%. For INR amp;lt;2.5 at PHCC2 and at both levels in PHCC1, CV% was 5.0. The accuracy fulfilled the SKUP quality goal in both outpatient clinic and PHCCs. User-friendliness of the operation manual was rated as intermediate, defined by SKUP as neutral ratings assessed as neither good nor bad. Operation facilities was rated unsatisfactory, and time factors satisfactory. In conclusion, quality requirements for imprecision were not met. The SKUP criteria for accuracy was fulfilled both at the hospital and at the PHCCs. The user-friendliness was rated intermediate.

  • 13.
    Carlsson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Robotassisterad kirurgi ökar – trots osäker kostnadseffektivitet2016In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 113, no 48, p. 1-5Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Chaireti, Roza
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Bystrom, Birgitta
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bremme, Katarina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Inflammatory and endothelial markers during the menstrual cycle2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 76, no 3, p. 190-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The menstrual cycle exhibits a pattern of repeated inflammatory activity. The present study aims to evaluate inflammatory and endothelial markers during the two phases of a menstrual cycle. Methods The study cohort consisted of 102 women with regular menstrual cycles. Inflammatory and endothelial markers (interleukin-6 [IL-6], pentraxin-3 [PTX-3], hs-C reactive protein [hs-CRP], sE-selectin, sP-selectin, intracellular and vascular cell adhesion molecules [ICAM-1 and VCAM-1] and cathepsins L, B and S) were measured during the early follicular and the late luteal phase of a normal menstrual cycle. Results Pentraxin-3 (PTX-3) and hs-CRP were significantly higher during the follicular phase compared to the luteal phase (p &lt; 0.001 respectively p = 0.025). The other inflammatory and endothelial markers, with the exception of cathepsin B, were higher, albeit not significantly, during the follicular phase. Conclusions Inflammatory activity, expressed mainly by members of the pentraxin family, is higher during the early follicular compared to the luteal phase. This could be associated to menstruation but the exact mechanisms behind this pattern are unclear and might involve the ovarian hormones or an effect on hepatocytes.

  • 15.
    Chenna Narendra, Sudeep
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Prakash Chalise, Jaya
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Uppugunduri, Srinivas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Local but Not Systemic Administration of Uridine Prevents Development of Antigen-Induced Arthritis2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 10, p. e0141863-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Uridine has earlier been show to down modulate inflammation in models of lung inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of uridine in arthritis. Methods Arthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of mBSA in the knee of NMRI mice preimmunized with mBSA. Uridine was either administered locally by direct injection into the knee joint or systemically. Systemic treatment included repeated injections or implantation of a pellet continuously releasing uridine during the entire experimental procedure. Anti-mBSA specific immune responses were determined by ELISA and cell proliferation and serum cytokine levels were determined by Luminex. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify cells, study expression of cytokines and adhesion molecules in the joint. Results Local administration of 25-100 mg/kg uridine at the time of arthritis onset clearly prevented development of joint inflammation. In contrast, systemic administration of uridine (max 1.5 mg uridine per day) did not prevent development of arthritis. Protection against arthritis by local administration of uridine did not affect the anti-mBSA specific immune response and did not prevent the rise in serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines associated with the triggering of arthritis. In contrast, local uridine treatment efficiently inhibited synovial expression of ICAM-1 and CD18, local cytokine production and recruitment of leukocytes to the synovium. Conclusion Local, but not systemic administration of uridine efficiently prevented development of antigen- induced arthritis. The protective effect did not involve alteration of systemic immunity to mBSA but clearly involved inhibition of synovial expression of adhesion molecules, decreased TNF and IL-6 production and prevention of leukocyte extravasation. Further, uridine is a small, inexpensive molecule and may thus be a new therapeutic option to treat joint inflammation in RA.

  • 16.
    Cibis, Merih
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Left Atrial 4D Blood Flow Dynamics and Hemostasis following Electrical Cardioversion of Atrial Fibrillation2017In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 8, article id 1052Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Electrical cardioversion in patients with atrial fibrillation is followed by a transiently impaired atrial mechanical function, termed atrial stunning. During atrial stunning, a retained risk of left atrial thrombus formation exists, which may be attributed to abnormal left atrial blood flow patterns. 4D Flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) enables blood flow assessment from the entire three-dimensional atrial volume throughout the cardiac cycle. We sought to investigate left atrial 4D blood flow patterns and hemostasis during left atrial stunning and after left atrial mechanical function was restored. Methods: 4D Flow and morphological CMR data as well as blood samples were collected in fourteen patients at two time-points: 2-3 h (Time-1) and 4 weeks (Time-2) following cardioversion. The volume of blood stasis and duration of blood stasis were calculated. In addition, hemostasis markers were analyzed. Results: From Time-1 to Time-2: Heart rate decreased (61 +/- 7 vs. 56 +/- 8 bpm, p = 0.01); Maximum change in left atrial volume increased (8 +/- 4 vs. 22 +/- 15%, p = 0.009); The duration of stasis (68 +/- 11 vs. 57 +/- 8%, p = 0.002) and the volume of stasis (14 +/- 9 vs. 9 +/- 7%, p = 0.04) decreased; Thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) decreased (5.2 +/- 3.3 vs. 3.3 +/- 2.2it.g/L, p = 0.008). A significant correlation was found between TAT and the volume of stasis (r(2) = 0.69, p amp;lt; 0.001) at Time-1 and between TAT and the duration of stasis (r(2) = 0.34, p = 0.04) at Time-2. Conclusion: In this longitudinal study, left atrial multidimensional blood flow was altered and blood stasis was elevated during left atrial stunning compared to the restored left atrial mechanical function. The coagulability of blood was also elevated during atrial stunning. The association between blood stasis and hypercoagulability proposes that assessment of left atrial 4D flow can add to the pathophysiological understanding of thrombus formation during atrial fibrillation related atrial stunning.

  • 17.
    Claesson, Kjersti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Faxälv, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Counting the platelets: a robust and sensitive quantification method for thrombus formation2016In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 115, no 6, p. 1178-1190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flow chambers are common tools used for studying thrombus formation in vitro. However, the use of such devices is not standardised and there is a large diversity among the flow chamber systems currently used, and also in the methods used for quantifying the thrombus development. It was the study objective to evaluate a new method for analysis and quantification of platelet thrombus formation that can facilitate comparison of results between research groups. Whole blood was drawn over a collagen patch in commercial Ibid or in-house constructed PDMS flow chambers. Five percent of the platelets were fluorescently labelled and z-stack time-lapse images were captured during thrombus formation. Images were processed in a Python script in which the number of platelets and their respective x-, y- and z-positions were obtained. For comparison with existing methods the platelets were also labelled and quantified using fluorescence intensity and thrombus volume estimations by confocal microscopy. The presented method was found less sensitive to microscope and image adjustments and provides more details on thrombus development dynamics than the methods for measuring fluorescence intensity and thrombus volume estimation. The platelet count method produced comparable results with commercial and PDMS flow chambers, and could also obtain information regarding the stability of each detected platelet in the thrombus. In conclusion, quantification of thrombus formation by platelet count is a sensitive and robust method that enables measurement of platelet accumulation and platelet stability in an absolute scale that could be used for comparisons between research groups.

  • 18.
    Connolly-Andersen, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Sundberg, Erik
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Baudin, Maria
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Johanna
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Dunne, Eimear
    Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Ireland.
    Kenny, Dermot
    Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Ireland.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Sofie
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Increased Thrombopoiesis and Platelet Activation in Hantavirus-Infected Patients2015In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0022-1899, E-ISSN 1537-6613, Vol. 212, no 7, p. 1061-1069Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Thrombocytopenia is a common finding during viral hemorrhagic fever, which includes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). The 2 main causes for thrombocytopenia are impaired thrombopoiesis and/or increased peripheral destruction of platelets. In addition, there is an increased intravascular coagulation risk during HFRS, which could be due to platelet activation. Methods. Thrombopoiesis was determined by quantification of platelet counts, thrombopoietin, immature platelet fraction, and mean platelet volume during HFRS. The in vivo platelet activation was determined by quantification of soluble P-selectin (sP-selectin) and glycoprotein VI (sGPVI). The function of circulating platelets was determined by ex vivo stimulation followed by flow cytometry analysis of platelet surface-bound fibrinogen and P-selectin exposure. Intravascular coagulation during disease was determined by scoring for disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and recording thromboembolic complications. Results. The levels of thrombopoietin, immature platelet fraction, and mean platelet volume all indicate increased thrombopoiesis during HFRS. Circulating platelets had reduced ex vivo function during disease compared to follow-up. Most interestingly, we observed significantly increased in vivo platelet activation in HFRS patients with intravascular coagulation (DIC and thromboembolic complications) as shown by sP-selectin and sGPVI levels. Conclusions. HFRS patients have increased thrombopoiesis and platelet activation, which contributes to intravascular coagulation.

  • 19.
    Davidson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindelof, Ann
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Wallen, Torbjorn
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Vastervik Hospital, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland.
    Point-of-care monitoring of warfarin treatment in community dwelling elderly - A randomised controlled study2015In: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, ISSN 1357-633X, E-ISSN 1758-1109, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 298-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to assess clinical effectiveness and costs of launching point-of-care monitoring of warfarin treatment in community dwelling frail elderly patients. A prospective multicentre controlled randomised study over 12 months comparing a point-of-care strategy with usual monitoring routines was carried out in primary healthcare centres and anticoagulation clinics in southeast Sweden. The subjects were community dwelling elderly across rural southeast Sweden on chronic warfarin treatment. Main outcome measures were time in therapeutic range (TTR), rate of treatment-related adverse events and costs. The study comprised 103 elderly people (61% women) mean age 86 yrs (range 75-98) treated with warfarin for median 9 yrs (range 1-18). Patients randomised to start point-of-care monitoring (n = 55) showed 75.9% in TTR before trial vs. 72.6% during trial (ns). The patients randomised to continue on usual monitoring routines (n = 48) showed 75.2% in TTR prior to trial vs. 72.9% during trial (ns). The point-of-care monitoring showed potential savings of SEK 624 per patient annually (based partly on effects that were not statistically significant). The study shows that point-of-care monitoring of warfarin treatment in community dwelling elderly in rural areas is as effective as usual monitoring routines and that it may offer savings to society.

  • 20.
    Dock, Hua
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    DNA Methylation Inhibitor Zebularine Confers Stroke Protection in Ischemic Rats2015In: TRANSLATIONAL STROKE RESEARCH, ISSN 1868-4483, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 296-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    5-Aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) confers neuroprotection in ischemic mice by inhibiting DNA methylation. Zebularine is another DNA methylation inhibitor, less toxic and more stable in aqueous solutions and, therefore more biologically suitable. We investigated Zebularines effects on brain ischemia in a rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) model in order to elucidate its therapeutic potential. Male Wistar wild-type (WT) rats were randomly allocated to three treatment groups, vehicle, Zebularine 100 mu g, and Zebularine 500 mu g. Saline (10 mu L) or Zebularine (10 mu L) was administered intracerebroventricularly 20 min before 45-min occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. Reperfusion was allowed after 45-min occlusion, and the rats were sacrificed at 24-h reperfusion. The brains were removed, sliced, and stained with 2 % 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) before measuring infarct size. Zebularine (500 mu g) reduced infarct volumes significantly (p less than 0.05) by 61 % from 20.7 +/- 4.2 % in the vehicle treated to 8.1 +/- 1.6 % in the Zebularine treated. Zebularine (100 mu g) also reduced infarct volumes dramatically by 55 to 9.4 +/- 1.2 %. The mechanisms behind this neuroprotection is not yet known, but the results agree with previous studies and support the notion that Zebularine-induced inhibition of DNA methyltransferase ameliorates ischemic brain injury in rats.

  • 21.
    Edvardsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång.
    Sund-Levander, Märtha
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Rättsmedicinalverket, Linköping, Sweden.
    Clinical use of conventional reference intervals in the frail elderly2015In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 229-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale, aims and objectives

    Reference intervals provided by the laboratory are commonly established by measuring samples from apparently healthy subjects in the ages 18–65 years, excluding elderly individuals with chronic diseases and medication. The aim of our study was to establish whether current reference intervals for immune parameters and chemical biomarkers are valid for older individuals including those with chronic diseases, so-called frail elderly.

    Methods

    Data from our cohort of 138 non-infected nursing home residents (NHR), mean age 86.8 years, range 80–98, were compared with raw data, as basis for the development of reference intervals, obtained from reference populations, like blood donors (IgA, IgG, IgM, C3 and C4) and from the Nordic Reference Interval Project (NORIP) (alanine aminotransferase, albumin, aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine, gamma-glutamyl transferase, lactate dehydrogenase, phosphate, sodium and urea). Immune parameters were measured by nephelometry and in NORIP the measurements were performed by means of different routine methods, in more than 100 laboratories.

    Results

    Only nine individuals (7%) of NHR were found to be free from chronic disease. C3, C4 (P < 0.001) and IgG levels (P < 0.05) were higher, while IgM levels (P < 0.001) were lower in NHR compared with reference blood donors. Levels of alanine aminotransferase, phosphate (P < 0.001), albumin (P < 0.05) and sodium (P < 0.01) were lower while creatinine and urea levels were higher (P < 0.001) in NHR compared with NORIP subjects.

    Conclusion

    Comparing laboratory results from elderly people with conventional reference intervals can be misleading or even dangerous, as normal conditions may appear pathological, or vice versa and thus lead to unnecessary or even harmful treatment.

  • 22.
    Ekman, Bertil
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Wahlberg Topp, Jeanette
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Landberg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Urine oligosaccharide pattern in patients with hyperprolactinaemia2015In: Glycoconjugate Journal, ISSN 0282-0080, E-ISSN 1573-4986, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 635-641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Free milk-type oligosaccharides are produced during pregnancy and lactation and may have an impact on several cells in the immune system. Our aim was to investigate if patients with isolated hyperprolactinaemia, not related to pregnancy, also have increased synthesis and urinary excretion of milk-type oligosaccharides and to compare the excretion pattern with that found during pregnancy. Urine samples were collected as morning sample from 18 patients with hyperprolactinaemia, 13 healthy controls with normal prolactin levels and four pregnant women. After purification, lactose and free oligosaccharides were analysed and quantified by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. The identity of peaks was confirmed by exoglycosidase treatment and comparison with oligosaccharide standards. Prolactin was measured in serum collected between 09 and 11 a.m. by a standardized immunochemical method. Patients with hyperprolactinaemia had higher urinary excretion of lactose than normoprolactinemic controls and urinary lactose correlated positively to prolactin levels (r = 0.51, p less than 0.05). Increased levels of the fucosylated oligosaccharides 2-fucosyl lactose and lacto-di-fucotetraose were found in urine from three and two patients, respectively. The acidic oligosaccharide 3-sialyl lactose was found in high amount in urine from two patients with prolactin of greater than 10,000 mU/l. However, pregnant women in their third trimester had the highest concentration of all these oligosaccharides and excretion increased during pregnancy. This study is first to show that both lactose and certain fucosylated and sialylated milk-type oligosaccharides are increased in some patients with hyperprolactinaemia. It remains to elucidate the functional importance of these findings.

  • 23.
    Faresjö, Åshild
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jullander, Miriam
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Götmalm, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Higher perceived stress and poorer health reflected in elevated cortisol concentrtions measured in extracts of hair from middle-aged healthy women2014In: BMC Psychology, ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 2, no 30, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The prevalence of mental strain and stress has increased in modern societies, resulting in increased public health problems. Stress can be measured either by biomarkers or by self-reports. A new biomarker that measures long-term biological stress is cortisol measured in timed hair extracts. Hair grows at approximately 1 cm per month, and retrospectively reflects average stress levels. However, the plausible relationship between perceived stress and self-reported health and this novel biomarker is yet not firmly established. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible relationship between perceived stress, self-reported health, and cortisol in hair extracts in healthy middle-aged women from two different occupations.

    Method

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in 112 middle-aged women working as nurses or librarians in a county in southeast Sweden. The women were invited to fill in a questionnaire covering stress, health, and life situation. The questionnaire included questions on health and disease symptoms, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale. A piece of hair was cut from the vertex posterior area of the head an analysed by a competitive radioimmunoassay method.

    Results

    Middle-aged women who reported high perceived stress (p = 0.031) or lower health (p = 0.029), or had signs of depressiveness (p = 0.016) had significantly higher cortisol concentrations adjusted for age. There were no significant differences in cortisol in hair concentrations or perceived stress between nurses and librarians. Two women with extremely high cortisol concentrations were considered as outliers, but during the interview at follow-up they reported experiences of serious life events in their work or social life during the retrospective time of the sample taken for cortisol measurement.

    Conclusions

    Higher cortisol concentrations measured in the hair of healthy and working middle-aged women were associated with higher perceived stress and generally poorer health and with depressiveness. These findings lend support to the general applicability of cortisol measured in hair extracts as a biomarker in population-based epidemiological studies.

  • 24.
    Faxälv, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Boknäs, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ström, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ramström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Putting polyphosphates to the test: evidence against platelet-induced activation of factor XII2013In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 122, no 23, p. 3818-3824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent claim that stimulated platelets activate the intrinsic pathway of coagulation by the release of polyphosphates has been considered a breakthrough in hemostasis research. In little more than 3 years, the original publication by Muller et al has been cited greater than100 times. However, none of the citing articles has sought to independently validate this potentially paradigm-shifting concept. To this end, we performed extensive experimentation in vitro and in vivo in an attempt to verify the claim that factor XII (FXII) is primarily activated by stimulated platelets. In contrast to the original assertion, platelet-derived polyphosphates were found to be weak activators of FXII, with a FXIIa-generating activity of less than10% compared with equivalent concentrations of kaolin. Using different coagulation assays, it was shown that platelet contribution to whole blood coagulation was unrelated to the generation of activated FXII in vitro. Additionally, key results used to verify the hypothesis in the original study in vivo were found to be irreproducible. We conclude that platelet-derived polyphosphates are not physiologically relevant activators of FXII.

  • 25.
    Gjesing Welinder, Karen
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Hansen, Rasmus
    Aalborg University, Denmark; Wellspring, USA.
    Toft Overgaard, Michael
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Brohus, Malene
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Sonderkaer, Mads
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    von Bergen, Martin
    Aalborg University, Denmark; UFZ Helmholtz Centre Environm Research, Germany; UFZ Helmholtz Centre Environm Research, Germany.
    Rolle-Kampczyk, Ulrike
    UFZ Helmholtz Centre Environm Research, Germany.
    Otto, Wolfgang
    UFZ Helmholtz Centre Environm Research, Germany.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Arinell, Karin
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Evans, Alina L.
    Hedmark University of Coll, Norway.
    Swenson, Jon E.
    Norwegian University of Life Science, Norway; Norwegian Institute Nat Research, Norway.
    Revsbech, Inge G.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Frobert, Ole
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Biochemical Foundations of Health and Energy Conservation in Hibernating Free-ranging Subadult Brown Bear Ursus arctos2016In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 291, no 43, p. 22509-22523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brown bears (Ursus arctos) hibernate for 5-7 months without eating, drinking, urinating, and defecating at a metabolic rate of only 25% of the summer activity rate. Nonetheless, they emerge healthy and alert in spring. We quantified the biochemical adaptations for hibernation by comparing the proteome, metabolome, and hematological features of blood from hibernating and active free-ranging subadult brown bears with a focus on conservation of health and energy. We found that total plasma protein concentration increased during hibernation, even though the concentrations of most individual plasma proteins decreased, as did the white blood cell types. Strikingly, antimicrobial defense proteins increased in concentration. Central functions in hibernation involving the coagulation response and protease inhibition, as well as lipid transport and metabolism, were upheld by increased levels of very few key or broad specificity proteins. The changes in coagulation factor levels matched the changes in activity measurements. A dramatic 45-fold increase in sex hormone-binding globulin levels during hibernation draws, for the first time, attention to its significant but unknown role in maintaining hibernation physiology. We propose that energy for the costly protein synthesis is reduced by three mechanisms as follows: (i) dehydration, which increases protein concentration without de novo synthesis; (ii) reduced protein degradation rates due to a 6 degrees C reduction in body temperature and decreased protease activity; and (iii) a marked redistribution of energy resources only increasing de novo synthesis of a few key proteins. The comprehensive global data identified novel biochemical strategies for bear adaptations to the extreme condition of hibernation and have implications for our understanding of physiology in general.

  • 26.
    Haarhaus, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Brandenburg, Vincent
    RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Germany.
    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar
    University of Calif Irvine, CA 92868 USA; University of Calif Los Angeles, CA 90502 USA.
    Stenvinkel, Peter
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Alkaline phosphatase: a novel treatment target for cardiovascular disease in CKD2017In: Nature Reviews Nephrology, ISSN 1759-5061, E-ISSN 1759-507X, Vol. 13, no 7, p. 429-442Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of early death in the settings of chronic kidney disease (CKD), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and ageing. Cardiovascular events can be caused by an imbalance between promoters and inhibitors of mineralization, which leads to vascular calcification. This process is akin to skeletal mineralization, which is carefully regulated and in which isozymes of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) have a crucial role. Four genes encode ALP isozymes in humans. Intestinal, placental and germ cell ALPs are tissue-specific, whereas the tissue-nonspecific isozyme of ALP (TNALP) is present in several tissues, including bone, liver and kidney. TNALP has a pivotal role in bone calcification. Experimental overexpression of TNALP in the vasculature is sufficient to induce vascular calcification, cardiac hypertrophy and premature death, mimicking the cardiovascular phenotype often found in CKD and T2DM. Intestinal ALP contributes to the gut mucosal defence and intestinal and liver ALPs might contribute to the acute inflammatory response to endogenous or pathogenic stimuli. Here we review novel mechanisms that link ALP to vascular calcification, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction in kidney and cardiovascular diseases. We also discuss new drugs that target ALP, which have the potential to improve cardiovascular outcomes without inhibiting skeletal mineralization.

  • 27.
    Haarhaus, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Monier-Faugere, Marie-Claude
    University of Kentucky, KY 40536 USA.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Malluche, Hartmut H.
    University of Kentucky, KY 40536 USA.
    Bone Alkaline Phosphatase Isoforms in Hemodialysis Patients With Low Versus Non-Low Bone Turnover: A Diagnostic Test Study2015In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, ISSN 0272-6386, E-ISSN 1523-6838, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 99-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Renal osteodystrophy encompasses the bone histologic abnormalities seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (bALP) isoform B1x is exclusively found in serum of some patients with CKD. Study Design: The aim of this cross-sectional diagnostic test study was to examine the relationship between serum bALP isoform activity and histomorphometric parameters of bone in patients with CKD receiving maintenance hemodialysis. Settings and Participants: Anterior iliac crest bone biopsy samples from 40 patients with CKD were selected on the basis of bone turnover for histomorphometric analysis. There were samples from 20 patients with low and 20 with non-low bone turnover. Index Test: In serum, bALP, bALP isoforms (B/I, B1x, B1, and B2), and parathyroid hormone (PTH) were measured. Reference Test: Low bone turnover was defined by mineral apposition rate, 0.36 mu m/d. Non-low bone turnover was defined by mineral apposition rate greater than= 0.36 mu m/d. Other Measurements: PTH. Results: B1x was found in 21 patients (53%) who had lower median levels of bALP, 18.6 versus 46.9 U/L; B/I, 0.10 versus 0.22 mu kat/L; B1, 0.40 versus 0.88 mu kat/L; B2, 1.21 versus 2.66 mu kat/L; and PTH, 49 versus 287 pg/mL, compared with patients without B1x (P less than 0.001). 13 patients (65%) with low bone turnover and 8 patients (40%) with non-low bone turnover (P less than 0.2) had detectable B1x. B1x correlated inversely with histomorphometric parameters of bone turnover. Receiver operating characteristic curves showed that B1x can be used for the diagnosis of low bone turnover (area under the curve [AUC], 0.83), whereas bALP (AUC, 0.89) and PTH (AUC, 0.85) are useful for the diagnosis of non-low bone turnover. Limitations: Small number of study participants. Requirement of high-performance liquid chromatography methods for measurement of B1x. Conclusions: B1x, PTH, and bALP have similar diagnostic accuracy in distinguishing low from non-low bone turnover. The presence of B1x is diagnostic of low bone turnover, whereas elevated bALP and PTH levels are useful for the diagnosis of non-low bone turnover.

  • 28.
    Halling Linder, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Biochemical and functional properties of mammalian bone alkaline phosphatase isoforms during osteogenesis2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The human skeleton is a living and dynamic tissue that constantly is being renewed in a process called bone remodeling. Old bone is resorbed by osteoclasts and new bone is formed by osteoblasts. Bone is a composite material made up by mineral crystals in the form of hydroxyapatite (calcium and phosphate) that provides the hardness of bone, and collagen fibrils that provides elasticity and flexibility. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is a family of enzymes that is present in most species and catalyzes the hydrolysis of various phosphomonoesters at alkaline pH. Despite the generalized use of ALP as a biochemical marker of bone formation, the precise function of bone ALP (BALP) is only now becoming clear. Three circulating human BALP isoforms (B1, B2, and B/I) can be distinguished in healthy individuals and a fourth isoform (B1x) has been discovered in patients with chronic kidney disease and in bone tissue.

    Paper I. Three endogenous phosphocompounds, (i.e., inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) and phosphoethanolamine (PEA)), have been suggested to serve as  physiological substrates for BALP. The BALP isoforms display different catalytic properties towards PPi and PLP, which is attributed to their distinct N-linked glycosylation patterns. The catalytic activity, using PEA as substrate, was barely detectable for all BALP isoforms indicating that PEA is not a physiological substrate for BALP.

    Paper II. Mouse serum ALP is frequently measured and interpreted in mammalian bone research. However, little is known about the circulating ALPs in mice and their relation to human ALP. We characterized the circulating and tissue-derived mouse ALP isozymes and isoforms from mixed strains of wild-type and knockout mice. All four BALP isoforms (B/I, B1x, B1, and B2) were identified in mouse serum and bone tissues, in good correspondence with those found in human bones. All mouse tissues, except liver, contained significant ALP activities. This is a notable difference as human liver contains vast amounts of ALP.

    Paper III. The objective of this study was to investigate the binding properties of human collagen type I to human BALP, including the two BALP isoforms B1 and B2, together with ALP from human liver, human placenta and E. coli. A surface plasmon resonance-based analysis showed that BALP binds stronger to collagen type I in comparison with ALPs expressed in non-mineralizing tissues. The B2 isoform binds significantly stronger to collagen type I in comparison with the B1 isoform, indicating that glycosylation differences in human ALPs are of crucial importance for protein–protein interactions with collagen type I.

    Paper IV. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) is highly expressed in osteoclasts and frequently used as a marker of bone resorption. Intriguingly, recent studies show that TRAP is also expressed in osteoblasts and osteocytes. TRAP displays enzymatic activity towards the endogenous substrates for BALP, i.e., PPi and PLP. Both TRAP and BALP can alleviate the inhibitory effect of osteopontin on mineralization by dephosphorylation, which suggests a novel role for TRAP in skeletal mineralization.

    List of papers
    1. Glycosylation differences contribute to distinct catalytic properties among bone alkaline phosphatase isoforms.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Glycosylation differences contribute to distinct catalytic properties among bone alkaline phosphatase isoforms.
    2009 (English)In: Bone, ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 987-993Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Three circulating human bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP) isoforms (B1, B2, and B/I) can be distinguished in healthy individuals and a fourth isoform (B1x) has been discovered in patients with chronic kidney disease and in bone tissue. The present study was designed to correlate differing glycosylation patterns of each BALP isoform with their catalytic activity towards presumptive physiological substrates and to compare those properties with two recombinant isoforms of the tissue-nonspecific ALP (TNALP) isozyme, i.e., TNALP-flag, used extensively for mutation analysis of hypophosphatasia mutations and sALP-FcD(10), a chimeric enzyme recently used as therapeutic drug in a mouse model of infantile hypophosphatasia. The BALP isoforms were prepared from human osteosarcoma (SaOS-2) cells and the kinetic properties were evaluated using the synthetic substrate p-nitrophenylphosphate (pNPP) at pH 7.4 and 9.8, and the three suggested endogenous physiological substrates, i.e., inorganic pyrophosphate (PP(i)), pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), and phosphoethanolamine (PEA) at pH 7.4. Qualitative glycosylation differences were also assessed by lectin binding and precipitation. The k(cat)/K(M) was higher for B2 for all the investigated substrates. The catalytic activity towards PEA was essentially undetectable. The kinetic activity for TNALP-flag and sALP-FcD(10) was similar to the activity of the human BALP isoforms. The BALP isoforms differed in their lectin binding properties and dose-dependent lectin precipitation, which also demonstrated differences between native and denatured BALP isoforms. The observed differences in lectin specificity were attributed to N-linked carbohydrates. In conclusion, we demonstrate significantly different catalytic properties among the BALP isoforms due to structural differences in posttranslational glycosylation. Our data also suggests that PEA is not an endogenous substrate for the BALP isoforms or for the recombinant TNALP isoforms. The TNALP-flag and the sALP-FcD(10) isoforms faithfully mimic the biological properties of the human BALP isoforms in vivo validating the use of these recombinant enzymes in studies aimed at dissecting the pathophysiology and treating hypophosphatasia.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-21351 (URN)10.1016/j.bone.2009.07.009 (DOI)19631305 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-10-01 Created: 2009-10-01 Last updated: 2016-04-14
    2. Isozyme profile and tissue-origin of alkaline phosphatases in mouse serum
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Isozyme profile and tissue-origin of alkaline phosphatases in mouse serum
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 399-408Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Mouse serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is frequently measured and interpreted in mammalian bone research. However, little is known about the circulating ALPs in mice and their relation to human ALP isozymes and isoforms. Mouse ALP was extracted from liver, kidney, intestine, and bone from vertebra, femur and calvaria tissues. Serum from mixed strains of wild-type (WT) mice and from individual ALP knockout strains were investigated, i.e., Alpl(-/-) (a.k.a. Akp2 encoding tissue-nonspecific ALP or TNALP), Akp3(-/-) (encoding duodenum-specific intestinal ALP or dIALP), and Alpi(-/-) (a.k.a. Akp6 encoding global intestinal ALP or gIALP). The ALP isozymes and isoforms were identified by various techniques and quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results from the WT and knockout mouse models revealed identical bone-specific ALP isoforms (B/I. B1, and B2) as found in human serum, but in addition mouse serum contains the B1x isoform only detected earlier in patients with chronic kidney disease and in human bone tissue. The two murine intestinal isozymes, dIALP and gIALP, were also identified in mouse serum. All four bone-specific ALP isoforms (B/I, B1x, B1, and B2) were identified in mouse bones, in good correspondence with those found in human bones. All mouse tissues, except liver and colon, contained significant ALP activities. This is a notable difference as human liver contains vast amounts of ALP. Histochemical staining, Northern and Western blot analyses confirmed undetectable ALP expression in liver tissue. ALP activity staining showed some positive staining in the bile canaliculi for BALB/c and FVB/N WT mice, but not in C57BI/6 and ICR mice. Taken together, while the main source of ALP in human serum originates from bone and liver, and a small fraction from intestine (andlt;5%), mouse serum consists mostly of bone ALP, including all four isoforms, B/I, B1x, B1, and B2, and two intestinal ALP isozymes dIALP and gIALR We suggest that the genetic nomenclature for the Alpl gene in mice (i.e., ALP liver) should be reconsidered since murine liver has undetectable amounts of ALP activity. These findings should pave the way for the development of user-friendly assays measuring circulating bone-specific ALP in mouse models used in bone and mineral research.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2013
    Keywords
    Alkaline phosphatase, Bone, Glycosylation, Hypophosphatasia, Knockout mice, Mineralization
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-90744 (URN)10.1016/j.bone.2012.12.048 (DOI)000315763700010 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland in Sweden||National Institutes of Health, USA|DE012889|

    Available from: 2013-04-05 Created: 2013-04-05 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    3. Glycation Contributes to Interaction Between Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase and Collagen Type I
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Glycation Contributes to Interaction Between Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase and Collagen Type I
    2016 (English)In: Calcified Tissue International, ISSN 0171-967X, E-ISSN 1432-0827, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 284-293Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Bone is a biological composite material comprised primarily of collagen type I and mineral crystals of calcium and phosphate in the form of hydroxyapatite (HA), which together provide its mechanical properties. Bone alkaline phosphatase (ALP), produced by osteoblasts, plays a pivotal role in the mineralization process. Affinity contacts between collagen, mainly type II, and the crown domain of various ALP isozymes were reported in a few in vitro studies in the 1980s and 1990s, but have not attracted much attention since, although such interactions may have important implications for the bone mineralization process. The objective of this study was to investigate the binding properties of human collagen type I to human bone ALP, including the two bone ALP isoforms B1 and B2. ALP from human liver, human placenta and E. coli were also studied. A surface plasmon resonance-based analysis, supported by electrophoresis and blotting, showed that bone ALP binds stronger to collagen type I in comparison with ALPs expressed in non-mineralizing tissues. Further, the B2 isoform binds significantly stronger to collagen type I in comparison with the B1 isoform. Human bone and liver ALP (with identical amino acid composition) displayed pronounced differences in binding, revealing that post-translational glycosylation properties govern these interactions to a large extent. In conclusion, this study presents the first evidence that glycosylation differences in human ALPs are of crucial importance for protein–protein interactions with collagen type I, although the presence of the ALP crown domain may also be necessary. Different binding affinities among the bone ALP isoforms may influence the mineral-collagen interface, mineralization kinetics, and degree of bone matrix mineralization, which are important factors determining the material properties of bone.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer-Verlag New York, 2016
    Keywords
    Alkaline phosphatase; Bone; Collagen; Glycosylation; Mineralization; Surface plasmon resonance
    National Category
    Endocrinology and Diabetes Dentistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127099 (URN)10.1007/s00223-015-0088-0 (DOI)000373744700008 ()26645431 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies:  Region Ostergotland, Sweden

    Available from: 2016-04-14 Created: 2016-04-14 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
  • 29.
    Halling Linder, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ek-Rylander, Barbro
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Krumpel, Michael
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Norgard, Maria
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Narisawa, Sonoko
    Sanford Childrens Health Research Centre, CA 92037 USA.
    Luis Millan, Jose
    Sanford Childrens Health Research Centre, CA 92037 USA.
    Andersson, Göran
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Bone Alkaline Phosphatase and Tartrate-Resistant Acid Phosphatase: Potential Co-regulators of Bone Mineralization2017In: Calcified Tissue International, ISSN 0171-967X, E-ISSN 1432-0827, Vol. 101, no 1, p. 92-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorylated osteopontin (OPN) inhibits hydroxyapatite crystal formation and growth, and bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP) promotes extracellular mineralization via the release of inorganic phosphate from the mineralization inhibitor inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi). Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), produced by osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes, exhibits potent phosphatase activity towards OPN; however, its potential capacity as a regulator of mineralization has not previously been addressed. We compared the efficiency of BALP and TRAP towards the endogenous substrates for BALP, i.e., PPi and pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP), and their impact on mineralization in vitro via dephosphorylation of bovine milk OPN. TRAP showed higher phosphatase activity towards phosphorylated OPN and PPi compared to BALP, whereas the activity of TRAP and BALP towards PLP was comparable. Bovine milk OPN could be completely dephosphorylated by TRAP, liberating all its 28 phosphates, whereas BALP dephosphorylated at most 10 phosphates. OPN, dephosphorylated by either BALP or TRAP, showed a partially or completely attenuated phosphorylation-dependent inhibitory capacity, respectively, compared to native OPN on the formation of mineralized nodules. Thus, there are phosphorylations in OPN important for inhibition of mineralization that are removed by TRAP but not by BALP. In conclusion, our data indicate that both BALP and TRAP can alleviate the inhibitory effect of OPN on mineralization, suggesting a potential role for TRAP in skeletal mineralization. Further studies are warranted to explore the possible physiological relevance of TRAP in bone mineralization.

  • 30.
    Halling Linder, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Glycation Contributes to Interaction Between Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase and Collagen Type I2016In: Calcified Tissue International, ISSN 0171-967X, E-ISSN 1432-0827, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 284-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone is a biological composite material comprised primarily of collagen type I and mineral crystals of calcium and phosphate in the form of hydroxyapatite (HA), which together provide its mechanical properties. Bone alkaline phosphatase (ALP), produced by osteoblasts, plays a pivotal role in the mineralization process. Affinity contacts between collagen, mainly type II, and the crown domain of various ALP isozymes were reported in a few in vitro studies in the 1980s and 1990s, but have not attracted much attention since, although such interactions may have important implications for the bone mineralization process. The objective of this study was to investigate the binding properties of human collagen type I to human bone ALP, including the two bone ALP isoforms B1 and B2. ALP from human liver, human placenta and E. coli were also studied. A surface plasmon resonance-based analysis, supported by electrophoresis and blotting, showed that bone ALP binds stronger to collagen type I in comparison with ALPs expressed in non-mineralizing tissues. Further, the B2 isoform binds significantly stronger to collagen type I in comparison with the B1 isoform. Human bone and liver ALP (with identical amino acid composition) displayed pronounced differences in binding, revealing that post-translational glycosylation properties govern these interactions to a large extent. In conclusion, this study presents the first evidence that glycosylation differences in human ALPs are of crucial importance for protein–protein interactions with collagen type I, although the presence of the ALP crown domain may also be necessary. Different binding affinities among the bone ALP isoforms may influence the mineral-collagen interface, mineralization kinetics, and degree of bone matrix mineralization, which are important factors determining the material properties of bone.

  • 31.
    Hammar, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Larsson, Erika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gäddlin, P O
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Leijon, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    A long-term follow-up study of men born with very low birth weight and their reproductive hormone profile2018In: Systems biology in reproductive medicine, ISSN 1939-6376, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 207-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental factors during the fetal period may adversely affect reproductive functions in men being born with very low birth weight (VLBW, <1500 g). The objective of this prospective, controlled cohort study was to investigate if VLBW men have an altered reproductive hormone profile compared with men born at term. The study group initially consisted of all VLBW boys live-born between 1 February 1987 and 30 April 1988 in the south-east region of Sweden (n = 47). A control child was chosen born at term, at the same hospital, with the same parity, without malformations, and next in order after each VLBW child who survived the first four weeks (n = 45). The present follow-up was performed when the men were 26-28 years of age and included measurements of serum hormone levels, hair testosterone concentration, and anthropometric data. Also life-style questionnaires were collected from 26 VLBW men and 19 controls. The VLBW group (n = 26) had higher median levels of serum estradiol, 84.5 pmol/L than controls (n = 19), 57.5 pmol/L (p = 0.008). There was no significant correlation between serum estradiol and BMI (r = 0.06, p = 0.74). There were no differences in other hormone levels or the reproductive pattern between the groups. In conclusion, even though there was a statistically significant difference in estradiol levels between the groups, both groups had low normal mean levels of questionable clinical significance. The reproductive pattern was similar in the two groups and in this study being born VLBW does not seem to affect these measured aspects of reproduction.

    ABBREVIATIONS: ADHD: attention deficit hyperactive disorder; AGA: average for gestational age; BMI: body mass index; CP: cerebral palsy; DHT: dihydrotestosterone; FSH: follicle stimulating hormone; LBW: low birth weight; LH: luteinizing hormone; SAD: sagittal abdominal diameter; SGA: small for gestational age; SHBG: sex hormone binding globulin; TSH: thyroid stimulating hormone; T3: triiodothyronine; T4: thyroxin; VLBW: very low birth weight.

  • 32.
    Hammarsten, Ola
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Bjurman, Christian
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Petzold, Max
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Risk of myocardial infarction at specific troponin T levels using the parameter predictive value among lookalikes (PAL)2017In: Clinical Biochemistry, ISSN 0009-9120, E-ISSN 1873-2933, Vol. 50, no 1-2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Myocardial infarction is more likely if the heart damage biomarker cardiac troponin T (cTnT) is elevated in a blood sample, indicating that cardiac damage has occurred. No method allows the clinician to estimate the risk of myocardial infarction at a specific cTnT level in a given patient. Methods: Predictive value among lookalikes (PAL) uses pre-test prevalence, sensitivity and specificity at adjacent cTnT limits based on percentiles. PAL is the pre-test prevalence-adjusted probability of disease between two adjacent cTnT limits. If a chest pain patients cTnT level is between these limits, the risk of myocardial infarction can be estimated. Results: The PAL based on percentiles had an acceptable sampling error when using 100 bootstrapped data of 18 different biomarkers from 38,945 authentic lab measurements. A PAL analysis of an emergency room cohort (n = 11,020) revealed that the diagnostic precision of a high-sensitive cTnT assay was similar among chest pain patients at different ages. The higher incidence of false positive results due to non-specific increases in cTnT in the high-age group was counterbalanced by a higher pre-test prevalence of myocardial infarction among older patients, a finding that was missed when using a conventional ROC plot analysis. Conclusions: The PAL was able to calculate the risk of myocardial infarction at specific cTnT levels and could complement decision limits. 2016 The Authors. The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • 33.
    Harris, L. F.
    et al.
    Dublin Institute Technology, Ireland.
    Rainey, P.
    Queens University of Belfast, North Ireland.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Killard, A. J.
    University of West England, England.
    A fully integrated microfluidic device for point of care monitoring of antithrombotics2016In: Analytical Methods, ISSN 1759-9660, E-ISSN 1759-9679, Vol. 8, no 35, p. 6500-6505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The simplicity and efficiency of point of care diagnostics have revolutionised patient care. Current methods for measuring hypercoagulability often require trained technicians, large blood volumes, and result in long turnaround times. Standard testing for hypercoagulable disorders is performed in the central laboratory using automated coagulation analysers. However the trend is moving towards the development and implementation of point of care testing, as a result of the ever increasing number of patients on antithrombotic therapy. We present a novel microfluidic device and assay for monitoring the effect of two anticoagulants, unfractionated heparin (UFH) and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). The assay is based on the anti-Xa assay principle but uses fluorescence detection. Our device is a disposable laminate microfluidic strip, fabricated from the cyclic polyolefin (COP), Zeonor (R), which is extremely suitable for application to fluorescent device platforms. We present data on the execution of the anti-Xa assay in this microfluidic format, demonstrating that the assay can be used to measure both UFH and LMWH in human plasma samples from 0 to 1 U mL(-1), with a rapid result obtained within 30-60 seconds.

  • 34.
    Holm, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Szabó, Zoltán
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Cederholm, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Copeptin Release in Cardiac Surgery: A New Biomarker to Identify Risk Patients?2018In: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia, ISSN 1053-0770, E-ISSN 1532-8422, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 245-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the dynamics of copeptin in open cardiac surgery during the perioperative course.

    DESIGN: Prospective cohort study.

    SETTING: Single tertiary hospital.

    PARTICIPANTS: Twenty patients scheduled for open cardiac surgery procedures with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB).

    INTERVENTIONS: No intervention.

    MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Copeptin concentrations were measured pre-, peri-, and postoperatively until day 6 after surgery. Patients were analyzed as a whole cohort (n = 20) and in a restricted "normal cohort" consisting of patients with normal preoperative copeptin concentration (<10 pmol/L) and perioperative uneventful course (n = 11). In the whole cohort, preoperative copeptin concentration was 7.0 pmol/L (interquartile range: 3.1-11 pmol/L). All patients had an early rise of copeptin, with 80% having peak copeptin concentration at weaning from CPB or upon arrival in the intensive care unit. Patients in the "normal cohort" had copeptin concentration at weaning from CPB of 194 pmol/L (98-275), postoperative day 1, 27 pmol/L (18-31); and day 3, 8.9 pmol/L (6.3-12).

    CONCLUSIONS: Regardless of cardiac surgical procedure and perioperative course, all patients had an early significant rise of copeptin concentrations, generally peaking at weaning from CBP or upon arrival in the intensive care unit. Among patients with normal copeptin concentration preoperatively and uneventful course, the postoperative copeptin concentrations decreased to normal values within 3-to-4 days after cardiac surgery. Furthermore, the restricted "normal cohort" generally tended to display lower levels of copeptin concentration postoperatively. Further studies may evaluate whether copeptin can be a tool in identifying risk patients in cardiac surgery.

  • 35.
    Ihnatko, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Short N-terminal galanin fragments are occurring naturally in vivo2017In: Neuropeptides, ISSN 0143-4179, E-ISSN 1532-2785, Vol. 63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The galanin family currently consists of four peptides, namely galanin, galanin-message associated peptide, galanin-like peptide and alarin. Unlike galanin that signals through three different G protein-coupled receptors; GALL, GAL(2), and GAL(3), binding at its N-terminal end, the cognate receptors for other members of the galanin family are currently unknown. Research using short N-terminal galanin fragments generated either by enzymatic cleavage or solid-phase synthesis has revealed differences in their receptor binding properties exerting numerous biological effects distinct from galanin(1-29) itself. Our studies on tissue extracts derived from rat small intestine and bovine gut using chromatographic techniques and sensitive galanin(1-16)-specific radioimmunoassay revealed the presence of immunoreactive compounds reacting with antiserum against galanin(1-16) distributed in distinct elution volumes. These results suggested a possible presence of short N-terminal galanin fragments also in vivo. Moreover, employing immunoaffinity chromatography and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) followed by mass spectrometry allowed specific enrichment of these immunoreactive compounds from rat tissues and identification of their molecular structure. Indeed, our study revealed presence of several distinct short N-terminal galanin sequences in rat tissue. To prove their receptor binding, four of the identified sequences were synthetized, namely, galanin(1-13), galanin(1-16), galanin(1.20), galanin(6-20), and tested on coronal rat brain sections competing with I-125-labeled galanin(1-29). Our autoradiographs confirmed that galanin(1-13), galanin(1-16), and galanin(1-20) comprehensively displaced I-125-galanin(1-29) but galanin (6-20) did not. Here we show, for the first time, that short N-terminal galanin fragments occur naturally in rat tissues and that similar or identical galanin sequences can be present also in tissues of other species. Biological significance: This study is first to provide an evidence of the presence of short N-terminal galanin fragments in vivo in a biological system and provides further foundations for the previous studies using synthetized short N-terminal galanin fragments.

  • 36.
    Ingberg, Edvin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Dock, Hua
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Ström, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Effect of laser Doppler flowmetry and occlusion time on outcome variability and mortality in rat middle cerebral artery occlusion: inconclusive results2018In: BMC neuroscience (Online), ISSN 1471-2202, E-ISSN 1471-2202, Vol. 19, article id 24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Stroke is among the leading causes of death and disability. Although intense research efforts have provided promising treatment options in animals, most clinical trials in humans have failed and the therapeutic options are few. Several factors have been suggested to explain this translational difficulty, particularly concerning methodology and study design. Consistent infarcts and low mortality might be desirable in some, but not all, studies. Here, we aimed to investigate whether the use of laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and the occlusion time (60 vs. 45 min) affected outcome variability and mortality in a rat stroke model. Eighty ovariectomized female Wistar rats were subjected to ischemic stroke using intraluminal filament middle cerebral artery occlusion with or without LDF and with occlusion times of 45 or 60 min. Outcome was evaluated by triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining of brain slices to measure infarct size and a modified sticky tape test. Results: Neither LDF nor occlusion times of 45 versus 60 min significantly affected mortality, outcome variability or outcome severity. Conclusions: Due to the unexpectedly high mortality and variability the statistical power was very low and thus the results were inconclusive.

  • 37.
    Ingberg, Edvin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Dock, Hua
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Ström, Jakob O
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Vårdvetenskapligt Forskningscentrum/Centre for Health Sciences, Örebro University Hospital, Region Örebro Län, Örebro, Sweden / School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden..
    Method parameters’ impact on mortality and variability in mouse stroke experiments: a meta-analysis2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although hundreds of promising substances have been tested in clinical trials, thrombolysis currently remains the only specifi c pharmacological treatment for ischemic stroke. Poor quality, e.g. low statistical power, in the preclinical studies has been suggested to play an important role in these failures. Therefore, it would be attractive to use animal models optimized to minimize unnecessary mortality and outcome variability, or at least to be able to power studies more exactly by predicting variability and mortality given a certain experimental setup. The possible combinations of methodological parameters are innumerous, and an experimental comparison of them all is therefore not feasible. As an alternative approach, we extracted data from 334 experimental mouse stroke articles and, using a hypothesis-driven meta-analysis, investigated the method parameters’ impact on infarct size variability and mortality. The use of Swiss and C57BL6 mice as well as permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery rendered the lowest variability of the infarct size while the emboli methods increased variability. The use of Swiss mice increased mortality. Our study offers guidance for researchers striving to optimize mouse stroke models.

  • 38.
    Ingberg, Edvin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics.
    Gudjonsdottir, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Ström, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Council Örebro, Sweden; University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Elevated body swing test after focal cerebral ischemia in rodents: methodological considerations2015In: BMC neuroscience (Online), ISSN 1471-2202, E-ISSN 1471-2202, Vol. 16, no 50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The elevated body swing test (EBST) is a behavioral test used to evaluate experimental stroke in rodents. The basic idea is that when the animal is suspended vertically by the tail, it will swing its head laterally to the left or right depending on lesion side. In a previous study from our lab using the EBST after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo), rats swung contralateral to the infarct day 1 post-MCAo, but ipsilateral day 3 post-MCAo. This shift was unexpected and prompted us to perform the present study. First, the literature was systematically reviewed to elucidate whether a similar shift had been noticed before, and if consensus existed regarding swing direction. Secondly, an experiment was conducted to systematically investigate the suggested behavior. Eighty-three adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to MCAo or sham surgery and the EBST was performed up to 7 days after the lesion. Results: Both experimentally and through systematic literature review, the present study shows that the direction of biased swing activity in the EBST for rodents after cerebral ischemia can differ and even shift over time in some situations. The EBST curve for females was significantly different from that of males after the same occlusion time (p = 0.023). Conclusions: This study highlights the importance of adequate reporting of behavioral tests for lateralization and it is concluded that the EBST cannot be recommended as a test for motor asymmetry after MCAo in rats.

  • 39.
    Ingberg, Edvin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ström, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. veÖrebro University Hospital, Sweden; Unirsity of Örebro, Sweden.
    Effects of high and low 17 beta-estradiol doses on focal cerebral ischemia in rats2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, no 20228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The majority of the numerous animal studies of the effects of estrogens on cerebral ischemia have reported neuroprotective results, but a few have shown increased damage. Differences in hormone administration methods, resulting in highly different 17 beta-estradiol levels, may explain the discrepancies in previously reported effects. The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that it is the delivered dose per se, and not the route and method of administration, that determines the effect, and that high doses are damaging while lower doses are protective. One hundred and twenty ovariectomized female Wistar rats (n = 40 per group) were randomized into three groups, subcutaneously administered different doses of 17 beta-estradiol and subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. The modified sticky tape test was performed after 24 h and the rats were subsequently sacrificed for infarct size measurements. In contrast to our hypothesis, a significant negative correlation between 17 beta-estradiol dose and infarct size was found (p = 0.018). Thus, no support was found for the hypothesis that 17 beta-estradiol can be both neuroprotective and neurotoxic merely depending on dose. In fact, on the contrary, the findings indicate that the higher the dose of 17 beta-estradiol, the smaller the infarct.

  • 40.
    Ingberg, Edvin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Ström, Jakob O
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Vårdvetenskapligt Forskningscentrum/Centre for Health Sciences, Örebro University Hospital, Region Örebro Län, Örebro, Sweden / School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden..
    Effects of high and low 17β-estradiol doses on focal cerebral ischemia in rats2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The majority of the numerous animal studies of the effects of estrogens on cerebral ischemia have reported neuroprotective results, but a few have shown increased damage. Differences in hormone administration methods, resulting in highly different 17β-estradiol levels, may explain the discrepancies in previously reported effects. The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that it is the delivered dose per se, and not the route and method of administration, that determines the effect, and that high doses are damaging while lower doses are protective. One hundred and twenty ovariectomized female Wistar rats (n=40 per group) were randomized into three groups, subcutaneously administered different doses of 17β-estradiol and subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. The modifi ed sticky tape test was performed after 24 h and the rats were subsequently sacrifi ced for infarct size measurements. In contrast to our hypothesis, a signifi cant negative correlation between 17β-estradiol dose and infarct size was found (p=0.018). Thus, no support was found for the hypothesis that 17β-estradiol can be both neuroprotective and neurotoxic merely depending on dose. In fact, on the contrary, the fi ndings indicate that the higher the dose of 17β-estradiol, the smaller the infarct.

  • 41.
    Ivars, Katrin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nelson Follin, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ström, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Correction: Development of Salivary Cortisol Circadian Rhythm and Reference Intervals in Full-Term Infants2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 3, article id e0151888Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Cortisol concentrations in plasma display a circadian rhythm in adults and children older than one year. Earlier studies report divergent results regarding when cortisol circadian rhythm is established. The present study aims to investigate at what age infants develop a circadian rhythm, as well as the possible influences of behavioral regularity and daily life trauma on when the rhythm is established. Furthermore, we determine age-related reference intervals for cortisol concentrations in saliva during the first year of life.

    METHODS:

    130 healthy full-term infants were included in a prospective, longitudinal study with saliva sampling on two consecutive days, in the morning (07:30-09:30), noon (10:00-12:00) and evening (19:30-21:30), each month from birth until the infant was twelve months old. Information about development of behavioral regularity and potential exposure to trauma was obtained from the parents through the Baby Behavior Questionnaire and the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events checklist.

    RESULTS:

    A significant group-level circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol secretion was established at one month, and remained throughout the first year of life, although there was considerable individual variability. No correlation was found between development of cortisol circadian rhythm and the results from either the Baby Behavior Questionnaire or the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events checklist. The study presents salivary cortisol reference intervals for infants during the first twelve months of life.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Cortisol circadian rhythm in infants is already established by one month of age, earlier than previous studies have shown. The current study also provides first year age-related reference intervals for salivary cortisol levels in healthy, full-term infants.

  • 42.
    Ivars, Katrin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nelson Follin, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ström, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Development of Salivary Cortisol Circadian Rhythm and Reference Intervals in Full-Term Infants2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 6, article id e0129502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Cortisol concentrations in plasma display a circadian rhythm in adults and children older than one year. Earlier studies report divergent results regarding when cortisol circadian rhythm is established. The present study aims to investigate at what age infants develop a circadian rhythm, as well as the possible influences of behavioral regularity and daily life trauma on when the rhythm is established. Furthermore, we determine age-related reference intervals for cortisol concentrations in saliva during the first year of life. Methods 130 healthy full-term infants were included in a prospective, longitudinal study with saliva sampling on two consecutive days, in the morning (07:30-09:30), noon (10:00-12:00) and evening (19:30-21:30), each month from birth until the infant was twelve months old. Information about development of behavioral regularity and potential exposure to trauma was obtained from the parents through the Baby Behavior Questionnaire and the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events checklist. Results A significant group-level circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol secretion was established at one month, and remained throughout the first year of life, although there was considerable individual variability. No correlation was found between development of cortisol circadian rhythm and the results from either the Baby Behavior Questionnaire or the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events checklist. The study presents salivary cortisol reference intervals for infants during the first twelve months of life. Conclusions Cortisol circadian rhythm in infants is already established by one month of age, earlier than previous studies have shown. The current study also provides first year age-related reference intervals for salivary cortisol levels in healthy, full-term infants.

  • 43.
    Ivars, Katrin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Nelson, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Department of Quality and Patient Safety, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ström, Jakob O.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Development of salivary cortisol circadian rhythm in preterm infants2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 8, article id e0182685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate at what age preterm infants develop a salivary cortisol circadian rhythm and identify whether it is dependent on gestational age and/or postnatal age. To evaluate whether salivary cortisol circadian rhythm development is related to behavioral regularity. To elucidate salivary cortisol levels in preterm infants during the first year of life.

    METHODS: This prospective, longitudinal study included 51 preterm infants. 130 healthy full-term infants served as controls. Monthly salivary cortisol levels were obtained in the morning (07:30-09:30), at noon (10:00-12:00), and in the evening (19:30-21:30), beginning at gestational age week 28-32 and continuing until twelve months corrected age. Behavioral regularity was studied using the Baby Behavior Questionnaire.

    RESULTS: A salivary cortisol circadian rhythm was established by one month corrected age and persisted throughout the first year. The preterm infants showed a cortisol pattern increasingly more alike the full-term infants as the first year progressed. The preterm infants increase in behavioral regularity with age but no correlation was found between the development of salivary cortisol circadian rhythm and the development of behavior regularity. The time to establish salivary cortisol circadian rhythm differed between preterm and full-term infants according to postnatal age (p = 0.001) and was dependent on gestational age. Monthly salivary cortisol levels for preterm infants from birth until twelve months are presented. Additional findings were that topical corticosteroid medication was associated with higher concentrations of salivary cortisol (p = 0.02) and establishment of salivary cortisol circadian rhythm occurred later in infants treated with topical corticosteroid medication (p = 0.02).

    CONCLUSIONS: Salivary cortisol circadian rhythm is established by one month corrected age in preterm infants. Establishment of salivary cortisol circadian rhythm is related to gestational age rather than to postnatal age. Salivary cortisol circadian rhythm development is not related to behavioral regularity.

  • 44.
    Kander, Thomas
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital Lund, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anna
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Taune, Victor
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Schott, Ulf
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital Lund, Sweden.
    Tynngård, Nahreen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Assessment of Haemostasis in Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation by Use of Point-of-Care Assays and Routine Coagulation Tests, in Critically Ill Patients; A Prospective Observational Study2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 3, p. e0151202-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) relates to the consumption of coagulation factors and platelets with bleeding and micro thrombosis events. Aim The aim of this study was to compare haemostasis parameters in critically ill patients with DIC versus patients without DIC, and in survivors versus non-survivors over time. Correlations between the DIC-score, the degree of organ failure and the haemostasis were assessed. Method Patients admitted to the intensive care unit with a condition known to be associated with DIC and with an expected length of stay of &gt;3 days were included. Routine laboratory tests, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, platelet count, fibrinogen concentration and D-dimer were measured. Coagulation and platelet function were assessed with two point-of-care devices; Multiplate and ROTEM. DIC scores were calculated according to the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis and Japanese Association for Acute Medicine. Results Blood was sampled on days 0-1, 2-3 and 4-10 from 136 patients with mixed diagnoses during 290 sampling events. The point-of-care assays indicated a hypocoagulative response (decreased platelet aggregation and reduced clot strength) in patients with DIC and, over time, in non-survivors compared to survivors. Patients with DIC as well as non-survivors had decreased fibrinolysis as shown by ROTEM. DIC scores were higher in non-survivors than in survivors. Conclusions Patients with DIC displayed signs of a hypocoagulative response and impaired fibrinolysis, which was also evident over time in non-survivors. Patients with DIC had a higher mortality rate than non-DIC patients, and DIC scores were higher in non-survivors than in survivors.

  • 45.
    Karlén, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Hedmark, Max
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olsen Faresjö, Åshild
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Early Psychosocial Exposures, Hair Cortisol Levels, and Disease Risk2015In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 135, no 6, p. E1450-E1457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Early psychosocial exposures are increasingly recognized as being crucial to health throughout life. A possible mechanism could be physiologic dysregulation due to stress. Cortisol in hair is a new biomarker assessing long-term hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. The objective was to investigate whether early-life adverse psychosocial circumstances influence infant cortisol levels in hair and health outcomes in children prospectively until age 10. METHODS: A cohort study in the general community using a questionnaire covering 11 psychosocial items in the family during pregnancy and the cumulative incidence of diagnoses until age 10 years in 1876 children. Cortisol levels in hair were measured by using a radioimmunoassay in those with sufficient hair samples at age 1, yielding a subsample of n = 209. RESULTS: Children with added psychosocial exposures had higher infant cortisol levels in hair (B = 0.40, P less than .0001, adjusted for gender and size for gestational age) in a cumulative manner and were significantly more often affected by 12 of the 14 most common childhood diseases, with a general pattern of increasing odds ratios. CONCLUSIONS: The findings support the model of physiologic dysregulation as a plausible mechanism by which the duration and number of early detrimental psychosocial exposures determine health outcomes. The model indicates that the multiplicity of adversities should be targeted in future interventions and could help to identify children who are at high risk of poor health. Furthermore, given the prolonged nature of exposure to a stressful social environment, the novel biomarker of cortisol in hair could be of major importance.

  • 46.
    Kawa, Lizan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Barde, Swapnali
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Arborelius, Ulf P.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Agoston, Denes
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uniformed Serv University of Health Science, MD 20814 USA.
    Risling, Marten
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hokfelt, Tomas
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Expression of galanin and its receptors are perturbed in a rodent model of mild, blast-induced traumatic brain injury2016In: Experimental Neurology, ISSN 0014-4886, E-ISSN 1090-2430, Vol. 279, p. 159-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The symptomatology, mood and cognitive disturbances seen in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild blast-induced traumatic brain injury (mbTBI) overlap considerably. However the pathological mechanisms underlying the two conditions are currently unknown. The neuropeptide galanin has been suggested to play a role in the development of stress and mood disorders. Here we applied bio- and histochemical methods with the aim to elucidate the nature of any changes in the expression of galanin and its receptors in a rodent model of mbTBI. In situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction studies revealed significant, injury induced changes, in some cases lasting at least for one week, in the mRNA levels of galanin and/or its three receptors, galanin receptor 1-3 (GalR1-3). Such changes were seen in several forebrain regions, and the locus coeruleus. In the ventral periaqueductal gray GalR1 mRNA levels were increased, while GalR2 were decreased. Analysis of galanin peptide levels using radioimmunoassay demonstrated an increase in several brain regions including the locus coeruleus, dorsal hippocampal formation and amygdala. These findings suggest a role for the galanin system in the endogenous response to mbTBI, and that pharmacological studies of the effects of activation or inhibition of different galanin receptors in combination with functional assays of behavioral recovery may reveal promising targets for new therapeutic strategies in mbTBI. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 47.
    Kilebrant, Sophie
    et al.
    Regional Vastra Gotaland Child and Youth Habilitat, Sweden.
    Braathen, Gunnar
    Regional Vastra Gotaland Child and Youth Habilitat, Sweden.
    Emilsson, Roger
    Regional Vastra Gotaland Child and Youth Habilitat, Sweden.
    Glansen, Ulla
    Regional Vastra Gotaland Child and Youth Habilitat, Sweden.
    Soderpalm, Ann-Charlott
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Zetterlund, Bo
    Regional Vastra Gotaland Child and Youth Habilitat, Sweden.
    Westerberg, Barbro
    Regional Vastra Gotaland Child and Youth Habilitat, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Swolin-Eide, Diana
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION THERAPY IN CHILDREN WITH SEVERE MOTOR DISABILITIES2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 223-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study the effect of whole-body vibration therapy on bone mass, bone turnover and body composition in severely disabled children. Methods: Nineteen non-ambulatory children aged 5.1-16.3 years (6 males, 13 females) with severe motor disabilities participated in an intervention programme with standing exercise on a self-controlled dynamic platform, which included whole-body vibration therapy (vibration, jump and rotation movements). Whole-body vibration therapy was performed at 40-42 Hz, with an oscillation amplitude of 0.2 mm, 5-15 min/treatment, twice/week for 6 months. Bone mass parameters and bone markers were measured at the study start, and after 6 and 12 months. Results: Whole-body vibration therapy was appreciated by the children. Total-body bone mineral density increased during the study period (p less than0.05). Z-scores for total-body bone mineral density ranged from -5.10 to -0.60 at study start and remained unchanged throughout. Approximately 50% of the subjects had increased levels of carboxy-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen and decreased levels of osteocalcin at the start. Body mass index did not change during the intervention period, but had increased by the 12-month follow-up (pless than 0.05). Conclusion: Whole-body vibration therapy appeared to be well tolerated by children with severe motor disabilities. Total-body bone mineral density increased after 6 months of whole-body vibration therapy. Higher carboxy-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen and lower osteocalcin values indicated that severely disabled children have a reduced capacity for bone acquisition.

  • 48.
    Kumar Jeengar, Manish
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. National Institute Pharmaceut Educ and Research Institute, India.
    Thummuri, Dinesh
    National Institute Pharmaceut Educ and Research Institute, India.
    Magnusson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Naidu, V. G. M.
    National Institute Pharmaceut Educ and Research Institute, India; National Institute Pharmaceut Educ and Research Institute, India.
    Uppugunduri, Srinivas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Uridine Ameliorates Dextran Sulfate Sodium (DSS)-Induced Colitis in Mice2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 3924Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uridine, one of the four components that comprise RNA, has attracted attention as a novel therapeutic modulator of inflammation. However, very little is known about its effect on intestinal inflammation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential protective effect of intracolonic administered uridine against DSS induced colitis in male C57BL/6 mice. Intracolonic instillation of 3 doses of uridine 1 mg/Kg (lower dose), 5 mg/Kg (medium dose), and 10 mg/Kg (higher dose) in saline was performed daily. Uridine at medium and high dose significantly reduced the severity of colitis (DAI score) and alleviated the macroscopic and microscopic signs of the disease. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1 beta and TNF in serum as well as mRNA expression in colon were significantly reduced in the uridine treated groups. Moreover, colon tissue myloperoxidase activities, protein expression of IL-6, TNF-alpha, COX-2, P-NFkB and P-Ikk-alpha beta in the colon tissues were significantly reduced in medium and high dose groups. These findings demonstrated that local administration of uridine alleviated experimental colitis in male C57BL/6 mice accompanied by the inhibition of neutrophil infiltration and NF-kappa B signaling. Thus, Uridine may be a promising candidate for future use in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

  • 49.
    Larsson, A.
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Tynngård, Nahreen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Kander, T.
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital Lund, Sweden.
    Bonnevier, J.
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital Lund, Sweden.
    Schott, U.
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital Lund, Sweden.
    Comparison of point-of-care hemostatic assays, routine coagulation tests, and outcome scores in critically ill patients2015In: Journal of critical care, ISSN 0883-9441, E-ISSN 1557-8615, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 1032-1038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purposes of the study are to compare point-of-care (POC) hemostatic devices in critically ill patients with routine laboratory tests and intensive care unit (ICU) outcome scoring assessments and to describe the time course of these variables in relation to mortality rate. Materials and methods: Patients admitted to the ICU with a prognosis of more than 3 days of stay were included. The POC devices, Multiplate platelet aggregometry, rotational thromboelastometry, and ReoRox viscoelastic tests, were used. All variables were compared between survivors and nonsurvivors. Point-of-care results were compared to prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, platelet count, fibrinogen concentration, and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score and Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3. Results: Blood was sampled on days 0 to 1, 2 to 3, and 4 to 10 from 114 patients with mixed diagnoses during 237 sampling events. Nonsurvivors showed POC and laboratory signs of hypocoagulation and decreased fibrinolysis over time compared to survivors. ReoRox detected differences between survivors and nonsurvivors better than ROTEM and Multiplate. Conclusions: All POC and routine laboratory tests showed a hypocoagulative response in nonsurvivors compared to survivors. ReoRox was better than ROTEM and Multiplate at detecting differences between surviving and nonsurviving ICU patients. However, Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3 showed the best association to mortality outcome.

  • 50.
    Lewander, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Larsson, B.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Wetterö, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Circulating cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in juvenile idiopathic arthritis2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 194-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Raised serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (sCOMP) has been reported to predict erosive disease in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), subnormal sCOMP levels have been associated with ongoing inflammation and growth retardation. In this study we aimed to assess sCOMP, C-reactive protein (CRP), and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 in children/adolescents with JIA and in referents.Method: We enrolled 52 JIA patients at planned outpatient visits and 54 inpatients with ongoing infection (infection referents). A total of 120 referents testing negative for immunoglobulin (Ig)E-mediated allergy (IgE referents) served as controls. All serum samples were analysed for COMP, IGF-1, and CRP.Results: The average sCOMP level was highest among the IgE referents and lowest among the infection referents. In the JIA patients, the level of sCOMP was not associated with the level of CRP or with clinical signs of disease activity.Conclusions: The results of this study do not support routine clinical analysis of sCOMP levels in patients with JIA.

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