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  • 1.
    Abelow, Alexis
    et al.
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA.
    Persson, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zharov, Ilya
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA.
    Electroresponsive Nanoporous Membranes by Coating Anodized Alumina with Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophone) and Polypyrrole2014In: Macromolecular materials and engineering (Print), ISSN 1438-7492, E-ISSN 1439-2054, Vol. 299, no 2, 190-197 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrically-active nanoporous membranes are prepared by coating the surface of anodized alumina with electroactive polymers using vapor phase polymerization with four combinations of conjugated polymers and doping ions: poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophone) and polypyrrole, FeCl3 and FeTs3. The permeability of the polymer-coated membranes is measured as a function of the applied electric potential. A reversible three-fold increase is found in molecular flux of a neutral dye for membranes in oxidized state compared to that in the reduced state. After analyzing various factors that may affect the molecular transport through these membranes, it is concluded that the observed behavior results mostly from swelling/deswelling of the polymers and from the confinement of the polymers inside the nanopores.

  • 2.
    Admassie, Shimelis
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elfwing, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bao, Qinye
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A renewable biopolymer cathode with multivalent metal ions for enhanced charge storage2014In: JOURNAL OF MATERIALS CHEMISTRY A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 2, no 6, 1974-1979 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A ternary composite supercapacitor electrode consisting of phosphomolybdic acid (HMA), a renewable biopolymer, lignin, and polypyrrole was synthesized by a simple one-step simultaneous electrochemical deposition and characterized by electrochemical methods. It was found that the addition of HMA increased the specific capacitance of the polypyrrole-lignin composite from 477 to 682 F g(-1) ( at a discharge current of 1 A g(-1)) and also significantly improved the charge storage capacity from 6(to 128 mA h g(-1).

  • 3.
    Ali Kamyabi, Mohammad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hajari, Nasim
    University of Zanjan, Iran .
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A high-performance glucose biosensor using covalently immobilised glucose oxidase on a poly(2,6-diaminopyridine)/carbon nanotube electrode2013In: Talanta: The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0039-9140, E-ISSN 1873-3573, Vol. 116, 801-808 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A highly-sensitive glucose biosensor amenable to ultra-miniaturisation was fabricated by immobilisation of glucose oxidase (GOx), onto a poly(2,6-diaminopyridine)/multi-walled carbon nanotube/glassy carbon electrode (poly(2,6-DP)/MWNT/GCE). Cyclic voltammetry was used for both the electrochemical synthesis of poly-(2,6-DP) on the surface of a MWNT-modified GC electrode, and characterisation of the polymers deposited on the GC electrode. The synergistic effect of the high active surface area of both the conducting polymer, i.e., poly-(2,6-DP) and MWNT gave rise to a remarkable improvement in the electrocatalytic properties of the biosensor. The transfer coefficient (alpha), heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant and Michaelis-Menten constant were calculated to be 0.6, 4 s(-1) and 0.20 mM at pH 7.4, respectively. The GOx/poly(2,6-DP)/MWNT/GC bioelectrode exhibited two linear responses to glucose in the concentration ranging from 0.42 mu M to 8.0 mM with a correlation coefficient of 0.95, sensitivity of 52.0 mu AmM-1 cm(-2), repeatability of 1.6% and long-term stability, which could make it a promising bioelectrode for precise detection of glucose in the biological samples. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Ali Kamyabi, Mohammad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Zanjan University, Iran.
    Hajari, Nasim
    Zanjan University, Iran.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Correction: A high-performance glucose biosensor using covalently immobilised glucose oxidase on a poly(2,6-diaminopyridine)/carbon nanotube electrode (vol 116, pg 801, 2013)2016In: Talanta: The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0039-9140, E-ISSN 1873-3573, Vol. 153, 414-415 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A highly-sensitive glucose biosensor amenable to ultraminiaturisation was fabricated by immobilization of glucose oxidase (wGOX), onto a poly(2,6-diaminopyridine)/multi-walled carbon nanotube/glassy carbon electrode (poly(2,6-DP)/MWCNT/GCE). Cyclic voltammetry was used for both the electrochemical synthesis of poly-(2,6-DP) on the surface of a MWCNT-modified GC electrode, and characterization of the polymers deposited on the GC electrode. The synergistic effect of the high active surface area of both the conducting-polymer, i.e., poly-(2,6-DP) and MWCNT gave rise to a remarkable improvement in the electrocatalytic properties of the biosensor. The transfer coefficient (alpha), heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant and Michaelis-Menten constant were calculated to be 0.6, 4 s-1 and 0.22 mM at pH 7.4, respectively. The GOx/poly(2,6-DP)/MWCNT/GC bioelectrode exhibited two linear responses to glucose in the concentration ranging from 0.42 mu M to 8.0 mM with a correlation coefficient of 0.95, sensitivity of 52.0 mu AmM-1 cm-2, repeatability of 1.6% and long-term stability, which could make it a promising bioelectrode for precise detection of glucose in the biological samples. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Al-Khafaji, Q A M
    et al.
    University of Florence.
    Harris, M
    University of Florence.
    Tombelli, S
    University of Florence.
    Laschi, S
    University of Florence.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mascini, M
    University of Florence.
    Marrazza, G
    University of Florence.
    An Electrochemical Immunoassay for HER2 Detection2012In: Electroanalysis, ISSN 1040-0397, E-ISSN 1521-4109, Vol. 24, no 4, 735-742 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a simple and sensitive approach for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) detection is presented, using antibody-functionalised magnetic beads coupled to screen-printed cells. The immunoassay is based on a sandwich format in which a primary monoclonal antibody anti-HER2 is coupled to protein A modified magnetic beads. The modified beads are then used to capture the protein from the sample solution and a sandwich assay is performed by adding a secondary monoclonal antibody anti-HER2 labelled with biotin. The enzyme alkaline phosphatase (AP) conjugated with streptavidin and its substrate (1-naphthyl-phosphate) are then used for the electrochemical detection by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The experimental conditions for the immunoassay were optimised. The performance of the assay in terms of sensitivity, reproducibility and selectivity has been studied in buffer and serum samples from hospital patients.

  • 6.
    Anwar Zainuddin, Ahmad
    et al.
    IIUM, Malaysia.
    Nurashikin Nordin, Anis
    IIUM, Malaysia.
    Ab Rahim, Rosminazuin
    IIUM, Malaysia.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Modeling of a Novel Biosensor with Integrated Mass and Electrochemical Sensing Capabilities2016In: 2016 IEEE EMBS CONFERENCE ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING AND SCIENCES (IECBES), IEEE , 2016, 420-425 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid development in technology and society has generated diverse developments in many fields including biosensors in healthcare application. Here, the design of integrated biosensor comprises mass sensing (Quartz Crystal Microbalance) and electrochemistry sensing (Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, EIS and Cyclic Voltammetry, CV) will be presented. The integrated sensor system is developed based on the innovative use of the top electrode of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) resonator as a working electrode for the electrochemistry technique. Integration of QCM with the electrochemistry technique is realized by fabricating a semicircular counter electrode near the upper electrode on the same side of the quartz crystal. CV and EIS measurement was conducted using finite element modeling, COMSOL (TM) 5.2 with the probe marker of 1 mmol L-1 of [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-). CV test was done to study the effect between increasing scan rate and peak current (anodic and cathodic) in observing the reversible electrochemical process. This observation is crucial in ensuring the electrochemical processes follow the Randles-Sevcik equation in characterizing the platform changes behavior. Later, EIS test was performed in order to measure the radius of the semicircle which reflects the charge transfer resistance (R-CT) of the redox marker. To show the effectiveness of this sensor, gold immobilization surface was electrochemically simulated and reported. Thus, an ultra-sensitive biosensor that capable to produce multi-analysis in the detection of biological targets in terms of electrochemical change of electrode interfaces, which is the crucial step towards the engineering of advanced bioelectronics.

  • 7.
    Arwin, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mendoza-Galvan, A.
    Cinvestav IPN, Mexico.
    Magnusson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andersson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Landin, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Järrendahl, Kenneth
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Garcia-Caurel, E.
    University of Paris Saclay, France.
    Ossikovski, R.
    University of Paris Saclay, France.
    Structural circular birefringence and dichroism quantified by differential decomposition of spectroscopic transmission Mueller matrices from Cetonia aurata2016In: Optics Letters, ISSN 0146-9592, E-ISSN 1539-4794, Vol. 41, no 14, 3293-3296 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transmission Mueller-matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry is applied to the cuticle of the beetle Cetonia aurata in the spectral range 300-1000 nm. The cuticle is optically reciprocal and exhibits circular Bragg filter features for green light. By using differential decomposition of the Mueller matrix, the circular and linear birefringence as well as dichroism of the beetle cuticle are quantified. A maximum value of structural optical activity of 560 degrees/mm is found. (C) 2016 Optical Society of America

  • 8.
    Ashaduzzaman, Md
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Anto Antony, Aswathi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Murugan, N. Arul
    Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Deshpande, Swapneel R.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Tekidag AB, UCS, S-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Studies on an on/off-switchable immunosensor for troponin T2015In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 73, 100-107 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regeneration is a key goal in the design of immunosensors. In this study, we report the temperature-regulated interaction of N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAAm) functionalised cardiac troponin T (cTnT) with anti-cTnT. Covalently bonded PNIPAAm on an anti-cTnT bioelectrode showed on/off-switchability, regeneration capacity and temperature triggered sensitivity for cTnT. Above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST), PNIPAAm provides a liphophilic microenvironment with specific volume reduction at the bioelectrode surface, making available binding space for cTnT, and facilitating analyte recognition. Computational studies provide details about the structural changes occurring at the electrode above and below the LCST. Furthermore, free energies associated with the binding of cTnT with PNIPAAm at 25 (Delta G(coil)=-6.0 Kcal/mole) and 37 degrees C (Delta G(globular)=-41.0 kcal/mole) were calculated to elucidate the interaction and stability of the antigen-antibody complex. The responsiveness of such assemblies opens the way for miniaturised, smart immuno-technologies with built-in programmable interactions of antigen-antibody upon receiving stimuli.

  • 9.
    Ashaduzzaman, Md.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. UCS, Institute Adv Mat, Teknikringen 4A,Mjardevi Science Pk, SE-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Deshpande, Swapneel R.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. UCS, Institute Adv Mat, Teknikringen 4A,Mjardevi Science Pk, SE-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Arul Murugan, N.
    Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Kumar Mishra, Yogendra
    University of Kiel, Germany.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. UCS, Institute Adv Mat, Teknikringen 4A,Mjardevi Science Pk, SE-58330 Linkoping, Sweden; Vinoba Bhave Research Institute, India.
    On/off-switchable LSPR nano-immunoassay for troponin-T2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, 44027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regeneration of immunosensors is a longstanding challenge. We have developed a re-usable troponin-T (TnT) immunoassay based on localised surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) at gold nanorods (GNR). Thermosensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAM) was functionalised with anti-TnT to control the affinity interaction with TnT. The LSPR was extremely sensitive to the dielectric constant of the surrounding medium as modulated by antigen binding after 20 min incubation at 37 degrees C. Computational modelling incorporating molecular docking, molecular dynamics and free energy calculations was used to elucidate the interactions between the various subsystems namely, IgG-antibody (c. f., anti-TnT), PNIPAAM and/or TnT. This study demonstrates a remarkable temperature dependent immuno-interaction due to changes in the PNIPAAM secondary structures, i.e., globular and coil, at above or below the lower critical solution temperature (LCST). A series of concentrations of TnT were measured by correlating the lambda(LSPR) shift with relative changes in extinction intensity at the distinct plasmonic maximum (i. e., 832 nm). The magnitude of the red shift in lambda(LSPR) was nearly linear with increasing concentration of TnT, over the range 7.6 x 10(-15) to 9.1 x 10(-4) g/mL. The LSPR based nano-immunoassay could be simply regenerated by switching the polymer conformation and creating a gradient of microenvironments between the two states with a modest change in temperature.

  • 10. Ashaduzzaman, Md
    et al.
    Parlak, Onur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fabrication of on/off-switchable enzymatic bioreactor for smart bioelectronics.2015In: Sweden-Japan Seminar on Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology – SJS-Nano, Linköping, Sweden, 10-11 March 2015., Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), Stockholm , 2015, 36-37 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Ashutosh, Tiwari
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Bioengineered stimuli-responsive nanosystems for biomedical devices2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Azzouzi, Sawsen
    et al.
    University of Sousse, Tunisia.
    Ben Ali, M
    University of Sousse, Tunisia.
    Abbas, M.N.
    Analytical Laboratory, National Research Center, Egypt.
    Bala, C
    University of Bucharest, Romania.
    Dridi, C
    University of Sousse, Tunisia.
    Errachid, A
    University of Lyon, France.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Electrochemical detection of cancer biomarkers using nano-materials based sensors as early warning system of prostate cancer2016In: Cancer Diagnostics Symposium, Swedish Exhibition and Congres Centre, Gothenburg, Sweden, 28 May 2016, Elsevier, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Azzouzi, Sawsen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of sousse, Tunisia.
    Kor, Kalamodin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Damghan University, Iran.
    Ben Ali, Mounir
    University of sousse, Tunisia.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A single probe based impedimetric biosensor for the label free, real time monitoring of microRNA-21 biomarker2016In: Biosensors 2016 – The World Congress on Biosensors, Gothenburg, Sweden, 25-27 May 2016, Elsevier, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Azzouzi, Sawsen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Sousse, Tunisia.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kor, Kamalodin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Iranian National Institute Oceanog and Atmospher Science, Iran.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ben Ali, Mounir
    University of Sousse, Higher Institute of Applied Sciences and Technology of Sousse, GREENS-ISSAT, Cité Ettafala, 4003 Ibn Khaldoun Sousse, Tunisia.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. ACREO SWEDISH ICE AB, Sweden.
    An integrated dual functional recognition/amplification bio-label for the one-step impedimetric detection of Micro-RNA-212017In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 92, 154-161 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alteration in expression of miRNAs has been correlated with different cancer types, tumour stage and response to treatments. In this context, a structurally responsive oligonucleotide-based electrochemical impedimetric biosensor has been developed for the simple and sensitive detection of miRNA-21. A highly specific biotinylated DNA/LNA molecular beacon (MB) probe was conjugated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to create an integrated, dual function bio-label (biotin-MB-AuNPs) for both biorecognition and signal generation. In the presence of target miRNA-21, hybridisation takes place resulting in the "activation" of the biotin-MB; this event makes the biotin group, which was previously "protected" by the steric hindrance of the MB stem-loop structure, accessible. The activated biotin-MB-AuNPs/miRNA complexes become available for capture, via supramolecular interaction, onto a nentravidin-modified electrode for electrochemical transduction. The binding event results in a decrease of the charge transfer resistance at the working electrode/electrolyte interface. The biosensor responded linearly in the range 1-1000 pM of miRNA-21, with a limit of detection of 0.3 pM, good reproducibility (Relative Standard deviation (RSD) =3.3%) and high selectivity over other miRNAs (i.e. miRNA221 and miRNA-205) sequences. Detection of miRNA-21 in spiked serum samples at clinically relevant levels (low pM range) was also demonstrated, thus illustrating the potential of the biosensor for point-of-care clinical applications. The proposed biosensor design, based on the combination of a neutravidin transducing surface and the dual-function biotin-MB-AuNPs bio-label, provides a simple and robust approach for detection of short-length nucleic acid targets, such as miRNAs.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-02-10 10:23
  • 15.
    Azzouzi, Sawsen
    et al.
    University of Sousse, Tunisia.
    Patra, Hirak Kumar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ben Ali, Mounir
    University of Sousse, Tunisia.
    Nooredeen Abbas, Mohammed
    National Research Centre, Egypt.
    Dridi, Cherif
    Centre Research Microelect and Nanotechnol CRMN Sousse, Tunisia.
    Errachid, Abdelhamid
    University of Lyon 1, France.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Citrate-selective electrochemical mu-sensor for early stage detection of prostate cancer2016In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 228, 335-346 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extremely specialised anatomical function of citrate inside the prostate, make it one of the preferred biomarkers for early stage detection of prostate cancer. However, current detection methods are seriously limited due to the very low citrate concentrations that need to be measured in order to follow disease progression. In the present work, we report a novel citrate-selective-sensor based on iron (III) phthalocyanine chloride-C-monoamido-Poly-n-Butyl Acrylate (Fe(III)MAPcC1 P n BA) modified gold -electrodes for the electrochemical determination and estimation of the pathophysiological range of citrate. The newly synthesised ionophore has been structurally characterised using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-vis spectroscopy. Contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been used to investigate the adhesion and morphological properties of the membrane. The developed citrate-selective-electrodes had a Nernstian sensitivity of-19.34 +/- 0.83 mV/decade with a detection limit of about 9 x 10-6M and a linear range from 4 x 10(-5)M to 10(-1) M, which covered the pathologically important clinical range. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) showed very high sensitivity with a lower Limit of detection 1.7 x 10(-9) M and linear detection range (10(-8)-10(-1) M), which is very important not only for the early-stage diagnosis and screening procedures, but also in mapping the stage of the cancer too. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 16.
    Bagheryan, Zahra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Mazandaran, Iran.
    Raoof, Jahan-Bakhsh
    University of Mazandaran, Iran.
    Golabi, Mohsen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Sweden.
    Diazonium-based impedimetric aptasensor for the rapid label-free detection of Salmonella typhimurium in food sample2016In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 80, 566-573 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fast and accurate detection of microorganisms is of key importance in clinical analysis and in food and water quality monitoring. Salmonella typhimurium is responsible for about a third of all cases of food borne diseases and consequently, its fast detection is of great importance for ensuring the safety of foodstuffs. We report the development of a label-free impedimetric aptamer-based biosensor for S. typhimurium detection. The aptamer biosensor was fabricated by grafting a diazonium-supporting layer onto screen printed carbon electrodes (SPEs), via electrochemical or chemical approaches, followed by chemical immobilisation of aminated-aptamer. FTIR-ATR, contact angle and electrochemical measurements were used to monitor the fabrication process. Results showed that electrochemical immobilisation of the diazonium-grafting layer allowed the formation of a denser aptamer layer, which resulted in higher sensitivity. The developed aptamer-biosensor responded linearly, on a logarithm scale, over the concentration range 1 x 10(1) to 1 x 10(8) CFU mL(-1), with a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 1 x 10(1) CFU mL(-1) and a limit of detection (LOD) of 6 CFU mL(-1). Selectivity studies showed that the aptamer biosensor could discriminate S. typhimurium from 6 other model bacteria strains. Finally, recovery studies demonstrated its suitability for the detection of S. typhimurium in spiked (1 x 10(2), 1 x 10(4) and 1 x 10(6) CFU mL(-1)) apple juice samples. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-02-10 00:00
  • 17.
    Bagheryan, Zahra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Mazandaran, Iran.
    Raoof, J-B
    University of Mazandaran, Iran.
    Ozalp, V.C.
    Istanbul Kemerburgaz University, Turkey.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Diazonium-based impedimetric aptasensor for the rapid label-free detection of Salmonella typhimurium in food samples2016In: Biosensors 2016 – The World Congress on Biosensors, Gothenburg, Sweden, 25-27 May 2016, Elsevier, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Banerjee, S
    et al.
    Department of Polymer Science and Technology, University of Calcutta, India.
    Sarkar, Priya
    Department of Polymer Science and Technology, University of Calcutta, India.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Amperometric Biosensor for estimation of Glucose-6-phosphate Using Prussian Blue Nanoparticles.2013In: Analytical Biochemistry, ISSN 0003-2697, E-ISSN 1096-0309, Vol. 439, no 2, 194-200 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glucose-6-phosphateplays an important role in carbohydrate metabolism of all living organisms.Compared to the conventional analytical methods available for estimation of glucose-6-phosphate,the biosensors having relative simplicity, specificity, low-cost and fastresponse time are a promising alternative. We have reported a glucose-6-phosphatesensor based on screen-printed electrode utilizing Prussian blue nanoparticlesand enzymes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase. The Prussianblue nanoparticles acted as a mediator enhancing the rate of electrochemical responses.The Fourier transforminfrared spectroscopy and energy-dispersiveX-ray spectroscopy study confirmed the formation of Prussian blue, whereas, the atomic forced microscopy revealed that Prussian bluenanoparticles were about 25-30 nm in diameter. To obtainmaximum amperometric response, optimization studies were conducted for pH,enzyme and cofactor loading. The proposed glucose-6-phosphate biosensor showed goodstability, rapid response time and broad linear response in the range of 0.01-1.25mM and detection limit of 6.3 mM. The biosensor also worked well for serum samples and exhibitedexcellent anti-interference ability.

  • 19.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Glavmo, M
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carlsson, C
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nytomt, J
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Salomonsson, P
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jobson, E
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Haggendal, B
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Martensson, P
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Response of metal-oxide-silicon carbide sensors to simulated and real exhaust gases1997In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 43, no 1-3, 52-59 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Field effect devices based on catalytic metal-oxide-silicon carbide (MOSiC) structures can be used as high temperature gas sensors. The devices are sensitive to hydrocarbons and hydrogen and can be operated up to at least 900 degrees C, which make them suitable for several combustion applications, Simulated and real exhaust gases from a car engine have been studied at sensor temperatures from 200 to 650 degrees C, and it was round that the sensor signal is high for excess hydrocarbon and low for excess oxygen. The response time is less than 100 ms and only a small degradation of the devices was observed after several days of operation. The devices also react to changes of the gas composition In the fuel-rich and fuel-lean region. The devices show an interesting temperature dependence in the fuel rich region.

  • 20.
    Bazzicalupi, Carla
    et al.
    University of Florence, Italy .
    Caltagirone, Claudia
    University of Cagliari, Italy .
    Cao, Zenfeng
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy E China University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China .
    Chen, Qibin
    E China University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China .
    Di Natale, Corrado
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy .
    Garau, Alessandra
    University of Cagliari, Italy .
    Lippolis, Vito
    University of Cagliari, Italy .
    Lvova, Larisa
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy St Petersburg State University, Russia .
    Liu, Honglai
    E China University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mostallino, M. Cristina
    Ist Neurosci CNR Cagliari, Italy .
    Nieddu, Mattia
    University of Cagliari, Italy .
    Paolesse, Roberto
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy .
    Prodi, Luca
    University of Bologna, Italy .
    Sgarzi, Massimo
    University of Bologna, Italy .
    Zaccheroni, Nelsi
    University of Bologna, Italy .
    Multimodal Use of New Coumarin-Based Fluorescent Chemosensors: Towards Highly Selective Optical Sensors for Hg2+ Probing2013In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 19, no 43, 14639-14653 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite several types of fluorescent sensing molecules have been proposed and examined to signal Hg2+ ion binding, the development of fluorescence-based devices for in-field Hg2+ detection and screening in environmental and industrial samples is still a challenging task. Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of three new coumarin-based fluorescent chemosensors featuring mixed thia/aza macrocyclic framework as receptors units, that is, ligands L1-L3. These probes revealed an OFF-ON selective response to the presence of Hg2+ ions in MeCN/H2O 4:1 (v/v), which allowed imaging of this metal ion in Cos-7 cells in vitro. Once included in silica core-polyethylene glycol (PEG) shell nanoparticles or supported on polyvinyl chloride (PVC)-based polymeric membranes, ligands L1-L3 can also selectively sense Hg2+ ions in pure water. In particular we have developed an optical sensing array tacking advantage of the fluorescent properties of ligand L3 and based on the computer screen photo assisted technique (CSPT). In the device ligand L3 is dispersed into PVC membranes and it quantitatively responds to Hg2+ ions in natural water samples.

  • 21.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Biosensors for Food and the Environment: Is it all in the DNA?2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Biosensor technology not only holds great promise for the healthcare market but it is also expected to have significant impacts in other areas such as environmental and food analysis. Between the different biosensor formats nucleic acid-based biosensors are gaining increasingly importance allowing the specific identification of DNA/RNA fragments and, more recently, the detection of biological or chemical species. Direct identification of DNA/RNA fragments, via hybridisation assays (genosensors), has been shown to be a very powerful tool for the detection of pathogens in environment and food, in food contamination analysis and food allergens monitoring. Recently the discovery of aptamers, synthetic receptors based on short functional DNA/RNA chains, has opened new opportunities for oligonucleotide based biosensors and more specifically in the detection of biological and/or chemical species, such as proteins and pollutants. In this paper an overview of the most recent advances in the development and applications of nucleic acid-based biosensors for environmental and food safety/quality application will be presented with special emphasis on electrochemical and optical hybridisation genosensors and aptasensors.

  • 22.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Development of an electrochemical genosensors for celiac disease predisposition analysis2013In: "Biomimetic structures and DNA technology in biosensing" / [ed] Tibor Hianik, 2013, 21- p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Low density DNA arrays are of growing interest in the field of fast clinical/environmental analysis; for example in clinical analysis these can find application in areas as early diagnosis of genetic diseases or as support in the diagnosis of genetically associated diseases. 

    Coeliac disease, a small intestinal inflammation triggered by the intake of gluten, has been shown to affect only genetically predisposed individuals. Relation between Coeliac disease and two Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) genes, DQ2 and DQ8, has been reported, with almost 100% of the affected patients carrying at least one of them.

    In this seminar the development of a low density electrochemical genosensor array for medium resolution typing of Coeliac disease associated HLA genes, is presented.                                        

    The proposed array was based on an enzymatic sandwich assay format performed at a photolitographically fabricated electrode array.                                                                            

    The optimisation of different aspects as surface chemistry, assay conditions, probe's design and single stranded DNA generation, together with real sample analysis will be present.

     

  • 23.
    Beni, Valerio
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, D.
    Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Sweden.
    Arven, P.
    Elect Engn J2 Holding AB, Sweden.
    Norberg, P.
    Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, G.
    Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Sweden.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Printed Electrochemical Instruments for Biosensors2015In: ECS Journal of Solid State Science and Technology, ISSN 2162-8769, E-ISSN 2162-8777, Vol. 4, no 10, S3001-S3005 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile diagnostics for healthcare, food safety and environmental monitoring, demand a new generation of inexpensive sensing systems suitable for production in high volume. Herein we report on the development of a new disposable electrochemical instrument exploiting the latest advances in printed electronics and printed biosensors. The current system is manufactured under ambient conditions with all interconnections printed; electrochemical measurements and data elaboration are realized by the integration onto the platform of two chips: a MICROCHIP-PIC24F16KA101 and a Texas Instruments LMP91000. A PEDOT.PSS vertical electrochromic display (VECD) is also incorporated into the system to visualize the data. A printed Enfucell 3V manganese dioxide battery was used to deliver the required power. Finally, in order to demonstrate the utility of the system, screen-printed sensors for the detection of glucose were added and the performance of the overall system was evaluated.

  • 24.
    Bini, Alessandra
    et al.
    University of Florence.
    Mascini, Marcello
    University of Teramo.
    Mascini, Marco
    University of Florence.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Selection of thrombin-binding aptamers by using computational approach for aptasensor application2011In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 26, no 11, 4411-4416 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility of introducing a computationally assisted method to study aptamer-protein interaction was evaluated with the aim of streamlining the screening and selection of new aptamers. Starting from information on the 15-mer (5-GGTTGGTGTGGTTGG-3 thrombin binding aptamer (TBA), a library of mutated DNA sequences (994 elements) was generated and screened using shapegauss a shape-based scoring function from openeye software to generate computationally derived binding scores. The TBA and three other mutated oligonucleotides, selected on the basis of their binding score (best, medium, worst), were incorporated into surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors. By reducing the ionic strength (binding buffer, 50 mMTrisHC1pH 7.4, 140 mM NaCl, 1 mM MgCl(2), diluted 1:50) in order to match the simulated condition, the analytical performances of the four oligonucleotide sequences were compared using signal amplitude, sensitivity (slope), linearity (R(2)) and reproducibility (CVav %). The experimental results were in agreement with the simulation findings.

  • 25.
    Bunnfors, Kalle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Synthesis and electrochemical characterisation of processable polypyrrole boronic acid derivatives for carbohydrate binding2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Conducting polymers have been widely explored for many different purposes including sensing. In thisthesis the conducive properties of pyrrole and the carbohydrate binding properties of boronic acid iscombined to make a reagent-free detector for carbohydrates. The polymer is manufactured in form ofparticles in the μm scale to create a porous film which has a high surface to volume ratio.The material was characterised and the binding properties were evaluated for galactose and glucose.Proof of binding was found via both electrochemical methods and QCM-D. A correlation between R2 value and concentration of substrate was found which enables measurement of concentration of carbohydratesin unknown samples.

  • 26.
    Cao, S.
    et al.
    Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China.
    Fang, L.
    Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China.
    Zhao, Z.
    Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China.
    Ge, Yi
    Cranfield University, Bedfordshire, UK.
    Piletsky, Sergey
    Cranfield University, Bedfordshire, UK.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Cranfield, UK.
    Hierachically Structured Hollow Silica Spheres for High Efficiency Immobilization of Enzymes2013In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 23, no 17, 2162-2167 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, the first example of a hierarchically structured hollow silica system is reported without any chemical modification to the enzyme involved in the process. The leaching of the physically adsorbed enzyme is substantially restrained in comparison to pure hollow silica supports. The hierarchical architecture is composed of the ordered hollow silica spheres with a shell-in-shell structure. This rationally integrated architecture, which serves as the host for glucose oxidase immobilization, displays many significant advantages, including increases in mechanical stability, enzyme loading, and bioactivity, and a decrease in enzyme leaching compared to existing pure hollow silica matrices. This facilitates further multifarious applications for enhanced enzyme immobilization, biosensors, and biocatalysis.

  • 27.
    Cao, Shunsheng
    et al.
    Jiangsu University, Peoples R China .
    Chen, Juanrong
    Cranfield University, England .
    Ge, Yi
    Cranfield University, England .
    Fang, Long
    Jiangsu University, Peoples R China .
    Zhang, Ying
    Jiangsu University, Peoples R China .
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A self-switchable Ag nanoreactor exhibiting outstanding catalytic properties2014In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 50, no 1, 118-120 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A highly efficient nanoreactor that contains silver nanoparticles in hollow silica spheres and an interpolymer network as a gate-keeper has been developed following a facile procedure. The fast "signal-triggered switch of the smart network results in a high reactivity and a high response rate, yielding improved potential for many practical applications.

  • 28.
    Cao, Z.
    et al.
    Department of Chemical Science and Technologies, University of Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China University of of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China.
    Lvova, L.
    Department of Chemical Science and Technologies, University of Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, Faculty of Biology and Soil Science, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia.
    Paolesse, R.
    Department of Chemical Science and Technologies, University of Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
    Di Natale, C
    Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
    D' Amico, A.
    Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Porphyrin electropolymers as opto-electrochemical probe for the detection of red-ox analytes2014In: Sensors: Proceedings of the First National Conference on Sensors, Rome 15-17 February, 2012, Springer Science Business Media , 2014, Vol. 162 LNEE, 49-55 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The application of pyrrole-substituted porphyrin electropolymers for simultaneous optical and electrochemical analysis of red-ox active analytes, namely diazo-conjugated dyes of Sudan family, is presented. Sudan colorants are widely used in many fields, but accurate screening of their consumption is required due to their high toxicity. The inherent electrochemical activity of Sudan dyes, as far as their intense coloration, makes possible to find the appropriate conditions of hybrid optical and electrochemical porphyrin electropolymer based sensor array system application. This approach allowed a significant increase in the chemical information, improving the analytical system performance in terms of selectivity and sensitivity, and permitted the fast and simple monitoring of Sudan dye analytes.

  • 29.
    Carlsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Winquist, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Danielsson, Bengt
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Separation of meat juice from various animals using a lectin panel and ellipsometryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work simple microcontact printed gold-wafers were used to make a lectin panel for investigation and separation of different meat juices from fresh meat of cattle, chicken, pig, cod, turkey and lamb. Seven different lectins were thus attached to gold surfaces using the streptavidin-biotin method. Lectins recognize and bind specifically to carbohydrate structures present on different proteins. The bio-recognition was evaluated with null ellipsometry and the data obtained was related to an internal standard of lactoferrin. The data was evaluated with multivariate data analysis techniques to identify possible separation or grouping of data. Scanning ellipsometry was used for visualization of the binding pattern of the lectins and the meat juice proteins. The 2-dimensional images obtained could be used to visualize the protein distribution, furthermore, to exclude anomalies. The results showed that the different meat juices could be separated from each other. Using a simple model based on an artificial neuronal net, it was also possible to classify meat juices from the mammals investigated.

  • 30.
    Carpi, Federico
    et al.
    Queen Mary University of London, England.
    Graz, Ingrid
    Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ladegaard Skov, Anne
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Vidal, Frederic
    University of Cergy Pontoise, France.
    Editorial Material: Electromechanically active polymer transducers: research in Europe2013In: Smart materials and structures (Print), ISSN 0964-1726, E-ISSN 1361-665X, Vol. 22, no 10Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 31.
    Cavanillas, Santiago
    et al.
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Winquist, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A self-polishing platinum ring voltammetric sensor and its application to complex media2015In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 859, 29-36 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A self-polishing voltammetric sensor was recently developed and has been applied to samples of urea, milk and sewage water. The polishing device continuously grinds a platinum ring electrode, offering a reproducible and clean electrode surface. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) techniques were applied to interpret the data and to build prediction models. In an evaluation of samples with different urea concentrations, the grinding step allows for repeatable measurements, similar to those after electrochemical cleaning. Furthermore, for the determination of sewage water concentrations in drinking water and for the evaluation of different fat contents in milk samples, the polishing eliminates sensor drift produced by electrode fouling. The results show that the application of a self-polishing unit offers a promising tool for electrochemical studies of difficult analytes and complex media. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 32.
    Chan, Cangel Pui Yee
    et al.
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China .
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cheung, Kwan Yee
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sin, King Keung
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, China.
    Yu, Cheuk Man
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
    Rainer, Timothy H.
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
    Renneberg, Reinhard
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, China.
    Evidence-Based Point-of-Care Diagnostics: Current Status and Emerging Technologies2013In: Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 1936-1327, Vol. 6, 191-211 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Point-of-care (POC) diagnostics brings tests nearer to the site of patient care. The turnaround time is short, and minimal manual interference enables quick clinical management decisions. Growth in POC diagnostics is being continuously fueled by the global burden of cardiovascular and infectious diseases. Early diagnosis and rapid initiation of treatment are crucial in the management of such patients. This review provides the rationale for the use of POC tests in acute coronary syndrome, heart failure, human immunodeficiency virus, and tuberculosis. We also consider emerging technologies that are based on advanced nanomaterials and microfluidics, improved assay sensitivity, miniaturization in device design, reduced costs, and high-throughput multiplex detection, all of which may shape the future development of POC diagnostics.

  • 33.
    Chaturvedi, Anupama
    et al.
    Department of Mechanical Engineerin g, University of Hawaii at Manoa, HI, USA.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tiwari, Atul
    Department of Mechanical Engineerin g, University of Hawaii at Manoa, HI, USA.
    Spectroscopic and morphological analysis of graphene vinylester nanocomposites2013In: Advanced Materials Letters, ISSN 0976-3961, E-ISSN 0976-397X, Vol. 4, no 9, 656-661 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This communication describes the development of graphene and graphene reinforced polyvinylester nanocomposites. Low concentration of graphene was incorporated in the polymer matrix with the help of two different solvents. The role of solvent in the nanocomposite was studied. The FTIR spectroscopy and electron microscopy have supported the presence of graphene in the nanocomposites. It was discovered that vehicular medium (i.e., solvent) plays a vital role in the properties of the ultimate nanocomposites. When dimethylacetamide was used as solvent, the morphological analysis suggested the increased toughness while in case when tetrahydrofuran was used as solvent, nanocomposite appeared brittle in nature.

  • 34.
    Cheung Mak, Wing
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kwan Yee, Cheung
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Orban, Jenny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Lee, Chyan-Jang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Surface-Engineered Contact Lens as an Advanced Theranostic Platform for Modulation and Detection of Viral Infection2015In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 7, no 45, 25487-25494 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have demonstrated an entirely new concept of a wearable theranostic device in the form of a contact lens (theranostic lens) with a dual-functional hybrid surface to modulate and detect a pathogenic attack, using a the corneal HSV serotype-1 (HSV-1) model. The theranostic lenses were constructed using a facile layer-by-layer surface engineering technique, keeping the theranostic lenses with good surface wettability, optically transparency, and nontoxic toward human corneal epithelial cells. The theranostic lenses were used to capture and concentrate inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), which is upregulated during HSV-1 reactivation, for sensitive, noninvasive diagnostics. The theranostic lens also incorporated an antiviral coating to serve as a first line of defense to protect patients against disease. Our strategy tackles major problems in tear diagnostics that are mainly associated with the sampling of a relatively small volume of fluid and the low concentration of biomarkers. The theranostic lenses show effective anti-HSV-1 activity and good analytical performance for the detection of IL-1a, with a limit of detection of 1.43 pg mL(-1) and a wide linear range covering the clinically relevant region. This work offers a new paradigm for wearable noninvasive healthcare devices combining diagnosis and protection against disease, while supporting patient compliance. We believe that this approach holds immense promise as a next-generation point-of-care and decentralized diagnostic/theranostic platform for a range of biomarkers.

  • 35.
    Chey, Chan Oeurn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Patra, Hirak K
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tengdelius, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Golabi, Mohsen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Parlak, Onur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Imani, Roghayeh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elhag, Sami A. I.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yandi, Wetra
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Impact of nanotoxicology towards technologists to end users2013In: Advanced Materials Letters, ISSN 0976-3961, E-ISSN 0976-397X, Vol. 4, no 8, 591-597 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The length scale for nanomaterial is small enough to be invisible and presume innocence for the initial avoidance of the toxicity issues. Again it was beyond the understanding of the time frame when nanotechnology just blooms that a length scale itself might be an important toxic parameter apart from its materialistic properties. We present this report to address the fundamental issues and questions related to the nanotoxicity issues from laboratory to the land of applications. We emphasize about the basic nanoscale materials that are regularly being used by the scientific community and the nanotechnology based materials that has already in the market or will come soon.

  • 36.
    DAmico, A.
    et al.
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Di Natale, C.
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy; IDASC CNR, Italy.
    Falconi, C.
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy; IDASC CNR, Italy.
    Pennazza, G.
    University of Campus Biomed Roma, Italy.
    Santonico, M.
    University of Campus Biomed Roma, Italy.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Equivalent electric circuits for chemical sensors in the Langmuir regime2017In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 238, 214-220 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an equivalent electric circuit model that describes adsorption-desorption processes occurring on bio and chemical sensor surfaces under the Langmuir hypothesis and considers the following practical case: the pressure or concentration of the particles in the test chamber is not perturbed by these processes and keeps its initial value, as in the cases of relatively high pressure or concentration values with zero molecular flow, or in the presence of a molecular flow at any pressure or concentration value. It is also pointed out that the equivalent circuit for Langmuir adsorption is similar to the circuit proposed for enzymatic reactions. Even if this work essentially covers theoretic aspects, a way is suggested for the possible experimental determination of both adsorption-desorption parameters and adsorption-desorption site density. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 37.
    Deshpande, S.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Tiwari, A.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Turner, A.P.F.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Smart auto-switchable cardiac troponin immunosensor for diagnosis of cardiac injury2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Dhankar, Raksha P
    et al.
    Sardar Patel Mahavidyalaya.
    Rahatgaonkar, Anjali M
    Institute of Science, Nagpur.
    Chorghade, Mukund S
    Chorghade Enterprises.
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Spectral and in vitro antimicrobial properties of 2-oxo-4-phenyl-6-styryl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-pyrimidine-5-carboxylic acid transition metal complexes2012In: Spectrochimica Acta Part A - Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy, ISSN 1386-1425, E-ISSN 1873-3557, Vol. 93, 348-353 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    2-oxo-4-phenyl-6-styryl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-pyrimidine-5-carboxylic acid (ADP) was complexed with acetates of Mn(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). The structures of the ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by microanalysis, IR. NMR, UV-vis spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility and TGA-DTA analyses. Octahedral and square planar geometries were suggested for the complexes in which the central metal ion coordinated with -O donors of ligand and acetate ions. Each ligand binds the metal using carboxylate oxygens. The ligand and complexes were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities against different species of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The present novel pyrimidine containing complexes could constitute a new group of antibacterial and antifungal agents.

  • 39.
    Dhankar, Raksha
    et al.
    Sardar Patel Mahavidyalaya, Maharashtra, India .
    Rahatgaonkar, Anjali M.
    Institute of Science, Nagpur, India .
    Shukla, Rakesh
    Central Drug Research Institute, Uttar Pradesh, India .
    Chorghade, Mukund
    Chorghade Enterprises, Natick, MA, USA .
    Tiwari, Ashutosh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Computer simulation of the in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory activities of dihydropyrimidines acid derivatives through the inhibition of cyclooxygenase-22013In: Medicinal Chemistry Research, ISSN 1054-2523, E-ISSN 1554-8120, Vol. 22, no 5, 2493-2504 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation of virtually designed 20 compounds as COX-2 inhibitors using molecular modelling of protein-ligand interactions to predict drug structure-activity relationship was performed in this study. A synthetic route with a rational chemical approach to (E)-2-oxo-(thio)-4-substituted phenyl-6-styryl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-pyrimidine-5-caboxylic acid was designed and demonstrated. A comparative analysis of antimetabolite drug and corresponding metabolites (virtually designed compounds) provided a better understanding of rational drug design. COX-1(pdb entry: 1eqg) and COX-2(pdb entry: 6cox) enzymes docked with novel ligands were evaluated for binding energies. Lead optimization was performed by computational simulation: methoxy-substituted analogues displayed the highest negative ligand-protein-binding energies. These results prompted us to evaluate in vivo anti-inflammatory activity by carrageenan-induced paw oedema test in rats at a dose of 100 mg/kg. Ibuprofen was administered as standard drug. Lead compounds having significant activity were tested for in vitro cyclooxygenase isoenzyme inhibition assay and found to be more selective towards COX-2 as indicated by COX-2 selective index. The objective of our research is to accept the challenge of discovery of new drug. To ensure the desired target specificity and potency, bioavailability and lack of toxicity, our approach stems out lead generation from virtual screening to their synthesis and ends up with biological assays.

  • 40.
    Dini, Francesca
    et al.
    Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
    Capuano, Rosamaria
    Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
    Strand, Tillan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Paolesse, Roberto
    Department of Chemical Science and Technology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
    Di Natale, Corrado
    Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Volatile Emissions from Compressed Tissue2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since almost every fifth patient treated in hospital care develops pressure ulcers, early identification of risk is important. A non-invasive method for the elucidation of endogenous biomarkers related to pressure ulcers could be an excellent tool for this purpose. We therefore found it of interest to determine if there is a difference in the emissions of volatiles from compressed and uncompressed tissue. The ultimate goal is to find a non-invasive method to obtain an early warning for the risk of developing pressure ulcers for bed-ridden persons. Chemical analysis of the emissions, collected in compresses, was made with gas-chromatography – mass spectrometry and with a chemical sensor array, the so called electronic nose. It was found that the emissions from healthy and hospitalized persons differed significantly irrespective of the site. Within each group there was a clear difference between the compressed and uncompressed site. Peaks that could be certainly deemed as markers of the compression were, however, not identified. Nonetheless, different compounds connected to the application of local mechanical pressure were found. The results obtained with GC-MS reveal the complexity of VOC composition, thus an array of non-selective chemical sensors seems to be a suitable choice for the analysis of skin emission from compressed tissues; it may represent a practical instrument for bed side diagnostics. Results show that the adopted electronic noses are likely sensitive to the total amount of the emission rather than to its composition. The development of a gas sensor-based device requires then the design of sensor receptors adequate to detect the VOCs bouquet typical of pressure. This preliminary experiment evidences the necessity of studies where each given person is followed for a long time in a ward in order to detect the insurgence of specific VOCs pattern changes signalling the occurrence of ulcers.

  • 41.
    Dini, Francesca
    et al.
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy .
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Paolesse, Roberto
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Di Natale, Corrado
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy .
    Computer screen assisted digital photography2013In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 179, no SI, 46-53 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The computer screen photo-assisted techniques (CSPT) have been developed during the last 10 years through an extensive collaboration between University of Rome "Tor Vergata" and Linkoping University in Sweden. CSPT has thus evolved into a concept we now call computer screen assisted digital photography, yielding detailed information about the interaction between color indicators and (volatile) analytes. In the present paper, we give a brief summary of the CSPT concept and its connection to digital photography. We concentrate, however, on the most recent results, which were obtained by using most of the degrees of freedom offered by a computer screen as a light source and a digital (web) camera as a detector. Thus, we describe in detail recent experiments on cotton yarns impregnated with color indicators for volatile organic molecules. The interaction between the color indicators and molecules, like trimethylamine, was investigated by CSPT in high dynamic imaging together with a background noise limiting algorithm. It is shown that the simultaneous use of the last two additions to the CSPT concept considerably enhances the chemical sensing ability of CSPT. It is concluded that the collaboration between Rome and Linkoping has generated a useful platform for further developments of chemical analysis with a ubiquitous instrumentation, a (computer) screen and a web camera. This technique is aimed at facilitating the assembly of opto-chemical sensors with evident benefits in the reduction of cost of sensor systems and in an increased integrability with the existent telecommunication infrastructures.

  • 42.
    Dini, Francesca
    et al.
    Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Rome, Italy.
    Magna, Gabriele
    Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Rome, Italy.
    Martinelli, Eugenio
    Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Rome, Italy.
    Pomarico, Giuseppe
    Department of Chemical Science and Technologies, University of Rome, Italy.
    Di Natale, Corrado
    Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Rome, Italy.
    Paolesse, Roberto
    Department of Chemical Science and Technologies, University of Rome, Italy.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Combining porphyrins and pH indicators for analyte detection2015In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 407, no 14, 3975-3984 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High sensitivity and cross-selectivity are mandatory properties for sensor arrays. Although metalloporphyrins and pH indicators are among the most common and appropriate choices for the preparation of optical sensor arrays, the sensitivity spectrum of these dyes is limited to those analytes able to induce an optical response. To extend the receptive field of optical sensors, we explore the design of composite materials, where the molecular interaction among the subunits enriches their sensing working mechanisms. We demonstrate that blends of single metalloporphyrins and pH indicators, tested with a transduction apparatus based on ubiquitous and easily available hardware, can be endowed with sensing properties wider than those of single constituents, enabling the recognition of a broad range of volatiles.

  • 43.
    Dini, Francesca
    et al.
    University of Roma Tor Vergata.
    Martinelli, Eugenio
    University of Roma Tor Vergata.
    Paolesse, Roberto
    University of Roma Tor Vergata.
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schild, Detlev
    University of Gottingen.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Di Natale, Corrado
    University of Roma Tor Vergata.
    Data processing for image-based chemical sensors: unsupervised region of interest selection and background noise compensation2012In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 402, no 2, 823-832 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural olfaction suggests that numerous replicas of small sensors can achieve large sensitivity. This concept of sensor redundancy can be exploited by use of optical chemical sensors whose use of image sensors enables the simultaneous measurement of several spatially distributed indicators. Digital image sensors split the framed scene into hundreds of thousands of pixels each corresponding to a portion of the sensing layer. The signal from each pixel can be regarded as an independent sensor, which leads to a highly redundant sensor array. Such redundancy can eventually be exploited to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. In this paper we report an algorithm for reduction of the noise of pixel signals. For this purpose, the algorithm processes the output of groups of pixels whose signals share the same time behavior, as is the case for signals related to the same indicator. To define these groups of pixels, unsupervised clustering, based on classification of the indicator colors, is proposed here. This approach to signal processing is tested in experiments on the chemical sensitivity of replicas of eight indicators spotted on to a plastic substrate. Results show that the groups of pixels can be defined independently of the geometrical arrangement of the sensing spots, and substantial improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio is obtained, enabling the detection of volatile compounds at any location on the distributed sensing layer.

  • 44.
    Ekedahl, Lars-Gunnar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hydrogen sensing mechanisms of metal insulator interfaces1998In: Accounts of Chemical Research, ISSN 0001-4842, E-ISSN 1520-4898, Vol. 31, no 5, 249-256 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hydrogen sensitivity of palladium-silicon dioxidesilicon (Pd-MOS) structures was demonstrated about 25 years ago. One of the most interesting features of the Pd-MOS device as a hydrogen sensor is its very large dynamic pressure range. Such devices are now used in several practical applications and in commercially available equipment, both as single sensors and in sensor arrays. We recall that the hydrogen sensitivity of the device occurs due to a hydrogen induced polarization at the Pd-SiO2 interface as schematically shown in Figure 1. During the years, several types of devices have been developed, both with insulators other than silicon dioxide and catalytic metals other than palladium. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that sensors with thin, discontinuous catalytic metals can detect molecules, like ammonia, which are not detected by sensors with thick continuous palladium gates. 1-3 Although several insulators have been used in hydrogen sensitive Pd-insulator-semiconductor

  • 45.
    Ekman, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Development and Evaluation of Textile Actuators2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Existing actuators in robotics are noisy, rigid and not very lifelike in their movements. There is a need for actuators in especially limb prosthetics and exoskeletons that are silent, softly moving and preferably operating on low currents. One such solution is the conducting polymers.

    Textiles are well researched and there is a wide variety of patterning. Even more important is their reproducibility and how easily they are mass-produced.

    This thesis work combines conducting polymers with textiles to achieve linear textile actuators. The textiles are coated with the conducting polymer Polypyrrole which has the property of volume change, when a voltage is applied and there is a reservoir of ions accessible. The volume change, expansion and contraction, results in a linear actuation. The force and strain are measured while changing different parameters and the results are evaluated in this thesis.

  • 46.
    Emin Corman, Mehmet
    et al.
    Hacettepe University, Turkey; Sinop University, Turkey.
    Armutcu, Canan
    Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Uzun, Lokman
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Denizli, Adil
    Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Rapid, efficient and selective preconcentration of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) by molecularly imprinted composite cartridge and HPLC2017In: Materials science & engineering. C, biomimetic materials, sensors and systems, ISSN 0928-4931, E-ISSN 1873-0191, Vol. 70, 41-53 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, cryogel-based molecularly imprinted composite cartridges were designed for the rapid, efficient, and selective preconcentration of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) from water samples. First, a BaP-imprinted poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-(L)-phenylalanine) composite cartridge was synthesized under semi-frozen conditions and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and swelling tests. After the optimization of preconcentration parameters, i.e., pH and initial BaP concentration, the selectivity and preconcentration efficiency, and reusability of these cartridges were also evaluated. In selectivity experiments, BaP imprinted composite cartridge exhibited binding capacities 3.09, 9.52, 8.87, and 8.77-fold higher than that of the non-imprinted composite cartridge in the presence of competitors, such as benzo[b]fluoranthene (BbF), benzo[k]fluoranthene (BkF), indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene (lcdP), and 1-naphthol, respectively. The method detection limit (MDL), relative standard deviation (RSD) and preconcentration efficiency (PE) of the synthesized composite cartridge were calculated as 24.86 mu g/L, 1.60%, and 349,6%, respectively. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 47.
    Ericsson, Emma
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bui, Lan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Site-Specific and Covalent Attachment of His-Tagged Proteins by Chelation Assisted Photoimmobilization: A Strategy for Microarraying of Protein Ligands2013In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 29, no 37, 11687-11694 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel strategy for site-specific and covalent attachment of proteins has been developed, intended for robust and controllable immobilization of histidine (His)-tagged ligands in protein microarrays. The method is termed chelation assisted photoimmobilization (CAP) and was demonstrated using human IgG-Fc modified with C-terminal hexahistidines (His-IgGFc) as the ligand and protein A as the analyte. Alkanethiols terminated with either nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), benzophenone (BP); or oligo(ethylene glycol) were synthesized and mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were prepared on gold and thoroughly characterized by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), ellipsometry, and contact angle goniometry. In the process of CAP, NTA chelates Ni2+ and the complex coordinates the His-tagged ligand in an oriented assembly. The ligand is then photoimmobilized via BP, which forms covalent bonds upon UV light activation. In the development of affinity biosensors and protein microarrays, site-specific attachment of ligands in a fashion where analyte binding sites are available is often preferred to random coupling. Analyte binding performance of ligands immobilized either by CAP or by standard amine coupling was characterized by surface plasmon resonance in combination with IRAS. The relative analyte response with randomly coupled ligand was 2.5 times higher than when site-specific attachment was used. This is a reminder that also when immobilizing ligands via residues far from the binding site, there are many other factors influencing availability and activity. Still, CAP provides a valuable expansion of protein immobilization techniques since it offers attractive microarraying possibilities amenable to applications within proteomics.

  • 48.
    Eriksson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lindgren, David
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bjorklund, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Winquist, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sundgren, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Drinking water monitoring with voltammetric sensors2011In: Procedia Engineering, ISSN 1877-7058, E-ISSN 1877-7058, Vol. 25, 1165-1168 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pulsed voltammetry has been applied to drinking water monitoring. This non-selective technique facilitates detection of several different threats to the drinking water. A multivariate algorithm shows that anomaly detection is possible with a minimum of false alarms. Multivariate analysis can also be used to classify different types of substances added to the drinking water. Low concentrations of sewage water contaminating the drinking water can be detected. A network of such sensors is envisaged to facilitate real-time and on-line monitoring of drinking water distribution networks.

  • 49.
    Eriksson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekedahl, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A model of the Temkin isotherm behaviour for hydrogen adsorption at Pd-SiO2 interfaces1997In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 82, no 6, 3143-3146 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simple electrostatic model of the adsorbate–adsorbateinteraction of hydrogen atoms at a Pd–SiO 2 interface is presented. The model predicts a hydrogen adsorption isotherm of the Temkin type. It is found that, in practice, an upper limit for the hydrogen response of a Pd-metal-oxide-semiconductor device exists. The value (in V) is equal to the difference of the initial heats of adsorption (in eV) of the interface and the Pd bulk, respectively. Furthermore, a corresponding maximum hydrogen concentration, at the interface, of 1×10 18  m −2 is predicted. The predictions are in good agreement with previously observed experimental data.

  • 50.
    Eriksson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Winquist, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Diesel detection in surface water in the low ppb range2016In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 30TH ANNIVERSARY EUROSENSORS CONFERENCE - EUROSENSORS 2016, ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV , 2016, Vol. 168, 384-387 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method for diesel detection in surface water in the low ppb range is presented. Even though standard commercial metal oxide gas sensors with detection limits in the ppm range are used, extraction of volatile compounds from the water enables a detection limit of about 2 ppb diesel in the water. The technique can be used for surface water monitoring. The standard technique of ultraviolet fluorescence detection has an interference problem with humic substances. This is not a problem with the suggested technique. Results from lab measurements as well as field tests at a water utility in the Stockholm region in Sweden are presented. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

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