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  • 1.
    Berglund, Henrik
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wennberg, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Pragmatic entrepreneurs and institutionalized scholars? On the path-dependent nature of entrepreneurship scholarship2016In: Challenging Entrepreneurship Research / [ed] H. Landström, A. Parhankangas, A. Fayolle, P. Riott, New York: Routledge, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Block, Per
    et al.
    ETH Zurich, Switzerland.
    Koskinen, Johan
    University of Manchester, UK.
    Hollway, James
    Geneva University, Switzerland.
    Steglich, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Stadtfeld, Christoph
    ETH Zurich, Switzerland.
    Change we can believe in: Comparing longitudinal network modelson consistency, interpretability and predictive power2017In: Social Networks, ISSN 0378-8733, E-ISSN 1879-2111, Vol. 52, 180-191 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While several models for analysing longitudinal network data have been proposed, their main differ-ences, especially regarding the treatment of time, have not been discussed extensively in the literature.However, differences in treatment of time strongly impact the conclusions that can be drawn from data.In this article we compare auto-regressive network models using the example of TERGMs – a temporalextensions of ERGMs – and process-based models using SAOMs as an example. We conclude that theTERGM has, in contrast to the ERGM, no consistent interpretation on tie-level probabilities, as well as noconsistent interpretation on processes of network change. Further, parameters in the TERGM are stronglydependent on the interval length between two time-points. Neither limitation is true for process-basednetwork models such as the SAOM. Finally, both compared models perform poorly in out-of-sampleprediction compared to trivial predictive models.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-08-23 14:10
  • 3.
    Borg, Ida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brandén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Do high levels of home-ownership create unemployment?: Introducing the missing link between housing tenure and unemployment2017In: Housing Studies, ISSN 0267-3037, E-ISSN 1466-1810, 1-24 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large number of studies have demonstrated that the proportion of home-owners in a region tend to be positively associated with the unemployment levels in that region. In this paper, we introduce a missing piece of explaining this commonly found pattern. By analysing individual-level population register data on Sweden, we jointly examine the effects of micro- and macro-level home-ownership on individuals’ unemployment. The findings indicate that even though home-owners have a lower probability of being unemployed, there is a penalty for both renters and home-owners on unemployment in regions with high home-ownership rates. Differences in mobility patterns cannot explain this pattern. However, when labour market size is considered, the higher probability of unemployment in high home-owning regions is drastically reduced. This suggests that high home-ownership regions tend to coincide with small labour markets, affecting the job matching process negatively.

  • 4.
    Brandén, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Sociologiska Institutionen, Stockholms Universitet.
    Birkelund, Gunn Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Sociology and Human Geography, University of Oslo.
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    Department of Sociology, Stockholm University.
    Does school segregation lead to poor educational outcomes?: evidence from fifteen cohorts of swedish ninth graders2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the impact of ethnic school segregation on the educational outcomes of students, using Swedish population register data. Through a school fixed effects, family fixed effects, and a two-way school- and family fixed effects design, we adjust for selection effects related to variation in the student composition across schools. The analyses show that students’ grades are relatively unaffected by the proportion of immigrant schoolmates.  However, it has a small negative effect on levels of eligibility for upper secondary school. Furthermore, immigrants’ educational outcomes are weakly positively affected by the proportion of peers with the same national background as themselves.

  • 5.
    Brandén, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Duvander, Ann-Zofie
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Ohlsson-Wijk, Sofi
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Sharing the Caring: Attitude–Behavior Discrepancies and Partnership Dynamics2016In: Journal of family issues, ISSN 0192-513X, E-ISSN 1552-5481, 1-25 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though ideals in favor of gender equality in the private sphere are wide spread, discrepancies between ideals and actual behavior are common. Such discrepancies and potential dissatisfaction with gender unequal behavior within a couple are expected to influence partnership dynamics negatively. This study examines how discrepancies between the perceived ideal sharing of parental leave and the actual division of leave, as well as satisfaction with the division are associated with (a) relationship satisfaction, (b) continued childbearing, and (c) union dissolution, using Swedish panel data. The findings cannot confirm an effect of discrepancies on partnership dynamics. However, men who wish they had used a larger share of the parental leave have lower relationship satisfaction, lower continued childbearing, and higher probability of union dissolution. Women are seemingly not affected by their (dis)satisfaction with the division. The findings may reflect a changing father role related to the policy setting and norms in Sweden.

  • 6.
    Brouwer, Jasperina
    et al.
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Flache, Andreas
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Jansen, Ellen
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Hofman, Adriaan
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Steglich, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Emergent achievement segregation in freshmenlearning community networks2017In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common assumption about Freshmen Learning Communities (FLCs) is that academic relationships contribute to students’ success. This study investigates how students inlearning communities connect with fellow students for friendship and academic support. Longitudinal social network data across the first year, collected from 95 Dutch students in eight FLCs, measure both social and academic relational choices within and beyond the FLCs. Using stochastic actor-based models, the study tests two competing hypotheses. The alignment hypothesis states that students connect with their similar-achieving friends for both academic and social support, leading to an alignment of both types of networks over time. In contrast, the duality hypothesis states dissimilarity between academic support networks and friendship networks: students should connect with better-achieving fellow students for academic support and to more similar peers for friendship. The data support the alignment hypothesis but not the duality hypothesis; in addition, they show evidence of achievement segregation in FLCs: the higher the students’ achievement level, the more they connect with other students for both academic support and friendship, relating in particular to peers with a similarly high achievement level. The results suggest that lower-achieving students are excluded from the support provided by higher achieving students and instead ask similar lower achievers for support. They thus cannot benefit optimally from the academic integration FLC offer. The article concludes with recommendations of how to support students in an FLC so that they can reach optimal achievement potential.

  • 7.
    Bygren, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm University, Sweden; Institute Future Studies, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Anni
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Gahler, Michael
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Do Employers Prefer Fathers? Evidence from a Field Experiment Testing the Gender by Parenthood Interaction Effect on Callbacks to Job Applications2017In: European Sociological Review, ISSN 0266-7215, E-ISSN 1468-2672, Vol. 33, no 3, 337-348 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In research on fatherhood premiums and motherhood penalties in career-related outcomes, employers discriminatory behaviours are often argued to constitute a possible explanation for observed gender gaps. However, there is as yet no conclusive evidence of such discrimination. Utilizing a field experiment design, we test (i) whether job applicants are subject to recruitment discrimination on the basis of their gender and parenthood status, and (ii) whether discrimination by gender and parenthood is conditional on the qualifications required by the job applied for. We applied for 2,144 jobs in the Swedish labour market, randomly assigning gender and parenthood status to fictitious job applicants. Based on the rate of callbacks, we do not find that employers practise systematic recruitment discrimination on the basis of the job applicants gender or parental status, neither in relation to less qualified nor more highly qualified jobs.

  • 8.
    Bygren, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Using register data to estimate causal effects of interventions: An ex post synthetic control-group approach2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 45, 50-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: It is common in the context of evaluations that participants have not been selected on the basis of transparent participation criteria, and researchers and evaluators many times have to make do with observational data to estimate effects of job training programs and similar interventions. The techniques developed by researchers in such endeavours are useful not only to researchers narrowly focused on evaluations, but also to social and population science more generally, as observational data overwhelmingly are the norm, and the endogeneity challenges encountered in the estimation of causal effects with such data are not trivial. The aim of this article is to illustrate how register data can be used strategically to evaluate programs and interventions and to estimate causal effects of participation in these. Methods: We use propensity score matching on pretreatment-period variables to derive a synthetic control group, and we use this group as a comparison to estimate the employment-treatment effect of participation in a large job-training program. Results: We find the effect of treatment to be small and positive but transient. Conclusions: Our method reveals a strong regression to the mean effect, extremely easy to interpret as a treatment effect had a less advanced design been used (e.g. a within-subjects panel data analysis), and illustrates one of the unique advantages of using population register data for research purposes.

  • 9.
    Criaco, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Rotterdam School of Managementm Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Sieger, Philipp
    University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Wennberg, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Chirico, Francesco
    Centre for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO), Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; Tecnológico de Monterrey EGADE Business School, San Pedro Garza Garcia, Mexico.
    Minola, Tommaso
    Department of Economics and Technology Management, University of Bergamo, Dalmine, Italy; Center for Young and Family Enterprise (CYFE), University of Bergamo, Bergamo, Italy.
    Parents’ performance in entrepreneurship as a “double-edged sword” for the intergenerational transmission of entrepreneurship2017In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 49, 841-864 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate how perceived parents’ performance in entrepreneurship (PPE) affects the entrepreneurial career intentions of offspring. We argue that while perceived PPE enhances offspring’s perceived entrepreneurial desirability and feasibility because of exposure mechanisms, it inhibits the translation of both desirability and feasibility perceptions into entrepreneurial career intentions due to upward social comparison mechanisms. Thus, perceived PPE acts as a double-edged sword for the intergenerational transmission of entrepreneurship. Our predictions are tested and confirmed on a sample of 21,895 individuals from 33 countries. This study advances the literature on intergenerational transmission of entrepreneurship by providing a foundation for understanding the social psychological conditions necessary for such transmission to occur

  • 10.
    Demir, Robert
    et al.
    Ratio Institute, Sweden; Lancaster University Management School, United Kingdom.
    Wennberg, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Ratio Institute, Sweden.
    McKelvie, Alexander
    Whitman School of Management, Syracuse University, New York, USA.
    The Strategic Management of High-Growth Firm: A Review and Theoretical Conceptualization2017In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872, Vol. 50, no 4, 431-456 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars’ knowledge of the factors behind high-growth firms remains fragmented. This paper provides a systematic review of the empirical literature concerning high-growth firms with a focus on the strategic aspects contributing to growth. Based on our review of 39 articles, we identify five drivers of high growth: human capital, strategy, human resource management, innovation, and capabilities. These drivers are combined to develop a conceptual model of high-growth firms that includes potential contingency factors among the five drivers. We also propose a research agenda to deepen the study of high-growth firms in strategic management.

  • 11. DeTienne, Dawn R.
    et al.
    Wennberg, KarlLinköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Research handbook of entrepreneurial exit2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With contributions from authors around the globe, Research Handbook of Entrepreneurial Exit explores this most important phenomenon in the entrepreneurial journey. This book presents a comprehensive review of the current issues in entrepreneurial exits, and provides theoretical and methodological insights for future research. It explores the historical perspective and discusses topics such as gender and exit, retirement, psychological barriers, emotional aspects, venture capital funding firm relocation and exit from social ventures.

  • 12.
    Eriksson, Kimmo
    et al.
    Malardalen University, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Strimling, Pontus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm University, Sweden; Institute Futures Studies, Sweden.
    Andersson, Per-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Lindholm, Torun
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Costly punishment in the ultimatum game evokes moral concern, in particular when framed as payoff reduction2017In: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, ISSN 0022-1031, E-ISSN 1096-0465, Vol. 69, 59-64 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ultimatum game is a common economic experiment in which some participants reject anothers unfair offer of how to split some money, even though it leaves them both worse off. This costly behavior can be seen as enforcement of a fairness norm and has been labeled "altruistic punishment", suggesting that it is a Moral thing to do. But is this behavior viewed as moral by participants? Is it viewed as punishment? And are the payoff consequences of the behavior sufficient to determine the answers to these questions? To investigate this we framed costly punishment in two different ways: either as rejection of an offer (the standard ultimatum game framing) or as reduction of payoff. In a series of paid and hypothetical experiments we found that moral concerns about costly punishment depended on the framing. Specifically, the reduction frame elicited more moral concern about, and less use of, costly punishment than did the rejection frame. Several implications are discussed. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 13.
    Franken, Aart
    et al.
    Utrecht University.
    Moffitt, Terrie
    Duke University.
    Steglich, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis
    University of Groningen.
    Harakeh, Zeena
    Utrecht University.
    Vollebergh, Wilma
    Utrecht University.
    The role of self-control and early adolescents’ friendships in the development of externalizing behavior: The SNARE study2016In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 45, no 9, 1800-1811 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This social network study investigated themoderating role of self-control in the association betweenfriendship and the development of externalizing behavior: Antisocial behavior, alcohol use, tobacco use. Previous studies have shown inconsistent findings, and did not control for possible friendship network or selection effects. We tested two complementary hypotheses: (1) That early adolescents with low self-control develop externalizing behavior regardless of their friends’ behavior, or (2) as aresult of being influenced by their friends’ externalizing behavior to a greater extent. Hypotheses were investigated using data from the SNARE (Social Network Analysis of Risk behavior in Early adolescence) study (N = 1144,50 % boys, Mage 12.7, SD = 0.47). We controlled for selection effects and the network structure, using a data analysis package called SIENA. The main findings indicate that personal low self-control and friends’ externalizing behaviors both predict early adolescents’ increasing externalizing behaviors, but they do so independently. Therefore, interventions should focus on all early adolescents’with a lower self-control, rather than focus on those adolescents with a lower self-control who also have friendswho engage in externalizing behavior.

  • 14.
    Franken, Aart
    et al.
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Prinstein, Mitch
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Steglich, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Harakeh, Zeena
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Vollebergh, Wilma
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Early Adolescent Friendship Selection Based on Externalizing Behavior: the Moderating Role of Pubertal Development. The SNARE Study2016In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 44, 1647-1657 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined friendship (de-)selection processes in early adolescence. Pubertal development was examined as a potential moderator. It was expected that pubertal development would be associated with an increased tendency for adolescents to select their friends based on their similarities in externalizing behavior engagement (i.e., delinquency, alcohol use, and tobacco use). Data were used from the first three waves of the SNARE (Social Network Analysis of Risk behaviorin Early adolescence) study (N= 1144; 50 % boys;Mage=12.7; SD= 0.47), including students who entered the first year of secondary school. The hypothesis was tested using Stochastic Actor-Based Modeling in SIENA. While taking the network structure into account, and controlling for peer influence effects, the results supported this hypothesis. Early adolescents with higher pubertal development were as likely as their peers to select friends based on similarity in externalizing behavior and especially likely to remain friends with peers who had a similar level of externalizing behavior, andthus break friendship ties with dissimilar friends in this respect. As early adolescents are actively engaged in reorganizing their social context, adolescents with a higher pubertal development are especially likely to lose friendships with peers who do not engage in externalizing behavior, thus losing an important source of adaptive social control (i.e.,friends who do not engage in externalizing behavior).

  • 15.
    Hedström, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Raymond Boudon (1934-2013)2013In: Revue Française de Sociologie, Sciences Po University Press , 2013, 1-2 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Hedström, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Collet, Francois
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Old friends and new acquaintances: Tie formation mechanisms in an inter-organizational network generated by employee mobility2013In: Social Networks, ISSN 0378-8733, E-ISSN 1879-2111, Vol. 35, no 3, 288-299 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates mechanisms of tie formation in an interorganizational network generated by the mobility of employees between organizations. We analyze a data set that contains information on all organizations in the Stockholm metropolitan area between 1990 and 2003. We show that the formation of new ties is contingent upon the direction of past ties, and that most connections occur at an intermediate geodesic distance of 2 and 3. The findings highlight the importance of tie direction and indirect connections in research on network dynamics and knowledge exchanges stemming from the mobility of employees across organizations.

  • 17.
    Hedström, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wennberg, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Causal mechanisms in organization and innovation studies2017In: Innovation: Management, Policy & Practice, ISSN 1447-9338, E-ISSN 2204-0226, Vol. 19, no 1, 91-102 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We outline the guiding ideas behind mechanisms-based theorizing in analytical sociology as a fruitful alternative to economics-inspired research on identification of causal effects, and discuss the potential of mechanisms-based theorizing for further development in organization and innovation studies. We discuss the realist stance on providing broader explanations as an identifying characteristic of the mechanism approach, its focus on the dynamic processes through which outcomes to be explained are brought about, and outline theoretical and methodological implications for organization and innovation studies.

  • 18.
    Hedström, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wennberg, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Causal mechanisms in organization and innovation studies2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We outline the guiding ideas behind mechanisms-based theorizing in analytical sociology as a fruitful alternative to economics-inspired research on identification of causal effects, and discuss the potential of mechanisms-based theorizing for further development in organization and innovation studies. We discuss the realist stance on providing broader explanations as an identifying characteristic of the mechanism approach, its focus on the dynamic processes through which outcomes to be explained are brought about, and outline theoretical and methodological implications for organization and innovation studies.

  • 19.
    Hedström, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ylikoski, Petri
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Analytical sociology and rational choice theory2014In: Analytical Sociology: Actions and Networks / [ed] G. Manzo, John Wiley & Sons, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Hedström, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ylikoski, Petri
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Analytical sociology and social mechanisms2013In: Encyclopedia of Philosophy and the Social Sciences, Sage Publications, 2013, 27-30 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Hjorth-Trolle, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Copenhagen.
    Asta, Breinholt
    Sociologisk Institut, University of Copenhagen.
    Forældreinvesteringer og social ulighed2017In: Social arv og social ulighed / [ed] Niels Ploug, Copenhagen: Hans Reitzels Forlag, 2017, 2, 45-67 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Jarvis, Benjamin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kawalerowicz, Juta
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Valdez, Sarah
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Impact of ancestry categorisations on residential segregation measures using Swedish register data2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 45, 62-65 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Country-of-birth data contained in registers are often aggregated to create broad ancestry group categories. We examine how measures of residential segregation vary according to levels of aggregation. Method: We use Swedish register data to calculate pairwise dissimilarity indices from 1990 to 2012 for ancestry groups defined at four nested levels of aggregation: (1) micro-groups containing 50 categories, (2) meso-groups containing 16 categories, (3) macro-groups containing six categories and (4) a broad Western/non-Western binary. Results: We find variation in segregation levels between ancestry groups that is obscured by data aggregation. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the practice of aggregating country-of-birth statistics in register data can hinder the ability to identify highly segregated groups and therefore design effective policy to remedy both intergroup and intergenerational inequalities.

  • 23.
    Jarvis, Benjamin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Song, Xi
    Department of Sociology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Rising Intragenerational Occupational Mobility in the United States, 1969 to 20112017In: American Sociological Review, ISSN 0003-1224, E-ISSN 1939-8271, Vol. 82, no 3Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the theoretical importance of intragenerational mobility and its connection to intergenerational mobility, no study since the 1970s has documented trends in intragenerational occupational mobility. The present article fills this intellectual gap by presenting evidence of an increasing trend in intragenerational mobility in the United States from 1969 to 2011. We decompose the trend using a nested occupational classification scheme that distinguishes between disaggregated micro-classes and progressively more aggregated meso-classes, macro-classes, and manual and nonmanual sectors. Log-linear analysis reveals that mobility increased across the occupational structure at nearly all levels of aggregation, especially after the early 1990s. Controlling for structural changes in occupational distributions modifies, but does not substantially alter, these findings. Trends are qualitatively similar for men and women. We connect increasing mobility to other macro-economic trends dating back to the 1970s, including changing labor force composition, technologies, employment relations, and industrial structures. We reassert the sociological significance of intragenerational mobility and discuss how increasing variability in occupational transitions within careers may counteract or mask trends in intergenerational mobility, across occupations and across more broadly construed social classes.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-05-31 13:52
  • 24.
    Kacperczyk, Aleksandra (Olenka)
    et al.
    Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA.
    Balachandran, Chanchal
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Vertical and horizontal wage inequality and mobility outcomes: evidence from the swedish microdata2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Using employer–employee matched data from Sweden between 2001 and 2008, we test hypotheses designed to assess the contingent nature of the relationship between wage inequality and cross-firm mobility. Whereas past research has mostly established that wage inequality increases inter-firm mobility, we investigate the conditions under which pay variance might have an opposite effect, serving to retain workers. We propose that the effect of wage inequality is contingent on organizational rank and that it depends on whether wages are dispersed vertically (between job levels) or horizontally (within the same job level). We find that vertical wage inequality suppresses cross-firm mobility because it is associated with outcomes beneficial for employees, such as attractive advancement opportunities. In contrast, horizontal wage dispersion increases cross-firm mobility because it is associated with outcomes harmful for employees, such as inequity concerns or job dissatisfaction. We further find that the vertical-inequality effect is amplified (mitigated) for bottom (top) different-level wage earners, consistent with the notion that bottom wage earners have the most to gain from climbing job ladders. Similarly, the horizontalinequality effect is amplified (mitigated) for bottom (top) same-level wage earners, consistent with the notion that bottom wage earners are most subject to negative consequences of this inequality. More broadly, the study contributes to our understanding of the relationship  between wage inequality and cross-firm mobility.

  • 25.
    Kawalerowicz, Juta
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Radicals, Revolutionaries, and Terrorists2017In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 60, no 1, 89-90 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 26.
    Kawalerowicz, Juta
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Too many immigrants: what shapes perceptions and attitudes towards immigrants in England and Wales?2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the link between natives’ residential context, perception of immigration levels and attitudes towards immigrants. We use British Election Study to extract individual level measures for 17,000 respondents in England and Wales and match them with contextual characteristics at the level of Westminster constituency. The paper focuses on three questions: (1) is perception of demographic changes affected by actual growth of the immigrant population? (2) if local context is associated with natives’ attitudes towards immigrants, which immigrant groups are most salient? (3) are base levels and changes in immigrant population affecting anti-immigration attitudes in the same way? We find that local context predicts both perception and attitudes, although individual characteristics seem to play a bigger role. Natives seem to be more sensitive to immigrant groups defined by ethnic criteria, rather than skills or religion. Natives are sensitive to changes of immigrant population but base levels of immigrant population are associated with less frequent reporting of high immigration levels. Similarly, natives are more hostile towards immigrants if they reside in areas where the immigrant population grew rapidly, but higher base levels of immigrant population mitigate this response.

  • 27.
    Keuschnigg, Marc
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kratz, Fabian
    Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Germany.
    Thou Shalt Recycle: How Social Norms of Environmental Protection Narrow the Scope of the Low-Cost Hypothesis2017In: Environment and Behavior, ISSN 0013-9165, E-ISSN 1552-390XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the “low-cost hypothesis” (LCH), attitudes explain behavior only if complying with personal convictions requires little effort. Environmental research has seized this argument to explain moderate participation in proenvironmental action against a backdrop of rising environmental awareness. However, evidence for the LCH remains ambiguous, and recent studies have reported contradictory results. Here, we reconcile prior findings on household waste recycling and argue that many environmental behaviors evolved into every day, “normal” practices increasingly encouraged by social norms, and thus slip out of the LCH’s scope. We combine a natural experiment exploiting households’ variation in geocoded walking distances to drop-off recycling sites in Munich, Germany (N=754) with an independent online survey (N=640) measuring local intensities of recycling norms for two distinct waste categories, plastics and glass. Our results suggest that normative change narrows the LCH’s scope to include only environmental action for which normative expectations are weak.

  • 28.
    Keuschnigg, Marc
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wimmer, Thomas
    Ludwig Maximilians University of Munchen, Germany.
    Is Category Spanning Truly Disadvantageous? New Evidence from Primary and Secondary Movie Markets2017In: Social Forces, ISSN 0037-7732, E-ISSN 1534-7605, Vol. 96, no 1, 449-479 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genre assignments help audiences make sense of new releases. Studies from a wide range of market contexts have shown that generalists defying clear mapping to established categories suffer penalties in market legitimacy, perceived quality, or audience attention. We introduce an empirical strategy to disentangle two mechanisms, reduced niche fitness and audience confusion, causing devaluation or ignorance of boundary-crossing offers. Our data on 2,971 feature films released to US theaters and subsequently made available on DVD further reveal that consequences of category spanning are subject to strong moderating influences. Negative effects are far from universal, manifesting only if (a) combined genres are culturally distant, (b) products are released to a stable and highly institutionalized market context, and (c) offers lack familiarity as an alternative source of market recognition. Our study provides ramifications as to the scope conditions of categorization effects and modifies some widely acknowledged truisms regarding boundary crossing in cultural markets.

  • 29.
    Kim, Phillip H
    et al.
    Babson College, USA.
    Wennberg, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Croidieu, Grégoire
    Linköping University, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Grenoble Ecole de Management, France.
    Hidden in plain sight: untapped riches of meso-level entrepreneurship mechanisms2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurial action is embedded within a variety of complex social structures, not all of which can be as easily defined or measured as macro-institutional or micro-individual characteristics, but collectively hold rich insights into the actual causal mechanisms influencing action. To address this problem, we call upon researchers to broaden their levels of analysis and direct their focus to mesolevel structures. Although meso-level social structures are widely studied independently, these intermediate levels are seldom integrated into existing multi-level models. We argue that meso-level structures offer untapped riches for enhancing multi-level entrepreneurial mechanisms and discuss how social groups, associations, and other collectives operating at a meso-level can play a more distinct integrative role in between the two ends of the institutional spectrum. To provide practical guidance for pursuing such investigations, we adapt Coleman’s Bathtub model to form a robust framework that integrates micro, meso, and macro levels of analysis. Our framework helps alleviate the shortcomings produced by an overdependence on either solely macro- or micro-level entrepreneurial mechanisms and brings the hidden intermediate level into plain sight.

  • 30.
    Laninga, Lydia
    et al.
    Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
    Harakeh, Zeena
    Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
    Steglich, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis
    University of Groningen.
    Veenstra, René
    University of Groningen.
    Vollebergh, Wilma
    Utrecht University.
    Populaire jongeren zetten een norm voor vriendschappen en agressie inde klas2017In: Kind en Adolescent, ISSN 0167-2436, Vol. 38, 212-232 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [nl]

    In deze studie onderzoeken wij of agressieve peer-normen, meer specifiek populariteitsnormen en descriptieve normen, een versterkende rol spelen in de mate waarin jongeren hun vrienden uitkiezen op basis van agressief gedrag en in de mate waarin jongeren door hun vrienden worden beïnvloed in agressie (N=1.134 eerstejaars leerlingen van middelbare school; leeftijd M=12,66 jaar). Zoals verwacht kwam uit longitudinale sociale-netwerkanalyses met peer-nominatie data naar voren dat vooral populaire jongeren in de klas een norm kunnen zetten voor de ontwikkeling van vriendschappen en agressie. In klassen met agressieve populaire jongeren blijken jongeren hun vrienden te selecteren op basis van gelijkheid in agressie, terwijl dit niet gebeurt in klassen met niet agressieve populaire jongeren. Daarnaast is de vriendschapsinvloed op agressie significant groter in klassen met agressieve populaire jongeren. Descriptieve normen spelen geen rol in vriendschapsprocessen omtrent agressie. Blijkbaar wordt agressie enkel en alleen als een belangrijk, waardevol kenmerk voor vriendschapsprocessen gezien als zij geassocieerd is met populariteit in de klas.

  • 31.
    Nordlund, Carl
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A deviational approach to blockmodeling of valued networks2016In: Social Networks, ISSN 0378-8733, E-ISSN 1879-2111, Vol. 44, 160-178 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article proposes a novel approach to blockmodeling of valued (one-mode) networks where the identification of (binary) block patterns in the valued relations differ from existing approaches. Rather than looking at the absolute values of relations, or examining valued ties on a per-actor basis (cf. Nordlund, 2007), the approach identifies prominent (binary) ties on the basis of deviations from expected values. By comparing the distribution of each actor's valued relations to its alters with the macro-level distributions of total in- and outdegrees, prominent (1) and non-prominent (0) ties are determined both on a per-actor-to-actor and a per-actor-from-actor basis. This allows for a direct interpretation of the underlying functional anatomy of a non-dichotomized valued network using the standard set of ideal blocks as found in generalized blockmodeling of binary networks.

    In addition to its applicability for direct blockmodeling, the article also suggests a novel indirect measure of deviational structural equivalence on the basis of such deviations from expected values.

    Exemplified with the note-sharing data in Žiberna (2007a), citations among social work journals (Baker, 1992), and total commodity trade among EU/EFTA countries as of 2010, both the direct and indirect approach produce results that are more sensitive to variations at the dyadic level than existing approaches. This is particularly evident in the case of the EU/EFTA trade network, where the indirect approach yields partitions and blockmodels in support of theories of regional trade, despite the significantly skewed valued degree distribution of the dataset.

  • 32.
    Nordlund, Carl
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    International Networks2013In: Encyclopedia of Social Networks / [ed] Barnett, G., Sage Publications, 2013, 425-431 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Nordlund, Carl
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Preceding and governing measurements: an Emmanuelian conceptualization of ecological unequal exchange2014In: Structures of the World Political Economy / [ed] Suter, S., Chase-Dunn, C., Zurich: Lit-Verlag , 2014, 315-346 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Nordlund, Carl
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Svensson, Sara
    Department of Public Policy, Central European University, Budapest.
    The building blocks of a Euroregion: Novel metrics to measure cross-border integration2015In: Journal of European Integration, ISSN 0703-6337, E-ISSN 1477-2280, Vol. 37, no 3, 371-389 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores how the notion of European integration at the local level can be conceptualized and measured. Based on a process-oriented inclusive understanding of integration and using relational datasets that maps both domestic and cross-border communication ties among political representatives in four Euroregions along the borders of Hungary–Slovakia and Sweden–Norway, we begin by applying and theoretically dissecting network-analytical metrics based on frequency of ties. Despite finding that such measures capture analytically relevant properties of political cross-border networks, we argue that they are less than ideal for capturing the notion of political integration. Instead, with inspiration from the blockmodeling tradition in network analysis, we propose two novel metrics—cross-border connectivity and integrational overfitting. These metrics not only enrich our understanding of political integration in cross-border settings but also can serve as useful mapping tools for policy-makers. A software client enabling the analysis of these measures supplements this article.

  • 35.
    Ruppanner, Leah
    et al.
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Brandén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm University Demography Unit (SUDA), Sweden.
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University Demography Unit (SUDA), Sweden; Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Does Unequal Housework Lead to Divorce?: Evidence from Sweden2017In: Sociology, ISSN 0038-0385, E-ISSN 1469-8684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lack of couple-level data hinders direct exploration of how inconsistencies in couples? housework reports structure their relationship quality. We address this limitation by applying Swedish data from the 2009 Young Adult Panel Study (N = 1057 couples) matched with Swedish register data (2009?2014) to extend equity theory by estimating mismatch in couples? housework reports on relationship satisfaction and stability. We find women who report performing more housework are less likely to be satisfied with their relationships, and are more likely to consider breaking up. These unions are also more likely to dissolve. Using both partners? housework reports, we document discrediting women?s housework contribution, or reporting she does less than she reports, is associated with lower relationship satisfaction. Women in these partnerships also consider breaking up, and the unions are more likely to dissolve. Our results identify the gendered impact of housework inequality on relationship stability.

  • 36.
    Sebhatu, Abiel
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics & Swedish Entrepreneurship Forum.
    Wennberg, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Institutional Pressure and Failure Dynamics in the Swedish Voucher School Sector2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 2001-7405, E-ISSN 2001-7413, Vol. 7, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We conduct a comparative case study following the growth and decline of the two largest private school organizations in Sweden from the voucher school deregulation in 1992 until the bankruptcy of one of the organization in 2013. Using archival data, hand-coded data on media exposure, interviews with managers and company press releases we explore institutional pressure and school organizations’ responses to institutional conformity and resistance. Both case organizations constitute private equity managed business groups but rely on distinct growth strategies and differential types of political and market-based ties to powerful stakeholders. Our results explain how organizational responses to institutional pressure are intimately tied to organizational structure, and furthermore how conformity may not translate into survival-enhancing conditions as earlier theorized

  • 37.
    van der Ploeg, Rozemarijn
    et al.
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Steglich, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Veenstra, René
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    The Support Group Approach in the Dutch KiVa Anti-Bullying Programme: Effects on Victimisation, Defending and Well-Being at School2016In: Educational research (Windsor. Print), ISSN 0013-1881, E-ISSN 1469-5847, Vol. 58, no 3, 221-236 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: School bullying is a wide-spread problem with severe consequences for victims, bullies and bystanders. Schools are strongly encouraged to implement both schoolwide, preventive interventions and reactive measures to handle existing bullying situations. In the Dutch implementation of the KiVa anti-bullying programme, pervasive-bullying situations are addressed according to the support group approach. The support group approach is widely used for addressing bullying situations, but little is known about its effectiveness.

    Purpose: We investigated the effectiveness of the support group approach in reducing victimisation, increasing defending and improving the victim’s well-being over the course of a school year, over and beyond of the effects of the universal KiVa intervention.

    Programme description: The support group approach is a non-punitive, problem-solving strategy to address pervasive-bullying situations. In this intervention, trained teachers form a support group that consists of 6–8 children, including the bullies and their assistants, defenders or friends of the victim and prosocial classmates. The purpose of the support group isto create mutual concern for the well-being of the victim and to trigger the bullies’ willingness to alter their behaviour.

    Sample: We used data from 66 Dutch elementary schools that participated in the KiVa intervention study. Data were collected inOctober 2012 and 2013, and May 2013 and 2014. The sample usedin the analyses consisted of 38 victims for whom a support group intervention was organised (44.7% boy, Mage = 9.24; SDage = 1.20).

    Design and method: To get insight into the effects above and beyond those of the KiVa programme itself, victims with a support group (N=38) were matched to similar victims without a support group (N=571). Statistical analyses were undertaken to examine whether the changes in victimisation, defending and well-being at school differed between the two groups.

    Result: Victims reported positive effects of the support group approach in reducing victimisation in the short term, but this decrease in victimisation was not lasting over the course of a school year. The intervention also did not improve the victims’ well-being at school inthe longer term. Victims with a support group, however, were found to have more defenders at the end of the school year than victims without a support group.

  • 38.
    van Rijsewijk, Loes
    et al.
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Pattiselanno, Kim
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Steglich, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Veenstra, René
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Who helps whom?: Investigating the development of adolescent prosocial relationships2016In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 52, 894-908 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated adolescent prosocial relations by examining social networks based on the question “Who helps you (e.g., with homework, with repairing a flat [bicycle] tire, or when you are feeling down?).” The effects of individual characteristics (academic achievement, symptoms of depressive mood, and peer status) on receiving help and giving help were examined, and we investigated the contribution of (dis)similarity between adolescents to the development of prosocial relations. Gender, structural network characteristics, and friendship relations were taken into account. Data were derived from the Social Network Analysis of Risk behavior in Early adolescence (SNARE) study, and contained information on students in 40 secondary school classes across 3 waves (N 840, M age 13.4, 49.7% boys). Results from longitudinal social network analyses (RSiena) revealed tendencies toward reciprocation of help and exchange of help within helping groups. Furthermore, boys were less often mentioned as helpers, particularly by girls. Depressed adolescents were less often mentioned as helpers, especially by low depressed peers. Moreover, lower academic achievers indicated that they received help from their higher achieving peers. Rejected adolescents received help more often, but they less often helped low-rejected peers. Last, low- and high-popular adolescents less often helped each other, and also high-popular adolescents less often helped each other. These findings show that (dis)similarity in these characteristics is an important driving factor underlying the emergence and development of prosocial relations in the peer context, and that prosocial behavior should be defined in terms of benefitting particular others.

  • 39.
    VendlerToft-Kehler, Rasmus
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School, Frederiksberg, Denmark; Accelerace, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wennberg, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kim, Phillip H.
    Babson College, Arthur M. Blank Center for Entrepreneurship, Babson Park, MA, USA.
    A little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing: Entrepreneurial experience and new venture disengagement2017In: Journal of Business Venturing Insights, ISSN 2352-6734, Vol. 6, 36-46 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Existing research has offered conflicting narratives of how entrepreneurial experience influences whether founders will continue working on or disengage from their ventures. We theorize and test how entrepreneurs with varying levels of experience disengage from early-stage companies. Findings reveal a U-shaped relationship, such that novices and highly experienced entrepreneurs are more likely to quit their ventures, while moderately experienced entrepreneurs are more likely to persist in their pursuits. We offer both theoretical and empirical explanations for how the propensity to disengage from new ventures evolves with entrepreneurial experience.

  • 40.
    Vidal, Sergi
    et al.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Perales, Francisco
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Lersch, Philipp M.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Brandén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholms University, Sweden.
    Family migration in a cross-national perspective: The importance of within-couple employment arrangements in Australia, Britain, Germany, and Sweden2017In: Demographic Research, ISSN 1435-9871, Vol. 36, 307-338 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE Migration rates of dual-earner couples are lower than those of male-breadwinner couples. We revisit this issue using a cross-national comparative perspective and examine heterogeneity in the role of female employment in couple relocations. We propose a theoretical framework in which national levels of support for female employment and normative expectations about gender roles act as moderators of the relationship between couple type (i.e., dual-earner and male-breadwinner) and family migration. METHODS We deploy discrete-time event history analyses of harmonised longitudinal data from four large-scale datasets from Australia, Britain, Germany, and Sweden, covering the 1992-2011 period. RESULTS Consistent with prior research, we find that male-breadwinner couples migrate more often than dual-earner couples in all countries, suggesting that traditional gender structures affecting family migration operate across very different contexts. We also find cross-country differences in the estimated effects of different sorts of absolute and relative partner resources on family migration. CONCLUSIONS We take our results as preliminary evidence that national contexts can serve as moderators of the relationship between within-couple employment arrangements and family migration decisions. CONTRIBUTION Our study contributes to family migration literature by illustrating how cross-national comparisons are a valuable methodological approach to put prevailing micro-level explanations of the relationship between female employment and family migration in context.

  • 41.
    Wennberg, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Entreprenörskap für alle2016In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 4, 88-92 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Wennberg, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Widespace: Managing growth and culture within amaturing technology venture2017In: Exploring Strategy Text & Cases / [ed] Johnson, G., R. Whittington, K. Scholes, D. Angwin, P. Regner, Pearson Education Academic Publisher, 2017, 616-621 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Wennberg, Karl
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bergström, AndreasFORES (Forum for Reforms, Entrepreneurship and Sustainability).
    Machines, jobs and equality: Technological change and labour markets in Europe2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid technological change in the form of digitalisation, robotisation, electronic payment systems and artificial intelligence, is transforming the production, distribution and consumption of goods and services in Europe. Labour markets are, in turn, radically affected. But how? And how much? Addressing the many economic and societal implications of rapid technological change requires an understanding of the conditions in which it takes place. This, in turn, is essential to the formulation of cogent future policy. In this volume, a range of experts develop their views on labour markets, productivity, unemployment, redistribution, means of payment and artificial intelligence. They discuss the implications for legislation and regulation. The subjects are of relevance for academics, experts, and political decision-makers alike. The book intends to instigate discussion around these specific issues and probe ideas on how to organise our societies in the face of such rapid technological change.

  • 44.
    Ylikoski, Petri
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department o f Social Research, University of Helsinki.
    Thinking with the Coleman boat2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to provide a rational reconstruction of the diagram as a tool for social scientific theorizing. I will show how Coleman uses the diagram and how it can be employed as a tool for theoretical thinking. I will also demonstrate how it can be used to clarify the nature of the micro-macro challenge in social explanation. The structure of the article is as following. Section 2 will describe the diagram and its elements. Section 3 will show various ways in which Coleman used the diagram in his work. Section 4 discusses more systematically issues related to the interpretation of the diagram, and Section 5 will provide a diagnosis of some recent interpretations of the diagram. Finally, Section 6 focuses on some important limitations of the diagram.

  • 45.
    Zander, Lysann
    et al.
    Free University of Berlin, Germany.
    Hannover, Bettina
    Free University of Berlin. Germany.
    Steglich, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Baumert, Jürgen
    Max Planck Institut für Bildungsforschung, Germany.
    Soziale Eingebundenheit in immersiven und monolingualen Klassenzimmern2017In: Erfolgreich integrieren - die Staatliche Europaschule Berlin / [ed] J. Möller, F. Hohenstein, J. Fleckenstein, O. Köller, & J. Baumert, Münster, Germany: Waxmann Verlag, 2017, 1, 285-303 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
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