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  • 1.
    Bednarska, Olga
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Icenhour, Adriane
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institute of Medical Psychology and Behavioral Immunobiology, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.
    Tapper, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Witt, Suzanne Tyson
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Elsenbruch, Sigrid
    Institute of Medical Psychology and Behavioral Immunobiology, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Reduced excitatory neurotransmitter levels in anterior insulae are associated with abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome2019In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 160, no 9, p. 2004-2012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a visceral pain condition with psychological comorbidity. Brain imaging studies in IBS demonstratealtered function in anterior insula (aINS), a key hub for integration of interoceptive, affective, and cognitive processes. However,alterations in aINS excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission as putative biochemical underpinnings of these functional changesremain elusive. Using quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we compared women with IBS and healthy women (healthycontrols [HC]) with respect to aINS glutamate 1 glutamine (Glx) and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA1) concentrations and addressedpossible associations with symptoms. Thirty-nine women with IBS and 21 HC underwent quantitative magnetic resonancespectroscopy of bilateral aINS to assess Glx and GABA1 concentrations. Questionnaire data from all participants and prospectivesymptom-diary data from patients were obtained for regression analyses of neurotransmitter concentrations with IBS-related andpsychological parameters. Concentrations of Glx were lower in IBS compared with HC (left aINS P , 0.05, right aINS P , 0.001),whereas no group differences were detected for GABA1concentrations. Lower right-lateralized Glx concentrations in patients weresubstantially predicted by longer pain duration, while less frequent use of adaptive pain‐coping predicted lower Glx in left aINS. Ourfindings provide first evidence for reduced excitatory but unaltered inhibitory neurotransmitter levels in aINS in IBS. The results alsoindicate a functional lateralization of aINS with a stronger involvement of the right hemisphere in perception of abdominal pain and ofthe left aINS in cognitive pain regulation. Our findings suggest that glutaminergic deficiency may play a role in pain processing in IBS.

  • 2.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Sandberg, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Ressner, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Koziorowski, Jacek
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Malmqvist, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Shining dead bone-cause for cautious interpretation of [F-18]NaF PET scans2018In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 124-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose — [18F]Fluoride ([18F]NaF) PET scan is frequently used for estimation of bone healing rate and extent in cases of bone allografting and fracture healing. Some authors claim that [18F]NaF uptake is a measure of osteoblastic activity, calcium metabolism, or bone turnover. Based on the known affinity of fluoride to hydroxyapatite, we challenged this view.

    Methods — 10 male rats received crushed, frozen allogeneic cortical bone fragments in a pouch in the abdominal wall on the right side, and hydroxyapatite granules on left side. [18F]NaF was injected intravenously after 7 days. 60 minutes later, the rats were killed and [18F]NaF uptake was visualized in a PET/CT scanner. Specimens were retrieved for micro CT and histology.

    Results — MicroCT and histology showed no signs of new bone at the implant sites. Still, the implants showed a very high [18F]NaF uptake, on a par with the most actively growing and remodeling sites around the knee joint.

    Interpretation — [18F]NaF binds with high affinity to dead bone and calcium phosphate materials. Hence, an [18F]NaF PET/CT scan does not allow for sound conclusions about new bone ingrowth into bone allograft, healing activity in long bone shaft fractures with necrotic fragments, or remodeling around calcium phosphate coated prostheses

  • 3.
    Elawa, Sherif
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mirdell, Robin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    The microvascular response in the skin to topical application of methyl nicotinate: Effect of concentration and variation between skin sites2019In: Microvascular Research, ISSN 0026-2862, E-ISSN 1095-9319, Vol. 124, p. 54-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Methyl nicotinate (MN) induces a local cutaneous erythema in the skin and may be used as a local provocation in the assessment of microcirculation and skin viability. The aims were to measure the effects of increasing doses of MN, to find the concentration that yields the most reproducible effect from day to day and between sites, and to study the variation between skin sites.

    Methods

    Microvascular responses to topically applied MN at different concentrations were measured in 12 subjects on separate days and on contralateral sides, using laserspeckle contrast imaging (LSCI). MN effects were measured in four different body sites.

    Results

    At 20 mmol/L, the response to MN was most reproducible day-to-day and site-to-site, and resulted in a plateau response between 5 and 20 min after application.

    The skin region of the lower back had a lower perfusion value compared to the epigastric region (p = 0.007). When responses were compared to nearby, unprovoked areas, a significantly larger increase in perfusion was seen in the forearm, compared to all other anatomical sites (p < 0.03).

    Conclusion

    A concentration of 20 mmol/L MN generated the most reproducible microvascular response in the skin. The response varies between different body sites.

  • 4.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Mirdell, Robin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Laser speckle contrast imaging in children with scalds: Its influence on timing of intervention, duration of healing and care, and costs2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 798-804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Background

    Scalds are the most common type of burn injury in children, and the initial evaluation of burn depth is a problem. Early identification of deep dermal areas that need excision and grafting would save unnecessary visits and stays in hospital. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) shows promise for the evaluation of this type of burn. The aim of this study was to find out whether perfusion measured with LSCI has an influence on the decision for operation, duration of healing and care period, and costs, in children with scalds.

    Methods

    We studied a group of children with scalds whose wounds were evaluated with LSCI on day 3–4 after injury during the period 2012–2015. Regression (adjustment for percentage total body surface area burned (TBSA%), age, and sex) was used to analyse the significance of associations between degree of perfusion and clinical outcome.

    Results

    We studied 33 children with a mean TBSA% of 6.0 (95% CI 4.4–7.7)%. Lower perfusion values were associated with operation (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve 0.86, 95% CI 0.73–1.00). The perfusion cut-off with 100% specificity for not undergoing an operation was ≥191 PU units (66.7% sensitivity and 72.7% accurately classified). Multivariable analyses showed that perfusion was independently associated with duration of healing and care period.

    Conclusion

    Lower perfusion values, as measured with LSCI, are associated with longer healing time and longer care period. By earlier identification of burns that will be operated, perfusion measurements may further decrease the duration of care of burns in children with scalds.

  • 5.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Model-inferred mechanisms of liver function from magnetic resonance imaging data: Validation and variation across a clinically relevant cohort2019In: PloS Computational Biology, ISSN 1553-734X, E-ISSN 1553-7358, PLOS COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY, Vol. 15, no 6, article id e1007157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estimation of liver function is important to monitor progression of chronic liver disease (CLD). A promising method is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with gadoxetate, a liver-specific contrast agent. For this method, we have previously developed a model for an average healthy human. Herein, we extended this model, by combining it with a patient-specific non-linear mixed-effects modeling framework. We validated the model by recruiting 100 patients with CLD of varying severity and etiologies. The model explained all MRI data and adequately predicted both timepoints saved for validation and gadoxetate concentrations in both plasma and biopsies. The validated model provides a new and deeper look into how the mechanisms of liver function vary across a wide variety of liver diseases. The basic mechanisms remain the same, but increasing fibrosis reduces uptake and increases excretion of gadoxetate. These mechanisms are shared across many liver functions and can now be estimated from standard clinical images.

    Author summary

    Being able to accurately and reliably estimate liver function is important when monitoring the progression of patients with liver disease, as well as when identifying drug-induced liver injury during drug development. A promising method for quantifying liver function is to use magnetic resonance imaging combined with gadoxetate. Gadoxetate is a liver-specific contrast agent, which is taken up by the hepatocytes and excreted into the bile. We have previously developed a mechanistic model for gadoxetate dynamics using averaged data from healthy volunteers. In this work, we extended our model with a non-linear mixed-effects modeling framework to give patient-specific estimates of the gadoxetate transport-rates. We validated the model by recruiting 100 patients with liver disease, covering a range of severity and etiologies. All patients underwent an MRI-examination and provided both blood and liver biopsies. Our validated model provides a new and deeper look into how the mechanisms of liver function varies across a wide variety of liver diseases. The basic mechanisms remain the same, but increasing fibrosis reduces uptake and increases excretion of gadoxetate.

  • 6.
    Hemmingsson, Jens
    et al.
    Department of Radiation Physics, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Högberg, Jonas
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Mölne, Johan
    Department of Pathology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Johanna
    Department of Oncology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gjertsson, Peter
    Department of Clinical Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rizell, Magnus
    Department of Surgery, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Henrikson, Olof
    Department of Radiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bernhardt, Peter
    Department of Radiation Physics, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Autoradiography and biopsy measurements of a resected hepatocellular carcinoma treated with 90 yttrium radioembolization demonstrate large absorbed dose heterogeneities2018In: Advances in radiation oncology, ISSN 2452-1094, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 439-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radioembolization is an alternative palliative treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma. Here, we examine the uptake differences between tumor tissue phenotypes and present a cross-section of the absorbed dose throughout a liver tissue specimen.

  • 7.
    Håkansson, Irene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Cassel, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; UCL Inst Neurol, England; UCL, England.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Neurofilament levels, disease activity and brain volume during follow-up in multiple sclerosis2018In: Journal of Neuroinflammation, ISSN 1742-2094, E-ISSN 1742-2094, Vol. 15, article id 209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a need for clinically useful biomarkers of disease activity in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and relapsing remitting MS (RRMS). The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between neurofilament light chain (NFL) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum and the relationship between NFL and other biomarkers, subsequent disease activity, and brain volume loss in CIS and RRMS. Methods: A panel of neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory markers were analyzed in repeated CSF samples from 41 patients with CIS or RRMS in a prospective longitudinal cohort study and from 22 healthy controls. NFL in serum was analyzed using a single-molecule array (Simoa) method. "No evidence of disease activity-3" (NEDA-3) status and brain volume (brain parenchymal fraction calculated using SyMRI (R)) were recorded during 4 years of follow-up. Results: NFL levels in CSF and serum correlated significantly (all samples, n = 63, r 0.74, p amp;lt; 0.001), but CSF-NFL showed an overall stronger association profile with NEDA-3 status, new T2 lesions, and brain volume loss. CSF-NFL was associated with both new T2 lesions and brain volume loss during follow-up, whereas CSF-CHI3L1 was associated mainly with brain volume loss and CXCL1, CXCL10, CXCL13, CCL22, and MMP-9 were associated mainly with new T2 lesions. Conclusions: Serum and CSF levels of NFL correlate, but CSF-NFL predicts and reflects disease activity better than S-NFL. CSF-NFL levels are associated with both new T2 lesions and brain volume loss. Our findings further add to the accumulating evidence that CSF-NFL is a clinically useful biomarker in CIS and RRMS and should be considered in the expanding NEDA concept. CSF-CXCL10 and CSF-CSF-CHI3L1 are potential markers of disease activity and brain volume loss, respectively.

  • 8.
    Karlsson, Markus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Liver R2*is affected by both iron and fat: A dual biopsy-validated study of chronic liver disease2019In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 325-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Liver iron content (LIC) in chronic liver disease (CLD) is currently determined by performing an invasive liver biopsy. MRI using R2* relaxometry is a noninvasive alternative for estimating LIC. Fat accumulation in the liver, or proton density fat fraction (PDFF), may be a possible confounder of R2* measurements. Previous studies of the effect of PDFF on R2* have not used quantitative LIC measurement. Purpose To assess the associations between R2*, LIC, PDFF, and liver histology in patients with suspected CLD. Study Type Prospective. Population Eighty-one patients with suspected CLD. Field Strength/Sequence 1.5 T. Multiecho turbo field echo to quantify R2*. PRESS MRS to quantify PDFF. Assessment Each patient underwent an MR examination, followed by two needle biopsies immediately following the MR examination. The first biopsy was used for conventional histological assessment of LIC, whereas the second biopsy was used to quantitatively measure LIC using mass spectrometry. R2* was correlated with both LIC and PDFF. A correction for the influence of fat on R2* was calculated. Statistical Tests Pearson correlation, linear regression, and area under the receiver operating curve. Results There was a positive linear correlation between R2* and PDFF (R = 0.69), after removing data from patients with elevated iron levels, as defined by LIC. R2*, corrected for PDFF, was the best method for identifying patients with elevated iron levels, with a correlation of R = 0.87 and a sensitivity and specificity of 87.5% and 98.6%, respectively. Data Conclusion PDFF increases R2*. Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2019;50:325-333.

  • 9.
    Kataria, Bharti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson Althen, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Smedby, Örjan
    School of Technology and Health (STH), KTH Royal Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Sökjer, Hannibal
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandborg, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Assessment of image quality in abdominal CT: potential dose reduction with model-based iterative reconstruction2018In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To estimate potential dose reduction in abdominal CT by visually comparing images reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and strengths of 3 and 5 of a specific MBIR.

    Material and methods A dual-source scanner was used to obtain three data sets each for 50 recruited patients with 30, 70 and 100% tube loads (mean CTDIvol 1.9, 3.4 and 6.2 mGy). Six image criteria were assessed independently by five radiologists. Potential dose reduction was estimated with Visual Grading Regression (VGR).

    Results Comparing 30 and 70% tube load, improved image quality was observed as a significant strong effect of log tube load and reconstruction method with potential dose reduction relative to FBP of 22–47% for MBIR strength 3 (p < 0.001). For MBIR strength 5 no dose reduction was possible for image criteria 1 (liver parenchyma), but dose reduction between 34 and 74% was achieved for other criteria. Interobserver reliability showed agreement of 71–76% (κw 0.201–0.286) and intra-observer reliability of 82–96% (κw 0.525–0.783).

    Conclusion MBIR showed improved image quality compared to FBP with positive correlation between MBIR strength and increasing potential dose reduction for all but one image criterion.

  • 10.
    Kataria, Bharti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Nilsson Althen, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Sökjer, Hannibal
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandborg, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Image quality and pathology assessment in CT Urography: when is the low-dose seriessufficient?2019In: BMC Medical Imaging, ISSN 1471-2342, E-ISSN 1471-2342, Vol. 19, article id 64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Our aim was to compare CT images from native, nephrographic and excretory phases using image quality criteria as well as the detection of positive pathological findings in CT Urography, to explore if the radiation burden to the younger group of patients or patients with negative outcomes can be reduced.

    Methods

    This is a retrospective study of 40 patients who underwent a CT Urography examination on a 192-slice dual source scanner. Image quality was assessed for four specific renal image criteria from the European guidelines, together with pathological assessment in three categories: renal, other abdominal, and incidental findings without clinical significance. Each phase was assessed individually by three radiologists with varying experience using a graded scale. Certainty scores were derived based on the graded assessments. Statistical analysis was performed using visual grading regression (VGR). The limit for significance was set at p = 0.05.

    Results

    For visual reproduction of the renal parenchyma and renal arteries, the image quality was judged better for the nephrogram phase (p < 0.001), whereas renal pelvis/calyces and proximal ureters were better reproduced in the excretory phase compared to the native phase (p < 0.001). Similarly, significantly higher certainty scores were obtained in the nephrogram phase for renal parenchyma and renal arteries, but in the excretory phase for renal pelvis/calyxes and proximal ureters. Assessment of pathology in the three categories showed no statistically significant differences between the three phases. Certainty scores for assessment of pathology, however, showed a significantly higher certainty for renal pathology when comparing the native phase to nephrogram and excretory phase and a significantly higher score for nephrographic phase but only for incidental findings.

    Conclusion

    Visualisation of renal anatomy was as expected with each post-contrast phase showing favourable scores compared to the native phase. No statistically significant differences in the assessment of pathology were found between the three phases. The low-dose CT (LDCT) seems to be sufficient in differentiating between normal and pathological examinations. To reduce the radiation burden in certain patient groups, the LDCT could be considered a suitable alternative as a first line imaging method. However, radiologists should be aware of its limitations.

  • 11.
    Kataria, Bharti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Nilsson Althén, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Smedby, Örjan
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Sökjer-Petersen, Hannibal
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandborg, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Image quality and pathology assessment in CT Urography: when is the low-dose series sufficient?2019In: BMC Medical Imaging, ISSN 1471-2342, E-ISSN 1471-2342, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Our aim was to compare CT images from native, nephrographic and excretory phases using image quality criteria as well as the detection of positive pathological findings in CT Urography, to explore if the radiation burden to the younger group of patients or patients with negative outcomes can be reduced.

    Methods

    This is a retrospective study of 40 patients who underwent a CT Urography examination on a 192-slice dual source scanner. Image quality was assessed for four specific renal image criteria from the European guidelines, together with pathological assessment in three categories: renal, other abdominal, and incidental findings without clinical significance. Each phase was assessed individually by three radiologists with varying experience using a graded scale. Certainty scores were derived based on the graded assessments. Statistical analysis was performed using visual grading regression (VGR). The limit for significance was set at p = 0.05.

    Results

    For visual reproduction of the renal parenchyma and renal arteries, the image quality was judged better for the nephrogram phase (p < 0.001), whereas renal pelvis/calyces and proximal ureters were better reproduced in the excretory phase compared to the native phase (p < 0.001). Similarly, significantly higher certainty scores were obtained in the nephrogram phase for renal parenchyma and renal arteries, but in the excretory phase for renal pelvis/calyxes and proximal ureters. Assessment of pathology in the three categories showed no statistically significant differences between the three phases. Certainty scores for assessment of pathology, however, showed a significantly higher certainty for renal pathology when comparing the native phase to nephrogram and excretory phase and a significantly higher score for nephrographic phase but only for incidental findings.

    Conclusion

    Visualisation of renal anatomy was as expected with each post-contrast phase showing favourable scores compared to the native phase. No statistically significant differences in the assessment of pathology were found between the three phases. The low-dose CT (LDCT) seems to be sufficient in differentiating between normal and pathological examinations. To reduce the radiation burden in certain patient groups, the LDCT could be considered a suitable alternative as a first line imaging method. However, radiologists should be aware of its limitations.

  • 12.
    Kvernby, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Rönnerfalk, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). SyntheticMR AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Longitudinal Changes in Myocardial T-1 and T-2 Relaxation Times Related to Diffuse Myocardial Fibrosis in Aortic Stenosis; Before and After Aortic Valve Replacement2018In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 799-807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Diffuse myocardial fibrosis is associated with adverse outcomes, although detection and quantification is challenging. Cardiac MR relaxation times mapping represents a promising imaging biomarker for diffuse myocardial fibrosis. Purpose: To investigate whether relaxation times can detect longitudinal changes in myocardial tissue composition associated with diffuse fibrosis in patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) before and after aortic valve replacement (AVR). Study type: Prospective longitudinal study. Population/Subjects/Phantom/Specimen/Animal Model: Fifteen patients with severe AS. Field Strength/Sequence: 3T /3(3) 3(3) 5-MOLLI, T2-GraSE, and 3D-QALAS. Assessment: Patients underwent MR examinations at three timepoints: before AVR, as well as 3 and 12 months after AVR. Data from each patient was analyzed in 16 myocardial segments. Statistical Tests: The segment-wise T1 and T2 data were analyzed over time after surgery using linear mixed models for repeated measures analysis. Results: The results showed that T1 relaxation times were significantly (Pamp;lt; 0.05) shorter 3 and 12 months postoperative than preoperative and that the T2 relaxation times were significantly (Pamp;lt; 0.05) longer 3 and 12 months postoperative than preoperative for both 3D and 2D mapping methods. No significant changes were seen between 3 and 12 months postoperative for any of the methods (P50.06/0.19 for T1 with 3D-QALAS/MOLLI and P50.09/0.25 for T2 with 3DQALAS/ GraSE). Data Conclusion: We demonstrated that changes in myocardial relaxation times and thus tissue characteristics can be observed within 3 months after AVR surgery. The significant changes in relaxation times from preoperative examinations to the follow-up may be interpreted as a reduction of interstitial fibrosis in the left ventricular wall. Level of Evidence: 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 3

  • 13.
    Linge, Jennifer
    et al.
    AMRA Medical AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Whitcher, Brandon
    AMRA Medical AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. AMRA Medical AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. AMRA Medical AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sub-phenotyping Metabolic Disorders Using Body Composition: An Individualized, Nonparametric Approach Utilizing Large Data Sets2019In: Obesity, ISSN 1930-7381, E-ISSN 1930-739X, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 1190-1199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study performed individual-centric, data-driven calculations of propensity for coronary heart disease (CHD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D), utilizing magnetic resonance imaging-acquired body composition measurements, for sub-phenotyping of obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).Methods: A total of 10,019 participants from the UK Biobank imaging substudy were included and analyzed for visceral and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue, muscle fat infiltration, and liver fat. An adaption of the k-nearest neighbors algorithm was applied to the imaging variable space to calculate individualized CHD and T2D propensity and explore metabolic sub-phenotyping within obesity and NAFLD.

    Results: The ranges of CHD and T2D propensity for the whole cohort were 1.3% to 58.0% and 0.6% to 42.0%, respectively. The diagnostic performance, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (95% CI), using disease propensities for CHD and T2D detection was 0.75 (0.73-0.77) and 0.79 (0.77-0.81). Exploring individualized disease propensity, CHD phenotypes, T2D phenotypes, comorbid phenotypes, and metabolically healthy phenotypes were found within obesity and NAFLD.

    Conclusions: The adaptive k-nearest neighbors algorithm allowed an individual-centric assessment of each individual’s metabolic phenotype moving beyond discrete categorizations of body composition. Within obesity and NAFLD, this may help in identifying which comorbidities a patient may develop and conse- quently enable optimization of treatment.

  • 14.
    Lundin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Leijon, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Davidsson, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grönqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Wikkelso, Carsten
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Preoperative and postoperative H-1-MR spectroscopy changes in frontal deep white matter and the thalamus in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus2013In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 84, no 2, p. 188-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background In a previous study we found significantly decreased N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and total N-acetyl (tNA) groups in the thalamus of patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) compared with healthy individuals (HI). No significant difference between the groups could be found in the frontal deep white matter (FDWM). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjective The primary aim of this study was to investigate if these metabolites in the thalamus were normalised after shunt surgery. The secondary aim was to investigate postoperative metabolic changes in FDWM. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSubjects and methods Fourteen patients with iNPH, mean age 74 years, and 15 HI, also mean age 74 years, were examined. Assessment of a motor score (MOSs) was performed before and after shunt surgery. Absolute quantitative H-1-MR spectroscopy (1.5 T, volumes of interest 2.5-3 ml) was performed on the patients in the FDWM and in the thalamus, before and 3 months after shunt surgery, and also once on the HI. The following metabolites were analysed: tNA, NAA, total creatine, total choline (tCho), myo-inositol (mIns), glutamate and lactate concentrations. MRI volumetric calculations of the lateral ventricles were also performed. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults At 3 months postoperatively, we found no significant changes of tNA or NAA in the thalamus. In contrast, in the FDWM, there was a significant increase of tCho (p=0.01) and a borderline significant decrease of mIns (p=0.06). 12/14 patients were shunt responders (motor function). Median reduction of the lateral ventricle was 16%. A weak correlation between MOS and ventricular reduction was seen. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions Normalisation of thalamic tNA and NAA could not be detected postoperatively. The increased tCho and decreased mIns in the FDWM postoperatively might relate to clinical improvement.

  • 15.
    Mirdell, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Accuracy of laser speckle contrast imaging in the assessment of pediatric scald wounds2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 90-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Changes in microvascular perfusion in scalds in children during the first four days, measured with laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), are related to the time to healing and need for surgical intervention. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of LSCI on different days after injury in the prediction of healing outcome and if the accuracy can be improved by combining an early and a late measurement. Also, the accuracy of LSCI was compared with that of clinical assessment. Methods: Perfusion was measured between 0-24h and between 72-96h using LSCI in 45 children with scalds. On the same occasions, burn surgeons assessed the burns as healing amp;lt; 14days or healing amp;gt; 14days/surgery. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed for the early and late measurement and for the double measurement (DM) using two different methods. Results: Sensitivity and specificity were 92.3% (95% CI: 64.0-99.8%) and 78.3% (95% CI: 69.985.3%) between 0-24h, 100% (95% CI: 84.6-100%) and 90.4% (95% CI: 83.8-94.9%) between 72-96h, and was 100% (95% CI: 59.0-100%) and 100% (95% CI: 95.1-100%) when combining the two measurements into a modified perfusion trend. Clinical assessment had an accuracy of 67%, Cohens k=0.23. Conclusion: The perfusion in scalds between 72-96h after injury, as measured using LSCI, is highly predictive of healing outcome in scalds when measured. The predictive value can be further improved by incorporating an early perfusion measurement within 24h after injury. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 16.
    Mirdell, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Lemstra-Idsardi, Aukje Nienke
    University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Data on microcirculatory perfusion dips in the resting nail bed2018In: Data in Brief, E-ISSN 2352-3409, Vol. 21, p. 1232-1235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contains the raw data from the article entitled: "The presence of synchronized perfusion dips in the microcirculation of the resting nail bed" Mirdell et al. (in press). A laser speckle contrast imager (LSCI) was used to make a total of 21 recordings of the perfusion in the resting nail bed of 10 healthy test subjects. The first 10 recordings were acquired after 5?min of acclimatization. An additional 10 recordings were acquired in the same test subjects, after 20?min of acclimatization. In the last recording, a digital nerve block was applied to the left dig III. The data show the presence of highly irregular perfusion variations, a phenomenon we like to call perfusion dips. The data also show how the perfusion dips can be abolished through a digital nerve block. An algorithm for the quantification of the perfusion dips is included in the data.

  • 17.
    Siiskonen, T.
    et al.
    STUK Radiat and Nucl Safety Author, Finland.
    Ciraj-Bjelac, O.
    Univ Belgrade, Serbia.
    Dabin, J.
    Belgian Nucl Res Ctr SCK CEN, Belgium.
    Diklic, A.
    Univ Hosp Rijelca, Croatia.
    Domienik-Andrzejewska, J.
    NIOM, Poland.
    Farah, J.
    Paris Sud Univ Hosp, France.
    Fernandez, J. M.
    San Carlos Hosp and Complutense Univ, Spain.
    Gallagher, A.
    St James Hosp, Ireland.
    Hourdakis, C. J.
    EEAE Greek Atom Energy Commiss, Greece.
    Jurkovic, S.
    Univ Hosp Rijelca, Croatia; Univ Rijeka, Croatia.
    Jarvinen, H.
    STUK Radiat and Nucl Safety Author, Finland.
    Jarvinen, J.
    Turku Univ Hosp, Finland; Univ Turku, Finland.
    Knezevic, Z.
    RBI, Croatia.
    Koukorava, C.
    EEAE Greek Atom Energy Commiss, Greece.
    Maccia, C.
    CAATS, France.
    Majer, M.
    RBI, Croatia.
    Malchair, F.
    CAATS, France; ZEPHYRA, Belgium; Ctr Hosp Univ Liege CHULg, Belgium.
    Riccardi, L.
    Veneto Inst Oncol IOV IRCCS, Italy.
    Rizk, C.
    Natl Council Sci Res, Lebanon; St Joseph Univ, Lebanon.
    Sanchez, R.
    San Carlos Hosp and Complutense Univ, Spain.
    Sandborg, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Merce, M. Sans
    Univ Hosp Geneva HUG, Switzerland; Univ Hosp Lausanne CHUV, Switzerland.
    Segota, D.
    Univ Hosp Rijelca, Croatia.
    Sierpowska, J.
    Cent Hosp Northern Karelia, Finland.
    Simantirakis, G.
    EEAE Greek Atom Energy Commiss, Greece.
    Sukupova, L.
    Inst Clin and Expt Med, Czech Republic.
    Thrapsanioti, Z.
    EEAE Greek Atom Energy Commiss, Greece.
    Vano, E.
    San Carlos Hosp and Complutense Univ, Spain.
    Establishing the European diagnostic reference levels for interventional cardiology2018In: Physica medica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-1797, E-ISSN 1724-191X, Vol. 54, p. 42-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interventional cardiac procedures may be associated with high patient doses and therefore require special attention to protect the patients from radiation injuries such as skin erythema, cardiovascular tissue reactions or radiation-induced cancer. In this study, patient exposure data is collected from 13 countries (37 clinics and nearly 50 interventional rooms) and for 10 different procedures. Dose data was collected from a total of 14,922 interventional cardiology procedures. Based on these data European diagnostic reference levels (DRL) for air kerma-area product are suggested for coronary angiography (CA, DRL = 35 Gy cm(2)), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI, 85 Gy cm(2)), transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI, 130 Gy cm(2)), electrophysiological procedures (12 Gy cm(2)) and pacemaker implantations Pacemaker implantations were further divided into single-chamber (2.5 Gy cm(2)) and dual chamber (3.5 Gy cm(2)) procedures and implantations of cardiac resynchronization therapy pacemaker (18 Gy cm(2)). Results show that relatively new techniques such as TAVI and treatment of chronic total occlusion (CTO) often produce relatively high doses, and thus emphasises the need for use of an optimization tool such as DRL to assist in reducing patient exposure. The generic DRL presented here facilitate comparison of patient exposure in interventional cardiology.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-09-27 16:01
  • 18.
    Veenstra, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Alföldi, Péter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Södermark, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Graven-Nielsen, Thomas
    Aalborg Univ, Denmark.
    Sjors, Anna
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Chronic widespread pain patients show disrupted cortical connectivity in default mode and salience networks, modulated by pain sensitivity2019In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 12, p. 1743-1755Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The remodeling of functional neuronal connectivity in chronic widespread pain (CWP) patients remains largely unexplored. This study aimed to investigate functional connectivity in CWP patients in brain networks related to chronic pain for changes related to pain sensitivity, psychological strain, and experienced pain.

    Patients and methods: Functional connectivity strength of the default mode network (DMN) and the salience network (SN) was assessed with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Between-group differences were investigated with an independent component analysis for altered connectivity within the whole DMN and SN. Then, changes in connectivity between nodes of the DMN and SN were investigated with the use of a seed-target analysis in relation to the covariates clinical pain intensity, pressure pain sensitivity, psychological strain, and as an effect of experienced experimental cuff-pressure pain.

    Results: CWP patients showed decreased connectivity in the inferior posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) in the DMN and increased connectivity in the left anterior insula/superior temporal gyrus in the SN when compared to controls. Moreover, higher pain sensitivity in CWP when compared to controls was related to increased connectivity within the SN (between left and right insula) and between SN and DMN (between right insula and left lateral parietal cortex).

    Conclusion: This study shows that connectivity within the DMN was decreased and connectivity within the SN was increased for CWP. Furthermore, we present a novel finding of interaction of pain sensitivity with SN and DMN-SN functional connectivity in CWP.

  • 19.
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). SyntheticMR AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Blystad, Ida
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Larsson, E. -M.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Synthesizing a Contrast-Enhancement Map in Patients with High-Grade Gliomas Based on a Postcontrast MR Imaging Quantification Only2018In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 39, no 12, p. 2194-2199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Administration of a gadolinium-based contrast agent is an important diagnostic biomarker for blood-brain barrier damage. In clinical use, detection is based on subjective comparison of native and postgadolinium-based contrast agent T1-weighted images. Quantitative MR imaging studies have suggested a relation between the longitudinal relaxation rate and proton-density in the brain parenchyma, which is disturbed by gadolinium-based contrast agents. This discrepancy can be used to synthesize a contrast-enhancement map based solely on the postgadolinium-based contrast agent acquisition. The aim of this study was to compare synthetic enhancement maps with subtraction maps of native and postgadolinium-based contrast agent images. MATERIALS AND METHODS: For 14 patients with high-grade gliomas, quantitative MR imaging was performed before and after gadolinium-based contrast agent administration. The quantification sequence was multidynamic and multiecho, with a scan time of 6 minutes. The 2 image stacks were coregistered using in-plane transformation. The longitudinal relaxation maps were subtracted and correlated with the synthetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement maps on the basis of the postgadolinium-based contrast agent images only. ROIs were drawn for tumor delineation. RESULTS: Linear regression of the subtraction and synthetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement maps showed a slope of 1.02 0.19 and an intercept of 0.05 +/- 0.12. The Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.861 +/- 0.059, and the coefficient of variation was 0.18 +/- 0.04. On average, a volume of 1.71 +/- 1.28 mL of low-intensity enhancement was detected in the synthetic enhancement maps outside the borders of the drawn ROI. CONCLUSIONS: The study shows that there was a good correlation between subtraction longitudinal relaxation enhancement maps and synthetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement maps in patients with high-grade gliomas. The method may improve the sensitivity and objectivity for the detection of gadolinium-based contrast agent enhancement.

  • 20.
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). SyntheticMR AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Håkansson, Irene
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Improved Precision of Automatic Brain Volume Measurements in Patients with Clinically Isolated Syndrome and Multiple Sclerosis Using Edema Correction2018In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 296-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The presence of edema will result in increased brain volume, which may obscure progressing brain atrophy. Similarly, treatment-induced edema reduction may appear as accelerated brain tissue loss (pseudoatrophy). The purpose of this study was to correlate brain tissue properties to brain volume, to investigate the possibilities for edema correction and the resulting improvement of the precision of automated brain volume measurements. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A group of 38 patients with clinically isolated syndrome or newly diagnosed MS were imaged at inclusion and after 1, 2, and 4 years using an MR quantification sequence. Brain volume, relaxation rates (R-1 and R-2), and proton density were measured by automated software. RESULTS: The reduction of normalized brain volume with time after inclusion was 0.273%/year. The mean SDs were 0.508%, 0.526%, 0.454%, and 0.687% at baseline and 1, 2, and 4 years. Linear regression of the relative change of normalized brain volume and the relative change of R-1, R-2, and proton density showed slopes of -0.198 (P amp;lt; .001), 0.156 (P = .04), and 0.488 (P amp;lt; .001), respectively. After we applied the measured proton density as a correction factor, the mean SDs decreased to 24.2%, 4.8%, 33.3%, and 17.4%, respectively. The observed atrophy rate reduced from 0.273%/year to 0.238%/year. CONCLUSIONS: Correlations between volume and R-1, R-2, and proton density were observed in the brain, suggesting that a change of brain tissue properties can affect brain volume. Correction using these parameters decreased the variation of brain volume measurements and may have reduced the effect of pseudoatrophy.

  • 21.
    Witt, Suzanne T.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Drissi, Natasha Morales
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Tapper, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Wretman, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Szakács, Attila
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hallböök, Tove
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Evidence for cognitive resource imbalance in adolescents with narcolepsy2018In: Brain Imaging and Behavior, ISSN 1931-7557, E-ISSN 1931-7565, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 411-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study investigated brain activity changes during performance of a verbal working memory task in a population of adolescents with narcolepsy. Seventeen narcolepsy patients and twenty healthy controls performed a verbal working memory task during simultaneous fMRI and EEG acquisition. All subjects also underwent MRS to measure GABA and Glutamate concentrations in the medial prefrontal cortex. Activation levels in the default mode network and left middle frontal gyrus were examined to investigate whether narcolepsy is characterized by an imbalance in cognitive resources. Significantly increased deactivation within the default mode network during task performance was observed for the narcolepsy patients for both the encoding and recognition phases of the task. No evidence for task performance deficits or reduced activation within the left middle frontal gyrus was noted for the narcolepsy patients. Correlation analyses between the spectroscopy and fMRI data indicated that deactivation of the anterior aspect of the default mode in narcolepsy patients correlated more with increased concentrations of Glutamate and decreased concentrations of GABA. In contrast, deactivation in the default mode was correlated with increased concentrations of GABA and decreased concentrations of Glutamate in controls. The results suggested that narcolepsy is not characterized by a deficit in working memory but rather an imbalance of cognitive resources in favor of monitoring and maintaining attention over actual task performance. This points towards dysregulation within the sustained attention system being the origin behind self-reported cognitive difficulties in narcolepsy.

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