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  • 1.
    Akram Hassan, Kahin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Forsell, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    On the Performance of Stereoscopic Versus Monoscopic 3D Parallel Coordinates2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents the results from an evaluation of stereoscopic versus monoscopic 3D parallel coordinates. The objective of the evaluation was to investigate if stereopsis increases user performance. The results show that stereoscopy has no effect at all on user performance compared to monoscopy. This result is important when it comes to the potential use of stereopsis within the information visualization community.

  • 2.
    Antonson, Hans
    et al.
    VTI Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute, MAP Unit, SE-58195 Linkoping, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Karolina
    VTI Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute, Sweden.
    Storbjörk, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Negotiating climate change responses: Regional and local perspectives on transport and coastal zone planning in South Sweden2016In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 52, 297-305 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Putting climate change policy-integration into practice is challenged by problems of institutional misfit, due to, inter alia, deficient vertical administrative interplay. While most focus within the field of climate change research has targeted the national-local interplay, less is known about the interface of regional and local perspectives. Here, the aim is to study that interface with a specific focus on the relation between regional and local spatial planning actors, through a case-study of transport and coastal zone management in a Swedish municipality. The article is based on interviews (focus group and single in-depth) and official planning documents. The material reveals a tricky planning situation, replete with conflict. In practice, various institutional frameworks, claims and ambitions collide. The attempts to steer the local spatial planning initiatives from the regional level led to conflicts, which in turn seems to have hampered the overall work for climate change management through spatial planning. Furthermore, there are few traces of prospects of a smooth vertical institutional interplay able to support the overall aims related to integrating climate change mitigation and adaptation in spatial planning. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Natural versus anthropogenic climate change: Swedish farmers joint construction of climate perceptions2016In: Public Understanding of Science, ISSN 0963-6625, E-ISSN 1361-6609, Vol. 25, no 5, 560-575 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While previous research into understandings of climate change has usually examined general public perceptions, this study offers an audience-specific departure point. This article analyses how Swedish farmers perceive climate change and how they jointly shape their understandings. The agricultural sector is of special interest because it both contributes to and is directly affected by climate change. Through focus group discussions with Swedish farmers, this study finds that (1) farmers relate to and understand climate change through their own experiences, (2) climate change is understood either as a natural process subject to little or no human influence or as anthropogenic and (3) various communication tools contribute to the formation of natural and anthropogenic climate change frames. The article ends by discussing frame resonance and frame clash in public understanding of climate change and by comparing potential similarities and differences in how various segments of the public make sense of climate change.

  • 4.
    Backstrand, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Kuyper, Jonathan W.
    Stockholm University, Sweden; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. University of Oxford, England.
    Lövbrand, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Non-state actors in global climate governance: from Copenhagen to Paris and beyond2017In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 26, no 4, 561-579 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 5.
    Brodén Gyberg, Veronica
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Aiding science? Past and present discourses of Swedish research aid policy.2016In: Panel 2: Where are we now? The past and the future of Swedish development research collaboration (conveners: David Nilsson and Sverker Sörlin), 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of research aid is to contribute to development in different ways through the use of research. Sarec (the Swedish Agency for Research Cooperation with Developing Countries) was one of the pioneers within state research aid, and existed between 1975 and 2008. One of the central questions asked in my dissertation on Sarec’s policy history is how the view of the relationship between research and development has changed over time. One of the conclusions is that there are two main policy discourses that can be traced throughout the entire period studied. They share the starting point that modern science can contribute to development and that national research capacity is an important component in this. The localist discourse represents a more multifaceted view of how research can contribute to development, and what that development consist of. It is more explicitly anti-colonialist and to a greater degree prioritizes the local context as basis for decisions regarding support. The universalist discourse places less emphasis on where knowledge is produced since it can be used anywhere, as long as the right structures and priorities are in place. This historical perspective will be complemented with reflections on current developments in Swedish science aid policy, focusing on the issue of how science aid can contribute to the sustainable development goals and transitions to sustainability (work in progress).

  • 6.
    Carlsen, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm Environm Institute, Sweden.
    Klein, Richard
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Stockholm Environm Institute, Germany.
    Wikman-Svahn, Per
    Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Letter: Transparent scenario development in NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE, vol 7, issue 9, pp 613-6132017In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 7, no 9, 613-613 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 7.
    Francisco, Marcela Miranda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change.
    Hesping, Malena
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change.
    Dincay, Ayla
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Lorent, Ecaterina
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change.
    Policy brief collection from the master course: climate science and policy 2016/172017Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of vulnerability often occurs in climate change research and literature. It is understood that vulnerable groups are particularly affected by climate change and thus, mitigation and adaptation measures regarding climate change need to address these vulnerable groups. The policy briefs in this section present different approaches and measures to deal with climate change from vulnerability and adaptation perspectives. Linda Johansson points out that adaptation measures are often not tackling the issues deeply enough and that transformational change is needed in order to address the roots of climate change issues. Digging somewhat deeper into vulnerability, Sara Litzell points out the importance of including most vulnerable groups in climate change adaptation measures. Her brief focuses on gender as women, especially in developing countries, are particularly vulnerable to climate change, but at the same time women present a great potential to contribute to community-based adaptation as they are very knowledgeable with regard to processes and changes in their local regions. The importance of local knowledge also plays a major roles in Sophie Lindstrand's brief, which focuses on UN-REDD. She points out that REDD projects can be most successful if local stakeholders are effectively included and projects follow and bottom-up approach. Sigrid Nilsson's brief focuses on the importance of biodiversity conservation with regard to climate change. She points out that ecosystems do not follow national borders and that biodiversity conservation measures accordingly require global solutions. 

  • 8.
    Fridahl, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Socio-political prioritization of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage2017In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 104, 89-99 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Limiting global warming to well below 2 °C requires the transformation of the global energy system at a scale unprecedented since the industrial revolution. To meet this 2 °C goal, 87% of integrated assessment models opt for using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS). Without BECCS, the models predict that the goal will be either unachievable or substantially more costly to meet. While the modeling literature is extensive, studies of how key climate policy actors perceive and prioritize BECCS are sparse. This article provides a unique intercontinental mapping of the prioritization of BECCS for the long term transition of the electricity supply sector. Based on survey responses from 711 UN climate change conference delegates, the article reports the low prioritization of BECCS relative to alternative technologies, indicating an urgent need for studies of the socio-political preconditions for large-scale BECCS deployment.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-01-31 15:57
  • 9.
    Fridahl, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Linda
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    An assessment of the potential for spurring transformational change through Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs)2017In: Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, E-ISSN 2210-4232, Vol. 25, 35-46 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fulfilling the UN Paris Agreement on climate change requires societal change at transformational scales, with associated challenges that are intensified in developing countries. In this context, Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) – a key instrument in support of developing countries’ climate actions – are promoted for their high theoretical transformative potential. However, little is known of how NAMAs are related to transformation in practice. This article studies how developing countries intend to use the instrument to implement climate actions and whether these intentions are related to how transformation can be spurred at landscape, regime, and niche levels. 144 developing countries’ Intended Nationally Determined Contributions to the Paris Agreement are examined alongside 17 representative NAMA proposals. Although there is scope to improve consideration of the instrument’s theoretically high transformative potential in actual design, current practices indicate that spurring transformational change is already a high priority of NAMA designers.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-11-19 15:42
  • 10.
    Glaas, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Gammelgaard Ballantyne, Anne
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Business Development and Technology, Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Visualization for supporting individual climate change adaptation planning: Assessment of a web-based tool2017In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, Vol. 158, 1-11 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Homeowners are important actors in implementing climate change adaptation. However, individual socio-cognitive constraints related to risk perceptions and perceived capacity may hamper their action. Climate change visualization could help planning and management overcome such constraints by offering accessible information to increase individual adaptive capacity. Such visualization would require that information be perceived as legitimate and credible by emphasizing the diversity of impacts and alternative options, and simultaneously as salient by highlighting context-specific risks and measures. Based on focus group interviews and test sessions, we analysed how homeowners made sense of and discussed a specific interactive planning support tool – VisAdapt™ – integrating climate scenarios, local risk maps, and adaptation measures for various house types. The tool combines precise and general depictions in visualizing climate change to support adaptation among Nordic homeowners. Results reveal that the tool spurred reflection on concrete local risks and various adaptation actions. The tool was less successful in providing a framework for assessing the magnitude of anticipated changes, making these appear as generally small. Visualization aspects that are important for spurring reflection on adaptive action are specifying various climate parameters, relating climate impacts to established practices for managing weather risks, and emphasizing diverse concrete short- and long-term measures.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-10-07 13:16
  • 11.
    Glaas, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Insurance sector management of climate change adaptation in three Nordic countries: the influence of policy and market factors2017In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 60, no 9, 1601-1621 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The insurance industry is important for facilitating climate change adaptation. Insurance companies involvement is, however, influenced by national adaptation policy. The literature suggests that especially policy factors - government interventions, political priorities and public-private cooperation - and market factors - cost offset, cost mitigation, planning flexibility and business opportunities - shape private actor approaches. To increase the understanding of insurance company involvement in adaptation, this study examines how insurance companies approaches are influenced by policy and market factors in three countries: Denmark, Norway and Sweden. The study found that the policy factors tested significantly shaped the approaches of the companies assessed, while market factors currently appear less influential. This is likely due to the absence of climate risk and adaptation in political debates and among insurance policyholders. The study discusses the potential role of the insurance industry in adaptation governance and suggests how barriers facing insurance companies could be overcome.

  • 12.
    Grönwall, Jenny
    et al.
    SIWI, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    The Impact of Zero Coming into Fashion: Zero Liquid Discharge Uptake and Socio-Technical Transitions in Tirupur2017In: Water Alternatives, ISSN 1965-0175, E-ISSN 1965-0175, Vol. 10, no 2, 602-624 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The textile industry is one of the major industrial polluters, and water recycling is yet far from being standard practice. Wastewater generation remains a serious and growing problem, affecting ecosystems, human health and freshwater availability for other uses. India is the worlds third largest exporter of textiles and the sector directly employs 45 million people. This case study explores the socio-technical transition of Tirupur, a textile cluster dubbed as the first in India to shift to zero liquid discharge (ZLD) in a systematic manner. It traces a path towards increased environmental sustainability that takes off in a time characterised by no effluent treatment, to the advanced approach to wastewater handling that was the norm in 2016. By adding a multi-scalar perspective, light is shed on where the system changes emerged that inspired key actors during various phases of the defining 35 years. The process towards ZLD becoming best practice involves conflicts, adaptation, resistance, and vast socioeconomic losses. Eventually, innovative ideas and artefacts replaced old practices, and effluent discharge has become a symbol of noncompliance. Farmers movements, authority directions and court orders drove the development, which came to inform a policy shift to mainstream water recovery in the textiles industry.

  • 13.
    Hansson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rayner, Steve
    University of Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Climate engineering2015In: Research handbook on climate governance / [ed] Karin Bäckstrand, Eva Lövbrand, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, 1, 411-422 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Himmelsbach, Raffael
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change.
    The Planet Remade: How Geoengineering Could Change the World2016In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 43, no 6, 872-873 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 15.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tomasz, Opach
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change.
    Navarra, Carlo
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rød, Jan Ketil
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    VisAdapt: A Visualization Tool to Support Climate Change Adaptation2017In: IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, ISSN 0272-1716, E-ISSN 1558-1756, Vol. 37, no 2, 54-65 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Web-based visualization VisAdapt tool was developed to help laypeople in the Nordic countries assess how anticipated climate change will impact their homes. The tool guides users through a three-step visual process that helps them explore risks and identify adaptive actions specifically modified to their location and house type. This article walks through the tool's multistep, user-centered design process. Although VisAdapt's target end users are Nordic homeowners, the insights gained from the development process and the lessons learned from the project are applicable to a wide range of domains.

  • 16.
    Karlsson, Emilia
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change.
    Working Hard or Hardly Working? How the Swedish Building Trade Magazines Mediate Issues Regarding Energy Efficiency2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The building sector accounts for 40 % of the energy usage, and to be able to reach the energy reduction goals set within the EU and Sweden, the building sector needs to change toward energy efficiency. The building sector has a lot of energy saving potential, and within the sector, the HVAC- and plumbing section has the greatest saving potential. Since building trade magazines are directed to practitioners within the building sector, and also their main channel for information regarding projects and developments, this study has used qualitative content analysis on articles, regarding energy efficiency, between the years of 2002-2014. Two building magazines and one HVAC- and plumbing magazine were used to cover the field of what issues regarding energy efficiency were mediated to the readers. The study found out that during the first years, the magazines mediated a positive image towards energy efficiency measures, but mentioned little concrete action plans. After the implementation of more stringent laws, the magazines mediated different issues in a more equal spreading, however two different issues battled to be heard. These were concerns regarding the risks of using new methods not tried before, the lack of clear definitions from the authorities and a focus on a holistic perspective that included environmental thinking. The most recent years focused on practical solutions, adopting a holistic perspective that included both buildings and individual behaviors. During the years, the magazines in general framed energy efficiency measures as something positive and mediated the image of that energy efficiency measures would be taken in the future.

  • 17.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rayner, Steve
    Institute for Science, Innovations and Society, University of Oxford.
    Innovation investments2015In: Research handbook on climate governance / [ed] Karin Bäckstrand, Eva Lövbrand, Northamton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, 547-554 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Lövbrand, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. University of Oxford, England.
    Making climate governance global: how UN climate summitry comes to matter in a complex climate regime2017In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 26, no 4, 580-599 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the role the UNFCCC plays in a polycentric climate regime complex. Through an extended questionnaire survey at the UN Climate Conferences in Warsaw (2013), Lima (2014) and Paris (2015), we study what government delegates and non-state observers see as the main purpose of UN climate summitry and their roles therein. Only a minority of these actors attend UN Climate Conferences to actively influence the outcome of the intergovernmental negotiation process. Instead, most come to these meetings to network, build interpersonal relationships, learn from each other and foster a sense of community across scales of difference. The ability of the UNFCCC to bring together different actors across time and space, to perform multiple policy tasks, has become one of its notable strengths and is an important facilitative practice that holds the polycentric regime complex together.

  • 19.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    et al.
    Environmental Analysis, Swedish Board of Agriculture.
    Ostwald, Madelene
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nissanka, SP
    Department of Crop Science, University of Peradeniya.
    Food security in Sri Lankan homegardens – what does science tell us?2017Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Agroforestry and other types of multifunctional land-use systems have increasingly been highlighted as win-win-win solutions to meet the challenges of climate change, agricultural intensification, secure ecosystem services as well as support to food security. In this brief the authors seek in the literature for evidence and information on the food security link to homegardens; a traditional agroforestry system common in Sri Lanka, and promoted by the Sri Lankan government . 

  • 20.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    et al.
    Centre for Environment and Sustainability, Chalmers University of Technology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ostwald, Madelene
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nissanka, SP
    Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.
    What is good about Sri Lankan homegardens with regards to food security? A synthesis of the current scientific knowledge of a multifunctional land-use system2017In: Agroforestry Systems, ISSN 0167-4366, E-ISSN 1572-9680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, there has been growing interest in agroforestry systems due to their great potential to mitigate threats to household food and nutrition security from soaring food prices but also as carbon sinks. In Sri Lanka, smallholder farms such as homegardens constitute a majority of Sri Lanka’s total annual crop and timber production. Despite Sri Lankan homegardens being considered desirable and sustainable land-use systems, their role in food and nutrition security is not yet entirely understood. By synthesising scientific articles and grey literature we sought the link between food security and homegardens by quantifying their products or services and ascertaining whether food security characteristics are assessed as direct or indirect impacts. The results show that 27% of 92 identified articles directly quantified aspects that are relevant to food security. Another 51% of the articles quantified indirect aspects that have relevance for food security, including climate, soil, ecosystem services, structural and floristic diversity and economic aspects. Twenty-two percent of the articles were categorised as being qualitative or conceptual and contained no direct assessments or quantification of food security. The presence of significant merits from homegardens includes providing food security throughout the year at low-cost while sustaining numerous ecosystem services. This benefits particularly the poor farmers. However, many studies are descriptive and only provide location-specific information on single research focuses such as plant species, yield and management. There are few comparisons with crop land, forests or other production systems, and there is even less empirical evidence and quantification of the food security and other benefits. Seven areas where more scientific focus would be beneficial are identified. Homegardens are strong in national policies and to reach a greater level of efficiency within these activities our findings suggest more emphasis on a higher degree of inclusiveness of relevant stakeholders and long-term engagements with context specific guidance.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-05-20 15:56
  • 21.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Cordell, Dana
    University of Technology Sydney, Australia.
    Mohr, Steven
    University of Technology Sydney, Australia.
    van Riper, Froggi
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    White, Stuart
    University of Technology Sydney, Australia.
    Visualizing alternative phosphorus scenarios for future food security2016In: Frontiers Nutrition, E-ISSN 2296-861X, Vol. 47, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of global phosphorus scarcity on food security has increasingly been the focus of scientific studies over the past decade. However, systematic analyses of alternative futures for phosphorus supply and demand throughout the food system are still rare and provide limited inclusion of key stakeholders. Addressing global phosphorus scarcity requires an integrated approach exploring potential demand reduction as well as recycling opportunities. This implies recovering phosphorus from multiple sources, such as food waste, manure, and excreta, as well as exploring novel opportunities to reduce the long-term demand for phosphorus in food production such as changing diets. Presently, there is a lack of stakeholder and scientific consensus around priority measures. To therefore enable exploration of multiple pathways and facilitate a stakeholder dialog on the technical, behavioral, and institutional changes required to meet long-term future phosphorus demand, this paper introduces an interactive web-based tool, designed for visualizing global phosphorus scenarios in real time. The interactive global phosphorus scenario tool builds on several demand and supply side measures that can be selected and manipulated interactively by the user. It provides a platform to facilitate stakeholder dialog to plan for a soft landing and identify a suite of concrete priority options, such as investing in agricultural phosphorus use efficiency, or renewable fertilizers derived from phosphorus recovered from wastewater and food waste, to determine how phosphorus demand to meet future food security could be attained on a global scale in 2040 and 2070. This paper presents four example scenarios, including (1) the potential of full recovery of human excreta, (2) the challenge of a potential increase in non-food phosphorus demand, (3) the potential of decreased animal product consumption, and (4) the potential decrease in phosphorus demand from increased efficiency and yield gains in crop and livestock systems.

  • 22.
    Parker, Charles F.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Assessing the European Unions global climate change leadership: from Copenhagen to the Paris Agreement2017In: Journal of European Integration, ISSN 0703-6337, E-ISSN 1477-2280, Vol. 39, no 2, 239-252 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution examines the role European Union (EU) leadership played in the outcome of the 2015 COP21 climate summit in Paris. The EUs attempts to realise its bid for climate change leadership are scrutinised by investigating to what extent the EU is actually recognised as a leader by potential followers and to what extent the EU has succeeded in achieving its negotiation objectives. To address these issues we utilize survey data collected at eight UN climate summits from 2008 to 2015 and evaluate the results of the climate negotiations particularly with respect to the Unions goal attainment in Copenhagen and Paris. Our findings, which reveal a fragmented leadership landscape in which the EU must adjust its leadership strategies in relation to other powerful actors, such as the United States and China, provide insights into leadership theory and the EUs prospects for exerting influence as an external actor on the world stage.

  • 23.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Gammelgaard Ballantyne, Anne
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Business Development and Technology, Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Opach, Tomasz
    Department of Geography, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Navarra, Carlo
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Bohman, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Rod, Jan Ketil
    Department of Geography, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Goodsite, Michael
    Department of Business Development and Technology, Aarhus University, Denmark; SDU Department of Technology and Innovation (ITI), Odense, Denmark.
    Climate change effects at your doorstep: Geographic visualization to support Nordic homeowners in adapting to climate change2016In: Applied Geography, ISSN 0143-6228, E-ISSN 1873-7730, Vol. 74, 65-72 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complexity of climate information, particularly as related to climate scenarios, impacts, and action alternatives, poses significant challenges for science communication. This study presents a geographic visualization approach involving lay audiences to address these challenges. VisAdapt (TM) is a web-based visualization tool designed to improve Nordic homeowners understanding of climate change vulnerability and to support their adaptive actions. VisAdapt is structured to enable individual users to explore several climate change impact parameters, including temperature and precipitation, for their locations and to find information on specific adaptation measures for their house types and locations. The process of testing the tool included a focus group study with homeowners in Norway, Denmark, and Sweden to assess key challenges in geographic visualization, such as the level of interactivity and information. The paper concludes that geographic visualization tools can support homeowners climate adaptation processes, but that certain features, such as downscaled climate information are a key element expected by users. Although the assessment of interactivity and data varied both across countries and user experience, a general conclusion is that a geographic visualization tool, like VisAdapt, can make climate change effects and adaptation alternatives tangible and initiate discussions and collaborative reflections. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-07-15 14:46
  • 24.
    Sovacool, Benjamin K.
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark; University of Sussex, England.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. University of Oxford, England.
    Klein, Richard J. T.
    Stockholm Environm Institute, Sweden.
    Climate change adaptation and the Least Developed Countries Fund (LDCF): Qualitative insights from policy implementation in the Asia-Pacific2017In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 140, no 2, 209-226 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Least developed countries often lack the requisite capacity to implement climate change adaptation projects. The Least Developed Countries Fund (LDCF) is a scheme where industrialized countries have (as of early 2016) disbursed $934.5 million in voluntary contributions, raised more than four times that amount in co-financing, and supported 213 adaptation projects across 51 least developed countries. But what sorts of challenges have arisen during implementation? Based on extensive field research in five least developed countries-Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, the Maldives, and Vanuatu-and original data collected from almost 150 research interviews, this article qualitatively explores both the benefits and challenges of LDCF projects in the Asia-Pacific. It finds that while LDCF projects do contribute to enhancing multiple types of infrastructural, institutional, and community-based adaptive capacity, they also suffer from uncertainty, a convoluted management structure, and an inability to fully respond to climate risks. Based on these findings, the study concludes that adaptation must be pursued as a multidimensional process; and that LDCF activities have tended to promote marginal rather than more radical or systematic transformations.

  • 25.
    Sovacool, Benjamin
    et al.
    Vermont Law School, USA.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. bjorn-ola.linner@liu.se.
    The Political Economy of Climate Change Adaptation2016 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on concepts in political economy, political ecology, justice theory, and critical development studies, the authors offer the first comprehensive, systematic exploration of the ways in which adaptation projects can produce unintended, undesirable results.

  • 26.
    Storbjörk, Sofie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Isaksson, Karolina
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut.
    ”We cannot be at the forefront, changing society”: Exploring how Swedish property developers respond to climate change inurban planning.2017In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, 1-15 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is increasingly expected that private actors play the role as entrepreneurs and front-runners in implementing climate measures, whereas empirical studies of the position, role and engagement of private actors are scarce. Situated in the context of urban planning, a critical arena for triggering climate transitions, the aim of this paper is to explore how Swedish property developers respond to climate change. Qualitative analyses of corporate policy documents and semi-structured interviews with property developers reveal a vast divergence between the written policies, where leadership ambitions are high, and how the practice of property development is discussed in interviews. In the latter, there is little evidence of property developers pursuing a forward-looking or cutting-edge climate change agenda. Instead, they are critical of increased public regulation for climate-oriented measures. Explanations both confirm previous studies, highlighting lack of perceived customer demand, uncertainty of financial returns and limited innovations, and add new elements of place-dependency suggesting that innovative and front-runner practices can only be realized in the larger urban areas. Municipalities seeking to improve their climate-oriented profile in urban planning by involving private property developers need to develop strategies to maneuver the variance in responses to increase the effectiveness of implementation.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-05-03 13:45
  • 27.
    Storbjörk, Sofie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Isaksson, Karolina
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, Linköping.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Antonson, Hans
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, Linköping.
    Hrelja, Robert
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, Linköping.
    Kommunerna och klimatomställningen: Lärdomar om klimatfrågans integrering i lokal policy och planering. En slutrapport från forskningsprojektet CLIPP2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport redovisar slutresultat från forskningsprojektet Climate Change Policy Integration in Local Policy and Planning (CLIPP), som har finansierats av forskningsrådet Formas (Dnr 242-2011-1599). Projektet har utformats, planerats och genomförts av Sofie Storbjörk och Mattias Hjerpe, Linköpings universitet, och Karolina Isaksson, Robert Hrelja och Hans Antonson, Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut. Storbjörk och Hjerpe är verksamma vid Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning och Tema miljöförändring vid Linköpings universitet. Isaksson, Antonson och Hrelja är verksamma vid enheten Mobilitet, aktörer och planering vid Statens Väg- och Transportforskningsinstitut. Författarna riktar ett tack till FORMAS för finansiellt stöd samt till de tre fallstudiekommunerna och intervjupersoner från offentlig och privat verksamhet som så generöst har delat med sig av tid och sina erfarenheter.

  • 28.
    Uhrqvist, Ola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Narratives of the Past for Future Earth: The Historiography of Global Environmental Change Research2015In: The Anthropocene Review, ISSN 2053-0196, E-ISSN 2053-020X, Vol. 2, no 2, 159-173 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the auto-historiography of global environmental change research. It traces how participating researchers make sense of and rationalise research strategies through narratives of the history of global change and Earth System science. Our study draws on personal and programme accounts of Earth System science’s background related to the international global environmental change research programmes International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP), the International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change (IHDP), the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), and Future Earth, from 1983 to 2013. The study finds three core narratives: the science history narrative motivates the future development of the programme by building on the successes of earlier international projects. The Earth System departs from an enhanced understanding of environmental change over time. Finally, the Anthropocene narrative underpins arguments for a science-based management of human–environment systems. We argue that including reflexive analytical perspectives in the history writing of Future Earth contributes to making environmental change research relevant and useful for democratic decision-making.

  • 29.
    Upadhyaya, Prabhat
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    National Appropriateness of International Climate Policy Frameworks in India, Brazil, and South Africa2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How does the international climate policy frameworks influence the domestic institutional responses to climate mitigation in emerging economies? And how, in turn, do domestic institutions and politics in emerging economies influence the fate of international climate policy frameworks? The thesis provides answers to these questions by studying domestic engagements with Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in three emerging economies – India, Brazil, and South Africa. The thesis specifically studies how these engagements were influenced by the domestic institutional context provided by national climate policy, norms, and institutional capacity in the three countries. Drawing upon the variations in the engagements with nationally appropriate mitigation actions, made visible by use of the policy cycle as a heuristic device, the thesis informs the implementation of another nascent, yet prevalent, international climate policy framework – Nationally Determined Contributions. The thesis identifies how engagements with nationally appropriate mitigation actions varied in India, Brazil, and South Africa in agenda-setting, policy formulation, decision-making, implementation, and evaluation. In cases where international support is considered crucial for taking mitigation actions, external factors such as lack of clarity on definitional aspects and availability of international support can hamper the prospects of such frameworks at the agenda-setting and policy formulation stages. Efforts to engage with these frameworks under this uncertainty are held back by non-decisions, overriding national climate policy, as well as by uneven inter-ministerial coordination. The thesis argues that successful implementation of upcoming Nationally Determined  Contributions will be influenced by a country’s ability to align them with its national climate policy, localization of the transnational norms, and the extent to which efforts to enhance institutional capacity for  coordinating the implementation of national climate policy are made. In sum, the effective implementation of International Climate Policy Frameworks will be dependent on the willingness of the state to  provide oversight and coordination, and clarity on the availability of international support.

    List of papers
    1. Developments in national climate change mitigation legislation and strategy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developments in national climate change mitigation legislation and strategy
    2013 (English)In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 13, no 6, 649-664 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The results are presented from a survey of national legislation and strategies to mitigate climate change covering almost all United Nations member states between 2007 and 2012. This data set is distinguished from the existing literature in its breadth of coverage, its focus on national policies (rather than international pledges), and on the use of objective metrics rather than normative criteria. The focus of the data is limited to national climate legislation and strategies and does not cover subnational or sectoral measures. Climate legislation and strategies are important because they can: enhance incentives for climate mitigation; provide mechanisms for mainstreaming; and provide a focal point for actors. Three broad findings emerge. First, there has been a substantial increase in climate legislation and strategies between 2007 and 2012: 67% of global GHG emissions are now under national climate legislation or strategy compared to 45% in 2007. Second, there are substantial regional effects to the patterns, with most increases in non-Annex I countries, particularly in Asia and Latin America. Third, many more countries have adopted climate strategies than have adopted climate legislation between 2007 and 2012. The article concludes with recommendations for future research.Policy relevance The increase in climate legislation and strategy is significant. This spread suggests that, at the national level, there is some movement in reshaping climate governance despite the relatively slow pace of global negotiations, although the exact implications of this spread require further research on stringency of actions and their implementation. Asia and Latin America represent the biggest improvements, while OECD countries, which start from a high base, remain relatively stagnant. Implications of regional patterns are further refined by an analysis by emissions, which shows that some areas of low levels of legislation and strategy are also areas of relatively low emissions. A broad trend toward an emphasis on strategies rather than legislation, with the significant exception of China, calls for enhanced research into the practical impact of national non-binding climate strategies versus binding legislation on countries' actual emissions over time.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Taylor & Francis, 2013
    Keyword
    Climate change, domestic policy instruments, national policies, policy measures, public policy
    National Category
    Climate Research
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-99869 (URN)10.1080/14693062.2013.845409 (DOI)000325845100001 ()
    Projects
    GoVNAMAs - Phase I
    Funder
    Swedish Energy Agency
    Available from: 2013-10-22 Created: 2013-10-22 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    2. Aligning Climate Policy with National Interest: Disengagements with Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in South Africa
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aligning Climate Policy with National Interest: Disengagements with Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in South Africa
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 18, no 4, 463-481 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) were proposed as a policy framework that could provide middle ground for meeting both the development and mitigation objectives in developing countries. While South Africa engaged actively with the NAMA terminology in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change negotiations, its engagement at the domestic level has been rather lacklus- tre. This presents an interesting paradox. The paper studies the interplay of international norms embodied in NAMAs with South Africa’s domestic policy process. Disengagement and contestation around NAMAs in South Africa is played out at three stages: decision- making stage where the symptoms surrounding this contestation first emerge; policy for- mulation stage where NAMAs have to not only align with the National Development Plan but also compete with a predilection for domestically familiar terminology of flagships under the national climate policy; and finally the broader agenda-setting stage of policy process, where NAMAs have to prove useful in not only pursuing the developmental state agenda but also in tackling the underlying material factors that represent country’s economic dependency on fossil fuels. NAMAs faced combined resistance from ideas and interests in various degrees at all these stages resulting in their disengagement.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis Group, 2016
    Keyword
    Climate Policy, South Africa, Domestic Politics, International Relations, Policy process, NAMA
    National Category
    Climate Research Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalization Studies)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124580 (URN)10.1080/1523908X.2016.1138402 (DOI)000381299800005 ()
    Projects
    GoverningNAMAs: Phase 2 -- Enhancing design and support for low-carbon trajectories
    Funder
    Swedish Energy Agency, P35462-2
    Note

    Funding agencies: Swedish Energy Agency (Energimyndigheten) [P35462-2]

    Available from: 2016-02-04 Created: 2016-02-04 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
  • 30.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Hansson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Himmelsbach, Raffael
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Fridahl, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Anshelm, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Policy brief on climate engineering2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate engineering (geoengineering) has been widely discussed as a potential instrument for curbing global warming if politics fails to deliver green house gas emission reductions. This debate has lost momentum over the last couple of years, but is now being renewed in the wake of the December 2015 Paris climate change agreement. Resurgent interest primarily stems from two elements of the Paris agreement. First, by defining the long term goal as “achiev[ing] a balance between anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks of greenhouse gases” instead of decarbonization, the agreement can be interpreted as providing leeway for climate engineering proposals. Second, the agreement formulated a temperature goal of “well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and pursuing efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C”. In response, several scientists argued that these goals may require climate engineering.

    As these discussions will affect the forthcoming review of pathways toward 1.5°C warming, this policy brief takes stock of climate engineering. It draws on the expertise of Linköping University’s Climate Engineering (LUCE) interdisciplinary research programme. The brief provides an overview of the status of academic debate on climate engineering regarding bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS);  stratospheric aerosol injection; and mass media reporting and public engagement.

  • 31.
    Wilk, Julie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Andersson, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Swedish Meteorol and Hydrol Institute, Sweden.
    Graham, L. P.
    Swedish Meteorol and Hydrol Institute, Sweden.
    Wikner, Jacob
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Circuits and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mokwatlo, S.
    Limpopo Department Agriculture and Rural Dev, South Africa.
    Petja, B.
    Water Research Commiss, South Africa; University of Limpopo, South Africa.
    From forecasts to action - What is needed to make seasonal forecasts useful for South African smallholder farmers?2017In: International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, E-ISSN 2212-4209, Vol. 25, 202-211 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the barriers that limit the use of SFs by smallholder farmers and policy-makers and practical, political and personal changes in the Limpopo Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (LDARD) that could enhance greater usage of SFs in risk management. Interviews and workshops were performed with LDARD staff at province, district municipality and service center level within the Extension and Advisory Services and Disaster Management Services divisions. Many extension officers repeatedly pointed out the need to move from reactive to proactive policies. This could entail creating effective channels for bottom-up communication of emerging ground conditions coupled with relief and support efforts distributed even during hazardous events, not only after greater losses have been felt. Different perceptions and understandings of if and how SFs inform national subsidies and site-specific recommendations distributed in the province to extension staff that departmental communication could be improved to increase trust and reliability of the forecasts and accompanying recommendations for farmers.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-07-13 16:26
  • 32.
    Wilk, Julie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Rydhagen, Birgitta
    Blekinge Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    del Callejo, Ivan
    University of Mayor San Simon, Bolivia.
    Cerruto, Noelia
    University of Mayor San Simon, Bolivia.
    Chila, German
    University of Mayor San Simon, Bolivia.
    Encinas, Silvia
    University of Mayor San Simon, Bolivia.
    Framing and blaming in the Cochabamba water agenda: local, municipal and regional perspectives2017In: Water Policy, ISSN 1366-7017, E-ISSN 1996-9759, Vol. 19, no 4, 620-636 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present framings of water issues at three administrative levels in Cochabamba, Bolivia to increase insight of how actors perspectives facilitate, obstruct or strengthen suggested actions or solutions. Participatory vulnerability assessments were conducted with leaders in one peri-urban community and municipal and regional officials in water-related sectors. Actors framed water problems and potential solutions differently, placing blame most often at other levels of responsibility. While all pointed to the municipality as responsible for solving the most acute water problems, it was acknowledged that the municipality consistently underperforms in its responsibilities. All actors promoted concrete and detailed technical measures as solutions to many problems while governance-related ones such as training and increased cooperation between different levels were only discussed at an abstract level. While fiscal federalism would fit some of the suggested management solutions, issues such as ecosystem protection and flooding with cross-border externalities might require shared yet clearly defined responsibilities between different levels. We suggest that the water war of 2000 and the framings that emerged from it have so strongly impacted the current water management situation that alternative management models and solutions are rarely discussed.

  • 33.
    Wiréhn, Lotten
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Climate vulnerability assessment methodology: Agriculture under climate change in the Nordic region2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Food security and climate change mitigation are crucial missions for the agricultural sector and for global work on sustainable development. Concurrently, agricultural production is directly dependent on climatic conditions, making climate change adaptation strategies essential for the agricultural sector. There is consequently a need for researchers, planners, and practitioners to better understand how, why, and to what extent agriculture is vulnerable to climate change. Such analyses involve challenges in relation to the complex social– ecological character of the agricultural system and to the multiple conceptualizations and approaches used in analysing vulnerability.

    The aim of this thesis is to identify how vulnerability assessments can be used to represent climate-related vulnerability in Nordic agriculture, in order to advance the methodological development of indicator-based and geographic visualization methods. The following research questions are addressed: (i) How can agricultural vulnerability to climate change and variability in the Nordic countries be characterized? (ii) How do selections, definitions, and emphases of indicators influence how vulnerability is assessed? (iii) How do estimates of vulnerability vary depending on the methods used in assessments? (iv) How can geographic visualization be applied in integrated vulnerability assessments? This thesis analyses and applies various vulnerability assessment approaches in the context of Nordic agriculture.

    This thesis demonstrates that various methods for composing vulnerability indices result in significantly different outcomes, despite using the same set of indicators. A conceptual framework for geographic visualization approaches to vulnerability assessments was developed for the purpose of creating transparent and interactive assessments regarding the indicating variables, methods and assumptions applied, i.e., opening up the ‘black box’ of composite indices. This framework served as the foundation for developing the AgroExplore geographic visualization tool. The tool enables the user to interactively select, categorize, and weight indicators as well as to explore the data and the spatial patterns of the indicators and indices. AgroExplore was used in focus group settings with experts in the Swedish agricultural sector.

    The visualization-supported dialogue results confirm the difficulty of selecting and constructing indicators, including different perceptions of what indicators actually indicate, the assumption of linear relationships between the indicators and vulnerability, and, consequently, that the direction of the relationship is predefined for each indicator. This thesis further points at the inherent complexity of agricultural challenges and opportunities in the context of climate change as such. It is specifically emphasized that agricultural adaptation policies and measures involve trade-offs between various environmental and socio–economic objectives, and that their implementation could furthermore entail unintended consequences, i.e., potential maladaptive outcomes. Nevertheless, it proved difficult to validate indicators due to, e.g. matters of scale and data availability. While heavy precipitation and other extreme weather events are perceived as the most relevant drivers of climate vulnerability by the agricultural experts participating in this study, statistical analyses of historical data identified few significant relationships between crop yield losses and heavy precipitation. In conclusion, this thesis contributes to the method development of composite indices and indicator-based vulnerability assessment. A key conclusion is that assessments are method dependent and that indicator selection is related to aspects such as the system’s spatial scale and location as well as to indicator thresholds and defined relationships with vulnerability, recognizing the contextual dependency of agricultural vulnerability. Consequently, given the practicality of indicator-based methods, I stress with this thesis that future vulnerability studies must take into account and be transparent about the principles and limitations of indicator-based assessment methods in order to ensure their usefulness, validity, and relevance for guiding adaptation strategies.

    List of papers
    1. Assessment of composite index methods for agricultural vulnerability to climate change
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of composite index methods for agricultural vulnerability to climate change
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 156, 70-80 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A common way of quantifying and communicating climate vulnerability is to calculate composite indices from indicators, visualizing these as maps. Inherent methodological uncertainties in vulnerability assessments, however, require greater attention. This study examines Swedish agricultural vulnerability to climate change, the aim being to review various indicator approaches for assessing agricultural vulnerability to climate change and to evaluate differences in climate vulnerability depending on the weighting and summarizing methods. The reviewed methods are evaluated by being tested at the municipal level. Three weighting and summarizing methods, representative of climate vulnerability indices in general, are analysed. The results indicate that 34 of 36 method combinations differ signifi- cantly from each other. We argue that representing agricultural vulnerability in a single composite index might be insufficient to guide climate adaptation. We emphasize the need for further research into how to measure and visualize agricultural vulnerability and into how to communicate uncertainties in both data and methods.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2015
    Keyword
    climate vulnerability; composite index; Agriculture; Regression Analysis
    National Category
    Climate Research Environmental Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-116480 (URN)10.1016/j.jenvman.2015.03.020 (DOI)000355036700009 ()
    Projects
    Nord-Star
    Available from: 2015-03-27 Created: 2015-03-27 Last updated: 2017-12-04
    2. Assessing agricultural vulnerability to climate change in the Nordic countries an interactive geovisualization approach
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing agricultural vulnerability to climate change in the Nordic countries an interactive geovisualization approach
    2017 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 60, no 1, 115-134 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Nordic agriculture must adapt to climate change to reduce vulnerability and exploit potential opportunities. Integrated assessments can identify and quantify vulnerability in order to recognize these adaptation needs. This study presents a geographic visualization approach to support the interactive assessment of agricultural vulnerability to climate change. We have identified requirements for increased transparency and reflexivity in vulnerability assessments, arguing that these can be met by geographic visualization. A conceptual framework to support the integration of geographic visualization for vulnerability assessments has been designed and applied for the development of AgroExplore, an interactive tool for assessing agricultural vulnerability to climate change in Sweden. To open up the black box of composite vulnerability indices, AgroExplore enables the user to select, weight, and classify relevant indicators into sub-indices of exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity. This enables the exploration of underlying indicators and factors determining vulnerability in Nordic agriculture.

    Keyword
    Nordic agriculture, climate vulnerability, geographic visualization, interactive map
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126306 (URN)10.1080/09640568.2016.1143351 (DOI)000390112400006 ()
    Projects
    NORD-STAR
    Funder
    Nordic Council of Ministers
    Note

    Funding agencies: Norden Top-Level Research Initiative sub-programme Effect studies and adaptation to climate change. Swedish Research Council [2013-1557]

    Available from: 2016-03-22 Created: 2016-03-22 Last updated: 2017-11-30
  • 34.
    Wiréhn, Lotten
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Opach, Tomasz
    Norwegain University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Assessing agricultural vulnerability to climate change in the Nordic countries an interactive geovisualization approach2017In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 60, no 1, 115-134 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nordic agriculture must adapt to climate change to reduce vulnerability and exploit potential opportunities. Integrated assessments can identify and quantify vulnerability in order to recognize these adaptation needs. This study presents a geographic visualization approach to support the interactive assessment of agricultural vulnerability to climate change. We have identified requirements for increased transparency and reflexivity in vulnerability assessments, arguing that these can be met by geographic visualization. A conceptual framework to support the integration of geographic visualization for vulnerability assessments has been designed and applied for the development of AgroExplore, an interactive tool for assessing agricultural vulnerability to climate change in Sweden. To open up the black box of composite vulnerability indices, AgroExplore enables the user to select, weight, and classify relevant indicators into sub-indices of exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity. This enables the exploration of underlying indicators and factors determining vulnerability in Nordic agriculture.

1 - 34 of 34
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