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  • 1.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Turesson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Hansson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Needle Fasciotomy or Collagenase Injection in the Treatment of Dupuytren’s Contracture: A Retrospective Study2020In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery – Global Open, E-ISSN 2169-7574, Vol. 8, no 1Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dupuytren’s contracture is common among older people in Sweden. Previous studies comparing the treatment with an injection of collagenase with percutaneous needle fasciotomy found no differences. Methods: We retrospectively compared the degree of improvement in the deficit in extension of the joints in 2 groups of patients who had been treated with collagenase (71 fingers) or needle fasciotomy (109 fingers) before and 1 year after treatment. We compared the improvement of the extension deficit among the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal joints before and after the intervention; additionally, the level of improvement was classified into 3 levels (mild = 0° to 29°; moderate = 30° to 60°; considerable = 61° and more). Results: The degree of improvement of extension in the MCP joints was 11° greater in the collagenase group (P = 0.001). The number of patients who had an improvement of >60° (considerable) in extension was greater in the collagenase group (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Collagenase was more effective than needle fasciotomy in treating extension deficits of the MCP joints in Dupuytren’s contracture in this retrospective analysis. Further prospective studies are required to confirm the finding.

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  • 2.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Vieweg, Rosa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Irschik, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Development of delirium: Association with old age, severe burns, and intensive care2020In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Delirium is defined as a disturbance of attention and awareness that develops over a short period of time, is a change from the baseline, and typically fluctuates over time. Burn care involves a high prevalence of known risk factors for delirium such as sedation, inflammation, and prolonged stay in hospital. Our aim was to explore the extent of delirium and the impact of factors associated with it for adult patients who have been admitted to hospital with burns. Methods In this retrospective study, all adult patients who had been admitted with burns during a four-year period were studied, including both those who were treated with intensive care and intermediate care only (no intensive care). Daily records of the assessment of delirium using the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale (Nu-DESC) were analysed together with age, sex, the percentage of total body surface area burned, operations, and numbers of wound care procedures under anaesthesia, concentrations of plasma C-reactive protein, and other clinical variables. Logistic regression was used to analyse factors that were associated with delirium and its effect on mortality, and linear regression was used to analyse its effect on the duration of hospital stay. Results Fifty-one patients (19%) of the total 262 showed signs of delirium (Nu-DESC score of 2 or more) at least once during their stay in hospital. Signs of delirium were recorded in 42/89 patients (47%) who received intensive care, and in 9/173 (5%) who had intermediate care. Independent factors for delirium in the multivariable regression were: age over 74 years; number of operations and wound care procedures under anaesthesia; and the provision of intensive care (area under the curve 0.940, 95% CI 0.899–0.981). Duration of hospital stay, adjusted for age and burn size, was 13.2 (95% CI 7.4–18.9, p < 0.001) days longer in the group who had delirium. We found no independent effects of delirium on mortality. Conclusion We found a strong association between delirium and older age, provision ofr intensive care, and number of interventions under anaesthesia. A further 5% of patients who did not receive intensive care also showed signs of delirium, which is a finding that deserves to be thoroughly investigated in the future.

  • 3.
    Adamina, Michel
    et al.
    Cantonal Hosp Winterthur, Switzerland; Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Bonovas, Stefanos
    Humanitas Univ, Italy; Humanitas Clin and Res Ctr, Italy.
    Raine, Tim
    Cambridge Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Spinelli, Antonino
    Humanitas Univ, Italy.
    Warusavitarne, Janindra
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Armuzzi, Alessandro
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Italy.
    Bachmann, Oliver
    Siloah St Trudpert Hosp, Germany.
    Bager, Palle
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Biancone, Livia
    Univ Tor Vergata Rome, Italy.
    Bokemeyer, Bernd
    Gastroenterol Practice Minden, Germany.
    Bossuyt, Peter
    Imelda Gen Hosp, Belgium.
    Burisch, Johan
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Collins, Paul
    Royal Liverpool Univ Hosp, England.
    Doherty, Glen
    St Vincents Univ Hosp, Ireland; St Vincents Univ Hosp, Ireland.
    El-Hussuna, Alaa
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Ellul, Pierre
    Mater Dei Hosp, Malta.
    Fiorino, Gionata
    Humanitas Univ, Italy; Humanitas Clin and Res Ctr, Italy.
    Frei-Lanter, Cornelia
    Hosp Zollikerberg, Switzerland.
    Furfaro, Federica
    Humanitas Clin and Res Ctr, Italy.
    Gingert, Christian
    Cantonal Hosp Winterthur, Switzerland; Univ Witten Herdecke, Germany.
    Gionchetti, Paolo
    Univ Bologna, Italy.
    Gisbert, Javier P.
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Spain.
    Gomollon, Fernando
    Hosp Cli Univ Lozano Blesa, Spain.
    Lorenzo, Marien Gonzalez
    Humanitas Univ, Italy.
    Gordon, Hannah
    Barts Hlth NHS Trust, England.
    Hlavaty, Tibor
    Comenius Univ, Slovakia; Comenius Univ, Slovakia.
    Juillerat, Pascal
    Univ Hosp Bern, Switzerland.
    Katsanos, Konstantinos
    Univ and Med Sch Ioannina, Greece.
    Kopylov, Uri
    Tel HaShomer Sheba Med Ctr, Israel; Sackler Med Sch, Israel.
    Krustins, Eduards
    Riga Stradins Univ, Latvia.
    Kucharzik, Torsten
    Hosp Luneburg, Germany.
    Lytras, Theodore
    Natl Publ Hlth Org, Greece.
    Maaser, Christian
    Hosp Luneburg, Germany.
    Magro, Fernando
    Dept Pharmacol and Therapeut, Portugal; Univ Porto, Portugal.
    Marshall, John Kenneth
    McMaster Univ, Canada; McMaster Univ, Canada.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Pellino, Gianluca
    Univ Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Italy.
    Rosa, Isadora
    IPOLFG, Portugal.
    Sabino, Joao
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Savarino, Edoardo
    Univ Padua, Italy.
    Stassen, Laurents
    Maastricht Univ Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Torres, Joana
    Hosp Beatriz Angelo, Portugal.
    Uzzan, Mathieu
    Beaujon Hosp, France.
    Vavricka, Stephan
    Univ Hosp, Switzerland.
    Verstockt, Bram
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium; Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Zmora, Oded
    Shamir Med Ctr Assaf Harofe, Israel.
    ECCO Guidelines on Therapeutics in Crohns Disease: Surgical Treatment2020In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 155-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is the second in a series of two publications relating to the European Crohns and Colitis Organisation [ECCO] evidence-based consensus on the management of Crohns disease. The first article covers medical management; the present article addresses surgical management, including preoperative aspects and drug management before surgery. It also provides technical advice for a variety of common clinical situations. Both articles together represent the evidence-based recommendations of the ECCO for Crohns disease and an update of previous guidelines.

  • 4.
    Ali, Zaheer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cui, Dongmei
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Yunlong
    Fudan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Tracey-White, Dhani
    UCL Inst Ophthalmol, England.
    Vazquez Rodriguez, Gabriela
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Moosajee, Mariya
    UCL Inst Ophthalmol, England.
    Ju, Rong
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Peoples R China.
    Li, Xuri
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Peoples R China.
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Synchronized tissue-scale vasculogenesis and ubiquitous lateral sprouting underlie the unique architecture of the choriocapillaris2020In: Developmental Biology, ISSN 0012-1606, E-ISSN 1095-564X, Vol. 457, no 2, p. 206-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The choriocapillaris is an exceptionally high density, two-dimensional, sheet-like capillary network, characterized by the highest exchange rate of nutrients for waste products per area in the organism. These unique morphological and physiological features are critical for supporting the extreme metabolic requirements of the outer retina needed for vision. The developmental mechanisms and processes responsible for generating this unique vascular network remain, however, poorly understood. Here we take advantage of the zebrafish as a model organism for gaining novel insights into the cellular dynamics and molecular signaling mechanisms involved in the development of the choriocapillaris. We show for the first time that zebrafish have a choriocapillaris highly similar to that in mammals, and that it is initially formed by a novel process of synchronized vasculogenesis occurring simultaneously across the entire outer retina. This initial vascular network expands by un-inhibited sprouting angiogenesis whereby all endothelial cells adopt tip-cell characteristics, a process which is sustained throughout embryonic and early post-natal development, even after the choriocapillaris becomes perfused. Ubiquitous sprouting was maintained by continuous VEGF-VEGFR2 signaling in endothelial cells delaying maturation until immediately before stages where vision becomes important for survival, leading to the unparalleled high density and lobular structure of this vasculature. Sprouting was throughout development limited to two dimensions by Bruchs membrane and the sclera at the anterior and posterior surfaces respectively. These novel cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying choriocapillaris development were recapitulated in mice. In conclusion, our findings reveal novel mechanisms underlying the development of the choriocapillaris during zebrafish and mouse development. These results may explain the uniquely high density and sheet-like organization of this vasculature.

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  • 5.
    Alim, Md Abdul
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Grujic, Mirjana
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Ackerman, Paul W.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kristiansson, Per
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Pernilla T.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Peterson, Magnus
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Acad Primary Hlth Care, Sweden.
    Pejler, Gunnar
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Glutamate triggers the expression of functional ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors in mast cells2020In: Cellular & Molecular Immunology, ISSN 1672-7681, E-ISSN 2042-0226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mast cells are emerging as players in the communication between peripheral nerve endings and cells of the immune system. However, it is not clear the mechanism by which mast cells communicate with peripheral nerves. We previously found that mast cells located within healing tendons can express glutamate receptors, raising the possibility that mast cells may be sensitive to glutamate signaling. To evaluate this hypothesis, we stimulated primary mast cells with glutamate and showed that glutamate induced the profound upregulation of a panel of glutamate receptors of both the ionotropic type (NMDAR1, NMDAR2A, and NMDAR2B) and the metabotropic type (mGluR2 and mGluR7) at both the mRNA and protein levels. The binding of glutamate to glutamate receptors on the mast cell surface was confirmed. Further, glutamate had extensive effects on gene expression in the mast cells, including the upregulation of pro-inflammatory components such as IL-6 and CCL2. Glutamate also induced the upregulation of transcription factors, including Egr2, Egr3 and, in particular, FosB. The extensive induction of FosB was confirmed by immunofluorescence assessment. Glutamate receptor antagonists abrogated the responses of the mast cells to glutamate, supporting the supposition of a functional glutamate-glutamate receptor axis in mast cells. Finally, we provide in vivo evidence supporting a functional glutamate-glutamate receptor axis in the mast cells of injured tendons. Together, these findings establish glutamate as an effector of mast cell function, thereby introducing a novel principle for how cells in the immune system can communicate with nerve cells.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Asa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Vilhelmsson, Mattias
    Reg Hosp Vaxjo, Sweden.
    Fomichov Casaballe, Victoria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Patient involvement in surgical care-Healthcare personnel views and behaviour regarding patient involvement2020In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background All professions in surgical care have a responsibility to include patients in their health care. By Swedish law, all care should be done in dialogue with the patient. The essential part of health care is the meeting between patient and healthcare professional. In the interaction, a decision can be made, and needs can be identified to a safer care. Previous studies on patient participation have focussed on patients perspectives in surgical care, but there is a paucity of studies about the personnels perspective of estimated patient involvement in surgical care. Aim The aim of this study was to identify and describe healthcare personnels view and behaviour regarding patient involvement in surgical care. Method A quantitative study with various professions was conducted. A validated questionnaire was used, remaining questions grouped under following areas: patient involvement, acute phase, hospital time, discharge phase and questions on employment and workplace. Results A total of 140 questionnaires were sent out to a surgical clinic in Sweden, and 102 questionnaires were answered. All professionals stated that clear information is an important part of patient involvement in surgical care. Statistically significant differences existed between the professions in the subscale information. Physicians rated their information higher than the Registered Nurses (p = 0.005) and the practical nurses did (p = 0.001). Hindrances to involving patients were lack of time and other priority tasks. Conclusions Professionals in surgical care graded information to be the most important thing for patient involvement. Participation in important decisions, including the possibility to express personal views and ask questions, is important factors for patient involvement. Barriers against patient involvement are lack of time and prioritisation of other work activities.

    The full text will be freely available from 2021-01-31 15:54
  • 7.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    RIFT study and management of suspected appendicitis2020In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 8.
    Asbun, H.J.
    et al.
    Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreas Surgery, Miami Cancer Institute, Miami, FL, United States.
    Moekotte, A.L.
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Vissers, F.L.
    Department of Surgery, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Kunzler, F.
    Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreas Surgery, Miami Cancer Institute, Miami, FL, United States.
    Cipriani, F.
    Department of Surgery, San Raffaele Hospital, Milan, Italy.
    Alseidi, A.
    Division of Hepatopancreatobiliary and Endocrine Surgery, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, VA, United States.
    DAngelica, M.I.
    Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, NY, United States.
    Balduzzi, A.
    Division of Pancreatic Surgery, University Hospital of Verona, Verona, Italy.
    Bassi, C.
    Division of Pancreatic Surgery, University Hospital of Verona, Verona, Italy.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Boggi, U.
    Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Callery, M.P.
    Department of General and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, United States.
    Del, Chiaro M.
    Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, University of Colorado, Denver, CO, United States.
    Coimbra, F.J.
    Department of Abdominal Surgery, AC Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Conrad, C.
    Department of Surgery, St. Elizabeths Medical Center, Boston, MA, United States.
    Cook, A.
    Wessex Institute, University of Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Coppola, A.
    General Surgery and Liver Transplant, Unit Department of General Surgery, Fondazione Policlinico, Universitario Agostino Gemelli, IRCCS, Rome, Italy.
    Dervenis, C.
    Department of Surgery, Medical School, University of Cyprus, Cyprus.
    Dokmak, S.
    Department of Surgery, Beaujon Hospital, Paris, France.
    Edil, B.H.
    Department of Surgery, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK, United States.
    Edwin, B.
    Intervention Centre, Department of HPB Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Giulianotti, P.C.
    Division of Minimally Invasive, General Surgery and Robotic Surgery, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, United States.
    Han, H.-S.
    Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea.
    Hansen, P.D.
    Department of Surgery, Portland Providence Medical Center, Portland, OR, United States.
    Van, Der Heijde N.
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Van, Hilst J.
    Department of Surgery, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Hester, C.A.
    Department of Surgery, University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States.
    Hogg, M.E.
    Department of Surgery, NorthShore University Health System, Evanston, IL, United States.
    Jarufe, N.
    Department of Digestive Surgery, Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.
    Jeyarajah, D.R.
    Department of HPB Surgery, Methodist Richardson Medical Center, Richardson, TX, United States.
    Keck, T.
    Clinic for Surgery, University of Schleswig-Holstein Campus Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany.
    Kim, S.C.
    Department of Surgery, Ulsan University, College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea.
    Khatkov, I.E.
    Department of Surgery, Moscow Clinical Scientific Center, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Kokudo, N.
    Department of Surgery, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
    Kooby, D.A.
    Department of Surgery, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    Korrel, M.
    Department of Surgery, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    De, Leon F.J.
    HPB and Transplant Unit, Regional Hospital, Málaga, Spain.
    Lluis, N.
    Department of Surgery, Bellvitge University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain.
    Lof, S.
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Machado, M.A.
    Department of Surgery, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Demartines, N.
    Department of Visceral Surgery, Lausanne University Hospital CHUV, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Martinie, J.B.
    Division of HPB Surgery, Department of Surgery, Carolinas Health Care Hospital, Charlotte, NC, United States.
    Merchant, N.B.
    Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, United States.
    Molenaar, I.Q.
    Department of Surgery, UMC Utrecht Cancer Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Moravek, C.
    Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, Manhattan Beach, CA, United States.
    Mou, Y.-P.
    Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatic Surgery, Zhengjiang Provincial Peoples Hospital, Peoples Hospital of Hangzhou Medical College, Zhejiang, China.
    Nakamura, M.
    Department of Surgery and Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
    Nealon, W.H.
    Department of Surgery, Northwell Health, Manhasset, NY, United States.
    Palanivelu, C.
    Department of Surgical Gastroenterology and HPB Surgery, GEM Hospital and Research Centre, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Pessaux, P.
    Division of Hepato-Biliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.
    Pitt, H.A.
    Department of Surgery, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
    Polanco, P.M.
    Department of Surgery, University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States.
    Primrose, J.N.
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Rawashdeh, A.
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Sanford, D.E.
    Division of Hepatobiliary, Pancreatic, and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University, School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, United States.
    Senthilnathan, P.
    Department of Surgical Gastroenterology and HPB Surgery, GEM Hospital and Research Centre, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Shrikhande, S.V.
    Department of Surgery, Tata Memorial Center, Mumbai, India.
    Stauffer, J.A.
    Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL, United States.
    Takaori, K.
    Department of Surgery, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.
    Talamonti, M.S.
    Department of Surgery, NorthShore University Health System, Evanston, IL, United States.
    Tang, C.N.
    Department of Surgery, Pamela Youde Nethersle Eastern Hospital, Chai Wan, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Vollmer, C.M.
    Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
    Wakabayashi, G.
    Center for Advanced Treatment of HPB Diseases, Ageo Central General Hospital, Saitama, Japan.
    Walsh, R.M.
    Department of General Surgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, United States.
    Wang, S.-E.
    Department of Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Zinner, M.J.
    Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreas Surgery, Miami Cancer Institute, Miami, FL, United States.
    Wolfgang, C.L.
    Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, John Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States.
    Zureikat, A.H.
    Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
    Zwart, M.J.
    Department of Surgery, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Conlon, K.C.
    Department of Surgery, Trinity College Dublin, Tallaght University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
    Kendrick, M.L.
    Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States; Department of Surgery, Istituto Fondazione Poliambulanza, Brescia, Italy.
    Zeh, H.J.
    Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
    Hilal, M.A.
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Besselink, M.G.
    Department of Surgery, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    The Miami International Evidence-based Guidelines on Minimally Invasive Pancreas Resection2020In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 271, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to develop and externally validate the first evidence-based guidelines on minimally invasive pancreas resection (MIPR) before and during the International Evidence-based Guidelines on Minimally Invasive Pancreas Resection (IG-MIPR) meeting in Miami (March 2019).Summary Background Data: MIPR has seen rapid development in the past decade. Promising outcomes have been reported by early adopters from high-volume centers. Subsequently, multicenter series as well as randomized controlled trials were reported; however, guidelines for clinical practice were lacking. Methods: The Scottisch Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) methodology was used, incorporating these 4 items: systematic reviews using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases to answer clinical questions, whenever possible in PICO style, the GRADE approach for assessment of the quality of evidence, the Delphi method for establishing consensus on the developed recommendations, and the AGREE-II instrument for the assessment of guideline quality and external validation. The current guidelines are cosponsored by the International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association, the Americas Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association, the Asian-Pacific Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association, the European-African Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association, the European Association for Endoscopic Surgery, Pancreas Club, the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgery, the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract, and the Society of Surgical Oncology. Results: After screening 16,069 titles, 694 studies were reviewed, and 291 were included. The final 28 recommendations covered 6 topics; laparoscopic and robotic distal pancreatectomy, central pancreatectomy, pancreatoduodenectomy, as well as patient selection, training, learning curve, and minimal annual center volume required to obtain optimal outcomes and patient safety.Conclusion: The IG-MIPR using SIGN methodology give guidance to surgeons, hospital administrators, patients, and medical societies on the use and outcome of MIPR as well as the approach to be taken regarding this challenging type of surgery. © 2019 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 9.
    Beeckmans, Dorien
    et al.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Farre, Ricard
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Riethorst, Danny
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Keita, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Augustijns, Patrick
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Vanuytsel, Tim
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Vanheel, Hanne
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Tack, Jan
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Relationship between bile salts, bacterial translocation, and duodenal mucosal integrity in functional dyspepsia2020In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, article id e13788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Functional dyspepsia (FD) is a complex disorder, in which multiple mechanisms underlie symptom generation, including impaired duodenal barrier function. Moreover, an altered duodenal bile salt pool was recently discovered in patients with FD. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between bile salts, bacterial translocation, and duodenal mucosal permeability in FD. Methods Duodenal biopsies from patients with FD and healthy volunteers (HV) were mounted in Ussing chambers to measure mucosal resistance and bacterial passage in the absence and presence of fluorescein-conjugated Escherichia coli and glyco-ursodeoxycholic acid (GUDCA) exposure. In parallel, duodenal fluid aspirates were collected from patients and bile salts were analyzed. Key results The transepithelial electrical resistance of duodenal biopsies from patients was lower compared with HV (21.4 +/- 1.3 omega.cm(2) vs. 24.4 +/- 1.2 omega.cm(2); P = .02; N = 21). The ratio of glyco-cholic and glyco-chenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA) to tauro- and GUDCA correlated positively with transepithelial electrical resistance in patients. Glyco-ursodeoxycholic acid slightly altered the mucosal resistance, resulting in similar values between patient and healthy biopsies (22.1 +/- 1.0 omega.cm(2) vs. 23.0 +/- 1.0 omega.cm(2); P = .5). Bacterial passage after 120 minutes was lower for patient than for healthy biopsies (0.0 [0.0-681.8] vs. 1684.0 [0.0-4773.0] E coli units; P = .02). Glyco-ursodeoxycholic acid increased bacterial passage in patient biopsies (102.1 [0.0-733.0] vs. 638.9 [280.6-2124.0] E coli units; P = .009). No correlation was found between mucosal resistance and bacterial passage. Conclusions amp; inferences Patients with FD displayed decreased duodenal mucosal resistance associated with bile salts, however, not associated with bacterial passage in vitro. In addition, the hydrophilic bile salt glyco-ursodeoxycholic acid abolished differences in mucosal resistance and bacterial passage between patient and control group.

  • 10.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Rosok, Bard
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Larsen, Peter Noergaard
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Urdzik, Jozef
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Schultz, Nicolai A.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Carling, Ulrik
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Fallentin, Eva
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Gilg, Stefan
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindell, Gert
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Sparrelid, Ernesto
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Segment 4 occlusion in portal vein embolization increase future liver remnant hypertrophy - A Scandinavian cohort study2020In: International Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1743-9191, E-ISSN 1743-9159, Vol. 75, p. 60-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The additional value of including segment 4 (S4) portal branches in right portal vein embolization (rPVE) is debated. The aim of the study was to explore this in a large multicenter cohort. Material and methods: A retrospective cohort study consisting of all patients subjected to rPVE from August 2012 to May 2017 at six Scandinavian university hospitals. PVE technique was essentially the same in all centers, except for the selection of main embolizing agent (particles or glue). All centers used coils or particles to embolize S4 branches. A subgroup analysis was performed after excluding patients with parts of or whole S4 included in the future liver remnant (FLR). Results: 232 patients were included in the study, of which 36 received embolization of the portal branches to S4 in addition to rPVE. The two groups (rPVE vs rPVE + S4) were similar (gender, age, co-morbidity, diagnosis, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bilirubin levels prior to PVE and embolizing material), except for diabetes mellitus which was more frequent in the rPVE + S4 group (p = 0.02). Pre-PVE FLR was smaller in the S4 group (333 vs 380 ml, p = 0.01). rPVE + S4 resulted in a greater percentage increase of the FLR size compared to rPVE alone (47 vs 38%, p = 0.02). A subgroup analysis, excluding all patients with S4 included in the FLR, was done. There was no longer a difference in pre-PVE FLR between groups (333 vs 325 ml, p = 0.9), but still a greater percentage increase and also absolute increase of the FLR in the rPVE + S4 group (48 vs 38% and 155 vs 112 ml, p = 0.01 and 0.02). Conclusion: In this large multicenter cohort study, additional embolization of S4 did demonstrate superior growth of the FLR compared to standard right PVE.

  • 11.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hjalmarsson, C.
    Blekinge Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Comparison of the duration of hospital stay after laparoscopic or open distal pancreatectomy: randomized controlled trial2020In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Studies have suggested that laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP) is advantageous compared with open distal pancreatectomy (ODP) regarding hospital stay, blood loss and recovery. Only one randomized study is available, which showed enhanced functional recovery after LDP compared with ODP. Methods Consecutive patients evaluated at a multidisciplinary tumour board and planned for standard distal pancreatectomy were randomized prospectively to LDP or ODP in an unblinded, parallel-group, single-centre superiority trial. The primary outcome was postoperative hospital stay. Results Of 105 screened patients, 60 were randomized and 58 (24 women, 41 per cent) were included in the intention-to-treat analysis; there were 29 patients of mean age 68 years in the LDP group and 29 of mean age 63 years in the ODP group. The main indication was cystic pancreatic lesions, followed by neuroendocrine tumours. The median postoperative hospital stay was 5 (i.q.r. 4-5) days in the laparoscopic group versus 6 (5-7) days in the open group (P = 0 center dot 002). Functional recovery was attained after a median of 4 (i.q.r. 2-6) versus 6 (4-7) days respectively (P = 0 center dot 007), and duration of surgery was 120 min in both groups (P = 0 center dot 482). Blood loss was less with laparoscopic surgery: median 50 (i.q.r. 25-150) ml versus 100 (100-300) ml in the open group (P = 0 center dot 018). No difference was found in the complication rates (Clavien-Dindo grade III or above: 4 versus 8 patients respectively). The rate of delayed gastric emptying and clinically relevant postoperative pancreatic fistula did not differ between the groups. Conclusion LDP is associated with shorter hospital stay than ODP, with shorter time to functional recovery and less bleeding. Registration number: ISRCTN26912858 ( ).

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  • 12.
    Bolckmans, Roel
    et al.
    Oxford Univ Hosp Natl Hlth Serv Fdn Trust, England.
    Kalman, Thordis Disa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Singh, Sandeep
    Oxford Univ Hosp Natl Hlth Serv Fdn Trust, England.
    Ratnatunga, Keshara C.
    Oxford Univ Hosp Natl Hlth Serv Fdn Trust, England.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Travis, Simon
    Oxford Univ Hosp Natl Hlth Serv Fdn Trust, England.
    George, Bruce D.
    Oxford Univ Hosp Natl Hlth Serv Fdn Trust, England.
    Does Smoking Cessation Reduce Surgical Recurrence After Primary Ileocolic Resection for Crohns Disease?2020In: Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, ISSN 0012-3706, E-ISSN 1530-0358, Vol. 63, no 2, p. 200-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Tobacco smoking is a known risk factor for recurrence of Crohns disease after surgical resection. OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the effect of smoking cessation on long-term surgical recurrence after primary ileocolic resection for Crohns disease. DESIGN: A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database was conducted. SETTINGS: Patient demographic data and medical and surgical details were combined from 2 specialist centers. After ethical approval, patients were contacted in case of missing data regarding smoking habit. PATIENTS: All patients undergoing ileocolic resection between 2000 and 2012 for histologically confirmed Crohns disease were included. Those with previous intestinal resection, strictureplasty for Crohns disease, leak after ileocolic resection, or who were never reversed were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary end point was surgical recurrence measured by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and secondary medical therapy at time of follow-up. RESULTS: Over a 12-year period, 290 patients underwent ileocolic resection. Full smoking data were available for 242 (83%) of 290 patients. There were 169 nonsmokers (70%; group 1), 42 active smokers at the time of ileocolic resection who continued smoking up to last follow-up (17%; group 2), and 31 (13%) who quit smoking after ileocolic resection (group 3). The median time of smoking exposure after ileocolic resection for group 3 was 3 years (interquartile range, 0-6 y), and median follow-up time for the whole group was 112 months (9 mo; interquartile range, 84-148 mo). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed a significantly higher surgical recurrence rate for group 2 compared with group 3 (16/42 (38%) vs 3/31 (10%); p = 0.02; risk ratio = 3.9 (95% CI, 1-12)). In addition, significantly more patients in group 2 without surgical recurrence received immunomodulatory maintenance therapy compared with group 3 (12/26 (46%) vs 4/28 (14%); p = 0.01; risk ratio = 3.2 (95% CI, 1-9)). LIMITATIONS: The study was limited by its retrospective design and small number of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking cessation after primary ileocolic resection for Crohns disease may significantly reduce long-term risk of surgical recurrence and is associated with less use of maintenance therapy. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/B86.

  • 13.
    Bögl, Hans Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Gavle Cent Hosp, Sweden.
    Michaelsson, K.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Zdolsek, G.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Hoijer, J.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Schilcher, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Increased rate of reoperation in atypical femoral fractures is related to patient characteristics and not fracture type. A nationwide cohort study2020In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 951-959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atypical femoral fractures are burdened with a high rate of reoperation. In our nationwide analysis, the increased rate of reoperation was related to patient background characteristics, such as age and health status, rather than fracture type. Introduction Patients with atypical fractures are complex to treat and burdened with a high risk of reoperation. We hypothesized that patients with surgically treated, complete atypical fractures have a higher risk of any reoperation and reoperation related to healing complications than patients with common femoral shaft fractures but that this increase would become insignificant when adjusted for predefined characteristics. Methods A cohort of 163 patients with atypical fractures and 862 patients with common femoral shaft or subtrochanteric fractures treated from 2008 to 2010 and who had follow-up radiographs and register data available until 31 December 2014 was included. Reoperations were identified by a complementary review of radiographs and register data and were used to calculate risks for any reoperation and reoperations related to healing complications. Results Patients with atypical fractures were more likely to be reoperated for any reason, age-adjusted OR 1.76 (95% CI, 1.08 to 2.86). However, patients with common fractures had a shorter follow-up due to a threefold higher death rate. Accordingly, in a multivariable-adjusted time-to-event model, the increased risk lost statistical significance for any reoperations, cause-specific HR 1.34 (95% CI, 0.85 to 2.13), and for reoperations related to healing complications, HR 1.32 (95% CI, 0.58 to 3.0). Continued use of bisphosphonate in the first year after the fracture did not affect the reoperation rate. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the increased risk of reoperation after an atypical femur fracture is largely explained by patient characteristics and not fracture type.

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  • 14.
    Casado Bedmar, Maite
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Keita, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Potential neuro-immune therapeutic targets in irritable bowel syndrome2020In: Therapeutic Advances in Gastroenterology, ISSN 1756-283X, E-ISSN 1756-2848, Vol. 13, article id 1756284820910630Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder characterized by recurring abdominal pain and disturbed bowel habits. The aetiology of IBS is unknown but there is evidence that genetic, environmental and immunological factors together contribute to the development of the disease. Current treatment of IBS includes lifestyle and dietary interventions, laxatives or antimotility drugs, probiotics, antispasmodics and antidepressant medication. The gut-brain axis comprises the central nervous system, the hypothalamic pituitary axis, the autonomic nervous system and the enteric nervous system. Within the intestinal mucosa there are close connections between immune cells and nerve fibres of the enteric nervous system, and signalling between, for example, mast cells and nerves has shown to be of great importance during GI disorders such as IBS. Communication between the gut and the brain is most importantly routed via the vagus nerve, where signals are transmitted by neuropeptides. It is evident that IBS is a disease of a gut-brain axis dysregulation, involving altered signalling between immune cells and neurotransmitters. In this review, we analyse the most novel and distinct neuro-immune interactions within the IBS mucosa in association with already existing and potential therapeutic targets.

  • 15.
    Dabrosin, Nina
    et al.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Postmenopausal Dense Breasts Maintain Premenopausal Levels of GH and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Proteins in Vivo2020In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 105, no 5, article id UNSP dgz323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Dense breast tissue is associated with 4 to 6 times higher risk of breast cancer by poorly understood mechanisms. No preventive therapy for this high-risk group is available. After menopause, breast density decreases due to involution of the mammary gland. In dense breast tissue, this process is haltered by undetermined biological actions. Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like binding proteins (IGFBPs) play major roles in normal mammary gland development, but their roles in maintaining breast density are unknown. Objective: To reveal in vivo levels of GH, IGFBPs, and other pro-tumorigenic proteins in the extracellular microenvironment in breast cancer, in normal breast tissue with various breast density in postmenopausal women, and premenopausal breasts. We also sought to determine possible correlations between these determinants. Setting and Design: Microdialysis was used to collect extracellular in vivo proteins intratumorally from breast cancers before surgery and from normal human breast tissue from premenopausal women and postmenopausal women with mammographic dense or nondense breasts. Results: Estrogen receptor positive breast cancers exhibited increased extracellular GH (P &lt;.01). Dense breasts of postmenopausal women exhibited similar levels of GH as premenopausal breasts and significantly higher levels than in nondense breasts (P &lt;.001). Similar results were found for IGFBP-1, -2, -3, and -7 (P &lt;.01) and for IGFBP-6 (P &lt;.05). Strong positive correlations were revealed between GH and IGFBPs and pro-tumorigenic matrix metalloproteinases, urokinase-type plasminogen activator, Interleukin 6, Interleukin 8, and vascular endothelial growth factor in normal breast tissue. Conclusions: GH pathways may be targetable for cancer prevention therapeutics in postmenopausal women with dense breast tissue.

  • 16.
    Derolf, Asa
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Benson, Lina
    Epidemiol and Reg Oncol Ctr Stockholm, Sweden.
    Floisand, Yngvar
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Lazarevic, Vladimir
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Antunovic, Petar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Mollgard, Lars
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lehmann, Soren
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Uggla, Bertil
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Anders
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Hoglund, Martin
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Deneberg, Stefan
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Letter: Decreasing early mortality in acute myeloid leukaemia in Sweden 1997-2014: improving performance status is a major contributing factor in BRITISH JOURNAL OF HAEMATOLOGY, vol 188, issue 1, pp 187-1912020In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 188, no 1, p. 187-191Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 17.
    Dimberg, Jan
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Rubér, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Skarstedt, Marita
    Dept Lab Med, Sweden.
    Andersson, Manne
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Genetic polymorphism patterns suggest a genetic driven inflammatory response as pathogenesis in appendicitis2020In: International Journal of Colorectal Disease, ISSN 0179-1958, E-ISSN 1432-1262, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 277-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The pathogenesis of appendicitis is not well understood. Environmental factors are regarded most important, but epidemiologic findings suggest a role of inflammatory and genetic mechanisms. This study determines the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of inflammatory genes with appendicitis. Methods As part of a larger prospective study on the diagnostic value of inflammatory variables in appendicitis, the genotype frequency of 28 polymorphisms in 26 inflammatory response genes from the appendicitis and control patients was analyzed in blood samples from 343 patients, 100 with appendicitis, and 243 with non-specific abdominal pain, using TaqMan SNP genotyping assays. Results Associations with appendicitis were found for SNPs IL-13 rs1800925 with odds ratio (OR) 6.02 (95% CI 1.52-23.78) for T/T versus C/C + T/T, for IL-17 rs2275913 with OR 2.38 (CI 1.24-4.57) for A/A vs G/G + GA, for CCL22 rs223888 with OR 0.12 (0.02-0.90), and for A/A vs G/G + GA. Signs of effect modification of age for the association with appendicitis were found for IL-13 rs1800925 and CTLA4 rs3087243. Stratified analysis showed difference in association with severity of disease for IL-17 rs2275913 and CD44 rs187115. Conclusions The association of gene variants on risk of appendicitis and its severity suggest an etiologic role of genetically regulated inflammatory response. This may have implications for understanding the prognosis of untreated appendicitis as a possible self-limiting disorder and for understanding the inverse association of appendicitis with ulcerative colitis.

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  • 18.
    Everhov, Asa
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sachs, Michael
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Khalili, Hamed
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA.
    Askling, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Neovius, Martin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Nordenvall, Caroline
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Soderling, Jonas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Olen, Ola
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Sachs Children and Youth Hosp, Sweden.
    Work Loss in Relation to Pharmacological and Surgical Treatment for Crohns Disease: A Population-Based Cohort Study2020In: Clinical Epidemiology, ISSN 1179-1349, E-ISSN 1179-1349, Vol. 12, p. 273-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Patients with Crohns disease have increased work loss. We aimed to describe changes in work ability in relation to pharmacological and surgical treatments. Patients and Methods: We linked data from the Swedish National Patient Register, The Swedish Quality Register for Inflammatory Bowel Disease SWIBREG, The Prescribed Drug Register, The Longitudinal Integrated Database for Health Insurance and Labour Market Studies, and the Social Insurance Database. We identified working-age (19-59 years) patients with incident Crohns disease 2006-2013 and population comparator subjects matched by sex, birth year, region, and education level. We assessed the number of lost workdays due to sick leave and disability pension before and after treatments. Results: Of 3956 patients (median age 34 years, 51% women), 39% were treated with aminosalicylates, 52% with immunomodulators, 22% with TNF inhibitors, and 18% with intestinal surgery during a median follow-up of 5.3 years. Most patients had no work loss during the study period (median=0 days). For all treatments, the mean number of lost workdays increased during the months before treatment initiation, peaked during the first month of treatment and decreased thereafter, and was heavily influenced by sociodemographic factors and amount of work loss before first Crohns disease diagnosis. The mean increase in work loss days compared to pre-therapeutic level was similar to 3 days during the first month of treatment for all pharmacological therapies and 11 days for intestinal surgery. Three months after treatment initiation, 88% of patients treated surgically and 90-92% of patients treated pharmacologically had the same amount of work loss as before treatment start. Median time to return to work was 2 months for all treatments. Conclusion: In this regular clinical setting, patients treated surgically had more lost workdays than patients treated pharmacologically, but return to work was similar between all treatments.

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  • 19.
    Fan, Chuanwen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Sichuan Univ, Peoples R China; Collaborat Innovat Ctr Biotherapy, Peoples R China.
    Kopsida, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Liu, Youbin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Sichuan Univ, Peoples R China; Collaborat Innovat Ctr Biotherapy, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Hong
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Gao, Jingfang
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Cao, Si-Yu-Wei
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Li, Yuan
    Sichuan Univ, Peoples R China; Collaborat Innovat Ctr Biotherapy, Peoples R China.
    Zhou, Zong-Guang
    Sichuan Univ, Peoples R China; Collaborat Innovat Ctr Biotherapy, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Prognostic Heterogeneity of MRE11 Based on the Location of Primary Colorectal Cancer Is Caused by Activation of Different Immune Signals2020In: Frontiers in Oncology, ISSN 2234-943X, E-ISSN 2234-943X, Vol. 9, article id 1465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: MRE11 plays an important role in DNA damage response for the maintenance of genome stability, and is becoming a prognostic marker for cancers, including colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the correlations of MRE11 to prognosis and tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells (TIICs) in different locations of CRC remains unclear. Methods: Among Swedish and TCGA-COREAD patients, we investigated the association of MRE11 expression, tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells (TIICs) and microsatellite status with survival in right-sided colon cancer (RSCC) and left-sided colon and rectal cancer (LSCRC). The signaling of MRE11-related was further analyzed using weighted gene co-expression network analysis and ClueGO. Results: High MRE11 expression alone or combination of high MRE11 expression with high TIICs was related to favorable prognosis in LSCRC. Moreover, high MRE11 expression was associated with favorable prognosis in LSCRC with microsatellite stability. The relationships above were adjusted for tumor stage, differentiation, and/or TIICs. However, no such evidence was observed in RSCC. Several signaling pathways involving MRE11 were found to be associated with cell cycle and DNA repair in RSCC and LSCRC, whereas, the activation of the immune response and necrotic cell death were specifically correlated with LSCRC. Conclusions: High MRE11 expression is an independent prognostic marker in LSCRC and enhanced prognostic potency of combining high MRE11 with high TIICs in LSCRC, mainly due to differential immune signaling activated by MRE11 in RSCC and LSCRC, respectively.

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  • 20.
    Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Tesch, Per A.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Tommy R.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Alkner, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Reg Jonkoping Cty, Sweden.
    Rullman, Eric
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Thomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Three months of bed rest induce a residual transcriptomic signature resilient to resistance exercise countermeasures2020In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the muscle genome-wide response to long-term unloading (84-day bed rest) in 21 men. We hypothesized that a part of the bed rest-induced gene expression signature would be resilient to a concurrent flywheel resistance exercise (RE) countermeasure. Using DNA microarray technology analyzing 35 345 gene-level probe-sets, we identified 335 annotated probe-sets that were downregulated, and 315 that were upregulated after bed rest (P &lt; .01). Besides a predictable differential expression of genes and pathways related to mitochondria (downregulation; false-discovery rates (FDR) &lt;1E-04), ubiquitin system (upregulation; FDR = 3E-02), and skeletal muscle energy metabolism and structure (downregulation; FDR &lt;= 3E-03), 84-day bed rest also altered circadian rhythm regulation (upregulation; FDR = 3E-02). While most of the bed rest-induced changes were counteracted by RE, 209 transcripts were resilient to the exercise countermeasure. Genes upregulated after bed rest were particularly resistant to training (P &lt; .001 vs downregulated, non-reversed genes). Specifically, "Translation Factors," "Proteasome Degradation," "Cell Cycle," and "Nucleotide Metabolism" pathways were not normalized by RE. This study provides an unbiased high-throughput transcriptomic signature of one of the longest unloading periods in humans to date. Classical disuse-related changes in structural and metabolic genes/pathways were identified, together with a novel upregulation of circadian rhythm transcripts. In the context of previous bed rest campaigns, the latter seemed to be related to the duration of unloading, suggesting the transcriptomic machinery continues to adapt throughout extended disuse periods. Despite that the RE training offset most of the bed rest-induced muscle-phenotypic and transcriptomic alterations, we contend that the human skeletal muscle also displays a residual transcriptomic signature of unloading that is resistant to an established exercise countermeasure.

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  • 21.
    Fohlin, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Bekkhus, Tove
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Sandström, Josefine
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    RAB6C is an independent prognostic factor of estrogen receptor-positive/progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer2020In: Oncology Letters, ISSN 1792-1074, E-ISSN 1792-1082, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 52-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The majority of breast cancer tumors are estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) and can be treated with endocrine therapy. However, certain patients may exhibit a good prognosis without systemic treatment. The aim of the present study was to identify novel prognostic factors for patients with ER breast cancer tumors using gene copy data, and to investigate if these factors have prognostic value in subgroups categorized by progesterone receptor status (PR). Public data, including the whole genome gene copy data of 199 systemically untreated patients with ER+ tumors, were utilized in the present study. To assess prognostic value, patients were divided into two groups using the median gene copy number as a cut-off for the SNPs that were the most variable. One SNP was identified, which indicated that the Ras-related protein Rab-6C (RAB6C) gene may exhibit prognostic significance. Therefore, RAB6C protein expression was subsequently investigated in a second independent cohort, consisting of 469 systematically untreated patients (of which 310 were ER+) who received long term follow-up. In the public data set, a distant recurrence risk reduction of 55% was determined for copy numbers above the median value of RAB6C compared with numbers below [multivariable adjusted hazard ratio (HR), 0.45; 95% CI 0.28-0.72; P=0.001)]. It was also more pronounced in the ER+/PR- subgroup (HR, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.05-0.46; P=0.001). In the second cohort, patients of the ER+/PR- subgroup who exhibited high RAB6C expression had a reduced distant recurrence risk (HR, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.05-0.60; P=0.006). However, this was not identified among ER+/PR- tumors (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 0.69-2.48; P=0.41). The results of the present study indicated that RAB6C serves as an independent prognostic factor of distant recurrence risk in systemically untreated patients with an ER+/PR- tumor.

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  • 22.
    Fritzell, Peter
    et al.
    Lanssjukhuset Ryhov, Sweden.
    Welinder-Olsson, Christina
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Joensson, Bodil
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Melhus, Asa
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Andersson, Siv G. E.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Bergstrom, Tomas
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Gerdhem, Paul
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hagg, Olle
    Spine Ctr Goteborg, Sweden.
    Laestander, Hans
    Spine Ctr Goteborg, Sweden.
    Knutsson, Bjorn
    Sundsvall Hosp, Sweden.
    Lundin, Anders
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ekman, Per
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden.
    Rydman, Eric
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden.
    Skorpil, Mikael
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Correction: Bacteria: back pain, leg pain and Modic sign-a surgical multicenter comparative study (vol 28, pg 2981, 2019)2020In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 196-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 23.
    Hagbom, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Molecular Medicine and Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Meira de Faria, Felipe
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tinnerfelt Winberg, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Westerberg, Sonja
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Molecular Medicine and Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nordgren, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Molecular Medicine and Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sharma, Sumit
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Molecular Medicine and Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Keita, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Loitto, Vesa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Molecular Medicine and Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Neurotrophic Factors Protect the Intestinal Barrier from Rotavirus Insult in Mice2020In: mBio, ISSN 2161-2129, E-ISSN 2150-7511, Vol. 11, no 1, article id e02834-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased intestinal permeability has been proposed as a mechanism of rotavirus-induced diarrhea. Studies with humans and mice have, however, shown that rotavirus leaves intestinal permeability unaffected or even reduced during diarrhea, in contrast to most bacterial infections. Gastrointestinal permeability is regulated by the vagus nerve and the enteric nervous system, which is composed of neurons and enteric glial cells (EGCs). We investigated whether the vagus nerve, serotonin (5-HT), EGCs, and neurotropic factors contribute to maintaining gut barrier homeostasis during rotavirus infection. Using subdiaphragmatic vagotomized and 5-HT3 receptor knockout mice, we found that the unaffected epithelial barrier during rotavirus infection is independent of the vagus nerve but dependent on 5-HT signaling through enteric intrinsic 5-HT3 receptors. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that rotavirus-infected enterocytes were in close contact with EGCs and enteric neurons and that the glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was strongly upregulated in enterocytes of infected mice. Moreover, rotavirus and 5-HT activated EGCs (P &lt; 0.001). Using Ussing chambers, we found that GDNF and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) led to denser epithelial barriers in small intestinal resections from noninfected mice (P &lt; 0.01) and humans (P &lt; 0.001) and that permeability was unaffected in rotavirus-infected mice. GSNO made the epithelial barrier denser in Caco-2 cells by increasing the expression of the tight junction protein zona occludens 1 (P &lt; 0.001), resulting in reduced passage of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (P &lt; 0.05) in rotavirus-infected monolayers. This is the first report to show that neurotropic factors contribute to maintaining the gut epithelial barrier during viral insult. IMPORTANCE Human and mouse studies have shown that rotavirus infection is associated with low inflammation and unaffected intestinal barrier at the time of diarrhea, properties different from most bacterial and inflammatory diseases of the gut. We showed by in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments that neurotrophic factors and 5-HT have barrier protective properties during rotavirus insult. These observations advance our understanding of how the gut barrier is protected against rotavirus and suggest that rotavirus affects the gut barrier differently from bacteria. This is the first report to show that neurotrophic factors contribute to maintain the gut epithelial barrier during viral insult.

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  • 24. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Colorectal Liver Metastases – Different Aspects on Treatment with Associated Liver Partition and Portal Vein Ligation for Staged Hepatectomy and on Portal Vein Occlusion2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: For patients with colorectal liver metastases (CRLM), the only treatment with a possibility for long-term survival and cure is radical resection. The majority of patients are at the time of diagnosis not assessed as resectable because they have advanced disease in the liver or unresectable extrahepatic disease or are too frail to withstand liver surgery. Patients who at the time of diagnosis are not assessed as resectable may be treated with conversion chemotherapy to downsize the tumor burden and render the patient eligible for resection. One concern with chemotherapy administered preoperatively has been the potential negative effect on the future liver remnant (FLR), especially for patients with a low volume of the FLR who are undergoing techniques to increase the volume. Established techniques to increase the volume are portal vein occlusion (PVO) and two-staged hepatectomy (TSH). A more recent method is Associating Liver Partition and Portal Vein Ligation for Staged Hepatectomy (ALPPS). Due to the relative novelty of ALPPS, the long-term oncological results are not known. For patients with CRLM, resection of liver metastases is more favorable from a health economic perspective than palliative treatment and results in a higher quality of life than palliative chemotherapy. For patients undergoing ALPPS as well as TSH, the data are scarce.

    Aim: The aim of the first study was to determine whether preoperative chemotherapy has a negative impact on the volume increase for patients undergoing ALPPS. The aim of the second study was to analyze the temporal course of the volume increase in the FLR for patients undergoing PVO. The aim of the third study was to study the long-term outcome for patients randomized to ALPPS or TSH. The aim of the fourth study was to perform a health economic analysis of patients randomized to ALPPS or TSH.

    Methods: The first study was based on data from the ALPPS registry, which is an international registry initiated 2012. All patients included in the registry between 2012 and 2016 were included. The patients were divided into the following four groups: no preoperative chemotherapy, 1 regimen of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, more than 1 regimen, and more than 1 regimen with the addition of monoclonal antibodies. The volume increase between interventions 1 and 2 was analyzed. In the second study, a retrospective analysis was performed of patients randomized to TSH. Forty-eight patients were included. The volume increase of the FLR was analyzed as the kinetic growth rate (KGR). The KGR was calculated from PVO until radical hepatectomy or exclusion, as well as between the first and second radiological evaluations. In the third and fourth studies, patients randomized to ALPPS and TSH were included. In the third study, survival, as well as factors affecting the outcome, were analyzed. In the fourth study, a calculation of resource use was performed, as was an analysis of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) for the groups.

    Results: In the first study, it was found that chemotherapy had no negative impact on the volume increase for patients undergoing ALPPS. In the second study, it was found that the volume increase of the FLR was largest the first week after ALPPS. In the third study, it was found that patients randomized to ALPPS had a longer survival than those randomized to TSH. Of the factors affecting the outcome, resection of liver metastases had a significant impact. In the fourth study, no significant difference could be found in resource use or HRQoL for patients randomized to ALPPS over TSH.

    Conclusion: Patients with advanced CRLM undergoing ALPPS should receive preoperative chemotherapy, if indicated. For those undergoing PVO, early evaluation is crucial to evaluate the volume increase, and for those with insufficient increase, additional techniques to increase the volume should be considered. Resection of liver metastases is an important factor to improve the outcome. Further studies are warranted to conclude whether ALPPS or TSH is most effective from a health economic perspective.

    List of papers
    1. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy does not affect future liver remnant growth and outcomes of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neoadjuvant chemotherapy does not affect future liver remnant growth and outcomes of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy
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    2017 (English)In: Surgery, ISSN 0039-6060, E-ISSN 1532-7361, Vol. 161, no 5, p. 1255-1265Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The only potentially curative treatment for patients with colorectal liver metastases is hepatectomy. Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy has emerged as a method of treatment for patients with inadequate future liver remnant. One concern about associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy is that preoperative chemotherapy may negatively affect the volume increase of the future liver remnant and outcomes. Methods. This study from the International Associating Liver Partition and Portal Vein Ligation for Staged Hepatectomy Registry (NCT01924741) includes 442 patients with colorectal liver metastases registered from 2012-2016. Future liver remnant hypertrophy (absolute increase, percent increase, and kinetic growth rate) and clinical outcome were analyzed retrospectively in relation to type and amount of chemotherapy. The analyzed groups included patients with no chemotherapy, 1 regimen of chemotherapy, amp;gt; 1 regimen, and a group that received monoclonal antibodies in addition to chemotherapy. Results. Ninety percent of the patients received neoadjuvant oncologic therapy including 42% with 1 regimen of chemotherapy, 44% with monoclonal antibodies, and 4% with amp;gt; 1 regimen. Future liver remnant increased between 74-92% with the largest increase in the group with 1 regimen of chemotherapy. The increase in milliliters was between 241 mL (amp;gt; 1 regimen) and 306 mL (1 regimen). Kinetic growth rate was between 14-18% per week and was greatest for the group with 1 regimen of chemotherapy. No statistical significance was found between the groups with any of the measurements of future liver remnant hypertrophy. Conclusion. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy, including monoclonal antibodies, does not negatively affect future liver remnant growth. Patients with colorectal liver metastases who might be potential candidates for associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy should be considered for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. (Surgery 2017;161:1255-65.)

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    MOSBY-ELSEVIER, 2017
    National Category
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-137854 (URN)10.1016/j.surg.2016.11.033 (DOI)000400318000011 ()28081953 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2017-06-02 Created: 2017-06-02 Last updated: 2020-04-28
    2. Future Liver Remnant (FLR) Increase in Patients with Colorectal Liver Metastases Is Highest the First Week After Portal Vein Occlusion: FLR Increase in Patients with CRLM Is Highest the First Week After PVO.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Future Liver Remnant (FLR) Increase in Patients with Colorectal Liver Metastases Is Highest the First Week After Portal Vein Occlusion: FLR Increase in Patients with CRLM Is Highest the First Week After PVO.
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    2019 (English)In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, ISSN 1091-255X, E-ISSN 1873-4626, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 556-562Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Portal vein occlusion (PVO) is an established method to increase the volume of the future liver remnant (FLR). The main reasons for not proceeding to radical hepatectomy are lack of volume increase and tumor progression due to a wait-time interval of up to 8 weeks. The hypothesis was that the increase in FLR volume is not linear and is largest during the first weeks.

    METHODS: Patients with colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) and standardized future liver remnant (sFLR) < 30% treated with PVO were prospectively included. All patients had at least one CT evaluation before radical hepatectomy.

    RESULTS: Forty-eight patients were included. During the first week after PVO, the kinetic growth rate (KGR) was 5.4 (± 4), compared to 1.5 (± 2) between the first and second CT (p < 0.05). For patients reaching adequate FLR and therefore treated with radical hepatectomy, the KGR was 7 (± 4) the first week, compared to 4.3 (± 2) for patients who failed to reach a sufficient volume (p = 0.4). During the interval between the first and second CT, the KGR was 2.2 (± 2), respectively (± 0.1) (p = 0.017).

    DISCUSSION: The increase in liver volume after PVO is largest during the first week. As KGR decreases over time, it is important to shorten the interval between PVO and the first volume evaluation; this may aid in decision-making and reduce unnecessary waiting time.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2019
    Keywords
    Colorectal liver metastases, Future liver remnant, Liver surgery, Portal vein embolization, Portal vein ligation
    National Category
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-163892 (URN)10.1007/s11605-018-4031-3 (DOI)000461287300014 ()30465187 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|LIO-534891, FORSS-560521, FORSS-660121, and FORSS-753-621

    Available from: 2020-02-25 Created: 2020-02-25 Last updated: 2020-04-28
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  • 25.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Isaksson, Bengt
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Ardnor, Bjarne
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Lindell, Gert
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Rizell, Magnus
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stromberg, Cecilia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Loftås, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Liver resection is beneficial for patients with colorectal liver metastases and extrahepatic disease2020In: Annals of Translational Medicine, ISSN 2305-5839, E-ISSN 2305-5847, Vol. 8, no 4, article id 109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Liver metastases are the most common cause of death for patients with colorectal cancer and affect up to half of the patients. Liver resection is an established method that can potentially be curative. For patients with extrahepatic disease (EHD), the role of liver surgery is less established. Methods: This is a retrospective study based on data from the national quality registry SweLiv. Data were obtained between 2009 and 2015. SweLiv is a validated registry and has been in use since 2009, with coverage above 95%. Patients with liver metastases and EHD were analyzed and cross-checked against the national death cause registry for survival analysis. Results: During the study period, 2,174 patients underwent surgery for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM), and 277 patients with EHD were treated with resection or ablation. The estimated median survival time for the entire cohort from liver resection/ablation was 40 months (95% CI, 32-47). The survival time for patients treated with liver resection was 45 months compared to 26 months for patients treated with ablation (95% CI 38-53, 18-33, P=0.001). A subgroup analysis of resected patients revealed that the group with pulmonary metastases had a significantly longer estimated median survival (50 months; 95 % CI, 39-60) than the group with lymph node metastases (32 months; 95% CI, 7-58) or peritoneal carcinomatosis (28 months; 95% CI, 14-41) (P=0.022 and 0.012, respectively). Other negative prognostic factors were major liver resection and nonradical liver resection. Conclusions: For patients with liver metastases and limited EHD, liver resection results in prolonged survival compared to what can be expected from chemotherapy alone.

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  • 26.
    Jarvholm, Kajsa
    et al.
    SKane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bruze, Gustaf
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Peltonen, Markku
    Natl Inst Hlth and Welf, Finland.
    Marcus, Claude
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Flodmark, Carl-Erik
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Henfridsson, Pia
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Beamish, Andrew J.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Royal Coll Surgeons England, England.
    Gronowitz, Eva
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dahlgren, Jovanna
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Olbers, Torsten
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    5-year mental health and eating pattern outcomes following bariatric surgery in adolescents: a prospective cohort study2020In: LANCET CHILD and ADOLESCENT HEALTH, ISSN 2352-4642, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 210-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Mental health problems are prevalent among adolescents with severe obesity, but long-term mental health outcomes after adolescent bariatric surgery are not well known. We aimed to assess mental health outcomes over 5 years of follow-up after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery in adolescents who participated in the Adolescent Morbid Obesity Surgery (AMOS) study. Methods This was a non-randomised matched-control study in adolescents aged 13-18 years who had a BMI of 40 kg/m(2) or higher, or 35 kg/m(2) or higher in addition to obesity-related comorbidity; who had previously undergone failed comprehensive conservative treatment; and were of pubertal Tanner stage III or higher, with height growth velocity beyond peak. A contemporary control group, matched for BMI, age, and sex, who underwent conventional obesity treatment, was obtained from the Swedish Childhood Obesity Treatment Register. Data on dispensed psychiatric drugs and specialist treatment for mental disorders were retrieved from national registers with complete coverage. In the surgical group only, questionnaires were used to assess self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem [RSE] score), mood (Mood Adjective Checklist [MACL]), and eating patterns (Binge Eating Scale [BES] and Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire-R21 [TFEQ]). This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00289705). Findings Between April 10, 2006, and May 20, 2009, 81 adolescents (53 [65%] female) underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, and 80 control participants received conventional treatment. The proportion of participants prescribed psychiatric drugs did not differ between groups in the years before study inclusion (pre-baseline; absolute risk difference 5% [95% CI -7 to 16], p=0.4263) or after intervention (10% [-6 to 24], p=0.2175). Treatment for mental and behavioural disorders did not differ between groups before baseline (2% [-10 to 14], p=0.7135); however, adolescents in the surgical group had more specialised psychiatric treatment in the 5 years after obesity treatment than did the control group (15% [1 to 28], p=0.0410). There were few patients who discontinued psychiatric treatment post-surgery (three [4%] receiving psychiatric drug treatment and six [7%] receiving specialised care for a mental disorder before surgery). In the surgical group, self-esteem (RSE score) was improved after 5 years (mixed model mean 21.6 [95% CI 19.9 to 23.4]) relative to baseline (18.9 [17.4 to 20.4], p=0.0059), but overall mood (MACL score) was not (2.8 [2.7 to 2.9] at 5 years vs 2.7 [2.6 to 2.8] at baseline, p=0.0737). Binge eating was improved at 5 years (9.3 [7.4 to 11.2]) relative to baseline (15.0 [13.5 to 16.5], pamp;lt;0.0001). Relative changes in BMI were not associated with the presence or absence of binge eating at baseline. Interpretation Mental health problems persist in adolescents 5 years after bariatric surgery despite substantial weight loss. Although bariatric surgery can improve many aspects of health, alleviation of mental health problems should not be expected, and a multidisciplinary bariatric team should offer long-term mental health support after surgery. Copyright (C) 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 27.
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Jadersten, Martin
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Deneberg, Stefan
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lehmann, Soren
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Mollgard, Lars
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Wennstrom, Lovisa
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Antunovic, Petar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cammenga, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Lorenz, Fryderyk
    Norrland Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Olander, Emma
    Sundsvall Hosp, Sweden.
    Lazarevic, Vladimir Lj
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Hoglund, Martin
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    The prognostic impact of FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutation in adult AML is age-dependent in the population-based setting2020In: BLOOD ADVANCES, ISSN 2473-9529, Vol. 4, no 6, p. 1094-1101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In acute myeloid leukemia (AML) FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD) and nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) mutations provide prognostic information with clinical relevance through choice of treatment, but the effect of age and sex on these molecular markers has not been evaluated. The Swedish AML Registry contains data on FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutations dating to 2007, and 1570 adult patients younger than 75 years, excluding acute promyelocytic leukemia, had molecular results reported. Females more often had FLT3(ITD) and/or NPM1(mut) (FLT3(ITD) : female, 29%; male, 22% [P - .00151; NPM1(mut) : female, 36%; male, 27% [P &lt; .0001]), and more males were double negative (female, 53%; male, 64%; P &lt; .0001). Patients with FLT3(ITD) were younger than those without (59 vs 62 years; P = .023), in contrast to patients with NPM1(mut) (62 vs 60 years; P = .059). Interestingly, their prognostic effect had a strong dependence on age: FLT3(ITD) indicated poor survival in younger patients (&lt;60 years; P = .00003), but had no effect in older patients (60-74 years; P = .5), whereas NPM1(mut) indicated better survival in older patients (P = .00002), but not in younger patients (P = .95). In FLT3(ITD)/NPM1(mut) patients, the survival was less dependent on age than in the other molecular subsets. These findings are likely to have clinical relevance for risk grouping, study design, and choice of therapy.

  • 28.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Burn scar outcome at six and 12 months after injury in children with partial thickness scalds: Effects of dressing treatment.2020In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 546-551, article id S0305-4179(19)30714-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: In line with other researchers in the field of burns' care, we think that research investigating the long-term outcome of scars is largely lacking. As scarring is of the utmost importance to the patient, clinicians who treat burns must aim to find treatments that lead to a good end result. The aim of this study was to study scar outcomes at six and 12 months after injury. It is an extension of a previous randomised controlled trial (RCT) in which two dressings (porcine xenograft and silver foam dressing) were examined with respect to their ability to help heal partial thickness scalds.

    METHOD: Children aged six months - six years with acute partial thickness scalds, on the trunk, or extremities, or both, were included. In the previous study, the silver foam was found to have significantly shorter healing times than the xenograft. Children were assessed at six and 12 months after injury for this study, and photographs were taken of the burn site, and both the patient and observer scar assessment scale (POSAS) and the Vancouver scar scale (VSS) were completed and evaluated by blinded observers.

    RESULTS: Of the 58 children from the original RCT, 39 returned to the clinic for evaluation of their scars at six months, and 34 at 12 months after injury. There were no differences in POSAS, VSS total scores, or incidence of hypertrophic scarring between the different dressings. Fifteen children were assessed as having hypertrophic scarring, all of whom had healing times that had extended beyond 14 days.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study compared burn scarring after two different treatments for burns in children with partial-thickness scalds and the data suggested that neither dressing had a more favourable impact on scar outcome. The conclusion is, however, tempered by the non-return of all the patients to the follow up. However, as anticipated, regardless of the dressing used, longer healing times were associated with higher scar scores (more scarring) and hypertrophic scarring.

  • 29.
    Keita, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Yakimenko Alkaissi, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Boström Holm, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Heil, Stéphanie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Molecular Medicine and Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Chassaing, Benoit
    Georgia State Univ, GA 30303 USA; Georgia State Univ, GA 30303 USA.
    Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette
    Univ Auvergne, France.
    McKay, Derek M.
    Univ Calgary, Canada.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Enhanced E. coli LF82 Translocation through the Follicle-associated Epithelium in Crohns Disease is Dependent on Long Polar Fimbriae and CEACAM6 expression, and Increases Paracellular Permeability2020In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 216-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: Patients with Crohns disease [CD] harbour an increased number of adherent-invasive E. coli [AIEC]. The strain LF82, identified in the ileal mucosa of CD patients, has been extensively studied for pathogenic mechanisms. However, understanding of the interaction of LF82 with the intestinal mucosa of CD patients is lacking. Methods: Here, we investigated the importance of long polar fimbriae [LPF] type 1 pili and the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell-adhesion molecule 6 [CEACAM6] for translocation of LF82 in an in vitro model of follicle-associated epithelium [FAE], and in the FAE and villus epithelium [VE] of patients with CD and controls, using Ussing chambers. Results: Significantly greater LF82 passage occurred in the FAE model compared with in the VE Caco-2cl1 mono-culture. Moreover, bacterial translocation was inhibited by either LPF disruption or pre-incubation with anti-CEACAM6 antibody. Tissue mounted in Ussing chambers showed significantly higher LF82 passage in FAE from patients with CD compared with control FAE, that was diminished in LF82 lacking LPF and by blocking host CEACAM6. Interestingly, addition of LF82 to the CD FAE tissues significantly increased paracellular permeability [of (51)Chromium-EDTA] compared with baseline, and the increase was inhibited by anti-CEACAM6. Immunofluorescence and immunoblots showed higher expression of CEACAM6 in FAE of patients with CD compared with in FAE from controls. Conclusions: These data suggest that the FAE of CD patients is a site of vulnerability for invasion by LF82 via a mechanism that requires both bacterial LPF and host CEACAM6. Further, LF82 has the ability to increase paracellular passage through the FAE of patients with CD. These data can help define novel therapeutic targets in CD for the prevention of clinical recurrence.

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  • 30.
    Lagerlof, Ingemar
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Holte, Harald
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; KG Jebsen Ctr B Cell Malignancies, Norway.
    Glimelius, Ingrid
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Bjorkholm, Magnus
    Karolinska Univ, Sweden.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Erlanson, Martin
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Fluge, Oystein
    Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Fohlin, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Fossa, Alexander
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; KG Jebsen Ctr B Cell Malignancies, Norway.
    Goldkuhl, Christina
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Gustavsson, Anita
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ann-Sofie
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Linderoth, Johan
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nome, Ole
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Palma, Marzia
    Karolinska Univ, Sweden.
    Akesson, Lisa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Ostenstad, Bjorn
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Raud, Cecilia
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Molin, Daniel
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    No excess long-term mortality in stage I-IIA Hodgkin lymphoma patients treated with ABVD and limited field radiotherapy2020In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 188, no 5, p. 685-691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When treating limited stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), balancing treatment efficacy and toxicity is important. Toxicities after extended-field radiotherapy are well documented. Investigators have aimed at reducing toxicity without compromising efficacy, mainly by using combined modality treatment (CMT), i.e. chemotherapy and limited-field radiotherapy. In some clinical trials, radiotherapy has been omitted. We evaluated 364 patients with stage I-IIA cHL treated between 1999 and 2005. Patients were treated with two or four cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine (ABVD) according to presence of risk factors, followed by 30 Gy limited-field (reduced compared to involved-field) radiotherapy. After a median follow-up of 16 years for survival, freedom from progression at five and ten years was 93% and overall survival at 5 and 10 years was 98% and 96%, respectively. Only two relapses, out of 27, occurred after more than 5 years. There was no excess mortality compared to the general population. Of the analysed subgroups, only patients with progression within five years showed significant excess mortality. The absence of excess mortality questions the concept of omitting radiotherapy after short-term chemotherapy, a strategy that has been associated with an elevated risk of relapse but not yet with a proven reduced long-term excess mortality.

  • 31.
    Li, Jun
    et al.
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany.
    Moustafa, Mohamed
    Univ Padua, Italy.
    Linecker, Michael
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Switzerland.
    Lurje, Georg
    Univ Hosp RWTH Aachen, Germany.
    Capobianco, Ivan
    Univ Hosp Tuebingen, Germany.
    Baumgart, Janine
    Univ Hosp Mainz, Germany.
    Ratti, Francesca
    Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Rauchfuss, Falk
    Univ Hosp Jena, Germany.
    Balci, Deniz
    Ankara Univ, Turkey.
    Fernandes, Eduardo
    Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Sao Lucas Hosp Copacabana, Brazil.
    Montalti, Roberto
    Federico II Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Robles-Campos, Ricardo
    Virgen Arrixaca Hosp, Spain.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Topp, Stefan A.
    Univ Hosp Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Fronek, Jiri
    Inst Clin and Expt Med, Czech Republic; Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic.
    Liu, Chao
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Peoples R China.
    Wahba, Roger
    Univ Hosp Cologne, Germany.
    Bruns, Christiane
    Univ Hosp Cologne, Germany.
    Brunner, Stefan M.
    Univ Med Ctr Regensburg, Germany.
    Schlitt, Hans J.
    Univ Med Ctr Regensburg, Germany.
    Heumann, Asmus
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany.
    Stueben, Bjoern-Ole
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany.
    Izbicki, Jakob R.
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany.
    Bednarsch, Jan
    Univ Hosp RWTH Aachen, Germany.
    Gringeri, Enrico
    Univ Padua, Italy.
    Fasolo, Elisa
    Univ Padua, Italy.
    Rolinger, Jens
    Univ Hosp Tuebingen, Germany.
    Kristek, Jakub
    Inst Clin and Expt Med, Czech Republic; Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic.
    Hernandez-Alejandro, Roberto
    Univ Rochester, NY USA.
    Schnitzbauer, Andreas
    Univ Hosp Frankfurt, Germany.
    Nuessler, Natascha
    Munchen Klin Neuperlach, Germany.
    Schoen, Michael R.
    Klinikum Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Voskanyan, Sergey
    AI Burnazyan Russian State Sci Ctr FMBC FMBA, Russia.
    Petrou, Athanasios S.
    Nicosia Teaching Hosp, Cyprus.
    Hahn, Oszkar
    Semmelweis Univ, Hungary.
    Soejima, Yuji
    Shinshu Univ, Japan.
    Vicente, Emilio
    San Pablo Univ CEU, Spain.
    Castro-Benitez, Carlos
    Univ Paris Saclay, France.
    Adam, Rene
    Univ Paris Saclay, France.
    Tomassini, Federico
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Troisi, Roberto Ivan
    Univ Ghent, Belgium; Univ Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Kantas, Alexandros
    Semmelweis Univ Budapest, Germany.
    Oldhafer, Karl Juergen
    Semmelweis Univ Budapest, Germany.
    Ardiles, Victoria
    Italian Hosp Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    de Santibanes, Eduardo
    Italian Hosp Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Malago, Massimo
    UCL, England.
    Clavien, Pierre-Alain
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Switzerland.
    Vivarelli, Marco
    Polytech Univ Marche, Italy.
    Settmacher, Utz
    Univ Hosp Jena, Germany.
    Aldrighetti, Luca
    Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Neumann, Ulf
    Univ Hosp RWTH Aachen, Germany.
    Petrowsky, Henrik
    Univ Hosp Zurich, Switzerland.
    Cillo, Umberto
    Univ Padua, Italy.
    Lang, Hauke
    Univ Hosp Mainz, Germany.
    Nadalin, Silvio
    Univ Hosp Tuebingen, Germany.
    ALPPS for Locally Advanced Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Did Aggressive Surgery Lead to the Oncological Benefit? An International Multi-center Study2020In: Annals of Surgical Oncology, ISSN 1068-9265, E-ISSN 1534-4681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background ALPPS is found to increase the resectability of primary and secondary liver malignancy at the advanced stage. The aim of the study was to verify the surgical and oncological outcome of ALPPS for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). Methods The study cohort was based on the ALPPS registry with patients from 31 international centers between August 2009 and January 2018. Propensity score matched patients receiving chemotherapy only were selected from the SEER database as controls for the survival analysis. Results One hundred and two patients undergoing ALPPS were recruited, 99 completed the second stage with median inter-stage duration of 11 days. The median kinetic growth rate was 23 ml/day. R0 resection was achieved in 87 (85%). Initially high rates of morbidity and mortality decreased steadily to a 29% severe complication rate and 7% 90-day morbidity in the last 2 years. Post-hepatectomy liver failure remained the main cause of 90-day mortality. Multivariate analysis revealed insufficient future liver remnant at the stage-2 operation (FLR2) to be the only risk factor for severe complications (OR 2.91, p = 0.02). The propensity score matching analysis showed a superior overall survival in the ALPPS group compared to palliative chemotherapy (median overall survival: 26.4 months vs 14 months; 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates: 82.4%, 70.5% and 39.6% vs 51.2%, 21.4% and 11.3%, respectively, p amp;lt; 0.01). The survival benefit, however, was not confirmed in the subgroup analysis for patients with insufficient FLR2 or multifocal ICC. Conclusion ALPPS showed high efficacy in achieving R0 resections in locally advanced ICC. To get the most oncological benefit from this aggressive surgery, ALPPS would be restricted to patients with single lesions and sufficient FLR2.

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  • 32.
    Lindblad, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Dept Orthoped, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Johansson, Torsten
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Dept Orthoped, Sweden.
    Risk factors during pregnancy and delivery for the development of Perthes disease, a nationwide Swedish study of 2.1 million individuals2020In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, BMC PREGNANCY AND CHILDBIRTH, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    To ascertain or disprove a correlation between suboptimal birth characteristics, breech position at delivery and development of Perthes’ disease.

    Methods

    Study material was collected from nationwide registers regarding diagnoses, birth statistics and delivery data. As study population were included children with a diagnosis code for Perthes’ disease who were alive and living in Sweden at age 13. Children with missing birth statistics were excluded. All children with no Perthes’ disease diagnosis were used as control group. Both single and multiple logistical regression analyses were used to calculate OR for the included characteristics.

    Results

    Children in breech position had a higher risk for developing Perthes’ disease. Children with Perthes’ disease had also a higher probability of having been born pre-term, very pre-term or post-term. Lower than normal birth weight and a lower Apgar-score were also associated with Perthes’ disease.

    Conclusions

    There is a correlation between breech birth and development of Perthes’ disease. There is also correlation to suboptimal birth characteristics. Despite our findings this should not be used for screening of Perthes’ disease as the percentage of children who actually develop it is very low. Also, as of yet there is no possibility to diagnose Perthes’ disease before the presence of skeletal changes. Our findings could be important in finding the cause of Perthes’ disease and therefore developing better diagnostics, treatment and prevention.

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  • 33.
    Malmström, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Lysiak, Malgorzata
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Åkesson, Lisa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jakobsen, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mudaisi, Munila
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Fomichov Casaballe, Victoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Broholm, Helle
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Grunnet, Kirsten
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark; Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Bratthall, Charlotte
    Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Strandeus, Michael
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Papagiannopoulou, Angeliki
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    ABCB1 single-nucleotide variants and survival in patients with glioblastoma treated with radiotherapy concomitant with temozolomide2020In: The Pharmacogenomics Journal, ISSN 1470-269X, E-ISSN 1473-1150, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 213-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Standard treatment for glioblastoma (GBM) patients is surgery and radiochemotherapy (RCT) with temozolomide (TMZ). TMZ is a substrate for ABCB1, a transmembrane drug transporter. It has been suggested that survival for GBM patients receiving TMZ is influenced by different single-nucleotide variants (SNV) of ABCB1. We therefore examined SNV:s of ABCB1, namely 1199Gamp;gt;A, 1236Camp;gt;T, 2677Gamp;gt;T/A, and 3435Camp;gt;T and correlated to survival for GBM patients receiving RCT. In a pilot cohort (97 patients) a significant correlation to survival was found for SNV 1199Gamp;gt;A, with median OS for variant G/G patients being 18.2 months versus 11.5 months for A/G (p = 0.012). We found no correlation to survival for the other SNV:s. We then expanded the cohort to 179 patients (expanded cohort) and also included a confirmatory cohort (49 patients) focusing on SNV 1199Gamp;gt;A. Median OS for G/G versus A/G plus A/A was 15.7 and 11.5 months, respectively (p = 0.085) for the expanded cohort and 13.8 versus 16.8 months (p = 0.19) for the confirmatory. In conclusion, in patients with GBM receiving RCT with TMZ, no correlation with survival was found for the SNV:s 1236Camp;gt;T, 2677Gamp;gt;T/A, and 3435Camp;gt;T of ABCB1. Although the SNV 1199Gamp;gt;A might have some impact, a clinically significant role could not be confirmed.

  • 34.
    Moltubak, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Landerholm, Kalle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Redéen, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Major Variation in the Incidence of Appendicitis Before, During and After Pregnancy: A Population-Based Cohort Study2020In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Previous studies indicate a low incidence of appendicitis in third-trimester pregnancy, suggesting a protecting effect of pregnancy. This large population-based cohort study analyzes the association of appendicitis with pregnancy in more detail. The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence of appendicitis and negative appendectomy before, during and after pregnancy. Methods Cross-linking between two Swedish health registries provided data on appendectomy for all women in Sweden giving birth between 1973 and 2013. We analyzed the incidence rates (IR) of perforated and non-perforated appendicitis and negative appendectomy before, during and after pregnancy, and secular trends during the study period. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were estimated using age-, sex- and period-specific IR from the background population in Sweden. Results Some 3,888,452 pregnancies resulted in birth during the study period. An appendectomy was registered for 27,575 women in the interval starting one year before and ending two years after pregnancy. The incidence of appendicitis varied substantially during and after pregnancy. SIR for perforated appendicitis was 0.47 (95% CI 0.38-0.59) in the third trimester, 3.89 (2.92-5.18) peripartum, 2.20 (1.89-2.55) in the puerperium and 1.27 (1.19-1.36) in the year postpartum. The pattern was similar for non-perforated appendicitis. Negative appendectomy decreased postpartum. Incidence rate of non-perforated appendicitis and negative appendectomy decreased for both pregnant and non-pregnant women during the study period. Conclusions The findings in this study suggest a protecting effect of pregnancy on the development of appendicitis, which is followed by a rebound effect after birth.

  • 35.
    Osterroos, Albin
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Anna
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Antunovic, Petar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Cammenga, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Deneberg, Stefan
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lazarevic, Vladimir
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lorenz, Fryderyk
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Mollgard, Lars
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Derolf, Asa R.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Uggla, Bertil
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Wennstrom, Lovisa
    Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden.
    Olander, Emma
    Sundsvall Hosp, Sweden.
    Hoglund, Martin
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lehmann, Soren
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Real-world data on treatment patterns and outcomes of hypomethylating therapy in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukaemia aged >= 60 years2020In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 36.
    Perlbach, Rico
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Palm, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Mohaddes, M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden; Registerctr VGR, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Schilcher, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Good implant survival after acetabular revision with extensive impaction bone grafting and uncemented components2020In: The Bone & Joint Journal, ISSN 2049-4394, E-ISSN 2049-4408, Vol. 102B, no 2, p. 198-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims This single-centre observational study aimed to describe the results of extensive bone impaction grafting of the whole acetabular cavity in combination with an uncemented component in acetabular revisions performed in a standardized manner since 1993. Methods Between 1993 and 2013, 370 patients with a median age of 72 years (interquartile range (IQR) 63 to 79 years) underwent acetabular revision surgery. Of these, 229 were more than ten years following surgery and 137 were more than 15 years. All revisions were performed with extensive use of morcellized allograft firmly impacted into the entire acetabular cavity, followed by insertion of an uncemented component with supplementary screw fixation. All types of reoperation were captured using review of radiographs and medical charts, combined with data from the local surgical register and the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register. Results Among patients with possible follow-up of ten and 15 years, 152 and 72 patients remained alive without revision of the acetabular component. The number of deaths was 61 and 50, respectively. Of those who died, six patients in each group had a reoperation performed before death. The number of patients with a reoperation was 22 for those with ten-year follow-up and 21 for those with 15 years of follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier implant survival rate for aseptic loosening among all 370 patients in the cohort was 96.3% (95% confidence interval (CI) 94.1 to 98.5) after ten years and 92.8% (95% CI 89.2 to 96.6) after 15 years. Conclusion Extensive bone impaction grafting combined with uncemented revision components appears to be a reliable method with favourable long-term survival. This technique offers the advantage of bone stock restoration and disputes the long-standing perception that uncemented components require amp;gt; 50% of host bone contact for successful implant survival.

  • 37.
    Pham, Tuan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Prince Mohammad Bin Fahd Univ, Saudi Arabia.
    Fan, Chuanwen
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Sichuan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Pfeifer, Daniella
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Hong
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Image-Based Network Analysis of DNp73 Expression by Immunohistochemistry in Rectal Cancer Patients2020In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 10, article id 1551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rectal cancer is a disease characterized with tumor heterogeneity. The combination of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy can reduce the risk of local recurrence. However, there is a significant difference in the response to radiotherapy among rectal cancer patients even they have the same tumor stage. Despite rapid advances in knowledge of cellular functions affecting radiosensitivity, there is still a lack of predictive factors for local recurrence and normal tissue damage. The tumor protein DNp73 is thought as a biomarker in colorectal cancer, but its clinical significance is still not sufficiently investigated, mainly due to the limitation of human-based pathology analysis. In this study, we investigated the predictive value of DNp73 in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma using image-based network analysis.

    Methods: The fuzzy weighted recurrence network of time series was extended to handle multi-channel image data, and applied to the analysis of immunohistochemistry images of DNp73 expression obtained from a cohort of 25 rectal cancer patients who underwent radiotherapy before surgery. Two mathematical weighted network properties, which are the clustering coefficient and characteristic path length, were computed for the image-based networks of the primary tumor (obtained after operation) and biopsy (obtained before operation) of each cancer patient.

    Results: The ratios of two weighted recurrence network properties of the primary tumors to biopsies reveal the correlation of DNp73 expression and long survival time, and discover the non-effective radiotherapy to a cohort of rectal cancer patients who had short survival time.

    Conclusion: Our work contributes to the elucidation of the predictive value of DNp73 expression in rectal cancer patients who were given preoperative radiotherapy. Mathematical properties of fuzzy weighted recurrence networks of immunohistochemistry images are not only able to show the predictive factor of DNp73 expression in the patients, but also reveal the identification of non-effective application of radiotherapy to those who had poor overall survival outcome.

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  • 38.
    Raatiniemi, Lasse
    et al.
    Oulu Univ Hosp, Finland; Univ Oulu, Finland.
    Magnusson, Vidar
    Landspitalinn Univ Hosp, Iceland.
    Hyldmo, Per K.
    Univ Stavanger, Norway; Norwegian Air Ambulance Fdn, Norway; Sorlandet Hosp, Norway.
    Friesgaard, Kristian D.
    Prehosp Emergency Med Serv, Denmark; Reg Hosp Horsens, Denmark.
    Kongstad, Poul
    Reg Skane, Sweden.
    Kurola, Jouni
    Kuopio Univ Hosp, Finland; Univ Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Larsen, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Rehn, Marius
    Univ Stavanger, Norway; Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Rognas, Leif
    Danish Air Ambulance, Denmark; Aarhus Univ Hosp, Denmark; Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Sandberg, Marten
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Vist, Gunn E.
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Norway.
    Femoral nerve blocks for the treatment of acute pre-hospital pain: A systematic review with meta-analysis2020In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Pain management is one of the most important interventions in the emergency medical services. The femoral nerve block (FNB) is, among other things, indicated for pre- and post-operative pain management for patients with femoral fractures but its role in the pre-hospital setting has not been determined. The aim of this review was to assess the effect and safety of the FNB in comparison to other forms of analgesia (or no treatment) for managing acute lower extremity pain in adult patients in the pre-hospital setting. Methods A systematic review (PROSPERO registration (CRD42018114399)) was conducted. The Cochrane and GRADE methods were used to assess outcomes. Two authors independently reviewed each study for eligibility, extracted the data and performed risk of bias assessments. Results Four studies with a total of 252 patients were included. Two RCTs (114 patients) showed that FNB may reduce pain more effectively than metamizole (mean difference 32 mm on a 100 mm VAS (95% CI 24 to 40)). One RCT (48 patients) compared the FNB with lidocaine and magnesium sulphate to FNB with lidocaine alone and was only included here for information regarding adverse effects. One case series included 90 patients. Few adverse events were reported in the included studies. The certainty of evidence was very low. We found no studies comparing FNB to inhaled analgesics, opioids or ketamine. Conclusions Evidence regarding the effectiveness and adverse effects of pre-hospital FNB is limited. Studies comparing pre-hospital FNB to inhaled analgesics, opioids or ketamine are lacking.

  • 39.
    Ranebo, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Björnsson Hallgren, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Holmgren, Theresa
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Surgery and physiotherapy were both successful in the treatment of small, acute, traumatic rotator cuff tears: a prospective randomized trial2020In: Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery, ISSN 1058-2746, E-ISSN 1532-6500, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 459-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous randomized trials on cuff repair have included mainly degenerative tears, but studies on acute traumatic tears are lacking. We aimed to compare early surgical repair with nonoperative treatment for traumatic supraspinatus tears. Methods: We did a 2-center randomized controlled trial of patients with small rotator cuff tears mainly involving supraspinatus, comparing surgical repair (n = 32) and physiotherapy (n = 26). The primary outcome was a group difference in the Constant-Murley score at 12-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes were differences in the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff index, pain (Numerical Rating Scale 0-10), and Euro quality-of-life-visual analog scale. We used magnetic resonance imaging to assess retear rate, tear progression, fatty infiltration, and atrophy. Results: The mean age was 59.7 years (range, 44-77 years), median sagittal tear size was 9.7 mm (range, 421 mm), and baseline characteristics were well balanced between the 2 groups. The repair group had a median Constant-Murley of 83 (25 quartile range [QR)) and the physiotherapy group 78 (QR, 22) at 12 months, with the between-group difference in medians of 4.5 (-5 to 9, 95% confidence interval; P = .68). The corresponding values for the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff index were 91% (QR, 24) vs. 86% (QR, 24), with the between-group difference of 5.0 (-4 to 9, 95% confidence interval; P- .62). There was no difference in Numerical Rating Scale or in Euro quality-of-life-visual analog scale. Retear was found in 63% of repaired patients and tear progression amp;gt;5 mm in 29.2% of unrepaired patients. Conclusions: We found no significant differences in clinical outcomes between cuff repair and nonoperative treatment at 12-month follow-up. Approximately one third of unrepaired patients had a tear enlargement of more than 5 mm. (C) 2019 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. All rights reserved.

  • 40.
    Sonesson, Sofi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Yakob, Jafar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hedevik, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gauffin, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Knee Arthroscopic Surgery in Middle-Aged Patients With Meniscal Symptoms: A 5-Year Follow-up of a Prospective, Randomized Study2020In: The Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 2325-9671, ORTHOPAEDIC JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 2325967119893920Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Arthroscopic meniscal surgery is a common orthopaedic procedure in middle-aged patients, but the efficacy of this procedure has been questioned. In this study, we followed up the only randomized controlled trial that has shown a 1-year benefit from knee arthroscopic surgery with an exercise program compared with an exercise program alone.

    Purpose:

    To (1) evaluate whether knee arthroscopic surgery combined with an exercise program provided an additional 5-year benefit compared with an exercise program alone in middle-aged patients with meniscal symptoms, (2) determine whether baseline mechanical symptoms affected the outcome, and (3) compare radiographic changes between treatment groups.

    Study Design:

    Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1.

    Methods:

    Of 179 eligible patients aged 45 to 64 years, 150 were randomized to either a 3-month exercise program (nonsurgery group) or to the same exercise program plus knee arthroscopic surgery (surgery group) within 4 weeks. Radiographs were assessed, according to the Kellgren-Lawrence grade, at baseline and at the 5-year follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)–Pain (KOOSPAIN) subscore from baseline to the 5-year follow-up. We performed an as-treated analysis.

    Results:

    A total of 102 patients completed the 5-year questionnaire. At the 5-year follow-up, both groups had significant improvement in KOOSPAIN subscores, although there was no significant change from the 3-year scores. There was no between-group difference in the change in the KOOSPAIN subscore from baseline to 5 years (3.2 points [95% CI, –6.1 to 12.4]; adjusted P = .403). In the surgery group, improvement was greater in patients without mechanical symptoms than in those with mechanical symptoms (mean difference, 18.4 points [95% CI, 8.7 to 28.1]; P < .001). Radiographic deterioration occurred in 60% of patients in the surgery group and 37% of those in the nonsurgery group (P = .060).

    Conclusion:

    Knee arthroscopic surgery combined with an exercise program provided no additional long-term benefit after 5 years compared with the exercise program alone in middle-aged patients with meniscal symptoms. Surgical outcomes were better in patients without mechanical symptoms than in patients with mechanical symptoms during the preoperative period. Radiographic changes did not differ between treatment groups.

    Registration:

    NCT01288768 (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier).

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  • 41.
    Torres, Joana
    et al.
    Hosp Beatriz Angelo, Portugal.
    Bonovas, Stefanos
    Humanitas Univ, Italy; Humanitas Clin and Res Ctr, Italy.
    Doherty, Glen
    St Vincents Univ Hosp, Ireland; Univ Coll Dublin, Ireland.
    Kucharzik, Torsten
    Hosp Luneburg, Germany.
    Gisbert, Javier P.
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Spain.
    Raine, Tim
    Cambridge Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Adamina, Michel
    Cantonal Hosp Winterthur, Switzerland; Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Armuzzi, Alessandro
    Presidio Columbus Fdn Policlin Gemelli Univ Catto, Italy.
    Bachmann, Oliver
    Siloah St Trudpert Hosp, Germany.
    Bager, Palle
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Biancone, Livia
    Univ Tor Vergata Rome, Italy.
    Bokemeyer, Bernd
    Gastroenterol Practice Minden, Germany.
    Bossuyt, Peter
    Imelda Gen Hosp, Belgium.
    Burisch, Johan
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Collins, Paul
    Royal Liverpool Univ Hosp, England.
    El-Hussuna, Alaa
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Ellul, Pierre
    Mater Hosp, Malta.
    Frei-Lanter, Cornelia
    Hosp Zollikerberg, Switzerland.
    Furfaro, Federica
    Humanitas Clin and Res Ctr, Italy.
    Gingert, Christian
    Cantonal Hosp Winterthur, Switzerland; Univ Witten Herdecke, Germany.
    Gionchetti, Paolo
    Univ Bologna, Italy.
    Gomollon, Fernando
    Hosp Cli Univ Lozano Blesa, Spain; CIBEREHD, Spain.
    Gonzalez-Lorenzo, Marien
    Humanitas Univ, Italy; Humanitas Clin and Res Ctr, Italy.
    Gordon, Hannah
    Royal London Hosp, England.
    Hlavaty, Tibor
    Comenius Univ, Slovakia.
    Juillerat, Pascal
    Inselspital Bern, Switzerland.
    Katsanos, Konstantinos
    Univ and Med Sch Ioannina, Greece.
    Kopylov, Uri
    Tel Ha Shomer Sheba Med Ctr, Israel; Sackler Med Sch, Israel.
    Krustins, Eduards
    Riga Stradins Univ, Latvia.
    Lytras, Theodore
    Natl Publ Hlth Org, Greece.
    Maaser, Christian
    Hosp Luneburg, Germany.
    Magro, Fernando
    Univ Porto, Portugal; Univ Porto, Portugal.
    Marshall, John Kenneth
    McMaster Univ, Canada.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Pellino, Gianluca
    Univ Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Italy.
    Rosa, Isadora
    IPOLFG, Portugal.
    Sabino, Joao
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Savarino, Edoardo
    Univ Padua, Italy.
    Spinelli, Antonino
    Humanitas Univ, Italy.
    Stassen, Laurents
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Uzzan, Mathieu
    Beaujon Hosp, France.
    Vavricka, Stephan
    Univ Hosp, Switzerland.
    Verstockt, Bram
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium; Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Warusavitarne, Janindra
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Zmora, Oded
    Shamir Med Ctr Assaf Harofe, Israel.
    Fiorino, Gionata
    Humanitas Univ, Italy; Humanitas Clin and Res Ctr, Italy.
    ECCO Guidelines on Therapeutics in Crohns Disease: Medical Treatment2020In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 14, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 42.
    Valdimarsson, Valentinus T.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Syk, Ingvar
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lindell, Gert
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Isaksson, Bengt
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Rizell, Magnus
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Noren, Agneta
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Ardnor, Bjarne
    Umea Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Sturesson, Christian
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Outcomes of Simultaneous Resections and Classical Strategy for Synchronous Colorectal Liver Metastases in Sweden: A Nationwide Study with Special Reference to Major Liver Resections2020In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background About 20% of patients with colorectal cancer have liver metastases at the time of diagnosis, and surgical resection offers a chance for cure. The aim of the present study was to compare outcomes for patients that underwent simultaneous resection to those that underwent a staged procedure with the bowel-first (classical) strategy by using information from two national registries in Sweden. Methods In this prospectively registered cohort study, we analyzed clinical, pathological, and survival outcomes for patients operated in the period 2008-2015 and compared the two strategies. Results In total, 537 patients constituted the study cohort, where 160 were treated with the simultaneous strategy and 377 with the classical strategy. Patients managed with the simultaneous strategy had less often rectal primary tumors (22% vs. 31%, p = 0.046) and underwent to a lesser extent a major liver resection (16% vs. 41%, p amp;lt; 0.001), but had a shorter total length of stay (11 vs. 15 days, p amp;lt; 0.001) and more complications (52% vs. 36%, p amp;lt; 0.001). No significant 5-year overall survival (p = 0.110) difference was detected. Twenty-five patients had a major liver resection in the simultaneous strategy group and 155 in the classical strategy group without difference in 5-year overall survival (p = 0.198). Conclusion Simultaneous resection of the colorectal primary cancer and liver metastases can possibly have more complications, with no difference in overall survival compared to the classical strategy.

  • 43.
    von Walden, Ferdinand
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Gidlund, Eva-Karin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Liu, Chang
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Norrbom, Jessica
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    von Wachenfelt, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Dept Orthopaed Eksjo, Reg Jonkoping Cty.
    Kjellgren, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Dept Orthopaed Eksjo, Reg Jonkoping Cty.
    Sundberg, Carl Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ponten, Eva
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Alkner, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    EFFECT OF ACUTE TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION ON INTRACELLULAR SIGNALLING IN HUMAN SKELETAL MUSCLE2020In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 52, no 2, article id UNSP jrm00022Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the potential of an acute bout of transcranial magnetic stimulation to induce anabolic signalling. Design: Experimental intervention on healthy subjects. Subjects: Ten healthy subjects, 5 women and 5 men (mean age 32 years; standard deviation (SD) 4). Methods: Transcranial magnetic stimulation, resulting in contraction of the quadriceps muscles, was applied at a frequency of 10 Hz for 10 s followed by 20 s of rest, repeated 40 times over 20 min. Electromyography and force data were collected for all transcranial magnetic stimulation sequences. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle before and 1 and 3 h after stimulation for evaluation of the molecular response of the muscle. Results: The described stimulation decreased phosphorylation of AKT at Thr308 (1 h: -29%, 3 h: -38%; p&lt;0.05) and mTOR phosphorylation at Ser2448 (1 h: -10%; ns, 3 h: -21%; p &lt; 0.05), both in the anabolic pathway. Phosphorylation of AMPK, ACC and ULK1 were not affected. c-MYC gene expression was unchanged following transcranial magnetic stimulation, but rDNA transcription decreased (1 h: -28%, 3 h: -19%; p&lt;0.05). PGC1 alpha-exlb mRNA increased (1 h: 2.3-fold, 3 h: 2.6-fold; p&lt;0.05), which also correlated with vastus lateralis electromyography activity, while other PGC-1 alpha variants were unchanged. Conclusion: Acute transcranial magnetic stimulation of skeletal muscle in weight-bearing healthy individuals did not induce anabolic signalling, but some signs of impaired muscle anabolism were detected. Therefore, these results do not support the use of acute transcranial magnetic stimulation in preventing muscle wasting.

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  • 44.
    Wilhelms, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    de Geer, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Causes of late mortality among ICU-treated patients with sepsis2020In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Patients with sepsis may have an increased risk of late mortality, but the causes of late death are unclear. This retrospective matched cohort study aimed to determine the causes of late death (&gt;= 1 year) among patients with sepsis compared to patients without sepsis. Methods 8760 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock (2001 consensus criteria) registered in the Swedish Intensive Care Registry (2008-2013) were compared with a 1:1 matched (gender, age, SAPS3 probability for death, ICU length of stay) control group consisting of non-septic ICU patients. Causes of death (International Classification of Diseases codes) were obtained from the Swedish Cause of Death Register (2008-2014). Results During 2008-2014, 903 patients with sepsis died at &gt;= 365 days after their initial septic event, compared to 884 patients in the control group. Median time of follow-up was 313 days (sepsis group, interquartile range 11-838 days) vs 288 days (control group, 9-836 days). The most common causes of death were heart diseases (sepsis: 50.2%, non-septic: 48.6%) and cancer (sepsis: 33.7%, non-septic: 31.7%). Infectious diseases were significantly more common cause of death in the sepsis group (24.3% vs 19.6%, respectively; P &lt; .05). Pneumonia was a common infectious cause of death in both groups, whereas sepsis was more common in the sepsis group. Conclusions The most common causes of late death after ICU admission among patients with and without sepsis were heart diseases and cancer. However, patients with sepsis more frequently had infectious diseases as a cause of late death, compared to non-septic patients.

  • 45.
    Woisetschläger, Mischa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Johansson, K.
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden; Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Wallin, G.
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Albert-Garcia, I
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Spångeus, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Dual energy 4D-CT of parathyroid adenomas not clearly localized by sestamibi scintigraphy and ultrasonography - a retrospective study2020In: European Journal of Radiology, ISSN 0720-048X, E-ISSN 1872-7727, Vol. 124, article id 108821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: At present, the gold standard for diagnosing PAs includes ultrasonography of the neck and sestamibi scans of the parathyroid. The objective of this study was to evaluate scans performed in 4D-DECT (4D-dualenergy mode) at three different time points, in order to analyze spectral information from PAs, lymph nodes (LNs), and thyroid gland (Thy). Method: Fifteen patients (mean age: 57 +/- 18.9 years) with primary hyperparathyroidism, in which previous ultrasound and sestamibi scanning proved to be negative or equivocal, underwent 4D-DECT in three different phases. Hounsfield units (HU), dual-energy information (electron density [Rho], atomic number [Z], dual-energy index [DEW, and spectral information (keV) were determined. Results: For all energies, PAs exhibited significantly lower HU-values than the Thy in non-contrast images, and higher HU-values than LNs in the arterial phase (p amp;lt; 0.05). All three tissues differed significantly in HU in the venous phase at 90 kV, 150 kV, and mixed 0.8 images; the Thy showed significantly higher HU-values than PAs or LNs in non-contrast images at 90 kV, 150 kV, mixed 0.8 images, and [Rho] (p amp;lt; 0.05). LNs exhibited significantly lower HU-values than PAs and Thy in the arterial phase at 90 kV, 150 kV, mixed 0.8, Rho, Z, and DEI (p amp;lt; 0.05). With regards to spectral information, lower energies showed greater HU differences between the three tissues. During the venous phase, there were significant differences between all three tissues up to 100 keV (p amp;lt; 0.05). Conclusions: We identified significant differences in HU-values and spectral information between PAs, LNs, and Thy at different energies and contrast phases.

  • 46.
    Wyckman, Alexander
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University,Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Granfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Nettelblad, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Reconstruction of sternal defects after sternotomy with postoperative osteomyelitis, using a unilateral pectoralis major advancement muscle flap2020In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 8380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The pectoralis major flap, which is usually harvested bilaterally, is considered a workhorse flap in the reconstruction of sternal defects. After a median sternotomy for open heart surgery, 1%-3% of patients develop deep infection and dehiscence of the sternal wound, some of which will eventually require reconstructive surgery. Our aim was to describe the clinical feasibility and associated complications of the unilateral pectoralis major advancement flap in the reconstruction of sternal defects.

    METHODS: A retrospective analysis of all adult patients who were operated on using a unilateral pectoralis major flap for reconstruction of the chest wall at the Linköping University Hospital during 2008-18 was made using data retrieved from medical records.

    RESULTS: Forty-three patients had reconstructions with unilateral pectoralis major flaps. Three flaps failed completely, and another 10 patients developed complications that required further operation. The factors that were independently associated with loss of the flaps and complications were: older age, male sex, the number of different antibiotics used, and a long duration of treatment with negative wound pressure. Fewer wound revisions before the reconstruction resulted in more complications. The factors that were independently associated with prolonged time to complete healing were emergency reoperation after the initial operation and complications after reconstruction.

    CONCLUSION: The unilateral pectoralis major advancement flap has proved to be a useful technique in the reconstruction of most sternal defects after sternal wound infection in older patients. There is, however, need for a follow-up study on a larger number of procedures to evaluate the long-term outcome compared with other methods of sternal reconstruction.

  • 47.
    Zhang, Xueli
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden; Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Hong
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Shen, Bairong
    Soochow Univ, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Novel MicroRNA Biomarkers for Colorectal Cancer Early Diagnosis and 5-Fluorouracil Chemotherapy Resistance but Not Prognosis: A Study from Databases to AI-Assisted Verifications2020In: Cancers, ISSN 2072-6694, CANCERS, Vol. 12, no 2, article id 341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide. In general, early diagnosis for CRC and individual therapy have led to better survival for the cancer patients. Accumulating studies concerning biomarkers have provided positive evidence to improve cancer early diagnosis and better therapy. It is, however, still necessary to further investigate the precise biomarkers for cancer early diagnosis and precision therapy and predicting prognosis. In this study, AI-assisted systems with bioinformatics algorithm integrated with microarray and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) gene expression (GE) data has been approached to predict microRNA (miRNA) biomarkers for early diagnosis of CRC based on the miRNA-messenger RNA (mRNA) interaction network. The relationships between the predicted miRNA biomarkers and other biological components were further analyzed on biological networks. Bayesian meta-analysis of diagnostic test was utilized to verify the diagnostic value of the miRNA candidate biomarkers and the combined multiple biomarkers. Biological function analysis was performed to detect the relationship of candidate miRNA biomarkers and identified biomarkers in pathways. Text mining was used to analyze the relationships of predicted miRNAs and their target genes with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Survival analyses were conducted to evaluate the prognostic values of these miRNAs in CRC. According to the number of miRNAs single regulated mRNAs (NSR) and the number of their regulated transcription factor gene percentage (TFP) on the miRNA-mRNA network, there were 12 promising miRNA biomarkers were selected. There were five potential candidate miRNAs (miRNA-186-5p, miRNA-10b-5, miRNA-30e-5p, miRNA-21 and miRNA-30e) were confirmed as CRC diagnostic biomarkers, and two of them (miRNA-21 and miRNA-30e) were previously reported. Furthermore, the combinations of the five candidate miRNAs biomarkers showed better prediction accuracy for CRC early diagnosis than the single miRNA biomarkers. miRNA-10b-5p and miRNA-30e-5p were associated with the 5-FU therapy resistance by targeting the related genes. These miRNAs biomarkers were not statistically associated with CRC prognosis.

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  • 48. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Zötterman, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging in Reconstructive Surgery2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    Reconstructive surgery aims to restore function or normal appearance by reconstructing defective organs after trauma or disease. In patients undergoing reconstructive surgery, previous trauma, surgery or radiotherapy can result in compromised blood supply. This will affect the viability of the tissue and increases the risk for postoperative complications, such as ischemia and infection. It is therefore important to assess the tissue viability, both before, during and after the surgery. This can be done using different techniques that monitor the perfusion of the skin covering the affected area. In this thesis, LSCI have been evaluated for tissue monitoring in reconstructive surgery. The technique allows for a fast and noninvasive assessment of superficial tissue perfusion over a wide field. Based on previous work on the technology, we have seen clear advantages with LSCI compared to other methods, for example laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). We have evaluated laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) as a tool for tissue monitoring in reconstructive surgery in four studies.

    Methods

    In study I we used a bench top model and healthy subjects to address methodological concerns subjected to the LSCI technology. We investigated the effect of motion distance and angle on the assessed perfusion value In study II we used a porcine model to compare LSCI and LDF as tools to detect partial and full venous outflow obstruction. We used both methods to assess a flap based on the cranial gluteal artery perforator with partial and complete occlusion of the vein and artery. In study III we used the same porcine model as in study II to investigate the possibility to use LSCI intraoperatively to identify flap areas with compromised circulation and thereby predict areas with a high risk of postoperative necrosis. In study IV we used LSCI for intraoperative evaluation of tissue viability during deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) free flap surgery and to investigate the perfusion distribution according to the Hartrampf zones, as measured with LSCI, in relation to the selected perforator in the deep inferior epigastric perforator free flap.

    Results

    In study I we saw that tissue perfusion as measured with LSCI increases with increasing tissue motion, independent of frame rate, number of images, and tissue perfusion. Measured perfusion will decrease when images are acquired at an angle larger than 45° but distances between 15 and 40 cm do not affect the measured perfusion. In study II we observed significant decreases in perfusion during both partial and complete venous occlusion with both LSCI and LDF. However, higher variability seen with LDF, measured as % coefficient of variation. In study III a decrease in perfusion during the first 30 min after raising the flap and a perfusion value below 25 PU after 30 min was a predictor for tissue morbidity 72h after surgery. In study IV the highest perfusion values were found in zone I and higher perfusion in zone II compared to zone III, directly after the flap was raised. No remaining significant difference between zone I, II and III could be seen after anastomosis of the vessels. All flaps with a minimum perfusion <30 PU, measured after the flap was shaped and inserted, later suffered from partial flap necrosis.

    Conclusion

    LSCI is a technology that has the potential to contribute to tissue monitoring in reconstructive surgery. It has many advantages over other techniques, such as the fast acquisition time, the spatial resolution and the fact that it is completely non-invasive. However, the current system is still too bulky to be easily introduced into a clinical setting and the technology is also subject to certain drawbacks which limit its usability. It is sensitive to motion artefacts; only superficial tissue is assessed and cannot offer absolute perfusion data. If these disadvantages could be addressed, LSCI could contribute to a more accurate survey of tissue perfusion and thus better outcome in reconstructive surgery.

    List of papers
    1. Methodological concerns with laser speckle contrast imaging in clinical evaluation of microcirculation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Methodological concerns with laser speckle contrast imaging in clinical evaluation of microcirculation
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    2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0174703Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI) is a non-invasive and fast technique for measuring microvascular blood flow that recently has found clinical use for burn assessment and evaluation of flaps. Tissue motion caused by for example breathing or patient movements may however affect the measurements in these clinical applications, as may distance between the camera and the skin and tissue curvature. Therefore, the aims of this study were to investigate the effect of frame rate, number of frames/image, movement of the tissue, measuring distance and tissue curvature on the measured perfusion. Methods Methyl nicotinate-induced vasodilation in the forearm skin was measured using LSCI during controlled motion at different speeds, using different combinations of frame rate and number of frames/image, and at varying camera angles and distances. Experiments were made on healthy volunteers and on a cloth soaked in a colloidal suspension of polystyrene microspheres. Results Measured perfusion increased with tissue motion speed. The relation was independent of the absolute perfusion in the skin and of frame rate and number of frames/image. The measured perfusion decreased with increasing angles (16% at 60, p = 0.01). Measured perfusion did not vary significantly between measurement distances from 15 to 40 cm (p = 0.77, %CV 0.9%). Conclusion Tissue motion increases and measurement angles beyond 45 decrease the measured perfusion in LSCI. These findings have to be taken into account when LSCI is used to assess moving or curved tissue surfaces, which is common in clinical applications.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2017
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-137098 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0174703 (DOI)000399174800074 ()28358906 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|ALF grants, Region Ostergotland

    Available from: 2017-05-05 Created: 2017-05-05 Last updated: 2020-03-18
    2. Monitoring of partial and full venous outflow obstruction in a porcine flap model using laser speckle contrast imaging
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Monitoring of partial and full venous outflow obstruction in a porcine flap model using laser speckle contrast imaging
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    2016 (English)In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815, E-ISSN 1532-1959, Vol. 69, no 7, p. 936-943Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In microsurgery, there is a demand for more reliable methods of postoperative monitoring of free flaps, especially with regard to tissue-threatening obstructions of the feeding arteries and draining veins. In this study, we evaluated laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) and laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) to assess their possibilities to detect partial and full venous outflow obstruction, as well as full arterial occlusion, in a porcine flap model. Methods: Cranial gluteal artery perforator flaps (CGAPs) were raised, and arterial and venous blood flow to and from the flaps was monitored using ultrasonic flow probes. The venous flow was altered with an inflatable cuff to simulate partial and full (50% and 100%) venous obstruction, and arterial flow was completely obstructed using clamps. The flap microcirculation was monitored using LSCI and LDF. Results: Both LDF and the LSCI detected significant changes in flap perfusion. After partial (50%) venous occlusion, perfusion decreased from baseline, LSCI: 63.5 +/- 12.9 PU (p = 0.01), LDF 31.3 +/- 15.7 (p = 0.64). After 100% venous occlusion, a further decrease in perfusion was observed: LSCI 54.6 +/- 14.2 PU (p amp;lt; 0.001) and LDF 16.7 +/- 12.8 PU (p amp;lt; 0.001). After release of the venous cuff, LSCI detected a return of the perfusion to a level slightly, but not significantly, below the baseline level 70.1 +/- 11.5 PU (p=0.39), while the LDF signal returned to a level not significant from the baseline 36.1 +/- 17.9 PU (p amp;gt; 0.99). Perfusion during 100% arterial occlusion decreased significantly as measured with both methods, LSCI: 48.3 +/- 7.7 (PU, pamp;lt;0.001) and LDF: 8.5 +/- 4.0 PU (pamp;lt;0.001). During 50% and 100% venous occlusion, LSCI showed a 20% and 26% inter-subject variability (CV%), respectively, compared to 50% and 77% for LDF. Conclusions: LSCI offers sensitive and reproducible measurements of flap microcirculation and seems more reliable in detecting decreases in blood perfusion caused by venous obstruction. It also allows for perfusion measurements in a relatively large area of flap tissue. This may be useful in identifying areas of the flap with compromised microcirculation during and after surgery. (C) 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2016
    Keywords
    Free flaps; Venous occlusion; Arterial occlusion; Laser Doppler; Laser speckle contrast imaging
    National Category
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130059 (URN)10.1016/j.bjps.2016.02.015 (DOI)000377698600010 ()27026039 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|county of Ostergotland

    Available from: 2016-07-06 Created: 2016-07-06 Last updated: 2020-03-18
    3. The use of laser speckle contrast imaging to predict flap necrosis: An experimental study in a porcine flap model
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The use of laser speckle contrast imaging to predict flap necrosis: An experimental study in a porcine flap model
    2019 (English)In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815, E-ISSN 1532-1959, Vol. 72, no 5, p. 771-777Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We evaluated the use of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) in the perioperative planning in reconstructive flap surgery. The aim of the study was to investigate whether LSCI can predict regions with a high risk of developing postoperative necrosis. Our hypothesis was that, perioperatively, such regions have perfusion values below a threshold value and show a negative perfusion trend. Methods: A porcine flap model based on the cranial gluteal artery perforator was used. Images were acquired before surgery, immediately after surgery (t = 0), after 30 min (t =30 min), and after 72h (t = 72 h). Regions of interest (ROIs) were chosen along the central axis of the flap. Clinical evaluation of the flap was made during each time point. Results: At t = 72 h, a demarcation line could be seen at a distance of 15.8 +/- 0.4 cm away from the proximal border of the flaps. At t =0, perfusion decreased gradually from the proximal to the distal ROI. At t =30 min, perfusion was significantly lower in the ROI distal to the final demarcation line than that at t = 0, and in all flaps, these ROIs had a perfusion amp;lt;25 PU. At t= 72 h, perfusion in the ROI proximal to this line returned to baseline levels, whereas perfusion in the distal ROI remained low. Conclusions: In our model, a decrease in perfusion during the first 30 min after surgery and a perfusion amp;lt;25 PU at t = 30 min was a predictor for tissue morbidity 72 h after surgery, which indicates that LSCI is a promising technique for perioperative monitoring in reconstructive flap surgery. (C) 2018 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2019
    Keywords
    Flap monitoring; Reconstructive surgery; Laser speckle contrast imaging; Partial flap necrosis
    National Category
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156911 (URN)10.1016/j.bjps.2018.11.021 (DOI)000464986400009 ()30711464 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|County of Ostergotland

    Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2020-05-02
    4. Intraoperative Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging in DIEP Breast Reconstruction: A Prospective Case Series Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intraoperative Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging in DIEP Breast Reconstruction: A Prospective Case Series Study
    Show others...
    2020 (English)In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery. Global open, ISSN 2169-7574, Vol. 8, no 1, p. e2529-e2529Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is a laser-based perfusion imaging technique that recently has been shown to predict ischemic necrosis in an experimental flap model and predicting healing time of scald burns. The aims were to investigate perfusion in relation to the selected perforator during deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap surgery, and to evaluate LSCI in assisting of prediction of postoperative complications. METHODS: Twenty-three patients who underwent DIEP-procedures for breast reconstruction at 2 centers were included. Perfusion was measured in 4 zones at baseline, after raising, after anastomosis, and after shaping the flap. The perfusion in relation to the selected perforator and the accuracy of LSCI in predicting complications were analyzed. RESULTS: After raising the flap, zone I showed the highest perfusion (65 ± 10 perfusion units, PU), followed by zone II (58 ± 12 PU), zone III (53 ± 10 PU), and zone IV (45 ± 10 PU). The perfusion in zone I was higher than zone III (P = 0.002) and zone IV (P < 0.001). After anastomosis, zone IV had lower perfusion than zone I (P < 0.001), zone II (P = 0.01), and zone III (P = 0.02). Flaps with areas <30 PU after surgery had partial necrosis postoperatively (n = 4). CONCLUSIONS: Perfusion is highest in zone I. No perfusion difference was found between zones II and III. Perfusion <30 PU after surgery was correlated with partial necrosis. LSCI is a promising tool for measurement of flap perfusion and assessment of risk of postoperative ischemic complications.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wolters Kluwer, 2020
    National Category
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-164324 (URN)10.1097/GOX.0000000000002529 (DOI)32095386 (PubMedID)
    Note

    32095386[pmid]; PMC7015619[pmcid]

    Available from: 2020-03-17 Created: 2020-03-17 Last updated: 2020-04-09Bibliographically approved
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  • 49.
    Zötterman, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Opsomer, Dries
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Blondeel, Phillip
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium.
    Monstrey, Stan
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Intraoperative Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging in DIEP Breast Reconstruction: A Prospective Case Series Study2020In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery. Global open, ISSN 2169-7574, Vol. 8, no 1, p. e2529-e2529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is a laser-based perfusion imaging technique that recently has been shown to predict ischemic necrosis in an experimental flap model and predicting healing time of scald burns. The aims were to investigate perfusion in relation to the selected perforator during deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap surgery, and to evaluate LSCI in assisting of prediction of postoperative complications. METHODS: Twenty-three patients who underwent DIEP-procedures for breast reconstruction at 2 centers were included. Perfusion was measured in 4 zones at baseline, after raising, after anastomosis, and after shaping the flap. The perfusion in relation to the selected perforator and the accuracy of LSCI in predicting complications were analyzed. RESULTS: After raising the flap, zone I showed the highest perfusion (65 ± 10 perfusion units, PU), followed by zone II (58 ± 12 PU), zone III (53 ± 10 PU), and zone IV (45 ± 10 PU). The perfusion in zone I was higher than zone III (P = 0.002) and zone IV (P < 0.001). After anastomosis, zone IV had lower perfusion than zone I (P < 0.001), zone II (P = 0.01), and zone III (P = 0.02). Flaps with areas <30 PU after surgery had partial necrosis postoperatively (n = 4). CONCLUSIONS: Perfusion is highest in zone I. No perfusion difference was found between zones II and III. Perfusion <30 PU after surgery was correlated with partial necrosis. LSCI is a promising tool for measurement of flap perfusion and assessment of risk of postoperative ischemic complications.

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  • 50.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Classification of Endometrial Cancer2020In: Management of Endometrial Cancer / [ed] Mansoor R. Mirza, Cham: Springer, 2020, p. 3-6Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Endometrial cancer is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract in the more developed regions of the world [1]. Stage of disease, i.e., the extent of tumor spread at the time of presentation, is the most significant prognostic parameter.

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