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  • 1.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindblom, Gunnar
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Skoog, Susann
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    PET/CT versus conventional CT for detection of lymph node metastases in patients with locally advanced bladder cancer.2015In: BMC urology, ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 87-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: We studied patients treated with radical cystectomy for locally advanced bladder cancer to compare the results of both preoperative positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and conventional CT with the findings of postoperative histopathological evaluation of lymph nodes.

    METHODS: Patients who had bladder cancer and were candidates for cystectomy underwent preoperative PET/CT using 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and conventional CT. The results regarding lymph node involvement were independently evaluated by two experienced radiologists and were subsequently compared with histopathology results, the latter of which were reassessed by an experienced uropathologist (HO).

    RESULTS: There were 54 evaluable patients (mean age 68 years, 47 [85 %] males and 7 [15 %] females) with pT and pN status as follows: < pT2-14 (26 %), pT2-10 (18 %), and > pT2-30 (56 %); pN0 37 (69 %) and pN+ 17 (31 %). PET/CT showed positive lymph nodes in 12 patients (22 %), and 7 of those cases were confirmed by histopathology; the corresponding results for conventional CT were 11 (20 %) and 7 patients (13 %), respectively. PET/CT had 41 % sensitivity, 86 % specificity, 58 % PPV, and 76 % NPV, whereas the corresponding figures for conventional CT were 41 %, 89 %, 64 %, and 77 %. Additional analyses of the right and left side of the body or in specified anatomical regions gave similar results.

    CONCLUSIONS: In this study, PET/CT and conventional CT had similar low sensitivity in detecting and localizing regional lymph node metastasis in bladder cancer.

  • 2.
    Alkaissi, Hammoudi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Ekstrand, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Jawad, Aksa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Nielsen, Jesper Bo
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Havarinasab, Said
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Genes Related to Renal Mercury Concentrations in Mice2016In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 124, no 7, p. 920-926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Following human mercury (Hg) exposure, the metal accumulates in considerable concentrations in kidney, liver, and brain. Although the toxicokinetics of Hg have been studied extensively, factors responsible for interindividual variation in humans are largely unknown. Differences in accumulation of renal Hg between inbred mouse strains suggest a genetic interstrain variation regulating retention or/and excretion of Hg. A. SW, DBA/2 and BALB/C mouse strains accumulate higher amounts of Hg than B10.S.

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to find candidate genes associated with regulation of renal Hg concentrations.

    METHODS: A. SW, B10.S and their F1 and F2 offspring were exposed for 6 weeks to 2.0 mg Hg/L drinking water. Genotyping with microsatellites was conducted on 84 F2 mice for genome-wide scanning with ion pair reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (IP RP HPLC). Quantitative trait loci (QTL) were established. Denaturing HPLC was used to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms for haplotyping and fine mapping in 184 and 32 F2 mice, respectively. Candidate genes (Pprc1, Btrc and Nfkb2) verified by fine mapping and QTL were further investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Genes enhanced by Pprc1 (Nrf1 and Nrf2) were included for gene expression analysis.

    RESULTS: Renal Hg concentrations differed significantly between A. SW and B10. S mice and between males and females within each strain. QTL analysis showed a peak logarithm of odds ratio score 5.78 on chromosome 19 (p = 0.002). Haplotype and fine mapping associated the Hg accumulation with Pprc1, which encodes PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC), a coactivator for proteins involved in detoxification. Pprc1 and two genes coactivated by Pprc1 (Nrf1 and Nrf2) had significantly lower gene expression in the A. SW strain than in the B10. S strain.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study supports Pprc1 as a key regulator for renal Hg excretion.

  • 3.
    Alkaissi, Hammoudi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Havarinasab, Said
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, Jesper Bo
    Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Bank1 and NF-kappaB as key regulators in anti-nucleolar antibody development2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e0199979Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic autoimmune rheumatic disorders (SARD) represent important causes of morbidity and mortality in humans. The mechanisms triggering autoimmune responses are complex and involve a network of genetic factors. Mercury-induced autoimmunity (HgIA) in mice is an established model to study the mechanisms of the development of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), which is a hallmark in the diagnosis of SARD. A.SW mice with HgIA show a significantly higher titer of antinucleolar antibodies (ANoA) than the B10.S mice, although both share the same MHC class II (H-2). We applied a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to their Hg-exposed F2 offspring to investigate the non-MHC genes involved in the development of ANoA. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis showed a peak logarithm of odds ratio (LOD) score of 3.05 on chromosome 3. Microsatellites were used for haplotyping, and fine mapping was conducted with next generation sequencing. The candidate genes Bank1 (B-cell scaffold protein with ankyrin repeats 1) and Nfkbl (nuclear factor kappa B subunit 1) were identified by additional QTL analysis. Expression of the Bank1 and Nfkb1 genes and their downstream target genes involved in the intracellular pathway (Tlr9,II6, Tnf) was investigated in mercury-exposed A.SW and B10.S mice by real-time PCR. Bank1 showed significantly lower gene expression in the A.SW strain after Hg-exposure, whereas the B10.S strain showed no significant difference. Nfkb1, Tlr9, II6 and Tnf had significantly higher gene expression in the A.SW strain after Hg-exposure, while the B10.S strain showed no difference. This study supports the roles of Bank1 (produced mainly in B-cells) and Nfkbl (produced in most immune cells) as key regulators of ANoA development in HgIA.

  • 4.
    Anders Eriksson, Mats
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Lieden, Agne
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Bremer, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics. Division of Clinical Genetics, University Hospital, Link.
    Wincent, Josephine
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sahlin, Ellika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gillberg, Christopher
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Fernell, Elisabeth
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Anderlid, Britt-Marie
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Rare copy number variants are common in young children with autism spectrum disorder2015In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 104, no 6, p. 610-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimSeveral studies have suggested that rare copy number variants (CNVs) are an important genetic contributor to autism spectrum disorders. The aims of the study were to use chromosomal microarray to investigate the presence of rare copy number variants in a population-based cohort of well-characterised young children with autism spectrum disorders and to relate the genetic results to neurodevelopmental profiles and medical conditions. MethodsWe performed chromosomal microarray on samples from 162 children who had been referred to the Stockholm Autism Centre for Young Children in Sweden after being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder between 20 and 54months of age. ResultsPathogenic aberrations were detected in 8.6% of the children and variants of uncertain significance were present in another 8.6%. CNVs were more frequent in children with congenital malformations or dysmorphic features as well as in the subgroup with intellectual disability. ConclusionOur results support the use of chromosomal microarray methods for the first tier genetic analysis of autism spectrum disorder. However, it is likely in the near future that chromosomal microarray methods will probably be replaced by whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing technologies in clinical genetic testing.

  • 5.
    Bausch, Birke
    et al.
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Schiavi, Francesca
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Ni, Ying
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patocs, Attila
    Semmelweis University, Hungary; Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Ngeow, Joanne
    National Cancer Centre Singapore, Singapore; Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Wellner, Ulrich
    University of Lubeck, Germany.
    Malinoc, Angelica
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Taschin, Elisa
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Barbon, Giovanni
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Lanza, Virginia
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Stenman, Adam
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Larsson, Catharina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Svahn, Fredrika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Chen, Jin-Lian
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Marquard, Jessica
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Fraenkel, Merav
    Hadassah Hebrew University, Israel.
    Walter, Martin A.
    University Hospital, Switzerland.
    Peczkowska, Mariola
    Institute Cardiol, Poland.
    Prejbisz, Aleksander
    Institute Cardiol, Poland.
    Jarzab, Barbara
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre and Institute Oncol, Poland.
    Hasse-Lazar, Kornelia
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre and Institute Oncol, Poland.
    Petersenn, Stephan
    Centre Endocrine Tumors, Germany.
    Moeller, Lars C.
    University of Duisburg Essen, Germany.
    Meyer, Almuth
    HELIOS Klin, Germany.
    Reisch, Nicole
    Ludwigs Maximilians University of Munich, Germany.
    Trupka, Arnold
    City Hospital, Germany.
    Brase, Christoph
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Galiano, Matthias
    University Hospital Erlangen, Germany.
    Preuss, Simon F.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Kwok, Pingling
    University of Regensburg, Germany.
    Lendvai, Nikoletta
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Berisha, Gani
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Makay, Ozer
    Ege University, Turkey.
    Boedeker, Carsten C.
    HELIOS Hanseklinikum Stralsund, Germany.
    Weryha, Georges
    University of Nancy, France.
    Racz, Karoly
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Januszewicz, Andrzej
    Institute Cardiol, Poland.
    Walz, Martin K.
    Kliniken Essen Mitte, Germany; Kliniken Essen Mitte, Germany.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Opocher, Giuseppe
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Eng, Charis
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA; Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Neumann, Hartmut P. H.
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Clinical Characterization of the Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma Susceptibility Genes SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 for Gene-Informed Prevention2017In: JAMA Oncology, ISSN 2374-2437, E-ISSN 2374-2445, Vol. 3, no 9, p. 1204-1212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Effective cancer prevention is based on accurate molecular diagnosis and results of genetic family screening, genotype-informed risk assessment, and tailored strategies for early diagnosis. The expanding etiology for hereditary pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas has recently included SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 as susceptibility genes. Clinical management guidelines for patients with germline mutations in these 4 newly included genes are lacking. OBJECTIVE To study the clinical spectra and age-related penetrance of individuals with mutations in the SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 genes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS This study analyzed the prospective, longitudinally followed up European-American-Asian Pheochromocytoma-Paraganglioma Registry for prevalence of SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 germline mutation carriers from 1993 to 2016. Genetic predictive testing and clinical investigation by imaging from neck to pelvis was offered to mutation-positive registrants and their relatives to clinically characterize the pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma diseases associated with mutations of the 4 new genes. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Prevalence and spectra of germline mutations in the SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 genes were assessed. The clinical features of SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 disease were characterized. RESULTS Of 972 unrelated registrants without mutations in the classic pheochromocytoma- and paraganglioma-associated genes (632 female [65.0%] and 340 male [35.0%]; age range, 8-80; mean [SD] age, 41.0 [13.3] years), 58 (6.0%) carried germline mutations of interest, including 29 SDHA, 20 TMEM127, 8 MAX, and 1 SDHAF2. Fifty-three of 58 patients (91%) had familial, multiple, extra-adrenal, and/or malignant tumors and/or were younger than 40 years. Newly uncovered are 7 of 63 (11%) malignant pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas in SDHA and TMEM127 disease. SDHA disease occurred as early as 8 years of age. Extra-adrenal tumors occurred in 28 mutation carriers (48%) and in 23 of 29 SDHA mutation carriers (79%), particularly with head and neck paraganglioma. MAX disease occurred almost exclusively in the adrenal glands with frequently bilateral tumors. Penetrance in the largest subset, SDHA carriers, was 39% at 40 years of age and is statistically different in index patients (45%) vs mutation-carrying relatives (13%; P amp;lt; .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 genes may contribute to hereditary pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. Genetic testing is recommended in patients at clinically high risk if the classic genes are mutation negative. Gene-specific prevention and/or early detection requires regular, systematic whole-body investigation.

  • 6.
    Bivik Eding, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Domer, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wäster, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jerhammar, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Melanoma Growth and Progression After Ultraviolet A Irradiation: Impact of Lysosomal Exocytosis and Cathepsin Proteases2015In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 95, no 7, p. 792-797Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is a risk factor for development of malignant melanoma. UVA-induced lysosomal exocytosis and subsequent cell growth enhancement was studied in malignant melanoma cell lines and human skin melanocytes. UVA irradiation caused plasma membrane damage that was rapidly repaired by calcium-dependent lysosomal exocytosis. Lysosomal content was released into the culture medium directly after irradiation and such conditioned media stimulated the growth of non-irradiated cell cultures. By comparing melanocytes and melanoma cells, it was found that only the melanoma cells spontaneously secreted cathepsins into the surrounding medium. Melanoma cells from a primary tumour showed pronounced invasion ability, which was prevented by addition of inhibitors of cathepsins B, D and L. Proliferation was reduced by cathepsin L inhibition in all melanoma cell lines, but did not affect melanocyte growth. In conclusion, UVA-induced release of cathepsins outside cells may be an important factor that promotes melanoma growth and progression.

  • 7.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Bojmar, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Nitrite, a novel method to decrease ischemia/reperfusion injury in the rat liver2015In: World Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 1007-9327, E-ISSN 2219-2840, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 1775-1783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate whether nitrite administered prior to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) reduces liver injury.

    METHODS: Thirty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to 3 groups, including sham operated (n = 8), 45-min segmental ischemia of the left liver lobe (IR, n = 14) and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) preceded by the administration of 480 nmol of nitrite (n = 14). Serum transaminases were measured after 4 h of reperfusion. Liver microdialysate (MD) was sampled in 30-min intervals and analyzed for glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glycerol as well as the total nitrite and nitrate (NOx). The NOx was measured in serum.

    RESULTS: Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) at the end of reperfusion was higher in the IR group than in the nitrite group (40 ± 6.8 μkat/L vs 22 ± 2.6 μkat/L, P = 0.022). Similarly, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was also higher in the I/R group than in the nitrite group (34 ± 6 μkat vs 14 ± 1.5 μkat, P = 0.0045). The NOx in MD was significantly higher in the nitrite group than in the I/R group (10.1 ± 2.9 μM vs 3.2 ± 0.9 μM, P = 0.031) after the administration of nitrite. During ischemia, the levels decreased in both groups and then increased again during reperfusion. At the end of reperfusion, there was a tendency towards a higher NOx in the I/R group than in the nitrite group (11.6 ± 0.7 μM vs 9.2 ± 1.1 μM, P = 0.067). Lactate in MD was significantly higher in the IR group than in the nitrite group (3.37 ± 0.18 mM vs 2.8 ± 0.12 mM, P = 0.01) during ischemia and the first 30 min of reperfusion. During the same period, glycerol was also higher in the IRI group than in the nitrite group (464 ± 38 μM vs 367 ± 31 μM, P = 0.049). With respect to histology, there were more signs of tissue damage in the I/R group than in the nitrite group, and 29% of the animals in the I/R group exhibited necrosis compared with none in the nitrite group. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) transcription increased between early ischemia (t = 15) and the end of reperfusion in both groups.

    CONCLUSION: Nitrite administered before liver ischemia in the rat liver reduces anaerobic metabolism and cell necrosis, which could be important in the clinical setting.

  • 8.
    Blanco, Ignacio
    et al.
    Bellvitge Institute Biomed Research IDIBELL, Spain.
    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Cuadras, Daniel
    Bellvitge Institute Biomed Research IDIBELL, Spain.
    Wang, Xianshu
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Barrowdale, Daniel
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Ruiz de Garibay, Gorka
    Bellvitge Institute Biomed Research IDIBELL, Spain.
    Librado, Pablo
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Sanchez-Gracia, Alejandro
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Rozas, Julio
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Bonifaci, Nuria
    Bellvitge Institute Biomed Research IDIBELL, Spain.
    McGuffog, Lesley
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Pankratz, Vernon S.
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Islam, Abul
    University of Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Mateo, Francesca
    Bellvitge Institute Biomed Research IDIBELL, Spain.
    Berenguer, Antoni
    Bellvitge Institute Biomed Research IDIBELL, Spain.
    Petit, Anna
    Bellvitge Institute Biomed Research IDIBELL, Spain.
    Catala, Isabel
    Bellvitge Institute Biomed Research IDIBELL, Spain.
    Brunet, Joan
    Hospital Josep Trueta, Spain.
    Feliubadalo, Lidia
    Bellvitge Institute Biomed Research IDIBELL, Spain.
    Tornero, Eva
    Bellvitge Institute Biomed Research IDIBELL, Spain.
    Benitez, Javier
    Spanish National Cancer Centre CNIO, Spain; Biomed Network Rare Disease, Spain.
    Osorio, Ana
    Spanish National Cancer Centre CNIO, Spain; Biomed Network Rare Disease, Spain.
    Cajal, Teresa Ramon Y.
    Hospital Santa Creu and Sant Pau, Spain.
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Aittomaki, Kristiina
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Arun, Banu K.
    University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre, TX 77030 USA.
    Toland, Amanda E.
    Ohio State University, OH 43210 USA.
    Karlan, Beth Y.
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Walsh, Christine
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Lester, Jenny
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Greene, Mark H.
    National Cancer Institute, MD USA.
    Mai, Phuong L.
    National Cancer Institute, MD USA.
    Nussbaum, Robert L.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Andrulis, Irene L.
    University of Toronto, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Domchek, Susan M.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA; University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Nathanson, Katherine L.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA; University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Rebbeck, Timothy R.
    University of Penn Perelman, PA 19104 USA; University of Penn Perelman, PA 19104 USA.
    Barkardottir, Rosa B.
    University of Iceland, Iceland; University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Jakubowska, Anna
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Lubinski, Jan
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Durda, Katarzyna
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Claes, Kathleen
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Van Maerken, Tom
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Diez, Orland
    Vall Hebron Research Institute VHIR, Spain; University of Autonoma Barcelona, Spain.
    Hansen, Thomas V.
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Jonson, Lars
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Gerdes, Anne-Marie
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Ejlertsen, Bent
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    de la Hoya, Miguel
    San Carlos Research Institute IdISSC, Spain.
    Caldes, Trinidad
    San Carlos Research Institute IdISSC, Spain.
    Dunning, Alison M.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Oliver, Clare
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Fineberg, Elena
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Cook, Margaret
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Peock, Susan
    University of Cambridge, England.
    McCann, Emma
    Glan Clwyd Gen Hospital, Wales.
    Murray, Alex
    Singleton Hospital, Wales.
    Jacobs, Chris
    Guys and St Thomas National Health Serv NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Pichert, Gabriella
    Guys and St Thomas National Health Serv NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Lalloo, Fiona
    Central Manchester University Hospital National Health Serv NHS Fdn, England.
    Chu, Carol
    Yorkshire Regional Genet Serv, England.
    Dorkins, Huw
    Kennedy Galton Centre, England.
    Paterson, Joan
    Addenbrookes Hospital, England.
    Ong, Kai-Ren
    Birmingham Womens Hospital Healthcare National Health Serv, England.
    Teixeira, Manuel R.
    University of Porto, Portugal; University of Porto, Portugal.
    Teixeira,
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, The Netherlands.
    Hogervorst, Frans B. L.
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, The Netherlands.
    van der Hout, Annemarie H.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Seynaeve, Caroline
    Erasmus University, Netherlands.
    van der Luijt, Rob B.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Devilee, Peter
    Leiden University, Netherlands; Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Wijnen, Juul T.
    Leiden University, Netherlands; Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Rookus, Matti A.
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.
    Vrije University of VJ University of Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Blok, Marinus J.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.
    Erasmus University, Netherlands.
    Aalfs, Cora M.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Rodriguez, Gustavo C.
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Phillips, Kelly-Anne A.
    Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Australia.
    Piedmonte, Marion
    Roswell Pk Cancer Institute, NY 14263 USA.
    Nerenstone, Stacy R.
    Hartford Hospital, CT USA.
    Bae-Jump, Victoria L.
    University of N Carolina, NC USA.
    OMalley, David M.
    Ohio State University, OH USA.
    Ratner, Elena S.
    Yale University, CT USA.
    Schmutzler, Rita K.
    University Hospital Cologne, Germany; University Hospital Cologne, Germany.
    Wappenschmidt, Barbara
    University Hospital Cologne, Germany; University Hospital Cologne, Germany.
    Rhiem, Kerstin
    University Hospital Cologne, Germany; University Hospital Cologne, Germany.
    Engel, Christoph
    University of Leipzig, Germany.
    Meindl, Alfons
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Ditsch, Nina
    University of Munich, Germany.
    Arnold, Norbert
    University of Kiel, Germany.
    Plendl, Hansjoerg J.
    University of Kiel, Germany.
    Niederacher, Dieter
    University of Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Sutter, Christian
    University of Heidelberg Hospital, Germany.
    Wang-Gohrke, Shan
    University Hospital Ulm, Germany.
    Steinemann, Doris
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Preisler-Adams, Sabine
    University of Munster, Germany.
    Kast, Karin
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda
    Charite, Germany.
    Gehrig, Andrea
    University of Wurzburg, Germany.
    Bojesen, Anders
    Vejle Hospital, Denmark.
    Sokilde Pedersen, Inge
    Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark.
    Sunde, Lone
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Birk Jensen, Uffe
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Thomassen, Mads
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Kruse, Torben A.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Foretova, Lenka
    Masaryk Mem Cancer Institute, Czech Republic.
    Peterlongo, Paolo
    Fdn Italiana Ric Cancro, Italy.
    Bernard, Loris
    Cogentech Cancer Genet Test Lab, Italy.
    Peissel, Bernard
    Fdn Ist Nazl Tumori INT, Italy.
    Scuvera, Giulietta
    Fdn Ist Nazl Tumori INT, Italy.
    Manoukian, Siranoush
    Fdn Ist Nazl Tumori INT, Italy.
    Radice, Paolo
    Fdn Ist Nazl Tumori INT, Italy.
    Ottini, Laura
    University of Roma La Sapienza, Italy.
    Montagna, Marco
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Agata, Simona
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Maugard, Christine
    Hop University of Strasbourg, France.
    Simard, Jacques
    Centre Hospital University of Quebec, Canada; University of Laval, Canada.
    Soucy, Penny
    Centre Hospital University of Quebec, Canada; University of Laval, Canada.
    Berger, Andreas
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria; Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Fink-Retter, Anneliese
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria; Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Singer, Christian F.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria; Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Rappaport, Christine
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria; Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Geschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria; Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Tea, Muy-Kheng
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria; Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Pfeiler, Georg
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria; Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    John, Esther M.
    Cancer Prevent Institute Calif, CA USA.
    Miron, Alex
    Dana Farber Cancer Institute, MA 02115 USA.
    Neuhausen, Susan L.
    Beckman Research Institute City Hope, CA USA.
    Beth Terry, Mary
    Columbia University, NY USA.
    Chung, Wendy K.
    Columbia University, NY USA.
    Daly, Mary B.
    Fox Chase Cancer Centre, PA 19111 USA.
    Goldgar, David E.
    University of Utah, UT USA.
    Janavicius, Ramunas
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Dorfling, Cecilia M.
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    van Rensburg, Elisabeth J.
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Fostira, Florentia
    National Centre Science Research Demokritos, Greece.
    Konstantopoulou, Irene
    National Centre Science Research Demokritos, Greece.
    Garber, Judy
    Harvard University, MA USA.
    Godwin, Andrew K.
    University of Kansas, KS 66103 USA.
    Olah, Edith
    National Institute Oncol, Hungary.
    Narod, Steven A.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Rennert, Gad
    Clalit National Israeli Cancer Control Centre, Israel; Carmel Hospital, Israel; B Rappaport Fac Med, Israel.
    Shimon Paluch, Shani
    Chaim Sheba Medical Centre, Israel.
    Laitman, Yael
    Chaim Sheba Medical Centre, Israel.
    Friedman, Eitan
    Chaim Sheba Medical Centre, Israel; Tel Aviv University, Israel.
    Liljegren, Annelie
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Rantala, Johanna
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stenmark Askmalm, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Loman, Niklas
    University of Lund Hospital, Sweden.
    Imyanitov, Evgeny N.
    NN Petrov Institute Oncol, Russia.
    Hamann, Ute
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Spurdle, Amanda B.
    Queensland Institute Medical Research, Australia.
    Healey, Sue
    Queensland Institute Medical Research, Australia.
    Weitzel, Jeffrey N.
    City Hope National Medical Centre, CA USA.
    Herzog, Josef
    City Hope National Medical Centre, CA USA.
    Margileth, David
    Care City Hope Clin Cancer Genet Commun Research Network, CA USA.
    Gorrini, Chiara
    University of Health Network, Canada.
    Esteller, Manel
    IDIBELL, Spain; University of Barcelona, Spain; Catalan Institute Research and Adv Studies ICREA, Spain.
    Gomez, Antonio
    IDIBELL, Spain.
    Sayols, Sergi
    IDIBELL, Spain.
    Vidal, Enrique
    IDIBELL, Spain.
    Heyn, Holger
    IDIBELL, Spain.
    Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique
    Institute Curie, France; Institute Curie, France; University of Paris 05, France.
    Leone, Melanie
    Hospital Civils Lyon, France.
    Barjhoux, Laure
    University of Lyon 1, France.
    Fassy-Colcombet, Marion
    Institute Curie, France.
    de Pauw, Antoine
    Institute Curie, France.
    Lasset, Christine
    University of Lyon 1, France; Centre Leon Berard, France.
    Fert Ferrer, Sandra
    Hop Hotel Dieu, France.
    Castera, Laurent
    Institute Curie, France.
    Berthet, Pascaline
    Centre Francois Baclesse, France.
    Cornelis, Francois
    Avicenne Hospital, France; Sud Francilien Hospital, France; University Hospital, France.
    Bignon, Yves-Jean
    University of Clermont Ferrand, France.
    Damiola, Francesca
    University of Lyon 1, France.
    Mazoyer, Sylvie
    University of Lyon 1, France.
    Sinilnikova, Olga M.
    Hospital Civils Lyon, France; University of Lyon 1, France.
    Maxwell, Christopher A.
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Vijai, Joseph
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Robson, Mark
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Kauff, Noah
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Corines, Marina J.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Villano, Danylko
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Cunningham, Julie
    Mayo Clin, MN USA; Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Lee, Adam
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Lindor, Noralane
    Mayo Clin Scottsdale, AZ USA.
    Lazaro, Conxi
    Bellvitge Institute Biomed Research IDIBELL, Spain.
    Easton, Douglas F.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Offit, Kenneth
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Chenevix-Trench, Georgia
    Queensland Institute Medical Research, Australia.
    Couch, Fergus J.
    Mayo Clin, MN USA; Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Antoniou, Antonis C.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Angel Pujana, Miguel
    Bellvitge Institute Biomed Research IDIBELL, Spain.
    Assessing Associations between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 Functional Module and Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 4, article id e0120020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While interplay between BRCA1 and AURKA-RHAMM-TPX2-TUBG1 regulates mammary epithelial polarization, common genetic variation in HMMR (gene product RHAMM) may be associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers. Following on these observations, we further assessed the link between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 functional module and risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Forty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers and subsequently analyzed using a retrospective likelihood approach. The association of HMMR rs299290 with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers was confirmed: per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04 - 1.15, p = 1.9 x 10(-4) (false discovery rate (FDR)-adjusted p = 0.043). Variation in CSTF1, located next to AURKA, was also found to be associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers: rs2426618 per-allele HR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.03 - 1.16, p = 0.005 (FDR-adjusted p = 0.045). Assessment of pairwise interactions provided suggestions (FDR-adjusted p(interaction) values greater than 0.05) for deviations from the multiplicative model for rs299290 and CSTF1 rs6064391, and rs299290 and TUBG1 rs11649877 in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following these suggestions, the expression of HMMR and AURKA or TUBG1 in sporadic breast tumors was found to potentially interact, influencing patients survival. Together, the results of this study support the hypothesis of a causative link between altered function of AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 and breast carcinogenesis in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

  • 9.
    Bojmar, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Haiying
    Children’s Cancer and Blood Foundation Laboratories, Departments of Pediatrics, and Cell and Developmental Biology, Drukier Institute for Children’s Health, Meyer Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA.
    Costa da Silva, Bruno
    Children’s Cancer and Blood Foundation Laboratories, Departments of Pediatrics, and Cell and Developmental Biology, Drukier Institute for Children’s Health, Meyer Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Vincent, Theresa
    Departments of Physiology and Biophysics and Cell and Developmental Biology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA / Department of Medicine, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Lyden, David
    Children’s Cancer and Blood Foundation Laboratories, Departments of Pediatrics, and Cell and Developmental Biology, Drukier Institute for Children’s Health, Meyer Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    miR-18a is regulated between progressive compartments of cancers, and incorporated in exosomes with the potential of creating premetastatic niches and predict cancer outcome2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ultimate cause of death for many cancer patients is the spread of the cancer via metastasis. Even so, there are still a lack of knowledge regarding the metastasis process. This study was performed to investigate the role of metastamirs in exosomes and their metastatic patterns. We used the well-established isogeneic murine cancer model of low metastatic 67NR cells, mimicking luminal/basal breast tumors, and highly metastatic 4T1 cells with characteristics of basal breast  tumors. We studied the exosomal properties and pre-metastatic effects in this metastasis model and compared human materials and exosomes of several other tumor types. Our data clearly demonstrated that exosomes from the highly metastatic cells home to the metastatic organs of their parental cells whereas exosomes from cells with low metastatic potential mostly located to lymph nodes. The exosome protein cargos also resembled their parental cells and potentially affects their target organs, and cells, differently. Furthermore, the exosomes from the highly metastatic cells had a more pronounced effect on tumor growth and pre-metastatic changes than the low metastatic exosomes. The microRNA-18a, a predictor of metastasis, was present to a higher extent in metastatic exosomes as compared to low metastatic exosomes, and altered the tumor progressive properties. Our findings support the role of exomirs as important players in the metastatic process, the value as biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets.

  • 10.
    Bruhn, H.
    et al.
    Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Strandeus, M.
    Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Lind, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Improved survival of Swedish glioblastoma patients treated according to Stupp2018In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 138, no 4, p. 332-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesThe median survival in glioblastoma (GBM) patients used to be less than 1year. Surgical removal of the tumor with subsequent concomitant radiation/temozolomide (the Stupp regimen) has been shown to prolong survival. The Stupp protocol was implemented in the county of Jonkoping in 2006. The purpose of this study was to examine if the Stupp treatment has prolonged overall survival, in an unselected patient cohort with histologically verified GBM. Material and MethodThis study includes all patients from the county of Jonkoping, with a diagnosis of GBM from January 2001 to December 2012. Patients were divided into 2 cohorts, 2001-2005 and 2006-2012, that is before and after implementation of the Stupp regimen. By reviewing the medical case notes, the dates of the histological diagnosis and of death were identified. The median and mean overall survival and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were calculated and compared between the 2 cohorts. ResultsThe mean survival was 110days longer in the cohort treated according to the Stupp regimen. Four patients in the 2006-2012 cohort and 1 patient in the 2001-2005 cohort are still alive. When comparing survival in patients with radical surgery vs biopsy, those that underwent radical surgery survived longer. The significance was slightly greater in the 2001-2005 cohort (mean 163 vs 344days, Pamp;lt;.001) than in the 2006-2012 cohort (mean 220 vs 397days, P=.02). ConclusionSurvival significantly improved after the implementation of the Stupp regimen in the study region of Sweden.

  • 11.
    Cauvi, D.M.
    et al.
    University of California, San Diego, CA, USA.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Pollard, K. Michael
    The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Autoimmune models2015In: Reference module in biomedical sciences, Elsevier, 2015, p. 413-438Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Models of autoimmunity fall into four categories: (a) those induced by immunization with self-antigen, (b) those induced by exogenous agents, (c) those which arise spontaneously, and (d) those which are produced by genetic manipulation. The autoimmunity exhibited by these models covers a spectrum of diseases which fall into the two broad categories, organ-specific and systemic autoimmunity. Animal models of autoimmune diseases have played an essential role in the discovery of many of mechanisms that result in the breaking of self-tolerance. This chapter describes a number of experimental animal models of autoimmunity and the underlying mechanisms that lead to disease.

  • 12.
    Christofer Juhlin, C.
    et al.
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Stenman, Adam
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Haglund, Felix
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Clark, Victoria E.
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Brown, Taylor C.
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Baranoski, Jacob
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Bilguvar, Kaya
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Goh, Gerald
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svahn, Fredrika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Rubinstein, Jill C.
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Caramuta, Stefano
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Yasuno, Katsuhito
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Guenel, Murat
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Backdahl, Martin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Prasad, Manju L.
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Korah, Reju
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Lifton, Richard P.
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Yale Centre Mendelian Genom, CT USA.
    Carling, Tobias
    Yale University, CT 06520 USA; Yale University, CT 06520 USA.
    Whole-exome sequencing defines the mutational landscape of pheochromocytoma and identifies KMT2D as a recurrently mutated gene2015In: Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer, ISSN 1045-2257, E-ISSN 1098-2264, Vol. 54, no 9, p. 542-554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As subsets of pheochromocytomas (PCCs) lack a defined molecular etiology, we sought to characterize the mutational landscape of PCCs to identify novel gene candidates involved in disease development. A discovery cohort of 15 PCCs wild type for mutations in PCC susceptibility genes underwent whole-exome sequencing, and an additional 83 PCCs served as a verification cohort for targeted sequencing of candidate mutations. A low rate of nonsilent single nucleotide variants (SNVs) was detected (6.1/sample). Somatic HRAS and EPAS1 mutations were observed in one case each, whereas the remaining 13 cases did not exhibit variants in established PCC genes. SNVs aggregated in apoptosis-related pathways, and mutations in COSMIC genes not previously reported in PCCs included ZAN, MITF, WDTC1, and CAMTA1. Two somatic mutations and one constitutional variant in the well-established cancer gene lysine (K)-specific methyltransferase 2D (KMT2D, MLL2) were discovered in one sample each, prompting KMT2D screening using focused exome-sequencing in the verification cohort. An additional 11 PCCs displayed KMT2D variants, of which two were recurrent. In total, missense KMT2D variants were found in 14 (11 somatic, two constitutional, one undetermined) of 99 PCCs (14%). Five cases displayed somatic mutations in the functional FYR/SET domains of KMT2D, constituting 36% of all KMT2D-mutated PCCs. KMT2D expression was upregulated in PCCs compared to normal adrenals, and KMT2D overexpression positively affected cell migration in a PCC cell line. We conclude that KMT2D represents a recurrently mutated gene with potential implication for PCC development. (c) 2015 The Authors. Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 13.
    Cordeddu, Viviana
    et al.
    Ist Super Sanita, Italy; University of G dAnnunzio, Italy.
    Yin, Jiani C.
    University of Toronto, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Virtanen, Carl
    University of Toronto, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Drunat, Severine
    Hop Robert Debre, France.
    Lepri, Francesca
    Bambino Gesu Pediat Hospital, Italy.
    De Luca, Alessandro
    Casa Sollievo Sofferenza Hospital, Italy.
    Rossi, Cesare
    St Orsola Marcello Malpighi Hospital, Italy.
    Ciolfi, Andrea
    Ist Super Sanita, Italy.
    Pugh, Trevor J.
    University of Toronto, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Bruselles, Alessandro
    Ist Super Sanita, Italy.
    Priest, James R.
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA; Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Pennacchio, Len A.
    University of Calif Berkeley, CA 94720 USA; US Department Energy Joint Genome Institute, CA 94598 USA.
    Lu, Zhibin
    University of Toronto, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Danesh, Arnavaz
    University of Toronto, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Quevedo, Rene
    University of Toronto, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Hamid, Alaa
    University of Toronto, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Martinelli, Simone
    Ist Super Sanita, Italy.
    Pantaleoni, Francesca
    Ist Super Sanita, Italy.
    Gnazzo, Maria
    Bambino Gesu Pediat Hospital, Italy.
    Daniele, Paola
    Casa Sollievo Sofferenza Hospital, Italy.
    Lissewski, Christina
    Otto von Guericke University, Germany.
    Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Stella, Lorenzo
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Odent, Sylvie
    Hop SUD, France.
    Philip, Nicole
    Hop Enfants la Timone, France.
    Faivre, Laurence
    Hop Enfants, France.
    Vlckova, Marketa
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; University Hospital Motol, Czech Republic.
    Seemanova, Eva
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; University Hospital Motol, Czech Republic.
    Digilio, Cristina
    Bambino Gesu Pediat Hospital, Italy.
    Zenker, Martin
    Otto von Guericke University, Germany.
    Zampino, Giuseppe
    University of Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Italy.
    Verloes, Alain
    Hop Robert Debre, France.
    Dallapiccola, Bruno
    Bambino Gesu Pediat Hospital, Italy.
    Roberts, Amy E.
    Boston Childrens Hospital, MA 02115 USA; Boston Childrens Hospital, MA 02115 USA.
    Cave, Helene
    Hop Robert Debre, France; University of Paris Diderot, France.
    Gelb, Bruce D.
    Icahn School Medical Mt Sinai, NY 10029 USA; Icahn School Medical Mt Sinai, NY 10029 USA; Icahn School Medical Mt Sinai, NY 10029 USA.
    Neel, Benjamin G.
    University of Toronto, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada; NYU, NY 10016 USA.
    Tartaglia, Marco
    Ist Super Sanita, Italy; Bambino Gesu Pediat Hospital, Italy.
    Activating Mutations Affecting the Dbl Homology Domain of SOS2 Cause Noonan Syndrome2015In: Human Mutation, ISSN 1059-7794, E-ISSN 1098-1004, Vol. 36, no 11, p. 1080-1087Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The RASopathies constitute a family of autosomal-dominant disorders whose major features include facial dysmorphism, cardiac defects, reduced postnatal growth, variable cognitive deficits, ectodermal and skeletal anomalies, and susceptibility to certain malignancies. Noonan syndrome (NS), the commonest RASopathy, is genetically heterogeneous and caused by functional dysregulation of signal transducers and regulatory proteins with roles in the RAS/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signal transduction pathway. Mutations in known disease genes account for approximately 80% of affected individuals. Here, we report that missense mutations altering Son of Sevenless, Drosophila, homolog 2 (SOS2), which encodes a RAS guanine nucleotide exchange factor, occur in a small percentage of subjects with NS. Four missense mutations were identified in five unrelated sporadic cases and families transmitting NS. Disease-causing mutations affected three conserved residues located in the Dbl homology (DH) domain, of which two are directly involved in the intramolecular binding network maintaining SOS2 in its autoinhibited conformation. All mutations were found to promote enhanced signaling from RAS to ERK. Similar to NS-causing SOS1 mutations, the phenotype associated with SOS2 defects is characterized by normal development and growth, as well as marked ectodermal involvement. Unlike SOS1 mutations, however, those in SOS2 are restricted to the DH domain.

  • 14.
    Couch, Fergus J.
    et al.
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA; Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Michailidou, Kyriaki
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A.
    University of S Florida, FL 33612 USA.
    Nord, Silje
    Radiumhosp, Norway.
    Lilyquist, Janna
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Olswold, Curtis
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Hallberg, Emily
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Agata, Simona
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Ahsan, Habibul
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA; University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA; University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Aittomaeki, Kristiina
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Ambrosone, Christine
    Roswell Pk Cancer Institute, NY 14263 USA.
    Andrulis, Irene L.
    Mt Sinai Hospital, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Anton-Culver, Hoda
    University of Calif Irvine, CA 92697 USA.
    Arndt, Volker
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Arun, Banu K.
    University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre, TX 77030 USA.
    Arver, Brita
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Barile, Monica
    Ist Europeo Oncol, Italy.
    Barkardottir, Rosa B.
    Landspitali University Hospital, Iceland; University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Barrowdale, Daniel
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Beckmann, Lars
    Institute Qual and Efficiency Health Care IQWiG, Germany.
    Beckmann, Matthias W.
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Benitez, Javier
    Spanish National Cancer Centre CNIO, Spain; Spanish National Cancer Centre CNIO, Spain; Biomed Network Rare Disease CIBERER, Spain.
    Blank, Stephanie V.
    NYU, NY 10016 USA.
    Blomqvist, Carl
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Bogdanova, Natalia V.
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Bojesen, Stig E.
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Bolla, Manjeet K.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Bonanni, Bernardo
    Ist Europeo Oncol, Italy.
    Brauch, Hiltrud
    Dr Margarete Fischer Bosch Institute Clin Pharmacol, Germany; University of Tubingen, Germany.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany; German Cancer Research Centre, Germany; National Centre Tumor Disease NCT, Germany.
    Burwinkel, Barbara
    Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Buys, Saundra S.
    University of Utah, UT 84112 USA.
    Caldes, Trinidad
    IdISSC, Spain.
    Caligo, Maria A.
    University of Pisa, Italy; University Hospital Pisa, Italy.
    Canzian, Federico
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Carpenter, Jane
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    NCI, MD 20850 USA.
    Chung, Wendy K.
    Columbia University, NY 10032 USA; Columbia University, NY 10032 USA.
    Claes, Kathleen B. M.
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Cox, Angela
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Cross, Simon S.
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Cunningham, Julie M.
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Czene, Kamila
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Daly, Mary B.
    Fox Chase Cancer Centre, PA 19111 USA.
    Damiola, Francesca
    University of Lyon, France.
    Darabi, Hatef
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    de la Hoya, Miguel
    IdISSC, Spain.
    Devilee, Peter
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Diez, Orland
    University Hospital Vall dHebron, Spain; University of Autonoma Barcelona, Spain.
    Ding, Yuan C.
    City Hope National Medical Centre, CA 91010 USA.
    Dolcetti, Riccardo
    CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute, Italy.
    Domchek, Susan M.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Dorfling, Cecilia M.
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel
    University of London London School Hyg and Trop Med, England.
    Dumont, Martine
    Centre Hospital University of Quebec, Canada; University of Laval, Canada.
    Dunning, Alison M.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Eccles, Diana M.
    University of Southampton, England.
    Ehrencrona, Hans
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Lund Hospital, Sweden.
    Ekici, Arif B.
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany; Comprehens Cancer Centre EMN, Germany.
    Eliassen, Heather
    Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Ellis, Steve
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Fasching, Peter A.
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Figueroa, Jonine
    NCI, MD 20850 USA.
    Flesch-Janys, Dieter
    University of Clin Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany; University of Clin Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany.
    Foersti, Asta
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany; Lund University, Sweden.
    Fostira, Florentia
    National Centre Science Research Demokritos, Greece.
    Foulkes, William D.
    McGill University, Canada.
    Friebel, Tara
    University of Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    Friedman, Eitan
    Chaim Sheba Medical Centre, Israel.
    Frost, Debra
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Gabrielson, Marike
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Gammon, Marilie D.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Ganz, Patricia A.
    Jonsson Comprehens Cancer Centre, CA 90095 USA; Jonsson Comprehens Cancer Centre, CA 90095 USA.
    Gapstur, Susan M.
    Amer Cancer Soc, GA 30303 USA.
    Garber, Judy
    Dana Farber Cancer Institute, MA 02215 USA.
    Gaudet, Mia M.
    Amer Cancer Soc, GA 30303 USA.
    Gayther, Simon A.
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Gerdes, Anne-Marie
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Ghoussaini, Maya
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Giles, Graham G.
    Cancer Council Victoria, Australia.
    Glendon, Gord
    Mt Sinai Hospital, Canada.
    Godwin, Andrew K.
    University of Kansas, KS 66205 USA.
    Goldberg, Mark S.
    McGill University, Canada; McGill University, Canada.
    Goldgar, David E.
    University of Utah, UT 84132 USA.
    Gonzalez-Neira, Anna
    Spanish National Cancer Research Centre CNIO, Spain.
    Greene, Mark H.
    NCI, MD 20850 USA.
    Gronwald, Jacek
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Guenel, Pascal
    CESP Centre Research Epidemiol and Populat Heatlh, France.
    Gunter, Marc
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Haeberle, Lothar
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Haiman, Christopher A.
    University of So Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Hamann, Ute
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Hansen, Thomas V. O.
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Hart, Steven
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Healey, Sue
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Heikkinen, Tuomas
    Heidelberg University, Germany; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Henderson, Brian E.
    University of So Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Herzog, Josef
    City Hope Clin Cancer Genet Community Research Network, CA 91010 USA.
    Hogervorst, Frans B. L.
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    Hollestelle, Antoinette
    Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    Hooning, Maartje J.
    Erasmus University, Netherlands.
    Hoover, Robert N.
    NCI, MD 20850 USA.
    Hopper, John L.
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Humphreys, Keith
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hunter, David J.
    Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Huzarski, Tomasz
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Imyanitov, Evgeny N.
    NN Petrov Oncology Research Institute, Russia.
    Isaacs, Claudine
    Georgetown University, DC 20007 USA.
    Jakubowska, Anna
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    James, Paul
    Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Australia; University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Janavicius, Ramunas
    State Research Institute, Lithuania.
    Birk Jensen, Uffe
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    John, Esther M.
    Cancer Prevent Institute Calif, CA 94538 USA.
    Jones, Michael
    Institute Cancer Research, England.
    Kabisch, Maria
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Kar, Siddhartha
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Karlan, Beth Y.
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Khan, Sofia
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Kibriya, Muhammad G.
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Knight, Julia A.
    Mt Sinai Hospital, Canada.
    Ko, Yon-Dschun
    Evangel Kliniken Bonn gGmbH, Germany.
    Konstantopoulou, Irene
    National Centre Science Research Demokritos, Greece.
    Kosma, Veli-Matti
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Kristensen, Vessela
    Radiumhosp, Norway.
    Kwong, Ava
    Hong Kong Hereditary Breast Cancer Family Registry, Peoples R China; University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Laitman, Yael
    Chaim Sheba Medical Centre, Israel.
    Lambrechts, Diether
    VIB, Belgium.
    Lazaro, Conxi
    IDIBELL Catalan Institute Oncol, Spain.
    Lee, Eunjung
    University of So Calif, CA 90032 USA.
    Le Marchand, Loic
    University of Cancer Centre, HI 96813 USA.
    Lester, Jenny
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Lindblom, Annika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lindor, Noralane
    Mayo Clin, AZ 85259 USA.
    Lindstrom, Sara
    Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Liu, Jianjun
    Genome Institute Singapore, Singapore.
    Long, Jirong
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA; Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA.
    Lubinski, Jan
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Mai, Phuong L.
    NCI, MD 20850 USA.
    Makalic, Enes
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Malone, Kathleen E.
    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre, WA 98109 USA; University of Washington, WA 98195 USA.
    Mannermaa, Arto
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Manoukian, Siranoush
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori INT, Italy.
    Margolin, Sara
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Marme, Frederik
    Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Martens, John W. M.
    Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    McGuffog, Lesley
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Meindl, Alfons
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Miller, Austin
    Roswell Pk Cancer Institute, NY 14263 USA.
    Milne, Roger L.
    Cancer Council Victoria, Australia.
    Miron, Penelope
    Case Western Reserve University, OH 44106 USA.
    Montagna, Marco
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Mazoyer, Sylvie
    University of Lyon, France.
    Mulligan, Anna M.
    University of Health Network, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Muranen, Taru A.
    Heidelberg University, Germany; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Nathanson, Katherine L.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Neuhausen, Susan L.
    City Hope National Medical Centre, CA 91010 USA.
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Nordestgaard, Borge G.
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Nussbaum, Robert L.
    Invitae Corp, CA 94107 USA.
    Offit, Kenneth
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10065 USA.
    Olah, Edith
    National Institute Oncol, Hungary.
    Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Olson, Janet E.
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Osorio, Ana
    Spanish National Cancer Centre CNIO, Spain.
    Park, Sue K.
    Seoul National University, South Korea; Seoul National University, South Korea.
    Peeters, Petra H.
    University of Medical Centre, Netherlands; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Peissel, Bernard
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori INT, Italy.
    Peterlongo, Paolo
    Fdn Ist FIRC Oncology Mol, Italy.
    Peto, Julian
    University of London London School Hyg and Trop Med, England.
    Phelan, Catherine M.
    University of S Florida, FL 33612 USA.
    Pilarski, Robert
    Ohio State University, OH 43210 USA.
    Poppe, Bruce
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Pylkaes, Katri
    University of Oulu, Finland; University of Oulu, Finland; University of Oulu, Finland.
    Radice, Paolo
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori INT, Italy.
    Rahman, Nazneen
    Institute Cancer Research, England.
    Rantala, Johanna
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Rappaport, Christine
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Rennert, Gad
    Clalit National Israeli Cancer Control Centre, Israel; Carmel Hospital, Israel; B Rappaport Fac Med, Israel.
    Richardson, Andrea
    Johns Hopkins University, MD 21205 USA.
    Robson, Mark
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10065 USA.
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Int Agency Research Canc, France.
    Rudolph, Anja
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Rutgers, Emiel J.
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Netherlands.
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    University of Granada, Spain; CIBER Epidemiol and Salud Public CIBERESP, Spain.
    Santella, Regina M.
    Columbia University, NY 10032 USA.
    Sawyer, Elinor J.
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Schmidt, Daniel F.
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Schmidt, Marjanka K.
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Netherlands.
    Schmutzler, Rita K.
    University Hospital Cologne, Germany; University Hospital Cologne, Germany.
    Schumacher, Fredrick
    University of So Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Scott, Rodney
    John Hunter Hospital, Australia.
    Senter, Leigha
    Ohio State University, OH 43210 USA.
    Sharma, Priyanka
    University of Kansas, KS 66205 USA.
    Simard, Jacques
    University of Laval, Canada.
    Singer, Christian F.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Sinilnikova, Olga M.
    University of Lyon, France; Hospital Civils Lyon, France.
    Soucy, Penny
    University of Laval, Canada.
    Southey, Melissa
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Steinemann, Doris
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique
    Institute Curie, France; University of Paris 05, France.
    Swerdlow, Anthony
    Institute Cancer Research, England.
    Szabo, Csilla I.
    NHGRI, MD 20892 USA.
    Tamimi, Rulla
    Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Tapper, William
    University of Southampton, England.
    Teixeira, Manuel R.
    Portuguese Oncology Institute, Portugal; University of Porto, Portugal.
    Teo, Soo-Hwang
    Cancer Research Initiat Fdn, Malaysia; University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Terry, Mary B.
    Columbia University, NY 10032 USA.
    Thomassen, Mads
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Thompson, Deborah
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Tihomirova, Laima
    Latvian Biomed Research and Study Centre, Latvia.
    Toland, Amanda E.
    Ohio State University, OH 43210 USA.
    Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Tomlinson, Ian
    University of Oxford, England; University of Oxford, England.
    Truong, Therese
    CESP Centre Research Epidemiol and Populat Heatlh, France.
    Tsimiklis, Helen
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Teule, Alex
    IDIBELL Catalan Institute Oncol, Spain.
    Tumino, Rosario
    Civ MP Arezzo Hospital, Italy; Civ MP Arezzo Hospital, Italy.
    Tung, Nadine
    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre, MA 02215 USA.
    Turnbull, Clare
    Institute Cancer Research, England.
    Ursin, Giski
    Institute Populat Based Cancer Research, Norway.
    van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.
    Erasmus University, Netherlands.
    van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda
    Charite, Germany.
    Wang, Zhaoming
    NCI, MD 20877 USA.
    Wang-Gohrke, Shan
    University Hospital Ulm, Germany.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Institute Populat Based Cancer Research, Norway; University of Tromso, Norway; Folkhalsan Research Centre, Finland.
    Weitzel, Jeffrey N.
    City Hope Clin Cancer Genet Community Research Network, CA 91010 USA.
    Whittemore, Alice
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Wildiers, Hans
    University Hospital, Belgium.
    Winqvist, Robert
    University of Oulu, Finland; University of Oulu, Finland; University of Oulu, Finland.
    Yang, Xiaohong R.
    NCI, MD 20892 USA.
    Yannoukakos, Drakoulis
    National Centre Science Research Demokritos, Greece.
    Yao, Song
    Department of Cancer Prevention and Control, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, USA.
    Pilar Zamora, M.
    Hospital University of La Paz, Spain.
    Zheng, Wei
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA; Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA.
    Hall, Per
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kraft, Peter
    Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Vachon, Celine
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Slager, Susan
    Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Chenevix-Trench, Georgia
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Pharoah, Paul D. P.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Monteiro, Alvaro A. N.
    University of S Florida, FL 33612 USA.
    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat
    NCI, MD 20850 USA.
    Easton, Douglas F.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Antoniou, Antonis C.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer2016In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 7, no 11375, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P&lt;5 x 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P&lt;0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for similar to 11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction.

  • 15. Daferera, Niki
    et al.
    Kumar Kumawat, Ashok
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Hultgren-Hornquist, Elisabeth
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Münch, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Fecal stream diversion and mucosal cytokine levels in collagenous colitis: A case report2015In: World Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 1007-9327, E-ISSN 2219-2840, Vol. 21, no 19, p. 6065-6071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this case report, we examined the levels of cytokines expressed before and during fecal stream diversion and after intestinal continuity was restored in a patient with collagenous colitis. We report the case of a 46-year-old woman with chronic, active collagenous colitis who either failed to achieve clinical remission or experienced adverse effects with the following drugs: loperamide, cholestyramine, budesonide, methotrexate and adalimumab. Due to the intractable nature of the disease and because the patient was having up to 15 watery bowel movements per day, she underwent a temporary ileostomy. Colonic biopsies were analyzed for mucosal cytokine protein levels before and during fecal stream diversion and after intestinal continuity was restored. Mucosal protein levels of interleukin (IL)-1 beta, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, IL-17 A, IL-23, TNF, IFN-gamma, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 were all higher during active disease and decreased to non-detectable or considerably lower levels during fecal stream diversion. One month after the restoration of bowel continuity, when the patient experienced a relapse of symptoms, IL-2, IL-23 and IL-21 levels were again increased. Our results indicate that fecal stream diversion in this patient suppressed the levels of all cytokines analyzed in colonic biopsies. With the recurrence of clinical symptoms and histological changes after bowel reconstruction, the levels of primarily proinflammatory cytokines increased. Our findings support the hypothesis that a luminal factor triggers the inflammation observed in collagenous colitis.

  • 16.
    Dahlrot, R. H.
    et al.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Dowsett, J.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Fosmark, S.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Malmström, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Henriksson, R.
    Umea Univ, Sweden; Reg Canc Ctr Stockholm Gotland, Sweden.
    Boldt, H.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    de Stricker, K.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Sorensen, M. D.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark; Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Poulsen, H. S.
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Lysiak, Malgorzata
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Hansen, S.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark; Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Kristensen, B. W.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark; Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Prognostic value of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) protein expression in glioblastoma excluding nontumour cells from the analysis2018In: Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology, ISSN 0305-1846, E-ISSN 1365-2990, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 172-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: It is important to predict response to treatment with temozolomide (TMZ) in glioblastoma (GBM) patients. Both MGMT protein expression and MGMT promoter methylation status have been reported to predict the response to TMZ. We investigated the prognostic value of quantified MGMT protein levels in tumour cells and the prognostic importance of combining information of MGMT protein level and MGMT promoter methylation status. Methods: MGMT protein expression was quantified in tumour cells in 171 GBMs from the population-based Region of Southern Denmark (RSD)cohort using a double immunofluorescence approach. Pyrosequencing was performed in 157 patients. For validation we used GBM-patients from a Nordic Study (NS) investigating the effect of radiotherapy and different TMZ schedules. Results: When divided at the median, patients with low expression of MGMT protein (AF-low) had the best prognosis (HR = 1.5, P = 0.01). Similar results were observed in the subgroup of patients receiving the Stupp regimen (HR = 2.0, P = 0.001). In the NS-cohort a trend towards superior survival (HR = 1.6, P = 0.08) was seen in patients with AF-low. Including MGMT promoter methylation status, we found for both cohorts that patients with methylated MGMT promoter and AF-low had the best outcome; median OS 23.1 and 20.0 months, respectively. Conclusion: Our data indicate that MGMT protein expression in tumour cells has an independent prognostic significance. Exclusion of nontumour cells contributed to a more exact analysis of tumour-specific MGMT protein expression. This should be incorporated in future studies evaluating MGMT status before potential integration into clinical practice.

  • 17.
    Domert, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sackmann, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Severinsson, Emelie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Agholme, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergstrom, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ingelsson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Aggregated Alpha-Synuclein Transfer Efficiently between Cultured Human Neuron-Like Cells and Localize to Lysosomes2016In: PLOS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 12, article id e0168700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parkinsons disease and other alpha-synucleinopathies are progressive neurodegenerative diseases characterized by aggregates of misfolded alpha-synuclein spreading throughout the brain. Recent evidence suggests that the pathological progression is likely due to neuron-to-neuron transfer of these aggregates between neuroanatomically connected areas of the brain. As the impact of this pathological spreading mechanism is currently debated, we aimed to investigate the transfer and subcellular location of alpha-synuclein species in a novel 3D co-culture human cell model based on highly differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. Fluorescently-labeled monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar species of alpha-synuclein were introduced into a donor cell population and co-cultured with an EGFP-expressing acceptor-cell population of differentiated neuron-like cells. Subsequent transfer and colocalization of the different species were determined with confocal microscopy. We could confirm cell-to-cell transfer of all three alpha-synuclein species investigated. Interestingly the level of transferred oligomers and fibrils and oligomers were significantly higher than monomers, which could affect the probability of seeding and pathology in the recipient cells. Most alpha-synuclein colocalized with the lysosomal/endosomal system, both pre- and postsynaptically, suggesting its importance in the processing and spreading of alpha-synuclein.

  • 18.
    Dutta, Ravi Kumar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Genetics of primary hyperaldosteronism2016In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 23, no 10, p. R437-R454Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypertension is a common medical condition and affects approximately 20% of the population in developed countries. Primary aldosteronism is the most common form of secondary hypertension and affects 8-13% of patients with hypertension. The two most common causes of primary aldosteronism are aldosterone-producing adenoma and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. Familial hyperaldosteronism types I, II and III are the known genetic syndromes, in which both adrenal glands produce excessive amounts of aldosterone. However, only a minority of patients with primary aldosteronism have one of these syndromes. Several novel susceptibility genes have been found to be mutated in aldosterone-producing adenomas: KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3, CTNNB1, CACNA1D, CACNA1H and ARMC5. This review describes the genes currently known to be responsible for primary aldosteronism, discusses the origin of aldosterone-producing adenomas and considers the future clinical implications based on these novel insights.

  • 19.
    Ekholm, Maria
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden; Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Grabau, Dorthe
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bendahl, Par-Ola
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Bergh, Jonas
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University Hospital, Sweden.
    Elmberger, Goran
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Russo, Leila
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Viale, Giuseppe
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Highly reproducible results of breast cancer biomarkers when analysed in accordance with national guidelines - a Swedish survey with central re-assessment2015In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 54, no 7, p. 1040-1048Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Biomarkers are crucial for decisions regarding adjuvant therapy in primary breast cancer, and their correct assessment is therefore of the utmost importance. Aims. To investigate the concordance between Swedish pathology departments and a reference laboratory, for routine analysis of oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), Ki67, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), alone, and in combination (St Gallen subtypes). Methods. This survey included 27 of the 28 pathology laboratories in Sweden, covering 98% of cases of primary breast cancer surgery in Sweden. Paraffin-embedded tumour blocks (n = 270) were collected and sent to the central reference laboratory, together with the originally stained slides, for re-analysis. The primary evaluations were previously performed according to national Swedish guidelines, without any knowledge of the subsequent central assessment. Results. The agreement for ER, PR, and Ki67 was 99% [kappa value (kappa) = 0.95], 95% (kappa = 0.85), and 85% (kappa = 0.70), respectively. The agreement for HER2 (0/1 + vs. 2+/3+) was 85% (kappa = 0.64), but when equivocal tumours were further analysed with in situ hybridisation, only one discrepancy was observed. Discrepancies between results for ER and PR seem to be explained by analytical differences, whereas the interpretation of staining seems to be more critical for Ki67 and HER2 immunohistochemistry. The agreement between the results from the Swedish laboratories and the reference laboratory, based on the St Gallen subtypes, was 88% (kappa = 0.81). Conclusions. When applying national guidelines, highly reproducible results were obtained in routine assessment of breast cancer biomarkers, and the results of this study confirm the clinical utility of these markers for decisions regarding the treatment of primary breast cancer.

  • 20.
    Eriksson, D.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Metab and Diabet Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bianchi, M.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Landegren, N.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nordin, J.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Dalin, F.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Mathioudaki, A.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Eriksson, G. N.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hultin-Rosenberg, L.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Dahlqvist, J.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Zetterqvist, H.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, A.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hallgren, A.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Farias, F. H. G.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Muren, E.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ahlgren, K. M.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lobell, A.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Andersson, G.
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Sweden.
    Tandre, K.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Dahlqvist, S. R.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rönnblom, L.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hulting, A. -L.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wahlberg Topp, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Ekwall, O.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dahlqvist, P.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Meadows, J. R. S.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Bensing, S.
    Metab and Diabet Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lindblad-Toh, K.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Broad Institute MIT and Harvard, MA USA.
    Kampe, O.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Metab and Diabet Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Pielberg, G. R.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Extended exome sequencing identifies BACH2 as a novel major risk locus for Addisons disease2016In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 286, no 6, p. 595-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundAutoimmune disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In Addisons disease, the adrenal glands are targeted by destructive autoimmunity. Despite being the most common cause of primary adrenal failure, little is known about its aetiology. MethodsTo understand the genetic background of Addisons disease, we utilized the extensively characterized patients of the Swedish Addison Registry. We developed an extended exome capture array comprising a selected set of 1853 genes and their potential regulatory elements, for the purpose of sequencing 479 patients with Addisons disease and 1394 controls. ResultsWe identified BACH2 (rs62408233-A, OR = 2.01 (1.71-2.37), P = 1.66 x 10(-15), MAF 0.46/0.29 in cases/controls) as a novel gene associated with Addisons disease development. We also confirmed the previously known associations with the HLA complex. ConclusionWhilst BACH2 has been previously reported to associate with organ-specific autoimmune diseases co-inherited with Addisons disease, we have identified BACH2 as a major risk locus in Addisons disease, independent of concomitant autoimmune diseases. Our results may enable future research towards preventive disease treatment.

  • 21.
    Eriksson, Daniel
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Bianchi, Matteo
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Landegren, Nils
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Dalin, Frida
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Skov, Jakob
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hultin-Rosenberg, Lina
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Mathioudaki, Argyri
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Nordin, Jessika
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Hallgren, Asa
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Andersson, Goran
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Tandre, Karolina
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Rantapaa Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Ronnblom, Lars
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Hulting, Anna-Lena
    Not Found:[Eriksson, Daniel; Landegren, Nils; Dalin, Frida; Hallgren, Asa; Kampe, Olle] Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden; [Eriksson, Daniel; Bensing, Sophie; Kampe, Olle] Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Endocrinol Metab and Diabet, Stockholm, Sweden; [Bianchi, Matteo; Hultin-Rosenberg, Lina; Mathioudaki, Argyri; Nordin, Jessika; Meadows, Jennifer R. S.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Pielberg, Gerli Rosengren] Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Biochem and Microbiol, Sci Life Lab, Uppsala, Sweden; [Landegren, Nils; Dalin, Frida; Tandre, Karolina; Ronnblom, Lars] Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Sci Life Lab, Uppsala, Sweden; [Skov, Jakob; Bensing, Sophie] Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med and Surg, Stockholm, Sweden; [Andersson, Goran] Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding and Genet, Uppsala, Sweden; [Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapaa; Dahlqvist, Per] Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth and Clin Med, Umea, Sweden; [Soderkvist, Peter; Wahlberg, Jeanette] Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin and Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden; [Wahlberg, Jeanette] Linkoping Univ, Dept Endocrinol, Linkoping, Sweden; [Wahlberg, Jeanette] Linkoping Univ, Dept Med and Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden; [Ekwall, Olov] Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Pediat, Gothenburg, Sweden; [Ekwall, Olov] Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Rheumatol and Inflammat Res, Gothenburg, Sweden; [Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin] Broad Inst MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA USA; [Kampe, Olle] KG Jebsen Ctr Autoimmune Dis, Bergen, Norway;.
    Wahlberg, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Dahlqvist, Per
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Ekwall, Olov
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Meadows, Jennifer R. S.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Broad Inst MIT and Harvard, MA USA.
    Bensing, Sophie
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Pielberg, Gerli Rosengren
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Kampe, Olle
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; KG Jebsen Ctr Autoimmune Dis, Norway.
    Common genetic variation in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) locus is associated with autoimmune Addisons disease in Sweden2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 8395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autoimmune Addisons disease (AAD) is the predominating cause of primary adrenal failure. Despite its high heritability, the rarity of disease has long made candidate-gene studies the only feasible methodology for genetic studies. Here we conducted a comprehensive reinvestigation of suggested AAD risk loci and more than 1800 candidate genes with associated regulatory elements in 479 patients with AAD and 2394 controls. Our analysis enabled us to replicate many risk variants, but several other previously suggested risk variants failed confirmation. By exploring the full set of 1800 candidate genes, we further identified common variation in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) as a novel risk locus associated to sporadic AAD in our study. Our findings not only confirm that multiple loci are associated with disease risk, but also show to what extent the multiple risk loci jointly associate to AAD. In total, risk loci discovered to date only explain about 7% of variance in liability to AAD in our study population.

  • 22.
    Eriksson, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nath, Sangeeta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bornefall, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Villamil Giraldo, Ana Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Impact of high cholesterol in a Parkinsons disease model: Prevention of lysosomal leakage versus stimulation of alpha-synuclein aggregation2017In: European Journal of Cell Biology, ISSN 0171-9335, E-ISSN 1618-1298, Vol. 96, no 2, p. 99-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parkinsons disease is characterized by accumulation of intraneuronal cytoplasmic inclusions, Lewy bodies, which mainly consist of aggregated alpha-synuclein. Controversies exist as to whether high blood cholesterol is a risk factor for the development of the disease and whether statin treatment could have a protective effect. Using a model system of BE(2)-M17 neuroblastoma cells treated with the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), we found that MPP+-induced cell death was accompanied by cholesterol accumulation in a lysosomal-like pattern in pre-apoptotic cells. To study the effects of lysosomal cholesterol accumulation, we increased lysosomal cholesterol through pre-treatment with U18666A and found delayed leakage of lysosomal contents into the cytosol, which reduced cell death. This suggests that increased lysosomal cholesterol is a stress response mechanism to protect lysosomal membrane integrity in response to early apoptotic stress. However, high cholesterol also stimulated the accumulation of alpha-synuclein. Treatment with the cholesterol-lowering drug lovastatin reduced MPP+-induced cell death by inhibiting the production of reactive oxygen species, but did not prevent lysosomal cholesterol increase nor affect alpha-synuclein accumulation. Our study indicates a dual role of high cholesterol in Parkinsons disease, in which it acts both as a protector against lysosomal membrane permeabilization and as a stimulator of alpha-synuclein accumulation. (C) 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  • 23.
    Eriksson, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Analysis of Lysosomal pH by Flow Cytometry Using FITC-Dextran Loaded Cells2017In: Lysosomes: Methods and Protocols / [ed] Karin Öllinger;Hanna Appelqvist, Humana Press, 2017, Vol. 1594, p. 179-189Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The acidic environment of the lysosomal lumen provides an optimal milieu for the acid hydrolases and is also essential for fusion/fission of endo-lysosomal compartments and sorting of cargo. Evidence suggests that maintaining lysosomal acidity is essential to avoid disease. In this chapter, we describe a protocol for analyzing the lysosomal pH in cultured cells using the fluorescent probe fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran together with a dual-emission ratiometric technique suitable for flow cytometry. Fluorescence-labeled dextran is endocytosed and accumulated in the lysosomal compartment. FITC shows a pH-dependent variation in fluorescence when analyzed at maximum emission wavelength and no variation when analyzing at the isosbestic point, thereby the ratio can be used to determine the lysosomal pH. A standard curve is obtained by equilibrating intralysosomal pH with extracellular pH using the ionophore nigericin. The protocol also includes information regarding procedures to induce lysosomal alkalinization and lysosomal membrane permeabilization.

  • 24.
    Falck, A. K.
    et al.
    Clin Science Lund, Sweden; Hospital Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Rome, A.
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ferno, M.
    Clin Science Lund, Sweden.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Chebil, G.
    Unilabs Pathol Unit, Sweden.
    Bendahl, P. O.
    Clin Science Lund, Sweden.
    Ryden, L.
    Clin Science Lund, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    St Gallen molecular subtypes in screening-detected and symptomatic breast cancer in a prospective cohort with long-term follow-up2016In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 103, no 5, p. 513-523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Diagnosis by screening mammography is considered an independent positive prognostic factor, although the data are not fully in agreement. The aim of the study was to explore whether the mode of detection (screening-detected versus symptomatic) adds prognostic information to the St Gallen molecular subtypes of primary breast cancer, in terms of 10-year cumulative breast cancer mortality (BCM). Methods: A prospective cohort of patients with primary breast cancer, who had regularly been invited to screening mammography, were included. Tissue microarrays were constructed from primary tumours and lymph node metastases, and evaluated by two independent pathologists. Primary tumours and lymph node metastases were classified into St Gallen molecular subtypes. Cause of death was retrieved from the Central Statistics Office. Results: A total of 434 patients with primary breast cancer were included in the study. Some 370primary tumours and 111 lymph node metastases were classified into St Gallen molecular subtypes. The luminal A-like subtype was more common among the screening-detected primary tumours (P=0.035) and corresponding lymph node metastases (P=0.114) than among symptomatic cancers. Patients with screening-detected tumours had a lower BCM (P=0.017), and for those diagnosed with luminal A-like tumours the 10-year cumulative BCM was 3 per cent. For patients with luminal A-like lymph node metastases, there was no BCM. In a stepwise multivariable analysis, the prognostic information yielded by screening detection was hampered by stage and tumour biology. Conclusion: The prognosis was excellent for patients within the screening programme who were diagnosed with a luminal A-like primary tumour and/or lymph node metastases. Stage, molecular pathology and mode of detection help to define patients at low risk of death from breast cancer.

  • 25.
    Fardell, Camilla
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Zettergren, Anna
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ran, Caroline
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Belin, Andrea Carmine
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ekman, Agneta
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sydow, Olof
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Backman, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Bjorn
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dizdar Segrell, Nil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Nissbrandt, Hans
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    S100B polymorphisms are associated with age of onset of Parkinsons disease2018In: BMC Medical Genetics, ISSN 1471-2350, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 19, article id 42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In this study we investigated the association between SNPs in the S100B gene and Parkinsons disease (PD) in two independent Swedish cohorts. The SNP rs9722 has previously been shown to be associated with higher S100B concentrations in serum and frontal cortex in humans. S100B is widely expressed in the central nervous system and has many functions such as regulating calcium homeostasis, inflammatory processes, cytoskeleton assembly/disassembly, protein phosphorylation and degradation, and cell proliferation and differentiation. Several of these functions have been suggested to be of importance for the pathophysiology of PD. Methods: The SNPs rs9722, rs2239574, rs881827, rs9984765, and rs1051169 of the S100B gene were genotyped using the KASPar (R) PCR SNP genotyping system in a case-control study of two populations (431 PD patients and 465 controls, 195 PD patients and 378 controls, respectively). The association between the genotype and allelic distributions and PD risk was evaluated using Chi-Square and Cox proportional hazards test, as well as logistic regression. Linear regression and Cox proportional hazards tests were applied to assess the effect of the rs9722 genotypes on age of disease onset. Results: The S100B SNPs tested were not associated with the risk of PD. However, in both cohorts, the T allele of rs9722 was significantly more common in early onset PD patients compared to late onset PD patients. The SNP rs9722 was significantly related to age of onset, and each T allele lowered disease onset with 4.9 years. In addition, allelic variants of rs881827, rs9984765, and rs1051169, were significantly more common in early-onset PD compared to late-onset PD in the pooled population. Conclusions: rs9722, a functional SNP in the 3-UTR of the S100B gene, was strongly associated with age of onset of PD.

  • 26.
    Farnebo, Lovisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stjernstrom, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ansell, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Garvin, Stina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Thunell, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    DNA repair genes XPC, XPD, XRCC1, and XRCC3 are associated with risk and survival of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck2015In: DNA Repair, ISSN 1568-7864, E-ISSN 1568-7856, Vol. 31, p. 64-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) are a heterogenous group of tumors with a high rate of early recurrences, second primary tumors, and mortality. Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment over the past decades, the overall 5-year survival rate remains around 50%. Since the head-and neck-region is continuously exposed to potentially DNA-damaging exogenous and endogenous factors, it is reasonable to expect that the DNA repair genes play a part in the development, progression, and outcome of HNSCC. The aim of this study was to investigate the SNPs XPC A499V, XPD K751Q XRCC1 R399Q and XRCC3 T241M as potential risk factors and indicators of survival among Caucasian patients. One-hundred-sixty-nine patients as well as 344 healthy controls were included and genotyped with PCR-RFLP. We showed that XPC A499V was associated with increased risk of HNSCC, especially laryngeal carcinoma. Among women, XPD K751Q was associated with increased risk of oral SCC. Furthermore, XPD homozygous mutant individuals had the shortest survival time, a survival time that increased however after full dose radiotherapy. Wild-type individuals of XRCC3 T241M demonstrated an earlier age of onset. HPV-positive never smokers had lower frequencies of p53 mutation. Among HNSCC patients, HPV-positivity was significantly associated with XRCC1 R399Q homozygous mutant genotype. Moreover, combinations of putative risk alleles seemed to act synergistically, increasing the risk of HNSCC. In conclusion, our results suggest that SNPs of the DNA repair genes XPC, XPD, XRCC1, and XRCC3 may affect risk and survival of HNSCC. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 27.
    Forsberg, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Sectra, Linköping, Sweden.
    Monsef, Nastaran
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Evaluating Cell Nuclei Segmentation for Use on Whole-Slide Images in Lung Cytology2014In: 2014 22nd International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR), IEEE Computer Society, 2014, p. 3380-3385Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents results from an evaluation of three previously presented methods for segmentation of cell nuclei in lung cytology samples scanned by whole-slide scanners. Whole-slide images from seven cases of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration samples were used for extracting a number of regions of interest, in which approximately 2700 cell nuclei were manually segmented to form the ground truth. The segmented cells included benign bronchial epithelium, lymphocytes, granulocytes, histiocytes and malignant epithelial cells. The best results were obtained with a method based upon adaptive thresholding and an added step of clustering for distinguishing between cytoplasm and cell nuclei. This method achieved a mean DICE-score of 0.81 and a sensitivity and specificity of 0.88 and 0.81 respectively. In addition, this method was by far the fastest method, with a mean processing time of 7.8 s per image (2048 x 2048 pixels per image). By further improvements, such as lowering the false positive rate and using parallel computing hardware, this method has the potential to form the first building block in a system for computerized screening of whole-slide images in lung cytology.

  • 28.
    Garvin, Stina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Oda, Husam
    Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Arnesson, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindström, Annelie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Tumor cell expression of CD163 is associated to postoperative radiotherapy and poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery2018In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0171-5216, E-ISSN 1432-1335, Vol. 144, no 7, p. 1253-1263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer cell fusion with macrophages results in highly tumorigenic hybrids that acquire genetic and phenotypic characteristics from both maternal cells. Macrophage traits, exemplified by CD163 expression, in tumor cells are associated with advanced stages and poor prognosis in breast cancer (BC). In vitro data suggest that cancer cells expressing CD163 acquire radioresistance. Tissue microarray was constructed from primary BC obtained from 83 patients treated with breast-conserving surgery, 50% having received postoperative radiotherapy (RT) and none of the patients had lymph node or distant metastasis. Immunostaining of CD163 in cancer cells and macrophage infiltration (MI) in tumor stroma were evaluated. Macrophage:MCF-7 hybrids were generated by spontaneous in vitro cell fusion. After irradiation (0, 2.5 and 5 Gy gamma-radiation), both hybrids and their maternal MCF-7 cells were examined by clonogenic survival. CD163-expression by cancer cells was significantly associated with MI and clinicopathological data. Patients with CD163-positive tumors had significantly shorter disease-free survival (DFS) after RT. In vitro generated macrophage:MCF-7 hybrids developed radioresistance and exhibited better survival and colony forming ability after radiation compared to maternal MCF-7 cancer cells. Our results suggest that macrophage phenotype in tumor cells results in radioresistance in breast cancer and shorter DFS after radiotherapy.

  • 29.
    Gothlin Eremo, Anna
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Tina, Elisabet
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Wegman, Pia
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Fransen, Karin
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Regional Cancer Centre Stockholm Gotland, Sweden.
    Wingren, Sten
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    HER4 tumor expression in breast cancer patients randomized to treatment with or without tamoxifen2015In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 1311-1320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 4 is a relative of HER2 and has been associated to endocrine breast cancer and prediction of tamoxifen response. In addition to PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathway activation, ligand binding to HER4 triggers proteolytic cleavage and release of an intracellular receptor domain (4ICD) with signaling properties. The aim of the present study was to analyze HER4 protein expression and intracellular localization in breast cancer tissue from patients randomized to treatment with or without adjuvant tamoxifen. To investigate HER4 expression and localization in response to estradiol (E2) and 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT) exposure, we also performed in vitro studies. Cytoplasmic, nuclear and membrane expression of HER4 protein was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining in tumor tissue from 912 breast cancer patients. Three different breast epithelia cancer cell lines were exposed to E2 and 4-OHT and mRNA expression was analyzed using qPCR. Further, nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins were separated and analyzed with western blotting. We found an association between nuclear HER4 protein expression and ER-positivity (P=0.004). Furthermore, significant association was found between cytoplasmic HER4 and ER-negativity (Pless than0.0005), PgR-negativity (Pless than0.0005), tumor size greater than20 mm (P=0.001) and HER2-negativity (P=0.008). However, no overall significance of HER4 on recurrence-free survival was found. After E2 exposure, HER4 mRNA and protein expression had decreased in two cell lines in vitro yet no changes in nuclear or cytoplasmic protein fractions were seen. In conclusion, nuclear HER4 seem to be co-located with ER, however, we did not find support for overall HER4 expression in independently predicting response of tamoxifen treatment. The possible influence of separate isoforms was not tested and future studies may further evaluate HER4 significance.

  • 30.
    Gréen, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet & Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden; Royal Institute Technology, Sweden; Science for Life Laboratory,{ School of Biotechnology, Division of Gene Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rehnberg, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Svensson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Jonasson, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Assessment of HaloPlex Amplification for Sequence Capture and Massively Parallel Sequencing of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy-Associated Genes2015In: Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, ISSN 1525-1578, E-ISSN 1943-7811, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 31-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genetic basis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is complex. Mutations in genes encoding components of the cardiac desmosomes have been implicated as being causally related to ARVC. Next-generation sequencing allows parallel sequencing and duplication/deletion analysis of many genes simultaneously, which is appropriate for screening of mutations in disorders with heterogeneous genetic backgrounds. We designed and validated a next-generation sequencing test panel for ARVC using HaloPlex. We used SureDesign to prepare a HaloPlex enrichment system for sequencing of DES, DSC2, DSG2, DSP, JUP, PKP2, RYR2, TGFB3, TMEM43, and TIN from patients with ARVC using a MiSeq instrument. Performance characteristics were determined by comparison with Sanger, as the gold standard, and TruSeq Custom Amplicon sequencing of DSC2, DSG2, DSP, JUP, and PKP2. All the samples were successfully sequenced after HaloPlex capture, with greater than99% of targeted nucleotides covered by greater than20x. The sequences were of high quality, although one problematic area due to a presumptive context-specific sequencing error causing motif Located in exon 1 of the DSP gene was detected. The mutations found by Sanger sequencing were also found using the HaloPlex technique. Depending on the bioinformatics pipeline, sensitivity varied from 99.3% to 100%, and specificity varied from 99.90/0 to 100%. Three variant positions found by Sanger and HaloPlex sequencing were missed by TruSeq Custom Amplicon owing to Loss of coverage.

  • 31.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Kolbun, Natallia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Jonson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    de Muinck, Ebo
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Visualization of oxidative stress in ex vivo biopsies using electron paramagnetic resonance imaging2015In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISSN 0740-3194, E-ISSN 1522-2594, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 1682-1691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to develop an X-Band electron paramagnetic resonance imaging protocol for visualization of oxidative stress in biopsies.

    METHODS: The developed electron paramagnetic resonance imaging protocol was based on spin trapping with the cyclic hydroxylamine spin probe 1-hydroxy-3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine and X-Band EPR imaging. Computer software was developed for deconvolution and back-projection of the EPR image. A phantom containing radicals of known spatial characteristic was used for evaluation of the developed protocol. As a demonstration of the technique electron paramagnetic resonance imaging of oxidative stress was performed in six sections of atherosclerotic plaques. Histopathological analyses were performed on adjoining sections.

    RESULTS: The developed computer software for deconvolution and back-projection of the EPR images could accurately reproduce the shape of a phantom of known spatial distribution of radicals. The developed protocol could successfully be used to image oxidative stress in six sections of the three ex vivo atherosclerotic plaques.

    CONCLUSIONS: We have shown that oxidative stress can be imaged using a combination of spin trapping with the cyclic hydroxylamine spin probe cyclic hydroxylamine spin probe 1-hydroxy-3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine and X-Band EPR imaging. A thorough and systematic evaluation on different types of biopsies must be performed in the future to validate the proposed technique. Magn Reson Med, 2014.

  • 32.
    Haglund, Felix
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Garvin, Stina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Ihre-Lundgren, Catharina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Inga-Lena
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hall, Evelina
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Carling, Tobias
    Yale School Med, CT USA.
    Hoog, Anders
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Christofer Juhlin, C.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Detailed Lymph Node Sectioning of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Specimen Increases the Number of pN1a Patients2016In: Endocrine pathology, ISSN 1046-3976, E-ISSN 1559-0097, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 346-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is a common endocrine malignancy, frequently presenting with lymph node metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Lymph node staging (N) partly determines treatment, follow-up, and prognosis. Since 2011, our institution has employed a more comprehensive histopathological work-up of lymph nodes in patients with PTC. We sought to retrospectively determine the value of serial lymph node level sectioning in PTCs with negative preoperative lymph node status (pN0) as a method to increase the sensitivity of detecting metastatic disease. We included all patients that underwent thyroidectomy and central neck dissection and subsequent comprehensive lymph node level sectioning due to PTC with an initial pN0 status between the years 2011 and 2015 at our institution. Sixty-seven cases of PTC with a median of 10 metastatic free lymph nodes identified per case were included. After serial lymph node sectioning of the central compartment, 11 cases (16 %) revealed lymph node metastasis, six of which (55 %) presented with a small primary tumor (amp;lt; 20 mm, T1). Of all T1 tumors with initial pN0 status, 18 % (T1a) and 9 % (T1b) reached a pN1 stage after comprehensive lymph node sectioning. Cases with altered lymph node status had a median of 15 identified lymph nodes as compared to ten in cases that remained negative. We conclude that comprehensive lymph node sectioning increased the sensitivity of detecting metastases in PTC and altered the pathological TNM staging (pTNM) for a significant number of patients. Although of limited prognostic significance, the method should be considered as an adjunct tool when assessing lymph node status of PTC as a part of the routine histological work-up to ensure an accurate cancer staging.

  • 33.
    Haj Hosseini, Neda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Richter, Johan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Neurokirurgi.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Optical Guidance for Brain Tumor Stereotactic Biopsy2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Haj-Hosseini, Neda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Höög, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Johansson, Kenth
    Landstinget i Kalmar län och Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhus, Västra Götalandsregion.
    Optiska metoder för identifiering av bisköldkörtel och sköldkörtel2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Identifiering av bisköldkörtlar är viktigt vid sköldkörtel- och bisköldkörtelkirurgi och kan vara svårt då de liknar omgivande vävnad såsom fett och lymfkörtlar. Peroperativ detektering av dessa vävnader kan förbättra möjligheten att bota patienter med hyperparathyroidism och minska risken för bisköldkörtelskador vid thyroideakirurgi. Optiska metoder är potentiella tekniker för att möjliggöra detta. Optiska tekniker utvärderades på vävnadsprover från patienter vid bisköldkörtel- och sköldkörteloperation. Teknikerna bestod av nära infraröd fluorescens (NIR) spektroskopi och optisk koherenstomografi (OCT) som ger en bild av vävnadens mikrostruktur liknande till ultraljud med högre upplösning (10 μm).

  • 35.
    Haj-Hosseini, Neda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hildesjö, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Richter, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fluorescence spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography for brain tumor detection2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resection of brain tumor is a challenging task as the tumor does not have clear borders and the malignant types specifically have often a diffuse and infiltrative pattern of growth. Recently, neurosurgical microscopes have been modified to incorporate fluorescence modules for detection of tumor when 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is used as a contrast. We have in combination with the fluorescence microscopes implemented and evaluated a fluorescence spectroscopy based handheld probe for detecting the 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in the gliomas in 50 patients intraoperatively. The results show a significantly high sensitivity for differentiating tumor from the healthy tissue and distinguished fluorescence intensity levels in the tumor cell infiltration zone around the tumor. However, knowledge on association of the quantified fluorescence signals specifically in the intermediate inflammatory zone with the infiltrative tumor cells can be complemented with volumetric tissue imaging and a higher precision histopathological analysis. In this work, a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with central wavelength of 1325nm has been used to image the tissue volume that the fluorescence is collected from and is evaluated against histopathological analysis for a higher precision slicing. The results show that although healthy brain has a homogenous microstructure in the OCT images, the brain tumor shows a distinguished texture in the images correlated with the PpIX fluorescence intensity and histopathology.

  • 36.
    Haj-Hosseini, Neda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Milos, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Richter, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A Multipurpose Guidance Probe for Stereotactic Biopsy Procedures2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Haj-Hosseini, Neda
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Milos, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Richter, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hildesjö, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Detection of brain tumor using fluorescence and optical coherence tomography2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resection of brain tumor is a challenging task as the tumor does not have clear borders and the malignant types specifically have often a diffuse and infiltrative pattern of growth. We have previously implemented and evaluated a fluorescence spectroscopy based handheld probe for detecting the 5-aminolevulinic acid induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in the gliomas. To add another dimension to the brain tumor detection and volumetric analysis of the tissue that exhibits fluorescence, optical coherence tomography was investigated on tumor specimens.

    Material and Methods:

    A fluorescence microscopy and a spectroscopy system as reported previously were used for detecting the fluorescence signals [1, 2]. A total of 50 patients have been included for intraoperative assessment of the tumor borders using the fluorescence techniques. A spectral domain OCT imaging system (TELESTO II, Thorlabs, Inc., NJ, USA) with central wavelength of 1325 nm was used to study the tissue microstructure post operatively. The system has a resolution of 13 and 5.5 μm in the lateral and axial directions, respectively. Tissue specimens from three patients undergoing brain tumor surgery were studied using the OCT system.

    Results and Conclusion:

    Using fluorescence spectroscopy the tumor could be detected with a sensitivity of 0.84 which was significantly higher than that of the surgical microscope (0.30). Brain tissue appeared rather homogeneous in the OCT images however the highly malignant tissue showed a clear structural difference from the non-malignant or low malignant brain tumor tissue which could be related to the fluorescence signal intensities.

  • 38.
    Haj-Hosseini, Neda
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Richter, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Low dose 5-aminolevulinic acid: Implications in spectroscopic measurements during brain tumor surgery2015In: Photodiagnosis and Photodynamic Therapy, ISSN 1572-1000, E-ISSN 1873-1597, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 209-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) as an intraoperative fluorescence contrast has been proven to improve the resection of glioblastoma and contribute to prolonged patient survival. ALA accumulates as protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in the tumor cells and is administered in an advised dose of 20 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) for brain tumor resection using fluorescence surgical microscopes. PpIX fluorescence availability and intensities of a four folds lower ALA dose (5 mg/kg b.w.) has been investigated in glioblastomas and skin using a spectroscopy system adapted for surgical guidance.

    Methods

    A total of 30 adult patients diagnosed with high grade gliomas were included in the analysis. ALA was orally administered in doses of 5 mg/kg b.w. (n = 15) dissolved in orange juice or 20 mg/kg b.w. (n = 15) dissolved in water. A fluorescence spectroscopy system with a handheld fiber-optical probe was used for performing the quantitative fluorescence measurements.

    Results

    The binominal comparison of the diagnostic performance parameters showed no significant statistical difference (p > 0.05). The median fluorescence values in tumor were 2-3 times higher for the high ALA dose group. No PpIX was detected in the skin of the patients in the low dose group (0/4) while PpIX was detected in the skin of the majority of the patients in the high ALA dose group (13/14).

    Conclusions

    Application of 5 mg/kg ALA was evaluated as equally reliable as the higher dose regarding the diagnostic performance when guidance was performed using a spectroscopic system. Moreover, no PpIX was detected in the skin of the patients.

  • 39.
    Haj-Hosseini, Neda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Richter, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Optical guidance for stereotactic brain tumor biopsy procedures-preliminary clinical evaluation2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During stereotactic biopsy on suspected tumors in the brain, tissue samples are harvested to determine the malignancy. To provide guidance for finding the diagnostic tumor sites and to avoid vessel rupture, an application specific probe was developed. The setup incorporated spectroscopy for detection of 5-aminolevulinic acid induced protoporphyrin (PpIX) fluorescence and blood flow using laser Doppler flowmetry. The PpIX fluorescence was significantly different in the tumor compared to the gliotic marginal zone (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the systems made real-time tumor detection and vessel tracking possible. Moreover, the autofluorescence and blood perfusion could be studied in the tumor.

  • 40.
    Jakobsen Falk, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Willander, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Chaireti, Roza
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lund, Johan
    Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nahi, Hareth
    Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hermanson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Green, Henrik
    National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Lotfi, Kourosh
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    TP53 mutations and MDM2(SNP309) identify subgroups of AML patients with impaired outcome2015In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 94, no 4, p. 355-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundTP53 is commonly mutated in several cancers and confers treatment resistance and poor prognosis. Altered expression of mouse double minute 2 (MDM2), a negative regulator of p53, may also attenuate normal p53 signaling, thereby enhancing tumor transformation and resistance to apoptosis. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) 309 has been reported to increase MDM2 expression and impair normal p53 response. Experimental designWe investigated the frequency and impact of TP53 mutations (TP53mut) and MDM2(SNP309) on treatment outcome and overall survival (OS) in 189 Swedish acute myeloid leukemia patients. The genetic analyses were performed using SSCA and direct sequencing (for mutations in exon 5-8 of TP53) and Pyrosequencing (for the MDM2(SNP309)). ResultsWe found a high frequency (22%) of TP53mut in patients with cytogenetic aberrations, with association to high-risk cytogenetics (Pless than0.001). TP53mut patients had lower response rates (22% compared with 76% CR in TP53 wild-type (wt) patients, Pless than0.001) and reduced OS (2 and 16months, respectively, Pless than0.001). In TP53wt patients with high or intermediate risk cytogenetic aberrations, the MDM2(SNP309) conferred an impaired outcome, with patients carrying the alternative G-allele having shorter OS compared with T/T patients (median 9 vs. 50months, P=0.020). ConclusionsOur results show that TP53mut analysis and MDM2(SNP309) genotyping may be useful tools for prognostication, risk stratification, and selection of patients most likely to benefit from new drugs targeting the p53 signaling pathway.

  • 41.
    Johansson, Joel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Littoral cell angioma in a patient with Crohn's disease.2015In: Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine, ISSN 2090-6528, E-ISSN 2090-6536, Vol. 2015, p. 1-4, article id 474969Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Littoral cell angioma is a rare vascular tumor of the spleen. The pathogenesis is unknown but the lesion is associated with several malignancies and immunological disorders. The diagnosis requires histopathological examination. The malignant potential of this lesion is unknown, which is why splenectomy is recommend for all cases. Symptomatic cases generally suffer from hypersplenism and pyrexia. A previously healthy 20-year-old female was diagnosed with colonic Crohn's disease; as part of the work-up a magnetic resonance enterography was performed which showed multiple signal changes of the spleen. The patient reported chronic abdominal pain in the left upper quadrant, malaise, and fever. The unknown splenic lesions prompted a laparoscopic splenectomy; pathology revealed a littoral cell angioma. The abdominal pain and malaise remitted but the fever persisted one year despite adequate treatment of the patient's Crohn's disease. Littoral cell angioma is associated with immune-dysregulation including Crohn's disease with several reported cases. Signs and symptoms of hypersplenism and splenic lesions on imaging should raise suspicion of littoral cell angioma in patients with Crohn's disease. Magnetic resonance enterography to assess disease severity in Crohn's disease may provide an opportunity to study the prevalence and natural history of this rare splenic tumor.

  • 42.
    Johansson, Joel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Sahin, Christofer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Pestoff, Rebecka
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Edsjö, Anders
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital Göteborg .
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Stenmark Askmalm, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    A Novel SMAD4 Mutation Causing Severe Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome with Protein Losing Enteropathy, Immunodeficiency, and Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia.2015In: Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine, ISSN 2090-6528, E-ISSN 2090-6536, Vol. 2015, p. 1-5, article id 140616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by juvenile polyps of the gastrointestinal tract. We present a new pathogenic mutation of the SMAD4 gene and illustrate the need for a multidisciplinary health care approach to facilitate the correct diagnosis. The patient, a 47-year-old Caucasian woman, was diagnosed with anaemia at the age of 12. During the following 30 years, she developed numerous gastrointestinal polyps. The patient underwent several operations, and suffered chronic abdominal pain, malnutrition, and multiple infections. Screening of the SMAD4 gene revealed a novel, disease-causing mutation. In 2012, the patient suffered hypoalbuminemia and a large polyp in the small bowel was found. Gamma globulin was given but the patient responded with fever and influenza-like symptoms and refused more treatment. The patient underwent surgery in 2014 and made an uneventful recovery. At follow-up two months later albumin was 38 g/L and IgG was 6.9 g/L. Accurate diagnosis is essential for medical care. For patients with complex symptomatology, often with rare diseases, this is best provided by multidisciplinary teams including representatives from clinical genetics. Patients with a SMAD4 mutation should be followed up both for JPS and haemorrhagic hereditary telangiectasia and may develop protein loosing enteropathy and immunodeficiency.

  • 43.
    Klionsky, Daniel J.
    et al.
    University of Michigan, Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; University of Michigan, Life Sciences Institute, Ann Arbor, MI, USA .
    Boman, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kurz, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mohseni, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Zughaier, Susu M.
    Emory University, School of Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Guidelines for the use and interpretation of assays for monitoring autophagy (3rd edition)2016In: Autophagy, ISSN 1554-8627, E-ISSN 1554-8635, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 1-222Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Krynitz, B.
    et al.
    Karolinska University of Labs, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Olsson, H.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lundh Rozell, Barbro
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindelof, B.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Edgren, G.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Smedby, K. E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Risk of basal cell carcinoma in Swedish organ transplant recipients: a population-based study2016In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 174, no 1, p. 95-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has been reported to be several-fold increased among organ transplant recipients (OTRs). However, due to lack of reliable BCC registration, population-based risk estimates are scarce. Objectives To characterize risk of BCC among OTRs compared with the general population, and contrast with risk of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Subjects and methods OTRs transplanted during 2004-2011 were identified through national healthcare registers and linked with the nationwide Swedish BCC Register initialized in 2004. Relative risk of BCC was expressed as standardized incidence ratios (SIR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Altogether, 4023 transplanted patients developed 341 BCCs during follow-up. Compared with the general population, the relative risk of BCC was increased sixfold (SIR 6.1, 95% CI 5.4-6.9). The risk was higher in kidney and heart/lung than in liver recipients (SIRkidney 7.2, 6.3-8.3; SIRheart/lung 5.8, 4.0-8.2; SIRliver 2.6, 1.7-4.0), and risk increased with time since transplantation (P-trend &lt; 0.01). The SCC to BCC ratio was 1 : 1.7 and BCC developed earlier after transplantation than SCC. Distribution of anatomical sites and histological types did not differ substantially between OTR- and population-BCCs. Conclusions Risk of BCC was strikingly elevated in OTRs compared with the general population. Risk was higher in kidney recipients and increased with follow-up time. These findings support a tumour-promoting effect of immunosuppressive drugs in BCC development. The low SCC to BCC ratio was possibly attributed to short follow-up time.

  • 45.
    Krynitz, Britta
    et al.
    Karolinska University of Labs, Sweden; Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Lundh Rozell, Barbro
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lyth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Smedby, Karin E.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lindelof, Bernt
    Karolinska University, Sweden; Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Cutaneous malignant melanoma in the Swedish organ transplantation cohort: A study of clinicopathological characteristics and mortality2015In: The Journal of American Academy of Dermatology, ISSN 0190-9622, E-ISSN 1097-6787, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 106-U190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Risk of cutaneous melanoma is increased among organ transplant recipients (OTRs) but outcome has rarely been evaluated. Objective: We sought to assess melanoma characteristics and prognosis among OTRs versus the general population. Methods: Using Swedish health care registers, we identified melanomas in OTRs (n = 49) and in the general population (n = 22,496), given a diagnosis between 1984 and 2008 and followed up through December 31, 2012. Tumor slides of posttransplantation melanomas were reviewed. Odds ratios for comparison of histopathological characteristics and hazard ratios of melanoma-specific death were calculated. Results: Among OTRs the trunk was the most common anatomic melanoma site (50% among female vs 51% among male) and 73% (n = 36) of all melanomas were histologically associated with a melanocytic nevus, 63% (n = 31) atypical/dysplastic. Compared with population melanomas, posttransplantation melanomas were more advanced at diagnosis (Clark level III-V: odds ratio 2.2 [95% confidence interval 1.01-4.7, P = .03], clinical stages III-IV: odds ratio 4.2 [1.6-10.8, P = .003]). Risk of melanoma-specific death was increased among OTRs: adjusted hazard ratio 3.0 (1.7-5.3, P = .0002). Limitations: Only posttransplantation melanoma slides were reviewed. Conclusions: Melanomas were more advanced at diagnosis and melanoma-specific survival was poorer in OTRs than in the general population. Prophylactic excision of truncal nevi among OTRs may be advised.

  • 46.
    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.
    et al.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Ramus, Susan J.
    University of So Calif, CA USA.
    Tyrer, Jonathan
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Lee, Andrew
    University of Cambridge, England; University of So Calif, CA USA.
    Shen, Howard C.
    University of So Calif, CA USA.
    Beesley, Jonathan
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Lawrenson, Kate
    University of So Calif, CA USA.
    McGuffog, Lesley
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Healey, Sue
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Lee, Janet M.
    University of So Calif, CA USA.
    Spindler, Tassja J.
    University of So Calif, CA USA.
    Lin, Yvonne G.
    University of So Calif, CA USA.
    Pejovic, Tanja
    Oregon Health and Science University, OR 97201 USA; Knight Cancer Institute, OR USA.
    Bean, Yukie
    Oregon Health and Science University, OR 97201 USA; Knight Cancer Institute, OR USA.
    Li, Qiyuan
    Centre Funct Cancer Epigenet, MA USA.
    Coetzee, Simon
    University of Sao Paulo, Brazil; Centre Integrat Syst Biol, Brazil.
    Hazelett, Dennis
    University of So Calif, CA USA; University of So Calif, CA USA.
    Miron, Alexander
    Case Western Reserve University, OH 44106 USA.
    Southey, Melissa
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Beth Terry, Mary
    Columbia University, NY USA.
    Goldgar, David E.
    University of Utah, UT USA.
    Buys, Saundra S.
    University of Utah, UT USA.
    Janavicius, Ramunas
    Vilnius University Hospital Santariskiu Clin, Lithuania; State Research Institute Centre Innovat Med, Lithuania.
    Dorfling, Cecilia M.
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Neuhausen, Susan L.
    City Hope National Medical Centre, CA 91010 USA.
    Chun Ding, Yuan
    City Hope National Medical Centre, CA 91010 USA.
    Hansen, Thomas V. O.
    University of Copenhagen Hospital, Denmark.
    Jonson, Lars
    University of Copenhagen Hospital, Denmark.
    Gerdes, Anne-Marie
    University of Copenhagen Hospital, Denmark.
    Ejlertsen, Bent
    University of Copenhagen Hospital, Denmark.
    Barrowdale, Daniel
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Dennis, Joe
    University of Cambridge, England; University of Cambridge, England.
    Benitez, Javier
    Spanish National Cancer Centre CNIO, Spain; CIBERER, Spain.
    Osorio, Ana
    Spanish National Cancer Centre CNIO, Spain; CIBERER, Spain.
    Jose Garcia, Maria
    Spanish National Cancer Centre CNIO, Spain; CIBERER, Spain.
    Komenaka, Ian
    Maricopa County Gen Hospital, CA USA.
    Weitzel, Jeffrey N.
    Clin Cancer Genet, CA USA.
    Ganschow, Pamela
    Cook County Health and Hospital Syst, CA USA.
    Peterlongo, Paolo
    Italian Fdn Cancer Research, Italy.
    Bernard, Loris
    Ist Europeo Oncol, Italy; Cogentech Cancer Genet Test Lab, Italy.
    Viel, Alessandra
    CRO, Italy.
    Bonanni, Bernardo
    Ist Europeo Oncol, Italy.
    Peissel, Bernard
    Italian Research Hospital, Italy.
    Manoukian, Siranoush
    Italian Research Hospital, Italy.
    Radice, Paolo
    Fdn IRCCS, Italy.
    Papi, Laura
    University of Florence, Italy.
    Ottini, Laura
    University of Roma La Sapienza, Italy.
    Fostira, Florentia
    National Centre Science Research Demokritos, Greece.
    Konstantopoulou, Irene
    National Centre Science Research Demokritos, Greece.
    Garber, Judy
    Childrens Hospital, MA 02115 USA.
    Frost, Debra
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Perkins, Jo
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Platte, Radka
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Ellis, Steve
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Godwin, Andrew K.
    University of Kansas, KS 66103 USA.
    Katharina Schmutzler, Rita
    University Hospital Cologne, Germany.
    Meindl, Alfons
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Engel, Christoph
    University of Leipzig, Germany.
    Sutter, Christian
    Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Sinilnikova, Olga M.
    University of Lyon, France; Hospital Civils Lyon, France.
    Damiola, Francesca
    University of Lyon, France.
    Mazoyer, Sylvie
    University of Lyon, France.
    Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique
    Institute Curie, France; University of Paris 05, France.
    Claes, Kathleen
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    De Leeneer, Kim
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Kirk, Judy
    Westmead Hospital, Australia; Westmead Hospital, Australia.
    Rodriguez, Gustavo C.
    NorthShore University of HealthSystem, IL USA.
    Piedmonte, Marion
    Roswell Pk Cancer Institute, NY 14263 USA.
    OMalley, David M.
    Ohio State University, OH 43210 USA.
    de la Hoya, Miguel
    Hospital Clin San Carlos, Spain.
    Caldes, Trinidad
    Hospital Clin San Carlos, Spain.
    Aittomaeki, Kristiina
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Margriet Collee, J.
    Erasmus University, Netherlands.
    Rookus, Matti A.
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    Oosterwijk, Jan C.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Tihomirova, Laima
    Latvian Biomed Research and Study Centre, Latvia.
    Tung, Nadine
    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre, MA 02215 USA.
    Hamann, Ute
    DKFZ, Germany.
    Isaccs, Claudine
    Georgetown University, DC USA.
    Tischkowitz, Marc
    McGill University, Canada.
    Imyanitov, Evgeny N.
    NN Petrov Institute Oncol, Russia.
    Caligo, Maria A.
    University of Pisa, Italy; University Hospital Pisa, Italy.
    Campbell, Ian G.
    Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Australia.
    Hogervorst, Frans B. L.
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    Olah, Edith
    National Institute Oncol, Hungary.
    Diez, Orland
    University Hospital Vall Hebron, Spain; University of Autonoma Barcelona, Spain.
    Blanco, Ignacio
    Catalan Institute Oncol, Spain.
    Brunet, Joan
    Catalan Institute Oncol, Spain.
    Lazaroso, Conxi
    Catalan Institute Oncol, Spain.
    Angel Pujana, Miguel
    Catalan Institute Oncol, Spain.
    Jakubowska, Anna
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Gronwald, Jacek
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Lubinski, Jan
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Sukiennicki, Grzegorz
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Barkardottir, Rosa B.
    Landspitali University Hospital, Iceland; University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Plante, Marie
    CHUQ, Canada.
    Simard, Jacques
    University of Laval, Canada.
    Soucy, Penny
    University of Laval, Canada.
    Montagna, Marco
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Tognazzo, Silvia
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Teixeira, Manuel R.
    University of Porto, Portugal; Portuguese Oncology Institute, Portugal.
    Pankratz, Vernon S.
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Wang, Xianshu
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Lindor, Noralane
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Szabo, Csilla I.
    NHGRI, MD 20892 USA.
    Kauff, Noah
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Vijai, Joseph
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Aghajanian, Carol A.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Pfeiler, Georg
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Berger, Andreas
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Singer, Christian F.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Tea, Muy-Kheng
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Phelan, Catherine M.
    H Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute, FL USA.
    Greene, Mark H.
    NCI, MD USA.
    Mai, Phuong L.
    NCI, MD USA.
    Rennert, Gad
    Carmel Hospital, Israel.
    Marie Mulligan, Anna
    University of Toronto, Canada; University of Health Network, Canada.
    Tchatchou, Sandrine
    Mt Sinai Hospital, Canada.
    Andrulis, Irene L.
    University of Toronto, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Glendon, Gord
    Mt Sinai Hospital, Canada.
    Ewart Toland, Amanda
    Ohio State University, OH 43210 USA.
    Birk Jensen, Uffe
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Kruse, Torben A.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Thomassen, Mads
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Bojesen, Anders
    Vejle Hospital, Denmark.
    Zidan, Jamal
    Rivka Ziv Medical Centre, Israel.
    Friedman, Eitan
    Sheba Medical Centre, Israel.
    Laitman, Yael
    Sheba Medical Centre, Israel.
    Soller, Maria
    University of Lund Hospital, Sweden.
    Liljegren, Annelie
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Arver, Brita
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Einbeigi, Zakaria
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Askmalm Stenmark, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Nussbaum, Robert L.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Rebbeck, Timothy R.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Nathanson, Katherine L.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Domchek, Susan M.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Lu, Karen H.
    University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre, TX 77030 USA.
    Karlan, Beth Y.
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Walsh, Christine
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Lester, Jenny
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Hein, Alexander
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Ekici, Arif B.
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Beckmann, Matthias W.
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Fasching, Peter A.
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany; University of Calif Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Lambrechts, Diether
    Vesalius Research Centre, Belgium; University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els
    University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Vergote, Ignace
    University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Lambrechts, Sandrina
    University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Dicks, Ed
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Doherty, Jennifer A.
    Geisel School Med, NH USA.
    Wicklund, Kristine G.
    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre, WA 98104 USA.
    Anne Rossing, Mary
    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre, WA 98104 USA; University of Washington, WA 98195 USA.
    Rudolph, Anja
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Wang-Gohrke, Shan
    University of Ulm, Germany.
    Eilber, Ursula
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Moysich, Kirsten B.
    Roswell Pk Cancer Institute, NY 14263 USA.
    Odunsi, Kunle
    Roswell Pk Cancer Institute, NY 14263 USA.
    Sucheston, Lara
    Roswell Pk Cancer Institute, NY 14263 USA.
    Lele, Shashi
    Roswell Pk Cancer Institute, NY 14263 USA.
    Wilkens, Lynne R.
    University of Hawaii Cancer Centre, HI USA.
    Goodman, Marc T.
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA; Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Thompson, Pamela J.
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA; Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Shvetsov, Yurii B.
    University of Hawaii Cancer Centre, HI USA.
    Runnebaum, Ingo B.
    University of Jena, Germany.
    Duerst, Matthias
    University of Jena, Germany.
    Hillemanns, Peter
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Doerk, Thilo
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Antonenkova, Natalia
    Byelorussian Institute Oncology and Medical Radiol Aleksandrov, Byelarus.
    Bogdanova, Natalia
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Leminen, Arto
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Pelttari, Liisa M.
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Butzow, Ralf
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Modugno, Francesmary
    University of Pittsburgh, PA USA; Magee Womens Research Institute, PA USA; University of Pittsburgh, PA USA.
    Kelley, Joseph L.
    University of Pittsburgh, PA USA.
    Edwards, Robert P.
    University of Pittsburgh, PA USA; University of Pittsburgh, PA USA.
    Ness, Roberta B.
    University of Texas Houston, TX USA.
    du Bois, Andreas
    Dr Horst Schmidt Klin Wiesbaden, Germany; Klin Essen Mitte, Germany.
    Heitz, Florian
    Dr Horst Schmidt Klin Wiesbaden, Germany; Klin Essen Mitte, Germany.
    Schwaab, Ira
    Institute Humangenetik Wiesbaden, Germany.
    Harter, Philipp
    Dr Horst Schmidt Klin Wiesbaden, Germany; Klin Essen Mitte, Germany.
    Matsuo, Keitaro
    Kyushu University, Japan.
    Hosono, Satoyo
    Aichi Cancer Centre, Japan.
    Orsulic, Sandra
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Jensen, Allan
    Danish Cancer Soc, Denmark.
    Kruger Kjaer, Susanne
    Danish Cancer Soc, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hogdall, Estrid
    Danish Cancer Soc, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nazihah Hasmad, Hanis
    Cancer Research Initiat Fdn, Malaysia.
    Adenan Noor Azmi, Mat
    University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Teo, Soo-Hwang
    Cancer Research Initiat Fdn, Malaysia; University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Woo, Yin-Ling
    University of Malaya, Malaysia; University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Fridley, Brooke L.
    University of Kansas, KS 66103 USA.
    Goode, Ellen L.
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Cunningham, Julie M.
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Vierkant, Robert A.
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Bruinsma, Fiona
    Cancer Council Victoria, Australia.
    Giles, Graham G.
    Cancer Council Victoria, Australia.
    Liang, Dong
    Texas So University, TX 77004 USA.
    Hildebrandt, Michelle A. T.
    University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre, TX 77030 USA.
    Wu, Xifeng
    University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre, TX 77030 USA.
    Levine, Douglas A.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Bisogna, Maria
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Berchuck, Andrew
    Duke University, NC 27710 USA.
    Iversen, Edwin S.
    Duke University, NC USA.
    Schildkraut, Joellen M.
    Duke Cancer Institute, NC USA; Duke University, NC 27710 USA.
    Concannon, Patrick
    University of Florida, FL USA; University of Florida, FL USA.
    Palmieri Weber, Rachel
    Duke University, NC 27710 USA.
    Cramer, Daniel W.
    Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Terry, Kathryn L.
    Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Poole, Elizabeth M.
    Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Tworoger, Shelley S.
    Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Bandera, Elisa V.
    Rutgers Cancer Institute New Jersey, NJ USA.
    Orlow, Irene
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Olson, Sara H.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Krakstad, Camilla
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Salvesen, Helga B.
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Tangen, Ingvild L.
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Bjorge, Line
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    van Altena, Anne M.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Aben, Katja K. H.
    Centre Comprehens Canc, Netherlands; Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Kiemeney, Lambertus A.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Massuger, Leon F. A. G.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Kellar, Melissa
    Oregon Health and Science University, OR 97201 USA; Knight Cancer Institute, OR USA.
    Brooks-Wilson, Angela
    British Columbia Cancer Agency, Canada; Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    Kelemen, Linda E.
    Medical University of S Carolina, SC 29425 USA.
    Cook, Linda S.
    University of New Mexico, NM 87131 USA.
    Le, Nhu D.
    British Columbia Cancer Agency, Canada.
    Cybulski, Cezary
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Yang, Hannah
    NCI, MD 20892 USA.
    Lissowska, Jolanta
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre, Poland.
    Brinton, Louise A.
    NCI, MD 20892 USA.
    Wentzensen, Nicolas
    NCI, MD 20892 USA.
    Hogdall, Claus
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lundvall, Lene
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nedergaard, Lotte
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Baker, Helen
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Song, Honglin
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Eccles, Diana
    Princess Anne Hospital, England.
    McNeish, Ian
    University of Porto, Portugal; University of Glasgow, Scotland.
    Paul, James
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Carty, Karen
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Siddiqui, Nadeem
    Glasgow Royal Infirm, Scotland.
    Glasspool, Rosalind
    Beatson West Scotland, Scotland.
    Whittemore, Alice S.
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Rothstein, Joseph H.
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    McGuire, Valerie
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Sieh, Weiva
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Ji, Bu-Tian
    NCI, MD 20892 USA.
    Zheng, Wei
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37212 USA.
    Shu, Xiao-Ou
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37212 USA.
    Gao, Yu-Tang
    Shanghai Cancer Institute, Peoples R China.
    Rosen, Barry
    University of Toronto, Canada; Princess Margaret Hospital, Canada.
    Risch, Harvey A.
    Yale School Public Heatlh, CT USA.
    McLaughlin, John R.
    Mt Sinai Hospital, Canada.
    Narod, Steven A.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Monteiro, Alvaro N.
    H Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute, FL USA.
    Chen, Ann
    H Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute, FL USA.
    Lin, Hui-Yi
    H Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute, FL USA.
    Permuth-Wey, Jenny
    H Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute, FL USA.
    Sellers, Thomas A.
    H Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute, FL USA.
    Tsai, Ya-Yu
    H Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute, FL USA.
    Chen, Zhihua
    H Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute, FL USA.
    Ziogas, Argyrios
    University of Calif Irvine, CA USA.
    Anton-Culver, Hoda
    University of Calif Irvine, CA USA.
    Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra
    UCL, England.
    Menon, Usha
    UCL, England.
    Harrington, Patricia
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Lee, Alice W.
    University of Cambridge, England; University of So Calif, CA USA.
    Wu, Anna H.
    University of So Calif, CA USA.
    Pearce, Celeste L.
    University of So Calif, CA USA.
    Coetzee, Gerry
    University of So Calif, CA USA; University of So Calif, CA USA.
    Pike, Malcolm C.
    University of So Calif, CA USA; Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre, Poland.
    Timorek, Agnieszka
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland; Brodnowski Hospital, Poland.
    Rzepecka, Iwona K.
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre, Poland.
    Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre, Poland.
    Freedman, Matt
    Centre Funct Cancer Epigenet, MA USA.
    Noushmehr, Houtan
    University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Easton, Douglas F.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Offit, Kenneth
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Couch, Fergus J.
    Mayo Clin, MN USA; Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Gayther, Simon
    University of So Calif, CA USA.
    Pharoah, Paul P.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Antoniou, Antonis C.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Chenevix-Trench, Georgia
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Identification of six new susceptibility loci for invasive epithelial ovarian cancer2015In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 164-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 12 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) susceptibility alleles. The pattern of association at these loci is consistent in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers who are at high risk of EOC. After imputation to 1000 Genomes Project data, we assessed associations of 11 million genetic variants with EOC risk from 15,437 cases unselected for family history and 30,845 controls and from 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers (3,096 with ovarian cancer), and we combined the results in a meta-analysis. This new study design yielded increased statistical power, leading to the discovery of six new EOC susceptibility loci. Variants at 1p36 (nearest gene, WNT4), 4q26 (SYNPO2), 9q34.2 (ABO) and 17q11.2 (ATAD5) were associated with EOC risk, and at 1p34.3 (RSPO1) and 6p22.1 (GPX6) variants were specifically associated with the serous EOC subtype, all with P less than 5 x 10(-8). Incorporating these variants into risk assessment tools will improve clinical risk predictions for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

  • 47.
    Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Rohlin, Anna
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Aravidis, Christos
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Nordling, Margareta
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stenmark Askmalm, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics. University of Lund Hospital, Sweden.
    Lindblom, Annika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nilbert, M. E. F.
    Lund University, Sweden; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mismatch repair gene mutation spectrum in the Swedish Lynch syndrome population2016In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 2823-2835Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lynch syndrome caused by constitutional mismatch-repair defects is one of the most common hereditary cancer syndromes with a high risk for colorectal, endometrial, ovarian and urothelial cancer. Lynch syndrome is caused by mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes i.e., MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. After 20 years of genetic counseling and genetic testing for Lynch syndrome, we have compiled the mutation spectrum in Sweden with the aim to provide a population-based perspective on the contribution from the different MMR genes, the various types of mutations and the influence from founder mutations. Mutation data were collected on a national basis from all laboratories involved in genetic testing. Mutation analyses were performed using mainly Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. A total of 201 unique disease-predisposing MMR gene mutations were identified in 369 Lynch syndrome families. These mutations affected MLH1 in 40%, MSH2 in 36%, MSH6 in 18% and PMS2 in 6% of the families. A large variety of mutations were identified with splice site mutations being the most common mutation type in MLH1 and frameshift mutations predominating in MSH2 and MSH6. Large deletions of one or several exons accounted for 21% of the mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 and 22% in PMS2, but were rare (4%) in MSH6. In 66% of the Lynch syndrome families the variants identified were private and the effect from founder mutations was limited and predominantly related to a Finnish founder mutation that accounted for 15% of the families with mutations in MLH1. In conclusion, the Swedish Lynch syndrome mutation spectrum is diverse with private MMR gene mutations in two-thirds of the families, has a significant contribution from internationally recognized mutations and a limited effect from founder mutations.

  • 48.
    Lawrenson, Kate
    et al.
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA; Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Kar, Siddhartha
    University of Cambridge, England.
    McCue, Karen
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Kuchenbaeker, Karoline
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Michailidou, Kyriaki
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Tyrer, Jonathan
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Beesley, Jonathan
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Ramus, Susan J.
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Li, Qiyuan
    Xiamen University, Peoples R China; Dana Farber Cancer Institute, MA 02215 USA.
    Delgado, Melissa K.
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Lee, Janet M.
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Aittomaki, Kristiina
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Andrulis, Irene L.
    Mt Sinai Hospital, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Anton-Culver, Hoda
    University of Calif Irvine, CA 92697 USA.
    Arndt, Volker
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Arun, Banu K.
    University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre, TX 77030 USA.
    Arver, Brita
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bandera, Elisa V.
    Rutgers Cancer Institute New Jersey, NJ 08903 USA.
    Barile, Monica
    Ist Europeo Oncol, Italy.
    Barkardottir, Rosa B.
    University of Iceland, Iceland; University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Barrowdale, Daniel
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Beckmann, Matthias W.
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Benitez, Javier
    Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Spain; Centre Invest Red Enfermedades Raras, Spain.
    Berchuck, Andrew
    Duke University, NC 27710 USA.
    Bisogna, Maria
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10065 USA.
    Bjorge, Line
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Blomqvist, Carl
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Blot, William
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA; Int Epidemiol Institute, MD 20850 USA.
    Bogdanova, Natalia
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Bojesen, Anders
    Vejle Hospital, Denmark; Seoul National University, South Korea; Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute Mt Sinai Hospital, Canada.
    Bojesen, Stig E.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark; Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark; Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Bolla, Manjeet K.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Bonanni, Bernardo
    Ist Europeo Oncol, Italy.
    Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Brauch, Hiltrud
    Dr Margarete Fischer Bosch Institute Clin Pharmacol, Germany; University of Tubingen, Germany; German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Brennan, Paul
    Int Agency Research Canc, France.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany; German Cancer Research Centre, Germany; German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Bruinsma, Fiona
    Cancer Council Victoria, Australia.
    Brunet, Joan
    Catalan Institute Oncol, Spain.
    Ahmad Buhari, Shaik
    National University of Health Syst, Singapore.
    Burwinkel, Barbara
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany; Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Butzow, Ralf
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Buys, Saundra S.
    University of Utah, UT 84112 USA.
    Cai, Qiuyin
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA.
    Caldes, Trinidad
    IdISSC El Institute Invest Sanitaria Hospital Clin San Car, Spain.
    Campbell, Ian
    Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Australia.
    Canniotto, Rikki
    Roswell Pk Cancer Institute, NY 14263 USA.
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany; University of Medical Centre Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany.
    Chiquette, Jocelyne
    University of Quebec, Canada.
    Choi, Ji-Yeob
    Seoul National University, South Korea.
    Claes, Kathleen B. M.
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Cook, Linda S.
    University of New Mexico, NM 87131 USA.
    Cox, Angela
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Cramer, Daniel W.
    Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Cross, Simon S.
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Cybulski, Cezary
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Czene, Kamila
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Daly, Mary B.
    Fox Chase Cancer Centre, PA 19111 USA.
    Damiola, Francesca
    University of Lyon, France.
    Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre, Poland; Institute Oncol, Poland.
    Darabi, Hatef
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Dennis, Joe
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Devilee, Peter
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Diez, Orland
    University Hospital Vall Hebron, Spain; University of Autonoma Barcelona, Spain.
    Doherty, Jennifer A.
    Geisel School Medical Dartmouth, NH 03755 USA.
    Domchek, Susan M.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Dorfling, Cecilia M.
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Doerk, Thilo
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Dumont, Martine
    University of Laval, Canada.
    Ehrencrona, Hans
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Lund Hospital, Sweden.
    Ejlertsen, Bent
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Ellis, Steve
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Engel, Christoph
    University of Leipzig, Germany.
    Lee, Eunjung
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Gareth Evans, D.
    University of Manchester, England.
    Fasching, Peter A.
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany; University of Calif Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Feliubadalo, Lidia
    Catalan Institute Oncol, Spain.
    Figueroa, Jonine
    NCI, MD 20892 USA.
    Flesch-Janys, Dieter
    University of Medical Centre Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany; University of Medical Centre Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany.
    Fletcher, Olivia
    Institute Cancer Research, England.
    Flyger, Henrik
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Foretova, Lenka
    Masaryk Mem Cancer Institute, Czech Republic; Medical Fac MU, Czech Republic.
    Fostira, Florentia
    Aghia Paraskevi Attikis, Greece.
    Foulkes, William D.
    McGill University, Canada.
    Fridley, Brooke L.
    University of Kansas, KS 66103 USA.
    Friedman, Eitan
    Chaim Sheba Medical Centre, Israel.
    Frost, Debra
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Gambino, Gaetana
    University of and University Hospital Pisa, Italy.
    Ganz, Patricia A.
    Jonsson Comprehens Cancer Centre, CA 90024 USA.
    Garber, Judy
    Dana Farber Cancer Institute, MA 02215 USA.
    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat
    NCI, MD 20892 USA; Institute Cancer Research, England.
    Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra
    UCL EGA Institute Womens Heatlh, England.
    Ghoussaini, Maya
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Giles, Graham G.
    Cancer Council Victoria, Australia; University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Glasspool, Rosalind
    Beatson West Scotland Cancer Centre, Scotland.
    Godwin, Andrew K.
    University of Kansas, KS 66160 USA.
    Goldberg, Mark S.
    McGill University, Canada; McGill University, Canada.
    Goldgar, David E.
    University of Utah, UT 84132 USA.
    Gonzalez-Neira, Anna
    Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Spain.
    Goode, Ellen L.
    Mayo Clin, MN 55902 USA.
    Goodman, Marc T.
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA; Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Greene, Mark H.
    NCI, MD 20892 USA.
    Gronwald, Jacek
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Guenel, Pascal
    INSERM, France; University of Paris 11, France.
    Haiman, Christopher A.
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Hall, Per
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Emily
    Mayo Clin, MN 55902 USA.
    Hamann, Ute
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Hansen, Thomas V. O.
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Harrington, Patricia A.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Hartman, Mikael
    National University of Health Syst, Singapore; National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    Hassan, Norhashimah
    University of Malaya, Malaysia; Cancer Research Initiat Fdn, Malaysia.
    Healey, Sue
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Heitz, Florian
    Kliniken Essen Mitte, Germany; Dr Horst Schmidt Kliniken Wiesbaden, Germany.
    Herzog, Josef
    City Hope Clin Cancer Genet Community Research Network, CA 91010 USA.
    Hogdall, Estrid
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark; Danish Cancer Soc Research Centre, Denmark.
    Hogdall, Claus K.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hogervorst, Frans B. L.
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    Hollestelle, Antoinette
    Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    Hopper, John L.
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Hulick, Peter J.
    NorthShore University of Health Syst, IL 60201 USA.
    Huzarski, Tomasz
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Imyanitov, Evgeny N.
    NN Petrov Institute Oncol, Russia.
    Isaacs, Claudine
    Georgetown University, DC 20057 USA.
    Ito, Hidemi
    Aichi Cancer Centre, Japan.
    Jakubowska, Anna
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Janavicius, Ramunas
    Centre Innovat Med, Lithuania.
    Jensen, Allan
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    John, Esther M.
    Cancer Prevent Institute Calif, CA 94538 USA.
    Johnson, Nichola
    Institute Cancer Research, England.
    Kabisch, Maria
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Kang, Daehee
    Seoul National University, South Korea.
    Kapuscinski, Miroslav
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Karlan, Beth Y.
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Khan, Sofia
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Kiemeney, Lambertus A.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Kruger Kjaer, Susanne
    Danish Cancer Soc Research Centre, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Knight, Julia A.
    Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute Mt Sinai Hospital, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Konstantopoulou, Irene
    Aghia Paraskevi Attikis, Greece.
    Kosma, Veli-Matti
    Kuopio University Hospital, Finland; University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Kristensen, Vessela
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre, Poland; Institute Oncol, Poland.
    Kwong, Ava
    Hong Kong Sanat and Hospital, Peoples R China; University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    de la Hoya, Miguel
    IdISSC El Institute Invest Sanitaria Hospital Clin San Car, Spain.
    Laitman, Yael
    Chaim Sheba Medical Centre, Israel.
    Lambrechts, Diether
    VIB, Belgium; University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Le, Nhu
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    De Leeneer, Kim
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Lester, Jenny
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Levine, Douglas A.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10065 USA.
    Li, Jingmei
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lindblom, Annika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Long, Jirong
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA.
    Lophatananon, Artitaya
    University of Warwick, England.
    Loud, Jennifer T.
    NCI, MD 20892 USA.
    Lu, Karen
    University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre, TX 77030 USA.
    Lubinski, Jan
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Mannermaa, Arto
    Kuopio University Hospital, Finland; Kuopio University Hospital, Finland; University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Manoukian, Siranoush
    Ist Nazl Tumori, Italy.
    Le Marchand, Loic
    University of Hawaii, HI 96813 USA.
    Margolin, Sara
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Marme, Frederik
    Heidelberg University, Germany; Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Massuger, Leon F. A. G.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Matsuo, Keitaro
    Kyushu University, Japan.
    Mazoyer, Sylvie
    University of Lyon, France.
    McGuffog, Lesley
    University of Cambridge, England.
    McLean, Catriona
    Alfred Hospital, Australia.
    McNeish, Iain
    University of Glasgow, Scotland.
    Meindl, Alfons
    Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Menon, Usha
    UCL EGA Institute Womens Heatlh, England.
    Mensenkamp, Arjen R.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Milne, Roger L.
    Cancer Council Victoria, Australia; University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Montagna, Marco
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Moysich, Kirsten B.
    Roswell Pk Cancer Institute, NY 14263 USA.
    Muir, Kenneth
    University of Warwick, England; University of Manchester, England.
    Mulligan, Anna Marie
    University of Health Network, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Nathanson, Katherine L.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Ness, Roberta B.
    University of Texas Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Neuhausen, Susan L.
    Beckman Research Institute City Hope, CA 91010 USA.
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Nord, Silje
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Nussbaum, Robert L.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Odunsi, Kunle
    Roswell Pk Cancer Institute, NY 14263 USA.
    Offit, Kenneth
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10065 USA.
    Olah, Edith
    National Institute Oncol, Hungary.
    Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Olson, Janet E.
    Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
    Olswold, Curtis
    Mayo Clin, MN 55902 USA.
    OMalley, David
    Ohio State University, OH 43210 USA; James Graham Brown Cancer Centre, OH 43210 USA.
    Orlow, Irene
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10017 USA.
    Orr, Nick
    Institute Cancer Research, England.
    Osorio, Ana
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark; Spanish National Cancer Centre CNIO, Spain; Biomed Network Rare Disease CIBERER, Spain.
    Kyung Park, Sue
    Seoul National University, South Korea; Seoul National University, South Korea; Seoul National University, South Korea.
    Pearce, Celeste L.
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Pejovic, Tanja
    Oregon Health and Science University, OR 97239 USA; Oregon Health and Science University, OR 97239 USA.
    Peterlongo, Paolo
    FIRC Italian Fdn Cancer Research, Italy.
    Pfeiler, Georg
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Phelan, Catherine M.
    H Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute, FL 33606 USA.
    Poole, Elizabeth M.
    Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Pylkas, Katri
    Centre NordLab, Finland; University of Oulu, Finland.
    Radice, Paolo
    Ist Nazl Tumori, Italy.
    Rantala, Johanna
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Usman Rashid, Muhammad
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany; Shaukat Khanum Mem Cancer Hospital and Research Centre SKMCH and RC, Pakistan.
    Rennert, Gad
    Clalit National Israeli Cancer Control Centre, Israel; Carmel Hospital, Israel.
    Rhenius, Valerie
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Rhiem, Kerstin
    University Hospital Cologne, Germany; University Hospital Cologne, Germany.
    Risch, Harvey A.
    Yale University, CT 06510 USA.
    Rodriguez, Gus
    NorthShore University of HealthSyst, IL 60201 USA.
    Anne Rossing, Mary
    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre, WA 98109 USA; University of Washington, WA 98109 USA.
    Rudolph, Anja
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Salvesen, Helga B.
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Sangrajrang, Suleeporn
    National Cancer Institute, Thailand.
    Sawyer, Elinor J.
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Schildkraut, Joellen M.
    Duke University, NC 27710 USA; Duke Cancer Institute, NC 27710 USA.
    Schmidt, Marjanka K.
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    Schmutzler, Rita K.
    University Hospital Cologne, Germany; University Hospital Cologne, Germany; University Hospital Cologne, Germany; University Hospital Cologne, Germany.
    Sellers, Thomas A.
    H Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute, FL 33606 USA.
    Seynaeve, Caroline
    Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    Shah, Mitul
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Shen, Chen-Yang
    Academic Sinica, Taiwan; China Medical University, Taiwan.
    Shu, Xiao-Ou
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA.
    Sieh, Weiva
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Singer, Christian F.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Sinilnikova, Olga M.
    Centre Leon Berard, France; University of Lyon 1, France.
    Slager, Susan
    Mayo Clin, MN 55902 USA.
    Song, Honglin
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Soucy, Penny
    University of Laval, Canada.
    Southey, Melissa C.
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Stenmark Askmalm, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics. University of Lund Hospital, Sweden.
    Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique
    Institute Curie, France; Institute Curie, France; Sorbonne Paris Cite, France.
    Sutter, Christian
    University of Heidelberg Hospital, Germany.
    Swerdlow, Anthony
    Institute Cancer Research, England; Institute Cancer Research, England.
    Tchatchou, Sandrine
    Mt Sinai Hospital, Canada.
    Teixeira, Manuel R.
    Portuguese Oncology Institute, Portugal; University of Porto, Portugal.
    Teo, Soo H.
    University of Malaya, Malaysia; Cancer Research Initiat Fdn, Malaysia.
    Terry, Kathryn L.
    Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Beth Terry, Mary
    Columbia University, NY 10027 USA.
    Thomassen, Mads
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Grazia Tibiletti, Maria
    University of Insubria, Italy.
    Tihomirova, Laima
    Latvian Biomed Research and Study Centre, Latvia.
    Tognazzo, Silvia
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Ewart Toland, Amanda
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA; IdISSC El Institute Invest Sanitaria Hospital Clin San Car, Spain; Ohio State University, OH 43210 USA.
    Tomlinson, Ian
    University of Oxford, England; University of Oxford, England.
    Torres, Diana
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany; Pontificia University of Javeriana, Colombia.
    Truong, Therese
    INSERM, France; University of Paris 11, France.
    Tseng, Chiu-chen
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Tung, Nadine
    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre, MA 02215 USA.
    Tworoger, Shelley S.
    Harvard University, MA 02115 USA; Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA 02115 USA; Harvard University, MA 02115 USA.
    Vachon, Celine
    Mayo Clin, MN 55902 USA.
    van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.
    Erasmus University, Netherlands.
    van Doorn, Helena C.
    Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Vant Veer, Laura J.
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Netherlands.
    Vanderstichele, Adriaan
    University Hospital Leuven, Belgium.
    Vergote, Ignace
    University Hospital Leuven, Belgium.
    Vijai, Joseph
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10065 USA.
    Wang, Qin
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Wang-Gohrke, Shan
    University Hospital Ulm, Germany.
    Weitzel, Jeffrey N.
    City Hope Clin Cancer Genet Community Research Network, CA 91010 USA.
    Wentzensen, Nicolas
    NCI, MD 20892 USA.
    Whittemore, Alice S.
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Wildiers, Hans
    University Hospital Leuven, Belgium.
    Winqvist, Robert
    Centre NordLab, Finland; University of Oulu, Finland.
    Wu, Anna H.
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA.
    Yannoukakos, Drakoulis
    National Centre Science Research Demokritos, Greece.
    Yoon, Sook-Yee
    Sime Darby Medical Centre, Malaysia; University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Yu, Jyh-Cherng
    National Def Medical Centre, Taiwan.
    Zheng, Wei
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37203 USA.
    Zheng, Ying
    Shanghai Centre Disease Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Kum Khanna, Kum
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Simard, Jacques
    University of Laval, Canada.
    Monteiro, Alvaro N.
    H Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute, FL 33612 USA.
    French, Juliet D.
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Couch, Fergus J.
    Mayo Clin, MN 55902 USA; Mayo Clin, MN 55905 USA.
    Freedman, Matthew L.
    Dana Farber Cancer Institute, MA 02215 USA.
    Easton, Douglas F.
    University of Cambridge, England; University of Cambridge, England.
    Dunning, Alison M.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Pharoah, Paul D.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Edwards, Stacey L.
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Chenevix-Trench, Georgia
    QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Antoniou, Antonis C.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Gayther, Simon A.
    University of Southern Calif, CA 90033 USA; Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA 90048 USA.
    Functional mechanisms underlying pleiotropic risk alleles at the 19p13.1 breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility locus2016In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 7, article id 12675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A locus at 19p13 is associated with breast cancer (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Here we analyse 438 SNPs in this region in 46,451 BC and 15,438 OC cases, 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 73,444 controls and identify 13 candidate causal SNPs associated with serous OC (P=9.2 × 10−20), ER-negative BC (P=1.1 × 10−13), BRCA1-associated BC (P=7.7 × 10−16) and triple negative BC (P-diff=2 × 10−5). Genotype-gene expression associations are identified for candidate target genes ANKLE1 (P=2 × 10−3) and ABHD8 (P<2 × 10−3). Chromosome conformation capture identifies interactions between four candidate SNPs and ABHD8, and luciferase assays indicate six risk alleles increased transactivation of the ADHD8 promoter. Targeted deletion of a region containing risk SNP rs56069439 in a putative enhancer induces ANKLE1 downregulation; and mRNA stability assays indicate functional effects for an ANKLE1 3′-UTR SNP. Altogether, these data suggest that multiple SNPs at 19p13 regulate ABHD8 and perhaps ANKLE1 expression, and indicate common mechanisms underlying breast and ovarian cancer risk.

  • 49.
    Lilledahl, Magnus B.
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technoogy, Norway.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Gunnar Ellingsen, Pal
    Norwegian University of Science and Technoogy, Norway.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Stenhjem Hagen, Vegard
    Norwegian University of Science and Technoogy, Norway.
    Kildemo, Morten
    Norwegian University of Science and Technoogy, Norway.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Norwegian University of Science and Technoogy, Norway.
    Combined imaging of oxidative stress and microscopic structure reveals new features in human atherosclerotic plaques2015In: Journal of Biomedical Optics, ISSN 1083-3668, E-ISSN 1560-2281, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 020503-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human atherosclerotic samples collected by carotid endarterectomy were investigated using electronic paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) for visualization of reactive oxygen species, and nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) to study structural features. Regions of strong EPRI signal, indicating a higher concentration of reactive oxygen species and increased inflammation, were found to colocalize with regions dense in cholesterol crystals as revealed by NLOM.

  • 50.
    Magnusson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cieslar-Pobuda, Artur
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of of TechnologyGliwice, Poland.
    Wigenius, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Carl Zeiss AB, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Thommie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Application Specialist Confocal Microscopy at Leica MicrosystemsIL, United States.
    Los, Marek Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Pathology, Pomeranian Medical UniversitySzczecin, Poland.
    Kågedal, Bertil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Jonasson, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Differential vital staining of normal fibroblasts and melanoma cells by an anionic conjugated polyelectrolyte2015In: Cytometry Part A, ISSN 1552-4922, E-ISSN 1552-4930, Vol. 87, no 3, p. 262-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular probes for imaging of live cells are of great interest for studying biological and pathological processes. The anionic luminescent conjugated polythiophene (LCP) polythiophene acetic acid (PTAA), has previously been used for vital staining of cultured fibroblasts as well as transformed cells with results indicating differential staining due to cell phenotype. Herein, we investigated the behavior of PTAA in two normal and five transformed cells lines. PTAA fluorescence in normal cells appeared in a peripheral punctated pattern whereas the probe was more concentrated in a one-sided perinuclear localization in the five transformed cell lines. In fibroblasts, PTAA fluorescence was initially associated with fibronectin and after 24 h partially localized to lysosomes. The uptake and intracellular target in malignant melanoma cells was more ambiguous and the intracellular target of PTAA in melanoma cells is still elusive. PTAA was well tolerated by both fibroblasts and melanoma cells, and microscopic analysis as well as viability assays showed no signs of negative influence on growth. Stained cells maintained their proliferation rate for at least 12 generations. Although the probe itself was nontoxic, photoinduced cellular toxicity was observed in both cell lines upon irradiation directly after staining. However, no cytotoxicity was detected when the cells were irradiated 24 h after staining, indicating that the photoinduced toxicity is dependent on the cellular location of the probe. Overall, these studies certified PTAA as a useful agent for vital staining of cells, and that PTAA can potentially be used to study cancer-related biological and pathological processes.

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