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  • 1.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change.
    Öhman, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Äldres hälsa och livsstil2017In: Vem är den äldre? - Äldrebilder i ett åldrande Sverige / [ed] Abramsson, Marianne; Hydén Lars-Christer & Motel Klingebiel Andreas, Stockholm: Nationell Kvalitetsplan för Äldreomsorgen , 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center.
    Self-efficacy and pain acceptance as mediators of the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities in women and men with rheumatoid arthritis2017In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 31, no 6, 824-834 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study whether personal factors (self-efficacy and pain acceptance) mediate the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities in persons with rheumatoid arthritis.

    METHODS: Persons with rheumatoid arthritis for at least four years (n = 737; 73% women) answered a questionnaire measuring self-efficacy, pain acceptance, performance of valued life activities, and self-rated pain. Relationships among these constructs were explored using univariate and multivariate analyses. Structural equation modelling was then used to examine the mediational role of personal factors on the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities.

    RESULTS: A direct negative association between pain and performance of valued life activities was identified (Beta = .34, P < .001). This suggests that people with rheumatoid arthritis who had higher levels of pain has increased difficulties in performing valued life activities. Self-efficacy and activity engagement component of pain acceptance mediated the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities, however the pain willingness component of pain acceptance did not influence participation in valued life activities.

    CONCLUSION: These findings highlight the importance of considering personal factors, such as pain acceptance and self-efficacy, in facilitating participation in valued life activities.

  • 3.
    Alfredsson Ågren, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Internet use among adolescents with intellectual disabilities at home and school2016In: Abstract book: International Conference on Cerebral Palsy and other Childhood-onset Disabilities Stockholm 1–4 June 2016, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Today everyday life depends on having access to, understand and use internet inorder to participate and take part in societal resources. This understanding can be complex forpersons with intellectual disabilities (ID) due to their cognitive impairments. It is even statedthat internet-use can be yet another part of daily life activities they are excluded from. Internet-use is claimed to involve risks, but also benefits for persons with ID, but there is a shortage inempirical studies with the target group ́s own opinion regarding this. Broader knowledge isacquired of internet-use in everyday life for adolescents with ID, as a precondition toparticipation. 

    Aim: This study aims to explore and describe internet-use and doing internet activities at homeand at school among adolescents with mild and moderate intellectual disabilities. Method: The study has a qualitative inductive design using observations and interviews in thetwo settings; at home and at school. Participants are six adolescents with mild and moderate ID,from special schools in the middle-region of Sweden, between the ages 13-20, that use internetto some extent. Data was collected at 2 occasions/participant for about 2hours/participant/setting. The analysis was done using a qualitative content analysis.

    Result: Preliminary results show that adolescents with mild and moderate ID use internet both athome and in school, to a greater extent than was expected, but the doings of internet-activitiesvaries in the different settings. Both facilitating and hindering aspects are described by theparticipants. Pictures on the internet seem to be of support when using and navigating theinternet.

    Conclusion: Deeper knowledge regarding internet-use from the target groups own perspectivehas been gained. The results can be used in the different occupational settings and in furtherresearch to survey internet use and participation in internet-activities

  • 4.
    Andreassen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öhman, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson Ranada, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Assessing occupational performance in special housing in Sweden2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Assessing occupational performance is commonly done by occupational therapists[OT] working in special housing in municipal elder care. Assessments should be relevant and evidence-based. Even so, we know little about how assessment of occupational performance is conducted in special housing.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to identify OTs’ use and perceptions of different methods to assess occupational performance for elderly clients living in special housing.  

    Method: An email questionnaire was sent to OTs working in special housing in Sweden. Data was analyzed using descriptive and parametric statistics.

    Results: The findings, based on data from 660 respondents, showed that OTs regularly assessed occupational performance but did not use standardized assessment instruments or structured methods to any great extent. In general, OTs reported that they were not pleased with their ability to assess their clients; however, OTs with higher education and with responsibility for fewer clients were more pleased with their assessments and stated that they had more knowledge about assessment methods. Conclusion: To support OTs in using structured assessments of occupational performance in everyday practice, organization as well as structures in the work environment and educational development need to be taken into consideration.

  • 5.
    Barns, Angela
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Svanholm, Frida
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Living in the present: Women's everyday experiences of living with rheumatoid arthritis2015In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 5, no 4, 1-13 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the findings from a qualitative research project exploring eight women’s experiences of living with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Through semistructured interviews, the women provided insights into the physical, emotional, and social impacts of RA and the “work” involved in negotiating its influence in the everyday life. In narrating their experiences of adapting to RA, the women express a common desire for “normalcy,” to return to a time and space before the disruption of RA. The women’s accounts also emphasized the interrelatedness between bodily experience and constructions of self, highlighting the corporeal nature of RA and the constant shaping and reshaping of personal meanings and values.

  • 6.
    Bergström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Jonköping University, Sweden; Curtin University, Australia.
    Börsbo, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center.
    Like the worst toothache you've had - How people with rheumatoid arthritis describe and manage pain2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 6, 468-476 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease often associated with disability. Despite new treatments, pain and activity limitations are still present. Objectives: To describe how persons with RA experience and manage pain in their daily life. Methods: Seven semi-structured focus groups (FGs) were conducted and analyzed using content analysis. Results: The analysis revealed four categories: 1) Pain expresses itself in different ways referred to pain as overwhelming, aching or as a feeling of stiffness. 2) Mitigating pain referred to the use of heat, cold, medications and activities as distractions from the pain. 3) Adapting to pain referred to strategies employed as coping mechanisms for the pain, e.g. planning and adjustment of daily activities, and use of assistive devices. 4) Pain in a social context referred to the participants social environment as being both supportive and uncomprehending, the latter causing patients to hide their pain. Conclusions: Pain in RA is experienced in different ways. This emphasizes the multi-professional team to address this spectrum of experiences and to find pain management directed to the individual experience that also include the persons social environment.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-01-05 15:20
  • 7.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Katz, Patricia
    University of California, San Francisco, USA.
    Validation and internal consistency of the Swedish version of the Valued Life Activities scale.2016In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 30, no 12, 1211-1219 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to create a linguistically and culturally validated Swedish version of the Valued Life Activities scale. The aim was also to describe its content and concurrent validity and its internal consistency in persons with rheumatoid arthritis.

    METHODS: The Valued Life Activities scale was translated to Swedish and culturally adapted. In order to describe the content validity, both the Swedish and original Valued Life Activities scale were linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. The concurrent validity and internal consistency were evaluated in 737 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. To establish concurrent validity, the scale was correlated to disease activity, activity limitations, and life satisfaction. Internal consistency was assessed with Cronbach's alpha.

    RESULTS: The equivalence of meaning between the Swedish and the original Valued Life Activities scale was ensured by harmonization review. Content validity was high when linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Concurrent validity showed a strong correlation with the activity limitations (r = 0.87), moderate with life satisfaction (r = -0.61), and weak with disease activity (r = 0.38). Internal consistency was excellent (Cronbach's alpha = 0.97).

    CONCLUSIONS: The Swedish Valued Life Activities scale has been tested in a large and well-characterized sample and found to be a linguistically valid and culturally adapted self-reported measure of participation. Content validity of the Valued Life Activities scale was excellent, concurrent validity strong, and the internal consistency excellent. Since both individual preferences and International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health concepts of disability are taken into account, the Swedish Valued Life Activities scale appears to be a promising new scale addressing important aspects of participation.

  • 8.
    Bolic Baric, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Hellberg, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden .
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Internet Activities During Leisure: A Comparison Between Adolescents With ADHD and Adolescents From the General Population2015In: Journal of Attention Disorders, ISSN 1087-0547, E-ISSN 1557-1246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Adolescents’ leisure activities are increasingly focusing on Internet activities, and today, these coexist with traditional leisure activities such as sport and meeting friends. The purpose of the present study was to investigate leisure activities, particularly Internet activities, among boys and girls with ADHD, and compare these with boys and girls from the general population. The objective was also to explore how traditional leisure activities and Internet activities interrelate among adolescents with ADHD.

    Method: Adolescents with ADHD (n = 102) were compared with adolescents from the general population on leisure activities and Internet use.

    Results: Leisure activities among adolescents with ADHD tended to focus on Internet activities, particularly online games. Internet activities were broadening leisure activities among adolescents with ADHD, rather than being a substitute for traditional leisure activities.

    Conclusion: Internet activities may provide adolescents with ADHD accessible means of social interaction.

  • 9.
    Bolic Baric, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Hellberg, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden .
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    The Occupational Transition Process to Upper Secondary School, Further Education and/or Work in Sweden: As Described by Young Adults with Asperger Syndrome and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder2017In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 47, no 3, 667-679 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe the occupational transition process to upper secondary school, further education and/or work, and to discover what support influences the process from the perspectives of young adults with Asperger’s disorder (AS) or attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This qualitative study comprised semi-structured interviews with 15 young adults with AS or ADHD, eight men and seven women (aged 20 to 29 years). Most of the participants were attending community-based day centres at local businesses. Analysis identified three different occupational transition pathways following compulsory school. Support influencing the occupational transition process included: occupational transition preparation in compulsory school, practical work experience in a safe environment, and support beyond the workplace. The overall understanding shows that the occupational transition process was a longitudinal one starting as early as in middle school, and continuing until the young adults with AS and ADHD obtained and were able to remain in employment or further education. Support from community-based day centres was described both as an important step towards finding employment in the regular labour market in which participants could develop practical work experience, and as being too far away from the regular labour market.

  • 10.
    Bolic Baric, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thelin, Nils
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Computer use in educational activities by students with ADHD2014In: 16th International Congress of the World Federation of Occupational Therapists: Sharing Traditions, Creating Futures, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: One type of support in school that holds promise for students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the use of information and communication technology (ICT) such as computers and Internet. Computer use in educational activities may be one promising tool to support academic performance of students with ADHD experiencing difficulties in school. However, students with ADHD may be overlooked regarding available support compared with students with physical disabilities.Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate computer use in educational activities by students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in comparison with that of students with physical disabilities and students from the general population.Methods: The design of the study was cross-sectional with group comparison. Students with a primary diagnosis of ADHD and related disorders were recruited from habilitation centres (HCs). Students with ADHD (n=102) were pairmatched in terms of age and sex with students with physical disabilities and students from the general population (n = 940) were used as a reference group.Results: Students with ADHD reported significantly less frequent use of computers for almost all educational activities compared with students with physical disabilities and students from the general population. Students with ADHD reported low satisfaction with computer use in school. In addition, students with ADHD reported a desire to use computers more often and for more activities in school compared with students with physical disabilities. Conclusion: From an equality perspective, it is essential to enable students with ADHD to use computers in educational activities. Contribution to the practice/evidence base of occupational therapy: Focusing on promoting computer use in educational activities in school for students with physical disabilities as well as students with ADHD is an emerging field in occupational therapy.

  • 11.
    Bolic Baric, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Tegelström, Valerie
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekblad, Erik
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Norrköping.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Usability of RemindMe – An Interactive Web-Based Mobile Reminder Calendar:: A Professional's Perspective2015In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics / [ed] Cecilia Sik-Lányi, Evert-Jan Hoogerwerf, Klaus Miesenberger, Peter Cudd, IOS Press, 2015, 217, Vol. 217, 1083 p.247-254 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the study was to examine the usability of an interactive web-based mobile reminder calendar (RemindMe) developed for supporting individuals in organizing, planning and executing activities in everyday life, from the perspectives of professionals.

    Methods and material: Eleven professionals working in community services evaluated the usability of RemindMe in their clinical practice. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and analysed with inductive qualitative analysis.

    Results: The professionals perceived that RemindMe was useful, easy to use, and intuitive. There was a need among professionals for a web-based reminder calendar that requires the active acknowledgement of reminders. RemindMe's feedback system offering self-monitored information based on the user's interaction with the system supported the professionals in discussions, evaluation, and follow-up based on the needs of the persons with cognitive impairments.

    Conclusion: The results indicate that RemindMe may be potentially useful to professionals who provide support to individuals with cognitive impairments. However, further research is needed to evaluate experience of using RemindMe from the perspective of individuals with cognitive impairments.

  • 12.
    Bolic, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hellberg, Kristina
    Specialpedagogiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Support for learning- goes beyond academic support: voices of students with Asperger’s disorder and ADHD2016In: Autism, ISSN 1362-3613, E-ISSN 1461-7005, Vol. 20, no 2, 183-195 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to describe and explore the experiences of support at school among young adults with Asperger’s disorder (AS) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and also to examine what support they, in retrospect, described as influencing learning. Purposive sampling was used to enroll participants. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with thirteen young adults aged between 20-29 years. A qualitative analysis, based on interpreting people’s experiences was conducted by grouping and searching for patterns in data. The findings indicate that the participants experienced difficulties at school that included academic, social and emotional conditions, all of which could influence learning. Support for learning included small groups, individualized teaching methods, teachers who cared, and practical and emotional support. These clusters together confirm the overall understanding that support for learning aligns academic and psychosocial support. In conclusion, academic support combined with psychosocial support at school seems to be crucial for learning among students with AS and ADHD.

  • 13.
    Borgestig, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Folke Bernadotte Regional Habilitation Centre and Department of Women´s and Children´s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sandqvist, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Ahlsten, Gunnar
    Folke Bernadotte Regional Habilitation Centre and Department of Women´s and Children´s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjorn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; School of Occupational Therapy, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Gaze-based assistive technology in daily activities in children with severe physical impairments: an intervention study2017In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 20, no 3, 129-141 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To establish the impact of a gaze-based assistive technology (AT) intervention on activity repertoire, autonomous use, and goal attainment in children with severe physical impairments, and to examine parents’ satisfaction with the gaze-based AT and with services related to the gaze-based AT intervention.

    Methods: Non-experimental multiple case study with before, after, and follow-up design. Ten children with severe physical impairments without speaking ability (aged 1–15 years) participated in gaze-based AT intervention for 9–10 months, during which period the gaze-based AT was implemented in daily activities.

    Results: Repertoire of computer activities increased for seven children. All children had sustained usage of gaze-based AT in daily activities at follow-up, all had attained goals, and parents’ satisfaction with the AT and with services was high.

    Discussion: The gaze-based AT intervention was effective in guiding parents and teachers to continue supporting the children to perform activities with the AT after the intervention program.

  • 14.
    Borgestig, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Folke Bernadotte Regional Habilitation Centre and Department of Women´s and Children´s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sandqvist, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Parsons, Richard
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia / School of Occupational Therapy, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eye gaze performance for children with severe physical impairments using gaze-based assistive technology: a longitudinal study2016In: Assistive technology, ISSN 1040-0435, E-ISSN 1949-3614, Vol. 28, no 2, 93-102 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaze-based assistive technology (gaze-based AT) has the potential to provide children affected by severe physical impairments with opportunities for communication and activities. This study aimed to examine changes in eye gaze performance over time (time on task and accuracy) in children with severe physical impairments, without speaking ability, using gaze-based AT. A longitudinal study with an AB design was conducted on ten children (aged 1–15 years) with severe physical impairments, who were beginners to gaze-based AT at baseline. Thereafter, all children used the gaze-based AT in daily activities over the course of the study. Compass computer software was used to measure time on task and accuracy with eye selection of targets on screen, and tests were performed with the children at baseline, after 5 months, 9–11 months, and after 15–20 months. Findings showed that the children improved in time on task after 5 months and became more accurate in selecting targets after 15–20 months. This study indicates that these children with severe physical impairments, who were unable to speak, could improve in eye gaze performance. However, the children needed time to practice on a long-term basis to acquire skills needed to develop fast and accurate eye gaze performance.

  • 15.
    Brorsson, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Öhman, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Stefan
    School of Technology and Health, The Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden .
    Nygård, Louise
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Being a pedestrian with dementia: a qualitative study using photo documentation and focus group interviews.2016In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 15, no 5, 1124-1140 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to identify problematic situations in using zebra crossings. They were identified from photo documentations comprising film sequences and the perspectives of people with dementia. The aim was also to identify how they would understand, interpret and act in these problematic situations based on their previous experiences and linked to the film sequences.

    A qualitative grounded theory approach was used. Film sequences from five zebra crossings were analysed. The same film sequences were used as triggers in two focus group interviews with persons with dementia. Individual interviews with three informants were also performed.

    The core category, the hazard of meeting unfolding problematic traffic situations when only one layer at a time can be kept in focus, showed how a problematic situation as a whole consisted of different layers of problematic situations. The first category, adding layers of problematic traffic situations to each other, was characterized by the informants’ creation of a problematic situation as a whole. The different layers were described in the subcategories of layout of streets and zebra crossings, weather conditions, vehicles and crowding of pedestrians. The second category, actions used to meet different layers of problematic traffic situations, was characterized by avoiding problematic situations, using traffic lights as reminders and security precautions, following the flow at the zebra crossing and being cautious pedestrians.

    In conclusion, as community-dwelling people with dementia commonly are pedestrians, it is important that health care professionals and caregivers take their experiences and management of problematic traffic situations into account when providing support.

  • 16.
    Ek, Ingalill
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Höglund, Anette
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    An experience-based treatment model for children unwilling to eat.2016In: Nursing children and young people, ISSN 2046-2344, Vol. 28, no 5, 22-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Guidance during Meals is a two-week inpatient intervention undertaken at the Folke Bernadotte Regional Habilitation Centre, Sweden, to help parents deal with children's eating problems. Parents are given advice about medical and/or behavioural reasons for food selectivity and possible treatment strategies. Aims To identify the way parents handle mealtimes and associated difficulties and investigate parents' opinion on children's progress using Guidance during Meals. Method A questionnaire, consisting of 30 statements and answered by 41 parents, was used to investigate parents' opinions regarding the success of the intervention in altering their child's eating habits at home. Findings Most parents thought that the intervention had helped them and their child, by teaching them how to guide their child during mealtimes, what made it easier for their child to eat, and how to communicate with their child in an encouraging way. Most children retained their increased interest in eating once back at home. These results were not dependent on time of onset of eating problems, number of intervention periods, length of time since the intervention, or gastrostomy. Conclusion The Guidance during Meals intervention helps parents develop knowledge about factors that hinder or facilitate eating in their child and tools that can help their child finish meals, and gives them a sense of hope that positive change can occur.

  • 17.
    Emanuelsson, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Landell, Sandra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Miljöns påverkan på äldres delaktighet i aktivitet på särskilt boende: en kvalitativ studie2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Det är viktigt för äldres välbefinnande och hälsa att känna delaktighet i aktivitet. Delaktighet i aktivitet påverkas av individens egna förutsättningar och miljöns utformning. Hemmet är en viktig aktivitetsmiljö där många äldre spenderar mycket tid. Det är vanligt att äldre flyttar till ett särskilt boende när de är i behov av hjälp och stöd för att klara sin vardag. Syfte: Att studera hur miljön påverkar äldres delaktighet i aktivitet på särskilt boende. Metod: En kvalitativ studie innefattande sju intervjuer med äldre och observationer på tre olika särskilda boenden har genomförts. Resultat: I resultatet framkom de fem kategorierna bristande tillgänglighet i den fysiska miljön, tillgångar i den fysiska miljön, betydelsen av hjälpmedel, betydelsen av att interagera med andra människor samt personalens betydelse för de äldres delaktighet i aktivitet. Den fysiska miljöns utformning bidrog till att de äldre inte uppfattade det särskilda boendet som hemlikt då de inte fick plats med alla de personliga tillhörigheter de önskade. Det visade sig att många äldre kände sig ensamma och inte upplevde någon samhörighet med de medboende. Gemensamma aktiviteter var mycket uppskattat av de äldre bland annat eftersom det gav dem en möjlighet att interagera med andra. Konklusion: Den fysiska och den sociala miljön på ett särskilt boende kunde både främja och hindra äldres delaktighet i aktivitet.

  • 18.
    Fisher, Gail
    et al.
    University of Illinois at Chicago, USA.
    Parkinson, Susanne
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Environment in the Model of Human Occupation 5th edition  – Transformation and Practical Tools2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Glännfjord, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson Ranada, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Elderly people’s perceptions of using Wii sports bowling – A qualitative study2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 5, 329-338 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Nintendo Wii is a gaming console with motion-sensitive controls that is making inroads into health care and rehabilitation. However, there is still limited knowledge on how elderly people perceive the use of such a product. The aim of this study was to examine how the use of the Wii Sports Bowling in an activity group was perceived by elderly people. The data consisted of observations and interviews with participants who used Wii Sports Bowling and was analysed with content analysis. The findings are described in three themes; ‘The use of the Wii Sports game’, ‘Engagement in the game’ and ‘Social interaction around the activity’. Wii Sports Bowling was described as easier to play compared to real-life bowling and was enjoyable and a social activity. The opportunity to meet the group each week was important for the participants. Playing the game resulted in signs of immersion and a flow-like state. The Wii was perceived to be easy to use, to provide a way to socialize with peers and to give opportunities to participate in activities in a new way. More studies regarding elderly people’s experiences and apprehensions regarding new technology such as gaming consoles and virtual reality are needed.

  • 20.
    Haglund, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bowyer, Patricia
    School of occupational therapy, Houston, USA.
    Scott, Patricia
    Department of occupational therapy, Indiana University, Indianapolis, USA.
    Taylor, Renée
    University of Illinois at Chicago, USA.
    The Model of Huma Occupation, the ICF, and de Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Connections to Support Best Practice around the World2017In: Kielhofner´s Model of Human Occupation: Theory and application / [ed] Taylor, Renée R, Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2017, 5, 466-485 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Björk Olafsdottir, Linda
    University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Thora Egilson, Snaefridur
    University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Agreements and disagreements between children and their parents in health-related assessments2017In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 39, no 11, 1059-1072 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To systematically review research concerning parent-child agreement in health-related assessments to reveal overall agreement, directions of agreement, and the factors that affect agreement in ratings. Method: The Uni-Search and five additional databases were searched. Childrens health issues were grouped into psychosocial issues including autism and ADHD, and physical and performance issues including pain. Measures used for comparison were those addressing (a) psychosocial functioning, (b) physical and performance functioning, and (c) health-related quality of life. Results: Totally, 39 studies met the inclusion criteria, comprising 44 analyses in all since four studies contained more than one analyses. Moderate child-parent agreement was demonstrated in 23 analyses and poor agreement in 20 analyses. Several analyses found more agreement on observable/external than on non-observable/internal domains. Overall, parents considered their children had more difficulties than did the children themselves, although there were indications that for children with physical performance issues, parents may underreport their childrens difficulties in emotional functioning and pain. There were no consistencies in differences between childrens and parents ratings on levels of agreement with respect to the childrens health issue, age or gender. Conclusions: Discrepancies between child and parent reports seem to reflect their different perspectives and not merely inaccuracy or bias. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION In general, parents consider their children to have more difficulties - or more extensive difficulties than the children themselves think they have. The perspectives of the child and his or her parents should be sought whenever possible since both constitute important information concerning the childs health and well-being. Children with physical and performance issues reported more difficulties than their parents concerning the childrens emotional functioning and pain. Clinicians should prioritize obtaining childrens views on subjective aspects such as emotional issues as well as on pain.

  • 22.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Bolic Baric, Vedrana
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    E-inclusion: Digital equality – young people with disabilities2015In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics / [ed] Cecilia Sik-Lányi, Evert-Jan Hoogerwerf, Klaus Miesenberger, Peter Cudd, IOS Press, 2015, 217, Vol. 217, 685 - 688 p.685-688 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The United Nations' position is that digital access is a matter involving equality between groups of people, the securing of democratic rights, and equal opportunities for all citizens. This study investigates digital equality in school and leisure between young people with and without disabilities. A cross-sectional design with group comparisons was applied. Participants were young people (10–18 years of age) with disabilities (n=389) and a reference group in about the same ages. Data were collected by a survey focusing on access to and engagement in ICT activities in school and during leisure time. The results demonstrated young people with disabilities had restricted participation in computer use in educational activities, in comparison to young people in general. During leisure time young people with disabilities had a leading position compared to the reference group with respect to internet use in a variety of activities. Beneficial environmental conditions at home (and the reverse in schools) are discussed as parts of the explanation for the differing engagement levels at home and in school, and among young people with disabilities and young people in general.

    Conclusion: Schools need to prioritise use of ICT by young people with disabilities.

  • 23.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Forsyth, Kirsty
    Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, UK.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Keponen, Riita
    Metropolia University of Applied Health Sciences, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ekbladh, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kielhofner, Gary
    Talking with Clients: Assessments that Collect Information through Interviews2017In: Kielhofner´s Model of Human Occupation: Theory and application / [ed] Renée R Taylor, Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins , 2017, 5, 275-290 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Karlsson, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Liedberg, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandqvist, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Initial evaluation of psychometric properties of a structured work task application for the Assessment of Work Performance in a constructed environment2017In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The Swedish Social Insurance Administration has developed a new assessment tool for sickness insurance. This study is a part of the initial evaluation of the application, called the Assessment of Work Performance, Structured Activities, and focuses on evaluation of the psychometric properties of social validity, content validity, and utility.

    Materials and methods: This was a qualitative study using semi-structured telephone interviews with occupational therapists. A convenience sample was used and participants who fulfilled inclusion criteria (n = 15) were interviewed. Data were analyzed using content analysis with a directed approach.

    Results: The results indicate that the application provides valuable information and that it is socially valid. Assessors found work tasks suitable for a diverse group of clients and reported that clients accepted the assessments. Improvements were suggested, for example, expanding the application with more work tasks.

    Conclusion: The instrument has benefits; however, further development is desired. The use of a constructed environment in assessments may be a necessary option to supplement a real environment. But depending on organizational factors such as time and other resources, the participants had different opportunities to do so. Further evaluations regarding ecological validity are essential to ensure that assessments are fair and realistic when using constructed environments.

    • Implications for rehabilitation
    • This study indicates that assessment in a constructed environment can provide a secure and protected context for clients being assessed.

    • Psychometric evaluations are a never-ending process and this assessment instrument needs further development. However, this initial evaluation provides guidance in development of the instrument but also what studies to give priority to.

    • It is important to evaluate social validity in order to ensure that clients and assessors perceive assessment methods fair and meaningful. In this study, participants found the work tasks appropriate and usable when assessing their clients but client’s perspective must also be included in following studies.

    • This assessment instrument is the only activity-based assessment instrument within the Swedish Social Security Insurance. Psychometric evaluations are important since it affects so many individuals in Sweden.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-06-22 10:59
  • 25.
    Karlsson, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandqvist, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Social validity in work related assessments2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION

    Over the last years the Swedish Social Insurance Agency has implemented and evaluated a national assessment tool with the purpose of a secure and equivalent process in assessing work ability within sickness insurance. An application with structured work tasks was created for the observation based instrument the Assessment of Work Performance (AWP). Social validity investigates whether an assessment is acceptable and socially appropriate.

     

    OBJECTIVE

    Investigate social validity, content validity and utility of the application of the Assessment of Work Performance (AWP).

     

    METHOD

    This was a qualitative study with semi-structured interviews. A convenience sample was conducted and the occupational therapists who agreed to participate applied the application at their work. Those who had used the application (n=15) was interviewed and data was analysed using content analysis.

     

    RESULTS

    The results indicate that the application provides valuable information since clients accepted assessments and assessors found work tasks suitable for a diverse group of clients. Improvements were suggested, for example expanding the application with more work tasks to choose from.

     

    CONCLUSION

    It appears to exist social validity, content validity and utility for the application. This study investigates social validity, a psychometric property unusual to investigate in vocational rehabilitation. It is important since an assessment with a non-socially valid instrument can be inappropriate and irrelevant for clients. When an assessment is acceptable and relevant for clients, the complexity of assessment results can be reduced. Therefore it is essential that occupational therapists as well as other professionals ensure quality and acceptability when assessing work ability.

  • 26.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Utilization of the Swedish version of the Assessment of Communication and Interaction Skills2016In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 79, no 4, 228-234 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction The Assessment of Communication and Interaction Skills, which is based on the Model of Human Occupation, is used when observing a client’s skills to communicate and interact with others while performing an occupation. The utility and psychometric status of an assessment is critical for treatment planning in occupational therapy. The aim of the current study was to examine the utility of the Swedish version of the Assessment of Communication and Interaction Skills from the perspective of occupational therapists working in the field of mental health, considering its clinical relevance and potential for implementation.

    Method Eight occupational therapists performed 116 assessments. Most of the 58 clients had affective or anxiety disorders. Descriptive and qualitative analysis were performed.

    Results In 76% of the assessments, the occupational therapists perceived that they had obtained a deeper knowledge of the client’s communication and interaction skills. This supports the clinical relevance of the assessment. Concerning the implementation potential and time required for using the assessment, all occupational therapists considered it reasonable.

    Conclusion The Swedish version of the Assessment of Communication and Interaction Skills is appropriate to use in the field of mental health for supporting occupational therapists in the treatment planning process.

  • 27.
    Kocher Stalder, Cornelia
    et al.
    Institute of Occupational Therapy at Zurich University of Applied Sciences , Winterthur , Switzerland.; b Neuropaediatrics , University Childrens Hospital Bern, Bern, Switzerland..
    Kottorp, Anders
    Karolinska Institutet, University Stockholm, Stockholm , Sweden.; Department of Occupational Therapy University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, USA..
    Steinlin, Maja
    Neuropaediatrics, University Childrens Hospital Bern, Bern, Switzerland..
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Children's and teachers' perspectives on adjustments needed in school settings after acquired brain injury.2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, 1-10 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children with acquired brain injury (ABI) often present with functional deficits that influence their societal participation and well-being. Successful reintegration into school calls for individual support to meet each child's adjustment needs. The adjustment needs of children with ABI in school settings have not previously been explored.less thanbr /greater than

    Aim: The objectives of the present study were (a) to describe adjustment needs in school settings for children with ABI and (b) to explore differences and similarities between reports from the children and their teachers.less thanbr /greater thanMethods: In this cross-sectional study, 20 children with ABI (mean age 12.8 ± 3.4 years; class grade 1-10) and their teachers were interviewed individually, using the School Setting Interview (SSI). Data were analyzed with descriptive and with non-parametric statistics.less thanbr /greater than

    Results: (a) In the overall group, children rated that 55.6% of the 16 activities in the SSI needed no adjustment. The corresponding percentage for teachers was 48.4%. (b) In the child-teacher pairs, there was a positive relationship between teachers' and children's responses only in 3 out of 16 school activities and agreement varied strongly according to the activity in question.less thanbr /greater than

    Conclusions and Significance: It is important for occupational therapists and other professionals to specifically consider adjustment needs relating to school activities from various perspectives when aiming to provide individualized interventions.

  • 28.
    Kottorp, Anders
    et al.
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden / Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA.
    Nygård, Louise
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Hedman, Annicka
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Öhman, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Rosenberg, Lena
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Eva
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Ryd, Charlotta
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Access to and use of everyday technology among older people: An occupational justice issue – but for whom?2016In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 23, no 3, 382-388 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research into older people’s use of remote controls, mobile phones, digital home appliances, and computerized communication systems reveals that many have difficulty accessing and using these everyday technologies. By using occupational justice theory as a lens onto this technological development, we argue in this commentary that critical analysis of the findings from an occupational perspective reveals systematic injustices that disadvantage certain sectors of the older population. In particular we propose that, contrary to what might be expected, diagnosis or disability is not the sole marker for a vulnerable population at high risk of occupational injustices. Rather, the empirical findings support that other aspects (e.g., economic, educational) may also be influencing both everyday technology access and use among the older population. In light of these concerns, we argue that (a) occupation-centred outcome measures are needed to target everyday technology populations at risk of occupational injustices, and (b) future studies evaluating the access and use of everyday technology among older people must also monitor and target socio-demographic diversities.

  • 29.
    Kåhlin, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hagberg, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Choice and control for people ageing with intellectual disability in group homes2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 23, no 2, 127-137 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many people ageing with intellectual disabilities (ID) age in place in group homes. Participation is a central concept in support and service to people with ID, but age is often a determining factor for participation among this group. Choice and control are dimensions of participation.

    Aim: The aim of this article is to explore how choice and control in the everyday life of people ageing with ID is expressed and performed in the group home’s semi-private spaces.

    Material and methods: Participant observations and interviews with residents and staff were conducted in four different group homes in Sweden that had older residents.

    Results: Four categories were found that can be understood as aspects of choice and control in the group home’s semi-private spaces in the everyday life of people ageing with ID. These categories included aspects such as space and object, time and routines, privacy, and a person-centred approach.

    Conclusion and significance: People ageing with ID are vulnerable when it comes to maintaining choice and control in various situations in the home’s semi-private spaces. It is argued that occupational therapists should include this occupational arena in their evaluations and interventions for people ageing with ID.

  • 30.
    Kåhlin, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nord, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hagberg, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ageing in people with intellectual disability as it is understood by group home staff2016In: Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability, ISSN 1366-8250, E-ISSN 1469-9532, Vol. 41, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of older residents in group homes for people with intellectual disability (ID) is increasing. This interview study was focused on how group home staff addresses issues of ageing and being old among people with ID. Twelve members of staff at four different group homes in Sweden were interviewed. Findings revealed old age as something unarticulated in the group home. Group home staff felt unprepared to meet age-related changes in residents. The study also revealed that group home staff had a one-tracked way of describing the process of ageing among people with ID, seemingly rooted in a medical paradigm of disability. This study suggests that there is a need to raise issues and give guidance related to ageing and ID in disability policy documents in order to support the development of a formal culture that addresses old age and ID in disability services.

  • 31.
    Larsson Ranada, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tilfredställelse med kvarboendefrämjande teknik i projektet BO VITAL2016In: Gerontologi, ISSN 1604-8644, Vol. 32, no 1, 34-39 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Larsson Ranada, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Satisfaction with assistive technology devicein relation to the service delivery process—: —A systematic review2017In: Assistive technology, ISSN 1040-0435, E-ISSN 1949-3614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The service delivery process (SDP) of assistive technology devices (ATDs) is attracting interest, as theprovision of ATDs is critical for the independence and participation in society of individuals withdisabilities. The purpose of the current study was to investigate what impact the SDP has on satisfactionwith ATDs in individuals with disabilities in relation to everyday activities. A systematic literature reviewwas conducted, which resulted in 53 articles included. The results showed that there are factors inalmost all the different steps of the SDP that affect the satisfaction with of the devices, which can lead tounderutilization and abandonment of ATDs. Only a few studies have been conducted with a designrobust enough to generalize the results; therefore, more research is needed. Therefore, the conclusion isthe SDP as a whole contributes to the satisfaction with and usability of ATDs in individuals with disabilityin relation to achieving the desired goals of participation in everyday activities, for the articles includedmust be deemed as moderate. A client-centred approach in the process is advocated, and was found tobe an important factor for an effective SDP and satisfied users.

  • 33.
    Liedberg, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center.
    Pain, self-efficacy, anxiety, and quality of life are central for a bad or good night's sleep in persons with fibromyalgia2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Liedberg, Gunilla M.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Occupational life trajectories in the context of chronic pain and immigration2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Liedberg, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Persson, Elisabeth
    Skånes universitetssjukhus.
    Arbetsterapeutens roll vid rehabilitering av personer med långvarig smärta2015In: Rehabiliteringsmedicin. Teori och praktik / [ed] Jörgen Borg, Kristian Borg, Björn Gerdle och Katharina Stibrant Sunnerhagen, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 1:1, 146-149 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Mårtensson, Lena
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Sweden.
    Liedberg, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Occupational life trajectories in the context of chronic pain and immigration2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 23, no 5, 383-390 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Persons with chronic pain report a range of occupational problems. The specific health needs of immigrants are judged to be poorly understood, and health systems are not prepared to respond adequately. Being an immigrant is regarded as a risk factor for the progression of chronic widespread pain into a state of disability. Objectives To explore occupational life trajectories among immigrant women with chronic pain. Material and methods A qualitative content analysis was used to capture the latent meaning of experiences in individual interviews of eight women with immigrant background and chronic pain. Results An overarching theme, 'making the best of a conditional situation', representing the women's occupational life trajectories, covers the content of two categories: 'being controlled', including affected self-perception, social relations, and future prospects, and 'trying to deal with challenges', comprising a focus on resources, having trust in one's own judgements and getting help from others. Conclusion and significance The experiences demonstrate an occupational life controlled by internal and external factors and may be understood as a disrupted occupational life trajectory. This knowledge may be helpful to occupational therapists supporting immigrant women's attempts to regain a structured life despite the constant presence of pain.

  • 37.
    Olaison, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Österholm, Johannes
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Case conferences as an arena for assessments- arguments used by social workers in order to maintain social problems.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Praetorius Holmgren, Angelica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Thörnqvist, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Äldre individer som bor på särskilda boenden och deras upplevelse av att utföra fritidsaktiviteter: - En kvalitativ studie2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Aging usually results in physical and/or cognitive impairments that affect older individuals’ ability to perform leisure activities. It is important to create the possibility for leisure activities for individuals in residential care since such activities have been proven to have a positive effect on both physical and psychosocial health. The meaning of leisure activities is individual and depends on how far the individual experiences the activity to bring joy and well-being. The aim of this study is to describe how older individuals in residential care perceive the performance of their leisure activities. To achieve the aim, a qualitative method and semi-structured interview were used to collect data. Nine individuals participated and the interviews took place in a residential care setting. Malterud (2014) four steps were used to analyze the material and to develop the result. The results show that older individuals living in residential care want to perform additional leisure activities to those that are offered but are limited by various factors such as physical disabilities or being in need of support from people around them, especially staff and relatives. The study shows that older individuals need support from people around them to perform leisure activities.

  • 39.
    Regardt, Malin
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Welin Henriksson, Elisabet
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sandqvist, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Lundberg, Ingrid E.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Schult, Marie-Louise
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Work ability in patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis: An explorative and descriptive study2016In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 53, no 2, 265-277 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM) are rare, chronic inflammatory diseases leading to muscle weakness and low muscle endurance. The muscle weakness may lead to restrictions in daily activities and low health-related quality of life. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate the work situation, work ability, work-related risk factors, and influence of the physical and psycho-social work environment in patients with PM and DM. METHODS: Patients with PM/DM were assessed using the Work Ability Index (WAI), and the Work Environment Impact Scale (WEIS). RESULTS: Forty-eight patients (PM n = 25 and DM n = 23) participated (women/men: 29/19) with a mean age of 54 years (range 28-67 years, SD. 10) and mean disease duration of nine years (SD. 9). Forty-four percent worked full-time, 31% part-time and 25% were on full-time sick leave. More than 50% self-rated work ability as "poor" or "lessgood". Physically strenuous work components were present "quite to very often" in 23-79% and more in patients on sick leave = 2 years. For those working, the interfering factors in the work environment concerned task and time demands. Supporting factors concerned meaning of work, interactions with co-workers and others. Self-rated work ability correlated moderately-highly positive with percentage of full-time employment, work-related risk factors and opportunities and constraints in the work environment. CONCLUSIONS: Poor self-rated work ability is common in patients with PM/DM indicating a need to identify interfering risk factors and support patients to enhance work performance.

  • 40.
    Ryd, Charlotta
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nygård, Louise
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Öhman, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Zurich University of Appl Science, Switzerland; University of Illinois, IL USA.
    Can the everyday technology use questionnaire predict overall functional level among older adults with mild cognitive impairment or mild-stage alzheimers disease? - a pilot study2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 31, no 1, 201-209 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction:The number of older adults living with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild-stage Alzheimers disease (AD) is increasing and they are often expected to live in their own homes without support, despite limited ability to perform daily life activities. The Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (ETUQ) has proven to be able to separate these groups and might also have potential to predict overall functional level (need of assistance in daily life activities) among them. Aim:To investigate whether the ETUQ can predict overall functional level among older adults with MCI or mild-stage AD. Method:Participants were older adults with a mean age of 76 years with MCI (n = 28) or mild-stage AD (n = 39). A three-step scale indicating (i) independence, (ii) need for minimal assistance or (iii) need for moderate to maximal assistance in daily life was dichotomised in two ways and used as outcome variables in two logistic regression models. Predictors in both models were perceived ability to use everyday technology (ET) and amount of relevant everyday technologies measured by the ETUQ. Ethical approval was obtained from the regional Ethical Committee. Result:Perceived ability to use ET discriminated individuals who were independent or in need of minimal support from those in need of moderate to maximal assistance (OR = 1.82, p amp;lt; 0.01, confidence interval = 95%; 1.76-2.82). The amount of relevant everyday technologies discriminated individuals who were independent from those in need of assistance at any level (OR = 1.39; p amp;lt; 0.01; confidence interval = 95%; 1.11-1.75). Conclusion:Both perceived ability to use ET and amount of relevant everyday technologies had potential to predict overall function but at different levels. The findings support the predictive validity of the ETUQ and suggest further research for the development of clinical cut-off criteria.

  • 41.
    Rytterström, Patrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Borgestig, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Teachers’ experiences of using eye gaze-controlled computers for pupils with severe motor impairments and without speech2016In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 31, no 4, 506-519 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore teachers’ experiences of using eye gaze-controlled computers with pupils with severe disabilities. Technology to control a computer with eye gaze is a fast growing field and has promising implications for people with severe disabilities. This is a new assistive technology and a new learning situation for teachers. Using a reflective lifeworld approach, 11 teachers were interviewed twice. The essence of the phenomenon of teaching pupils who use an eye gaze-controlled computer is to understand what the pupil does with the computer and relate this to what the pupil wants to express through the computer. The pupils have emotions, wishes and knowledge that are trapped in their own bodies. The eye gaze computer creates opportunities to get a glimpse of these thoughts to others, and creates hope concerning the pupil’s future possibilities. The teacher’s responsibility to try to understand what is inside the pupil’s trapped body is a motivating factor to integrate the computer in everyday classroom activities. The results give directions for teaching and for implementation of eye gaze computers in the school system, and also suggest improvements that could be made to computers.

  • 42.
    Sandqvist, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekbladh, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Applying the Model of Human Occupation to Vocational Rehabilitation2017In: Kielhofner's Model of Human Occupation, Fifth Edition: THEORY AND APPLICATION / [ed] Renee Taylor, Wolters Kluwer, 2017, 5, 377-396 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Sernheim, Åsa-Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish National Rett Center, Östersund.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Witt Engerström, Ingegerd
    Swedish National Rett Center, Östersund.
    Liedberg, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Activities that girls and women with Rett syndrome liked or did ot like to do2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, 1-11 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Activities occur in all people’s lives. This study investigated over a period of time, 15 years, what activities were enjoyed or not enjoyed and what activities parents and staff liked to do with girls/women with Rett syndrome.

    Method: A descriptive study was conducted using secondary data from three earlier questionnaires at the Swedish National Rett Center. The first questionnaire provided data on 123 girls/women with Rett syndrome, the second on 52 and the third questionnaire, on 39. Informants were parents and/or staff, in total 365. Open-ended questions were analysed using a content analysis approach.

    Results: Three categories appeared: Being in motion, receiving impressions and having contact. Bathing/swimming, listening to music and being outdoors/walking were the most enjoyed activities over the years. Of the few activities that were reported as being unenjoyable, most were daily care activities. The activities that the parents/staff enjoyed doing with the girls/women were similar to those the girls/women themselves liked to do.

    Conclusion: A preliminary overview for both liked and disliked activities of girls/women with Rett syndrome was presented. This knowledge could facilitate the choice and use of activities.

  • 44.
    Svensson, Elise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kåhlin, Ida
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Residential environment impact scale: Utilization of the Swedish version2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 28, 1-9 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Residential Environment Impact Scale (REIS) is an assessment and consulting instrument designed to examine the impact of the residential environment on its residents and to develop recommendations for adapting this environment. Since REIS is new for occupational therapists in Sweden it is important to evaluate its utilization potential.

    Aim: The aim was to examine the utility of the Swedish version of the Residential Environment Impact Scale (REIS-S) for adults living in residential settings.

    Material and methods: Twenty-two occupational therapists conducted 28 REIS-S assessments in residential settings including 92 older persons and persons with disabilities. In total, 44 questionnaires were answered before and after conduction of the assessment. The data was analyzed using qualitative methods of analysis.

    Results: The REIS-S showed both positive and negative dimensions of utility among occupational therapists working in residential settings. It provided support for making recommendations and contributed to effective assessments but was found time-consuming. The clinical relevance with REIS-S was positive since it met the needs expressed by the occupational therapists.

    Conclusions: REIS-S seems promising according to utility in Swedish residential settings for adults. However, psychometrically testing is required for further establishing the utilization of the instrument.

  • 45.
    Söderlund Schaller, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Liedberg, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Quality of life during early radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer and pain2017In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 10, 1697-1704 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) have a potentially severe diagnosis and often suffer from tumor-related pain as well as from adverse side effects of treatment such as radiotherapy (RT). Knowledge about quality of life (QoL) during early RT in this group is limited and should be assessed in relation to diagnosis and treatment. Purpose: The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to identify potential factors that may influence QoL in patients with HNC during the early stages of RT (no later than two weeks of ongoing RT). We hypothesized that pain intensity, pain interference, catastrophizing, and mood disturbances are associated with QoL during early RT. Patients and methods: In this study, 54 patients (53% of eligible patients) diagnosed with HNC were consecutively recruited from the regular flow to the Pain and Rehabilitation Center at Linkoping University. The patients completed self-reported questionnaires on sociodemo-graphics, pain intensity, pain interference, anxiety, depression, pain catastrophizing, and QoL. Results: The patients in this study scored high for QoL, low for pain intensity, and low for pain interference. The patients reported minor depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms. Regression analyses showed that pain intensity and depressive symptoms negatively influenced QoL. Conclusion: No later than two weeks of RT, pain intensity and depression negatively influenced QoL in patients with HNC. Early screening for pain and depression in a targeted preventive strategy might maintain QoL during the course of the RT for patients with HNC. This assumption needs to be further investigated.

  • 46.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Stenström, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Adams, Jo
    Centre for Innovation and Leadership, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
    Hand pains in women and men in early rheumatoid arthritis, a one year follow-up after diagnosis. The Swedish TIRA project2017In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 39, no 3, 291-300 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This research analysed general pain intensity, hand pain at rest and hand pain during activity in women and men in early rheumatoid arhtritis (RA).

    Method: Out of the 454 patients that were recruited into the Swedish early RA project "TIRA" the 373 patients (67% women) that remained at 12 months follow-up are reported here. Disease activity 28 joint score (DAS-28), disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire = HAQ) and pain (VAS) were recorded at inclusion and after 3 (M3), 6 (M6) and 12 (M12) months. General pain, hand pain during rest, hand pain during test of grip force as assessed by Grippit™, prescribed disease-modifying anti-inflammatory drugs (DMARDs) and hand dominance were recorded.

    Results: DAS-28 and HAQ scores were high at inclusion and improved thereafter in both women and men. There were no significant differences between sexes at inclusion but women had higher DAS-28 and HAQ at all follow-ups. Women were more often prescribed DMARDs than were men. In both women and men all pain types were significantly lower at follow-up compared to at inclusion and women reported higher pain than men at follow-ups. The pain types differed significantly from each other at inclusion into TIRA, general pain was highest and hand pain during rest was lowest. There were no significant differences in hand pain related to hand dominance or between right and left hands.

    Conclusions: Disease activity, disability and pain were high at inclusion and reduced over the first year. Despite more DMARDs prescribed in women than in men, women were more affected than were men. General pain was highest and not surprisingly hand pain during active grip testing was higher than hand pain during rest that was lowest in both sexes. Although our cohort was well controlled, it was evident that hand pain remains a problem. This has implications for rehabilitation and suggests potential ongoing activity limitations that should continue to receive attention from a multi-professional team.

    • Implications for Rehabilitation
    • General pain and hand pain remain a problem in RA despite today's early intervention and effective disease control with new era biologics.
    • The extent of hand pain evidenced in our work gives a more detailed and comprehensive account of pain status.
    • Higher hand pain during active grip testing than that during rest indicates a potential relationship to ongoing activity limitation.
    • Hand pain assessment can help guiding multi-professional interventions directed to reduce hand pain and thereby probably reduce activity limitations.
  • 47.
    Wennberg, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Per A
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Effectiveness of time-related interventions in children with ADHD aged 9-15 years: a randomized contolled study2017In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Specific problems with time and timing that affect daily routines, homework, school work, and social relations have been recognized in children with ADHD. The primary treatments for children with ADHD do not specifically focus on time-related difficulties. The aim of this randomized controlled study (RCT) was to investigate how multimodal interventions, consisting of training in time-processing ability (TPA) and compensation with time-assistive devices (TAD), affect TPA and daily time management (DTM) in children with ADHD and time difficulties, compared with only educational intervention. Thirty-eight children on stable medication for ADHD in the 9–15-year age range were randomly allocated to an intervention or a control group. The children’s TPA was measured with a structured assessment (KaTid), and the children’s DTM was rated by a parent questionnaire (Time-Parent scale) and by children’s self-reporting (Time-Self-rating). The intervention consisted of time-skill training and compensation with TAD. Data were analysed for differences in TPA and in DTM between the control and intervention groups in the 24-week follow-up. Children in the intervention group increased their TPA significantly (p = 0.019) more compared to the control group. The largest increase was in orientation to time. In addition, the parents in the intervention group rated their children’s DTM as significantly (p = 0.01) improved compared with the parents in the control group. According to the children, their DTM was not significantly changed. In conclusion, a multimodal intervention consisting of time-skill training and TAD improved TPA and DTM in children with ADHD aged 9–15 years.

  • 48.
    Widehammar, Cathrine
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hermansson, Liselotte
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Environmental barriers to participation and facilitators for use of three types of assistive technology devices.2017In: Assistive technology, ISSN 1040-0435, E-ISSN 1949-3614, ISSN 1040-0435, 1-9 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to compare the presence of environmental barriers to participation and facilitators for assistive technology (AT) use and study the relation between barriers and AT use in three different AT devices. A cross-sectional survey was conducted. Inclusion criteria were ≥one year of experience as a user of myoelectric prosthesis (MEP), powered mobility device (PMD), or assistive technology for cognition (ATC) and age 20-90 years. Overall, 156 participants answered the Swedish version of the Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors and a study-specific questionnaire on facilitating factors. Non-parametric tests were used for comparisons. Barriers to participation were lowest in MEP users (md=0.12; p>0.001), and highest in ATC users (md=1.56; p>0.001) with the least support for AT use (p>0.001 - p=0.048). A positive correlation between fewer barriers and higher use of MEP was seen (r=0.30, p=0.038). The greatest barriers to participation were Natural environment, Surroundings and Information, and the most support came from relatives and professionals. Support, training and education are vital in the use of AT. These factors may lead to a more sustained and prolonged use of AT and may enable increased participation. Future research should focus on interventions that meet the needs of people with cognitive disabilities.

  • 49.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    et al.
    Division of Social Work, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    The Use of Avoidance, Adjustment, Interaction and Acceptance Strategies to Handle Participation Restrictions Among Swedish Men with Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.2016In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 14, no 4, 206-218 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Living with a chronic disease means learning to live under new circumstances and involves a continuous adaptation to new ways of living. There is increasing knowledge about how people cope with stressful life events and adapt to new life situations. Approximately a third of patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are men; however, few studies have described the needs and experiences of men living with RA. The aim of the present study was to explore men's strategies for handling challenges related to participation in everyday life.

    METHODS: The present study was associated with the prospective Swedish multicentre early arthritis project (given the Swedish acronym TIRA), which, in 2006-2009, included patients with early RA, contemporarily treated, with a mean disease duration of three years. From this cohort, 25 men, aged 20-63 years, were recruited consecutively. Data were collected in individual interviews, using the critical incident technique. The strategies for dealing with the challenges of RA in everyday life were analysed and categorized using content analysis.

    RESULTS: Men with RA described four types of strategy for dealing with participation restrictions in everyday life: (i) Adjustment strategies - adjust behaviour, movements, medication, equipment and clothing to find new ways to conduct tasks or activities; (ii) Avoidance strategies - avoid activities, movements, social contacts and sometimes medication; (iii) Interaction strategies - say no, ask for help and work together to handle participation restrictions; and (iv) Acceptance strategies - learn to accept RA, with the pain, the slower work pace and the extended time needed.

    CONCLUSIONS: According to men's lived experiences, a combination of strategies was used to deal with RA, depending on the situation and the experienced restriction. The results provided an understanding of how men with RA manage their disease, to reduce physical, social and emotional challenges. This knowledge may be used further to develop multi-professional interventions and patient education tailored to men with RA.

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