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  • 1.
    Ackerley, Rochelle
    et al.
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Croy, Ilona
    Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Neurofysiologiska kliniken US.
    Badre, Gaby
    Gothenburg Univ, Sweden.
    Investigating the Putative Impact of Odors Purported to Have Beneficial Effects on Sleep: Neural and Perceptual Processes2020Inngår i: Chemosensory Perception, ISSN 1936-5802, E-ISSN 1936-5810, Vol. 13, nr 2, s. 93-105Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Olfaction has an important role in physiological and affective processes, as well as the potential to have profound effects on activities such as sleep and learning. We investigated two commercially manufactured odors ("Deep Sleep" and "Oriental," from This Works) purported to promote sleep, compared with control odor, where we aimed to explore whether neural and behavioral differences existed after odor inhalation. Methods In a neuroimaging study, 30 healthy participants were exposed to the odors via an olfactometer during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In a further behavioral study using 12 chronic insomniacs, we investigated whether the commercial odors showed effects on sleep during a double-blind, randomized home evaluation. Results In the neuroimaging, the odors were related to activation of olfactory-relevant areas, such as the orbitofrontal cortex, and we found positive connectivity between the piriform cortex and the hippocampus, amygdala, insula, and middle cingulate cortex. Deep Sleep specifically activated the superior temporal gyrus, whereas Oriental activated the caudate. Further, these commercial odors showed some beneficial impact on sleep. Conclusions The perceptual and neural impacts of the commercial odors showed that olfactory stimulation can potentially aid sleep and modify affective processes in a number of ways. Implications The present work opens up opportunities for further investigations into how different odors may lead to specific behavioral and physiological modifications, such as their impact on sleep and well-being, which may provide non-pharmacological alternative approaches.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
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  • 2.
    Ackerley, Rochelle
    et al.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Sverrisdottir, Yrsa B.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Birklein, Frank
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Germany.
    Elam, Mikael
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Neurofysiologiska kliniken US. Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Kraemer, Heidrun H.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Justus Liebig Univ, Germany.
    Cutaneous warmth, but not touch, increases muscle sympathetic nerve activity during a muscle fatigue hand-grip task2020Inngår i: Experimental Brain Research, ISSN 0014-4819, E-ISSN 1432-1106, Vol. 238, s. 1035-1042Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In homeostasis, somatosensory C fibre afferents are hypothesised to mediate input to the brain about interactions with external stimuli and sympathetic efference provides the output that regulates bodily functions. We aimed to test this hypothesis and whether different types of innocuous somatosensory input have differential effects. Healthy volunteers performed a muscle fatigue (hand-grip) task to exhaustion, which produces increased muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), as measured through microneurography. Participants completed the muscle fatigue task without concurrent cutaneous sensory stimulation (control) or we applied skin warming (heat pack) as a C fibre stimulation, slow brush stroking as C and A beta fibre stimulation, or vibration as A beta fibre stimulation, to the participants forearm. We also measured heart rate, the duration of the hand-grip task, and ratings of pain at the end of the task. Concurrent skin warming showed increased MSNA compared to the other conditions. Tactile stimuli (brushing, vibration) were not significantly different to the control (no intervention) condition. Warming increased the pain from the muscle contraction, whereas the tactile stimuli did not. We interpret the effect of warming on MSNA as providing relevant afferent information during muscle contraction, which needed to be counteracted via vasoconstriction to maintain homeostasis. Brushing and vibration were less homeostatically relevant stimuli for the muscle contraction and hence had no significant effect. The findings add sensory specificity to our current understanding of homeostatic regulation through somatosensory afferent and sympathetic efferent pathways.

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  • 3.
    Ahmad, Irma
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Matilda
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Brus, Ole
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Ekman, Carl Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hammar, Åsa
    Univ Bergen, Norway.
    Landén, Mikael
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordanskog, Pia
    Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Axel
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Validity of diagnoses, treatment dates, and rating scales in the Swedish national quality register for electroconvulsive therapy2022Inngår i: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 76, nr 2, s. 96-103Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The Swedish national quality register for electroconvulsive therapy (Q-ECT) contains data on patients receiving treatment with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in Sweden. Aim This study determined the validity of diagnoses, treatment dates, and rating scales in the Q-ECT by investigating the degree of accordance between data from the Q-ECT and patient records. Materials and methods From January 2016 to December 2017, 200 treatment series were randomly selected from the Q-ECT. The corresponding patient records were requested from the treating hospitals. Data on the indicative diagnosis, dates for the first and the last ECT session, and rating scales were compared between the Q-ECT and patient records using (i) a strict and (ii) a liberal method of assessment. Using the liberal method, each variable was assessed as accordant if it belonged to the same diagnosis group, or if the dates differed by less than 1 week, or ratings differed by only 1 point on the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI- S), or no more than 3 points on the Montgomery angstrom sberg Depression Rating Scale between the Q-ECT and the patient record. Results A total of 179 patient records were received. The strict method of assessment showed an accordance of 89% or higher for all studied variables. The liberal method showed an accordance of 95% or higher. Conclusions We conclude that data on the studied variables in the Q-ECT have high validity. However, limited use of some rating scales makes the results uncertain. Measures can be taken to further improve the data quality.

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  • 4.
    Ahs, Jill W.
    et al.
    Swedish Red Cross Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ranheim, Albertine
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Mattelin, Erica
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för barnafrid. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Univ West, Sweden.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Sophiahemmet Univ, Sweden.
    Distance in Distant Care: Qualitative Content Analysis of Providers Experiences in Tele-Mental Care2023Inngår i: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 25, artikkel-id e38568Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
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  • 5.
    Alfvén, Tobias
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet, Sverige; Sachsska barn- och ungdomssjukhuset, Sverige.
    Ekman, Anna-Theresia
    Karolinska institutet, Sverige; St Görans sjukhus, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Awil, Hana
    ST-läkare i allmänmedicin, Mora, Sverige.
    Holmer, Hampus
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sverige; Duke Global Health Institute, USA.
    Mia Ekström, Anna
    Karolinska institutet, Sverige; Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Sverige.
    Preet, Raman
    Umeå universitet, Sverige.
    Agardh, Anette
    Lunds universitet, Sverige.
    Frielingsdorf Lundqvist, Helena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Flyktingmedicinskt centrum.
    Agenda 2030 och målen för en hållbar utveckling angår oss alla [The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development - an important opportunity to improve global health]2020Inngår i: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 117Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its seventeen Sustainable Development Goals were adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 2015. It is a bold agenda for global social, environmental and economic development, with human health as a central theme. Even though substantial improvements in health have been achieved during the last decades, every year over 5 million children die, mostly from preventable causes, and 300 000 women die in conjunction with childbirth. Premature deaths from non-communicable diseases are increasing, and our ability to treat infections is under threat through widespread anti-microbial resistance. Climate change is recognized as the biggest threat to health in our time. When the world now starts to plan for how society and our health systems should be reorganized after the COVID-19 pandemic the 2030 Agenda could and should play a central role. In this context, Agenda 2030 provides an ambitious roadmap for development, with its emphasis on collaboration across borders and disciplines. The agenda is achievable but reaching its goals will require strong commitment at all levels and societal change on a large scale.

  • 6.
    Alm Mårtensson, Anna
    et al.
    Länsstyrelsen i Jönköping, Sverige.
    Boström, Anita
    Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper, Karlstads universitet, Sverige.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avd. för naturvetenskap och biomedicin, Sverige.
    Lundgren, Charlie
    Länsstyrelsen Västerbotten, Sverige.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Medicinska och geriatriska akutkliniken. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård.
    Simmons, Johanna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Medicinska och geriatriska akutkliniken.
    Att möta våldsutsatta äldre personer2022Inngår i: Äldre personers utsatthet för våld i nära relationer: Interprofessionella perspektiv / [ed] Lena Östlund, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB , 2022, s. 183-220Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 7.
    Aminoff, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bobeck, Johan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för barns och kvinnors hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Hjort, Sofia
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Sorliden, Elise
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Medicinska och geriatriska akutkliniken.
    Berg, Matilda
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Tailored internet-based psychological treatment for psychological problems during the COVID-19 pandemic: A randomized controlled trial2023Inngår i: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 34, artikkel-id 100662Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 pandemic influence mental health in both infected and non-infected populations. In this study we examined if individually tailored internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) could be an effective treatment for psychological symptoms related to the pandemic. Following recruitment we included 76 participants who were randomized to either a treatment group (n = 37) or a waitlist control group (n = 39). The treatment group received 8 modules (out of 16 possible) during 8 weeks with weekly therapist support. We collected data on symptoms of depression, experienced quality of life, anxiety, stress, anger, insomnia, PTSD, and alcohol use before, after the treatment and at one year follow-up. Using multiple regression analysis, group condition was found to be a statistically significant predictor for a decrease, favoring the treatment group, in symptoms of depression, insomnia, and anger with small to moderate effect sizes. The improvements remained at one year follow-up. Group condition did not significantly predict changing symptoms regarding experienced quality of life, anxiety, stress, PTSD and alcohol use. Findings indicate that ICBT is an effective intervention for some psychological symptoms associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. There is a need for further studies on mechanisms of change and on tailored ICBT for problems associated with crises like the pandemic.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Aminoff, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Sellén, Malin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Sörliden, Elise
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Medicinska och geriatriska akutkliniken. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Berg, Matilda
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Psychological Distress Associated With the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial2021Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, artikkel-id 684540Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has been associated with various negative psychological consequences. This is a challenge for the society as regular psychological services cannot be offered to the same extent as before the pandemic. In addition to the requirement of social distancing, there is a need to adjust psychological treatment components like exposure to avoid increasing the spread of the infection. Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) has an established evidence base for a range of psychiatric problems and has been suggested as one possible approach to deal with the situation. This study aimed to conduct a randomized controlled pilot trial during the summer of 2020 with a broad focus on psychological distress and a treatment approach that tailors the intervention based on symptom profile and preferences.

    Methods: Following the advertisement and interview, we included 52 participants with elevated levels of psychological distress. They were randomly allocated to either a 7-week-long individually tailored ICBT (n = 26) or a wait-list control condition (n = 26). Measures of depression and quality of life were used as primary outcomes. We also included secondary outcome measures of anxiety, insomnia, trauma, stress, anger, and alcohol use. For screening, we used the CoRonavIruS Health Impact Survey (CRISIS).

    Results: Overall moderate to large between-group effects were found at post-treatment in favor of the treatment on measures of both depression [Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); Cohens d = 0.63; Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9): d = 0.62] and anxiety [Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7-item scale (GAD-7); d = 0.82]. This was also observed for stress symptoms [Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-14); d = 1.04]. No effects were seen on measures of quality of life, insomnia, symptoms of post-traumatic stress, and anger. There was an effect on alcohol use [Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT); d = 0.54], which was not of clinical relevance.

    Conclusion: Individually tailored ICBT shows initial promise as a way to reduce psychological problems in association with the COVID-19 pandemic. A possible limitation was that the trial was conducted when the effects of the pandemic were decreasing and when fewer people were affected by the restrictions (e.g., the summer of 2020).

    Fulltekst (pdf)
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  • 9.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Käll, Anton
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Juhlin, Simon
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Wahlstrom, Carl
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Licht, Edvard de Fine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Färdeman, Simon
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Franck, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Tholcke, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Nachtweij, Karin
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Fransson, Emma
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Vernmark, Kristofer
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för diagnostik och specialistmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Medicinska och geriatriska akutkliniken.
    Berg, Matilda
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Free choice of treatment content, support on demand and supervision in internet-delivered CBT for adults with depression: A randomized factorial design trial2023Inngår i: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 162, artikkel-id 104265Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Even if much is known regarding the effects of internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) for depression there are several topics that have not been studied. In this factorial design trial with 197 participants we investigated if clients in ICBT could select treatment modules themselves based on a selection of 15 tailored treatment modules developed for use in ICBT for depression. We contrasted this against clinician-tailored module selection. We also investigated if support on demand (initiated by the client) could work as well as scheduled support. Finally, we tested if clients that were mentioned in supervision would improve more than clients not mentioned (with the exception of acute cases). The treatment period lasted for 10 weeks, and we measured effects at post-treatment and two-year follow-up. Measures of depression and secondary outcomes were collected at pre-treatment, post-treatment and two-year follow-up. Overall, within-group effects were large across con-ditions (e.g., d = 1.73 on the BDI-II). We also found a small but significant difference in favour of self-tailored treatment over clinician-tailored (d = 0.26). Within-group effects for the secondary measures were all moderate to large including a test of knowledge about CBT. The other two contrasts "support on demand" and "supervision" yielded mostly non-significant differences, with the exception of a larger dropout rate in the support on demand condition. There were few negative effects (2.2%). Effects were largely maintained at a two-year follow-up. We conclude that clients can choose treatment modules and that support on demand may work. The role of su-pervision is not yet clear as advice can be transferred across clients.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Andersson, Hedvig
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Aspeqvist, Erik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Marie Cederschiold Univ, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Linda S.
    Marie Cederschiold Univ, Sweden.
    Landberg, Åsa
    Marie Cederschiold Univ, Sweden.
    Zetterqvist, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Barn- och ungdomspsykiatriska kliniken Linköping.
    Emotional Dysregulation and Trauma Symptoms Mediate the Relationship Between Childhood Abuse and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in Adolescents2022Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 13, artikkel-id 897081Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundNonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is common in adolescents. Emotion dysregulation has been identified as a core mechanism in the development and maintenance of NSSI and it is therefore an important target when addressing NSSI. The pathogenic connection between different kinds of childhood abuse, difficulties in emotion regulation and NSSI needs further investigation. The objective of this study was to examine whether difficulties with emotion regulation and trauma symptoms, separately and together, mediate the relationships between sexual, physical and emotional abuse and NSSI. MethodCross-sectional data was collected from 3,169 adolescent high-school students aged 16-19 years (M = 18.12, SD = 0.45). Data from self-reported experiences of childhood abuse, current difficulties with emotion regulation (measured with the Difficulties with Emotion Regulation Scale, DERS-16) and trauma symptoms (measured with the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children, TSCC), and NSSI were collected. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to test the proposed relationships between variables. ResultsThe prevalence of life-time NSSI was 27.4%. Prevalence of reported childhood abuse was 9.2, 17.5, and 18.0% for sexual, physical, and emotional abuse, respectively. Childhood abuse, difficulties with emotion regulation and trauma symptoms exhibited significant positive associations with NSSI in adolescents. Emotional dysregulation and trauma symptoms were both found to mediate the relationship between childhood abuse and NSSI. Latent variable models were found to fit data well. ConclusionResults indicate that increased levels of emotional dysregulation and trauma symptoms in relation to childhood abuse contribute to the increased risk of NSSI. Further, results point to some aspects of emotional dysregulation and trauma symptoms being more important in this regard. Clinical implications are discussed.

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    fulltext
  • 11.
    Andersson, Hedvig
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Svensson, E.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Magnusson, A.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Zetterqvist, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Barn- och ungdomspsykiatriska kliniken Linköping.
    Young adults looking back at their experiences of treatment and care for nonsuicidal self-injury during adolescence: a qualitative study2024Inngår i: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 18, nr 1, artikkel-id 16Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundNonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is associated with stigma, and negative attitudes among healthcare professionals toward NSSI have been reported. A person-centered approach that focuses on how individuals with lived experience of NSSI perceive the treatment and care they receive is invaluable in reducing barriers to help-seeking and improving treatment and mental healthcare services. The aim of the current qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of young adults when they look back upon their experiences of psychiatric treatment for NSSI during adolescence.MethodsTwenty-six individuals with lived experience of NSSI who were in contact with child and adolescent psychiatry during adolescence were interviewed. The interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis.ResultsThree main themes were developed: Changed perceptions in retrospect, The importance of a collaborative conceptualization and Lasting impression of the relationship. Participants' perception of themselves as well as the treatment changed over time. The importance of a joint understanding of NSSI and an agreed-upon treatment focus was emphasized. The relationship to the mental health professionals, and experiences of how NSSI was communicated, were salient several years later.ConclusionsHealthcare professionals need to communicate about NSSI in a respectful manner and include the perspective of the adolescent with lived experience of NSSI in a joint conceptualization of NSSI and treatment focus.

  • 12.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Medicincentrum, Endokrinmedicinska kliniken. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för barns och kvinnors hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Norrköping.
    Early increase in HbA1c trajectory predicts development of severe microangiopathy in patients with type 1 diabetes: the VISS study2024Inngår i: BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care, ISSN 2052-4897, Vol. 12, nr 3, artikkel-id e003917Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction To study the HbA1c trajectory from the time of diagnosis to examine if patients at the greatest risk for severe microangiopathy can be identified early allowing clinicians to intervene as soon as possible to avoid complications. Research design and methods In a population-based observational study, 447 patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes before 35 years of age, 1983-1987, were followed from diagnosis until 2019. Mean HbA1c was calculated each year for each patient. Severe diabetic microangiopathy was defined as proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) or macroalbuminuria (nephropathy). Results After 32 years, 27% had developed PDR and 8% macroalbuminuria. Patients with weighted HbA1c (wHbA1c); <57 mmol/mol; <7.4% did not develop PDR or macroalbuminuria. The HbA1c trajectories for patients developing PDR and macroalbuminuria follow separate courses early on and stay separated for 32 years during the follow-up. Patients without severe complications show an initial dip, after which HbA1c slowly increases. HbA1c in patients with severe complications directly rises to a high level within a few years. Mean HbA1c calculated for the period 5-8 years after diabetes onset strongly predicts the development of severe complications. Females with childhood-onset diabetes exhibit a high peak in HbA1c during adolescence associated with higher wHbA1c and higher prevalence of PDR. Conclusions The HbA1c trajectory from diabetes onset shows that mean HbA1c for the period 5-8 years after diagnosis strongly predicts severe microangiopathy. Females with childhood-onset diabetes exhibit a high peak in HbA1c during adolescence associated with higher wHbA1c and a higher prevalence of PDR.

  • 13.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Medicincentrum, Endokrinmedicinska kliniken.
    Westerlund, Malin C.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Ögonkliniken US.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för barns och kvinnors hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Barn- och ungdomskliniken i Norrköping.
    Impact of HbA(1c) Followed 32 Years From Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes on Development of Severe Retinopathy and Nephropathy: The VISS Study2022Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 45, nr 11, s. 2675-2682Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate HbA(1c) followed from diagnosis, as a predictor of severe microvascular complications (i.e., proliferative diabetic retinopathy [PDR] and nephropathy [macroalbuminuria]). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In a population-based observational study, 447 patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes before 35 years of age from 1983 to 1987 in southeast Sweden were followed from diagnosis until 2019. Long-term weighted mean HbA(1c) (wHbA(1c)) was calculated by integrating the area under all HbA(1c) values. Complications were analyzed in relation to wHbA(1c) categorized into five levels. RESULTS After 32 years, 9% had no retinopathy, 64% non-PDR, and 27% PDR, and 83% had no microalbuminuria, 9% microalbuminuria, and 8% macroalbuminuria. Patients with near-normal wHbA(1c) did not develop PDR or macroalbuminuria. The lowest wHbA(1c) values associated with development of PDR and nephropathy (macroalbuminuria) were 7.3% (56 mmol/mol) and 8.1% (65 mmol/mol), respectively. The prevalence of PDR and macroalbuminuria increased with increasing wHbA(1c), being 74% and 44% in the highest category, wHbA(1c) >9.5% (>80 mmol/mol). In comparison with the follow-up done after 20-24 years duration, the prevalence of PDR had increased from 14 to 27% and macroalbuminuria from 4 to 8%, and both appeared at lower wHbA(1c) values. CONCLUSIONS wHbA(1c) followed from diagnosis is a very strong biomarker for PDR and nephropathy, the prevalence of both still increasing 32 years after diagnosis. To avoid PDR and macroalbuminuria in patients with type 1 diabetes, an HbA(1c) <7.0% (53 mmol/mol) and as normal as possible should be recommended when achievable without severe hypoglycemia and with good quality of life.

  • 14.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Reg Gavleborg, Sweden; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Janeslatt, Gunnel
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Wennberg, Birgitta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Lidstrom-Holmqvist, Kajsa
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Holmefur, Marie
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Hayat Roshanay, Afsaneh
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Evaluation of the group intervention "Lets Get Organized" for improving time management, organisational, and planning skills in people with mild intellectual disability2023Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 30, nr 8, s. 1257-1266Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundLimited time management skills cause problems in daily life for people with mild intellectual disability (ID) and "Lets Get Organized" (LGO) is a promising manual-based occupational therapy group intervention aiming to support management skills.Aims/ObjectivesTo evaluate the applicability of the Swedish version of LGO-S by i) exploring enhancements in time management skills, satisfaction with daily occupations, and aspects of executive functioning in people with time-management difficulties and mild ID, and ii) describing clinical experiences of using the LGO-S for people with mild ID.Material and methodsTwenty-one adults with mild ID were included. Data were collected pre-/post-intervention and at 3- and 12-month follow-ups with: Swedish version of Assessment of Time Management Skills (ATMS-S), Satisfaction with Daily Occupation (SDO-13), and Weekly Calendar Planning Activity (WCPA-SE). There were few follow-up participants (n = 6-9).ResultsSignificant change in time management skills that maintained at 12-months follow-ups. Significant increase in regulation of emotions at 12-month follow-up. Results at 12-months follow-up indicated sustainability in outcomes as measured by ATMS-S. A non-significant positive trend was observed in other outcomes between pre- and post-intervention.Conclusions and significanceLGO-S seems applicable for improving skills in time management, organisation and planning also for people with mild ID.

  • 15.
    Aspeqvist, Erik
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Andersson, Hedvig
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Korhonen, Laura
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Barn- och ungdomspsykiatriska kliniken Linköping. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för barnafrid.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Zetterqvist, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Barn- och ungdomspsykiatriska kliniken Linköping.
    Measurement and stratification of nonsuicidal self-injury in adolescents2024Inngår i: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 24, nr 1, artikkel-id 107Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundNonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is highly prevalent in adolescents. In survey and interview studies assessing NSSI, methods of assessment have been shown to influence prevalence estimates. However, knowledge of which groups of adolescents that are identified with different measurement methods is lacking, and the characteristics of identified groups are yet to be investigated. Further, only a handful of studies have been carried out using exploratory methods to identify subgroups among adolescents with NSSI.MethodsThe performance of two prevalence measures (single-item vs. behavioral checklist) in the same cross-sectional community sample (n = 266, age M = 14.21, 58.3% female) of adolescents was compared regarding prevalence estimates and also characterization of the identified groups with lifetime NSSI prevalence. A cluster analysis was carried out in the same sample. Identified clusters were compared to the two groups defined using the prevalence measures.ResultsA total of 118 (44.4%) participants acknowledged having engaged in NSSI at least once. Of these, a group of 55 (20.7%) adolescents confirmed NSSI on a single item and 63 (23.7%) adolescents confirmed NSSI only on a behavioral checklist, while denying NSSI on the single item. Groups differed significantly, with the single-item group being more severely affected and having higher mean scores on difficulties in emotion regulation, self-criticism, number of methods, higher frequency of NSSI, higher rates of suicidal ideation and suicidal behavior and lower mean score on health-related quality of life. All cases with higher severity were not identified by the single-item question. Cluster analysis identified three clusters, two of which fit well with the groups identified by single-item and behavioral checklist measures.ConclusionsWhen investigating NSSI prevalence in adolescents, findings are influenced by the researchers' choice of measures. The present study provides some directions toward what kind of influence to expect given the type of measure used, both with regards to the size of the identified group and its composition. Implications for future research as well as clinical and preventive work are discussed.

  • 16.
    Asutay, Erkin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Genevsky, Alexander
    Erasmus Univ, Netherlands.
    Barrett, Lisa Feldman
    Northeastern Univ, MA 02115 USA.
    Hamilton, Paul
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Slovic, Paul
    Decis Res, OR USA.
    Västfjäll, Daniel
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Decis Res, OR USA.
    Affective Calculus: The Construction of Affect Through Information Integration Over Time2021Inngår i: Emotion, ISSN 1528-3542, E-ISSN 1931-1516, Vol. 21, nr 1, s. 159-174Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Humans receive a constant stream of input that potentially influence their affective experience. Despite intensive research on affect, it is still largely unknown how various sources of information are integrated into the single, unified affective features that accompany consciousness. Here, we aimed to investigate how a stream of evocative input we receive is dynamically represented in self-reported affect. In 4 experiments, participants viewed a number of sequentially presented images and reported their momentary affective experience on valence and arousal scales. The number and duration of images in a trial varied across studies. In Study 4, we also measured participants physiological responses while they viewed images. We formulated and compared several models with respect to their capacity to predict self-reported affect based on normative image ratings, physiological measurements, and prior affective experience (measured in the previous trial). Our data best supported a model incorporating a temporally sensitive averaging mechanism for affective integration that assigns higher weights to effectively more potent and recently represented stimuli. Crucially, affective averaging of sensory information and prior affect accounted for distinct contributions to currently experienced affect. Taken together, the current study provides evidence that prior affect and integrated affective impact of stimuli partly shape currently experienced affect.

  • 17.
    Asutay, Erkin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Genevsky, Alexander
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Nationalekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Erasmus Univ, Netherlands.
    Hamilton, Paul
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV.
    Västfjäll, Daniel
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Decis Res, OR USA.
    Affective Context and Its Uncertainty Drive Momentary Affective Experience2022Inngår i: Emotion, ISSN 1528-3542, E-ISSN 1931-1516, Vol. 22, nr 6, s. 1336-1346Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Affect fluctuates in a moment-to-moment fashion, reflecting the continuous relationship between the individual and the environment. Despite substantial research, there remain important open questions regarding how a stream of sensory input is dynamically represented in experienced affect. Here, approaching affect as a temporally dependent process, we show that momentary affect is shaped by a combination of the affective impact of stimuli (i.e., visual images for the current studies) and previously experienced affect. We also found that this temporal dependency is influenced by uncertainty of the affective context. Participants in each trial viewed sequentially presented images and subsequently reported their affective experience, which was modeled based on images normative affect ratings and participants previously reported affect. Study 1 showed that self-reported valence and arousal in a given trial is partly shaped by the affective impact of the given images and previously experienced affect. In Study 2, we manipulated context uncertainty by controlling occurrence probabilities for normatively pleasant and unpleasant images in separate blocks. Increasing context uncertainty (i.e., random occurrence of pleasant and unpleasant images) was associated with increased negative affect. In addition, the relative contribution of the most recent image to experienced pleasantness increased with increasing context uncertainty. Taken together, these findings provide clear behavioral evidence that momentary affect is a temporally dependent and continuous process, which reflects the affective impact of recent input variables and the previous internal state, and that this process is sensitive to the affective context and its uncertainty.

  • 18.
    Augier, Eric
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Recent Advances in the Potential of Positive Allosteric Modulators of the GABA(B) Receptor to Treat Alcohol Use Disorder2021Inngår i: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 56, nr 2, s. 139-148Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The effects of alcohol on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission are key for the development and maintenance of alcohol use disorder (AUD). Previous research consistently indicates that GABA(B) receptor agonists such as baclofen can attenuate addiction-related behaviors in preclinical models of AUD. More importantly, baclofen has also shown promise in clinical studies, particularly in severely alcohol-dependent patients. However, despite this promise, other clinical studies have not confirmed its efficacy and chiefly, larger clinical trials have not been conducted. Therefore, with the exception of France, baclofen is not approved for the treatment of AUD in any other country. Furthermore, it is also important to keep in mind that some patients treated with baclofen may experience important side-effects, including sedation, drowsiness and sleepiness. Methods: This short review will first discuss the history of baclofen for AUD treatment. We will then summarize preclinical behavioral results that have investigated the efficacy of GABA(B) PAMs for addiction treatment, with a special focus on our recent work that investigated the effects of ADX71441, a novel GABA(B) PAM, on several alcohol-related behaviors in rats that model important aspects of human AUD. Finally, in light of the recent criticism about the translational value of animal models of addiction, the specific translational potential of our work and of other preclinical studies that have unanimously reported the efficacy of GABA(B) PAMs to attenuate multiple alcohol-related behaviors will be discussed. Results: Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the GABA(B) receptor offer an attractive alternative approach to baclofen and have the potential to achieve mechanistic and therapeutic effects similar to GABA(B) agonists, while avoiding the tolerance and toxicity issues associated with baclofen. To date, all preclinical behavioral results have invariably shown the efficacy of GABA(B) PAMs for addiction treatment. Conclusions: Preclinical studies indicate that GABA(B) PAMs have a higher therapeutic index than orthosteric agonists, at least in terms of mitigating the sedative effects of GABA(B) agonism. This predicts that GABA(B) PAMs have a high translational potential in humans and merit being tested clinically, in particular in patients with severe AUD.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Augier, Gaëlle
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Schwabl, Veronika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Lguensat, Asmae
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Atudorei, Mihai
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Iyere, Osamudiamen
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Eriksson Solander, Sandra
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Augier, Eric
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Wistar rats choose alcohol over social interaction in a discrete-choice model2023Inngår i: Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0893-133X, E-ISSN 1740-634X, Vol. 48, s. 1098-1107Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Animal models of substance use disorders have been criticized for their limited translation. One important factor behind seeking and taking that has so far been largely overlooked is the availability of alternative non-drug rewards. We recently reported that only about 15% of outbred Wistar rats will choose alcohol over a sweet solution of saccharin. It was also shown using a novel operant model of choice of drugs over social rewards that social interaction consistently attenuates self-administration and incubation of craving for stimulants and opioids. Whether this is also true for alcohol and choice of alcohol over a sweet reward translates to social rewards is currently unknown. We therefore evaluated choice between alcohol and a social reward in different experimental settings in both male and female Wistar rats. We found, in contrast to prior work that employed discrete choice of drugs vs. social reward, that rats almost exclusively prefer alcohol over social interaction, irrespective of the nature of the social partner (cagemate vs. novel rat), the length of interaction, housing conditions and sex. Alcohol choice was reduced when the response requirement for alcohol was increased. However, rats persisted in choosing alcohol, even when the effort required to obtain it was 10-16 times higher (for females and males respectively) than the one for the social reward. Altogether, these results indicate that the social choice model may not generalize to alcohol, pointing to the possibility that specific interactions between alcohol and social reward, not seen when a sweet solution is used as an alternative to the drug, may play a crucial role in alcohol vs. social choice experiments.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 20.
    Azadi, Maryam
    et al.
    Tarbiat Modares Univ, Iran.
    Moazen, Parisa
    Tarbiat Modares Univ, Iran.
    Wiskerke, Joost
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Semnanian, Saeed
    Tarbiat Modares Univ, Iran.
    Azizi, Hossein
    Tarbiat Modares Univ, Iran.
    Preconception paternal morphine exposure leads to an impulsive phenotype in male rat progeny2021Inngår i: Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0033-3158, E-ISSN 1432-2072, Vol. 238, s. 3435-3446Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale Identifying the long-term neurocognitive implications of opioid addiction may further our understanding of the compulsive nature of this brain disorder. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of paternal adolescent opiate exposure on cognitive performance (visual attention, impulsivity, and compulsivity) in the next generation. Methods Male Wistar rats received escalating doses of morphine (2.5-25 mg/kg, s.c.) or saline for 10 days during adolescence (P30-39). In adulthood (P70-80), these rats were allowed to mate with drug-naive females. Male offspring from morphine- and saline-exposed sires, once in adulthood, were trained and tested in the 5-choice serial reaction time test (5-CSRTT) to evaluate their cognitive abilities under baseline, drug-free conditions as well as following acute (1, 3, 5 mg/kg morphine) and subchronic morphine (5 mg/kg morphine for 5 days) treatment. Behavioral effects of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone were also assessed. Results Morphine-sired offspring exhibited delayed learning when the shortest stimulus duration (1 s) was introduced, i.e., when cognitive load was highest. These subjects also exhibited a reduced ability to exert inhibitory control, as reflected by increased premature and perseverative responding under drug-free baseline conditions in comparison to saline-sired rats. These impairments could not be reversed by administration of naloxone. Moreover, impulsive behavior was further enhanced in morphine-sired rats following acute and subchronic morphine treatment. Conclusion Paternal opiate exposure during adolescence was found to primarily impair inhibitory control in male progeny. These results further our understanding of the long-term costs and risk of opioid abuse, extending across generations.

  • 21.
    Bang, Peter
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för neurobiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Igelström, Kajsa
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för neurobiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap.
    Modality-specific associations between sensory differences and autistic traits2023Inngår i: Autism, ISSN 1362-3613, E-ISSN 1461-7005, Vol. 27, nr 7, s. 2158-2172Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensory processing differences measured by self- or parent-report co-segregate with quantitative autistic traits and have potential endophenotypic properties. It is not known to what extent this reflects generalized sensory dysfunction versus more specific associations involving individual senses or autistic trait domains. We combined Bayesian variable selection with dominance analysis to obtain a more nuanced understanding of modality-specific associations. We recruited two independent samples of adults to complete the Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire and the Glasgow Sensory Questionnaire. For each domain of autistic traits (social interaction, communication, cognitive rigidity), we performed stochastic search variable selection using Glasgow Sensory Questionnaire modality subscales as predictors while controlling for uncertainty in other variables. Dominance analysis was applied to the reduced models to evaluate the relative importance of predictors. Only auditory scores reliably predicted all three autistic traits when other modalities were accounted for. The proprioceptive scale, which included motor and interoceptive deficits, predicted communicative autistic traits more than other trait domains. The tactile scale appeared most specific for social autistic traits. Although the findings must be interpreted in light of the limitations of the questionnaires, the study suggests that auditory differences may be more likely than differences in other senses to be a robust sensory endophenotype relevant to autism. Lay abstract Sensory symptoms are a major source of distress for many autistic people, causing anxiety, stress, and avoidance. Sensory problems are thought to be passed on genetically together with other autistic characteristics, such as social preferences. This means that people who report cognitive rigidity and autistic-like social function are more likely to suffer from sensory issues. We do not know what role the individual senses, such as vision, hearing, smell, or touch, play in this relationship, because sensory processing is generally measured with questionnaires that target general, multisensory issues. This study aimed to investigate the individual importance of the different senses (vision, hearing, touch, smell, taste, balance, and proprioception) in the correlation with autistic traits. To ensure the results were replicable, we repeated the experiment in two large groups of adults. The first group contained 40% autistic participants, whereas the second group resembled the general population. We found that problems with auditory processing were more strongly predictive of general autistic characteristics than were problems with the other senses. Problems with touch were specifically related to differences in social interaction, such as avoiding social settings. We also found a specific relationship between proprioceptive differences and autistic-like communication preferences. The sensory questionnaire had limited reliability, so our results may underestimate the contribution of some senses. With that reservation in mind, we conclude that auditory differences are dominant over other modalities in predicting genetically based autistic traits and may therefore be of special interest for further genetic and neurobiological studies.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Barazanji, Nawroz
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för diagnostik och specialistmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Centrum för kirurgi, ortopedi och cancervård, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Icenhour, Adriane
    Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, Germany.
    Simon, Rozalyn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för diagnostik och specialistmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV.
    Bednarska, Olga
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Centrum för kirurgi, ortopedi och cancervård, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Tapper, Sofie
    Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för diagnostik och specialistmedicin. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Medicinsk strålningsfysik.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Medicinsk strålningsfysik. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för diagnostik och specialistmedicin.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för diagnostik och specialistmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Medicinsk strålningsfysik. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för diagnostik och specialistmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV. Region Östergötland, Centrum för kirurgi, ortopedi och cancervård, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Irritable bowel syndrome in women: Association between decreased insular subregion volumes and gastrointestinal symptoms2022Inngår i: NeuroImage: Clinical, E-ISSN 2213-1582, Vol. 35, artikkel-id 103128Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic pain disorder characterized by disturbed interactions between the gut and the brain with depression as a common comorbidity. In both IBS and depression, structural brain alterations of the insular cortices, key structures for pain processing and interoception, have been demonstrated but the specificity of these findings remains unclear. We compared the gray matter volume (GMV) of insular cortex (IC) subregions in IBS women and healthy controls (HC) and examined relations to gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and glutamate + glutamine (Glx) concentrations. We further analyzed GMV of IC subregions in women with major depression (MDD) compared to HC and addressed possible differences between depression, IBS, IBS with depression and HC.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Barbier, Estelle
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Barchiesi, Riccardo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Domi, Ana
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Chanthongdee, Kanat
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Mahidol Univ, Thailand.
    Domi, Esi
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Augier, Gaëlle
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Augier, Eric
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Xu, Li
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Sichuan Prov Peoples Hosp, Peoples R China.
    Adermark, Louise
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Downregulation of Synaptotagmin 1 in the Prelimbic Cortex Drives Alcohol-Associated Behaviors in Rats2021Inngår i: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 89, nr 4, s. 398-406Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Alcohol addiction is characterized by persistent neuroadaptations in brain structures involved in motivation, emotion, and decision making, including the medial prefrontal cortex, the nucleus accumbens, and the amygdala. We previously reported that induction of alcohol dependence was associated with long-term changes in the expression of genes involved in neurotransmitter release. Specifically, Syt1, which plays a key role in neurotransmitter release and neuronal functions, was downregulated. Here, we therefore examined the role of Syt1 in alcohol-associated behaviors in rats. METHODS: We evaluated the effect of Syt1 downregulation using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) containing a short hairpin RNA against Syt1. Cre-dependent Syt1 was also used in combination with an rAAV2 retro-Cre virus to assess circuit-specific effects of Syt1 knockdown (KD). RESULTS: Alcohol-induced downregulation of Syt1 is specific to the prelimbic cortex (PL), and KD of Syt1 in the PL resulted in escalated alcohol consumption, increased motivation to consume alcohol, and increased alcohol drinking despite negative consequences ("compulsivity"). Syt1 KD in the PL altered the excitation/inhibition balance in the basolateral amygdala, while the nucleus accumbens core was unaffected. Accordingly, a projection-specific Syt1 KD in the PL-basolateral amygdala projection was sufficient to increase compulsive alcohol drinking, while a KD of Syt1 restricted to PL-nucleus accumbens core projecting neurons had no effect on tested alcohol-related behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: Together, these data suggest that dysregulation of Syt1 is an important mechanism in long-term neuroadaptations observed after a history of alcohol dependence, and that Syt1 regulates alcohol-related behaviors in part by affecting a PL-basolateral amygdala brain circuit.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 24.
    Barchiesi, Riccardo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Overlapping Neural Substrates of Alcohol- and Anxiety-Related Behavior in the Rat2021Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Alcohol use is a leading cause of death and disease worldwide. A large part of this disease burden is associated with alcohol use disorder (AUD), a diagnostic category characterized by excessive use in spite of negative consequences ("compulsive use"), a loss of control over intake, and choice of alcohol over natural rewards. These behavioral symptoms are believed to reflect the emergence of persistent neuroadaptations in key brain regions that exert control over motivated behavior. A major challenge to addressing the treatment needs of patients with AUD is the high prevalence of co-occurring psychiatric disorders, of which anxiety disorders are the most common. Both AUD and anxiety disorders are characterized by broad changes in gene expression within brain regions that include the prelimbic cortex (PL) and the amygdala complex. Although the risk for AUD has a substantial genetic component, heavy alcohol use and stress also contribute to disease risk. 

    Our lab previously identified DNA hypermethylation as a mechanism behind alcohol-induced downregulation of prelimbic Syt1 and Prdm2. In a subsequent study, our lab demonstrated a functional role of Prdm2 in alcohol-associated behaviors. In the work that constitutes this thesis, we have further investigated the behavioral consequences of Syt1 and Prdm2 downregulation. We found that Syt1 knock-down in the PL of non-dependent rats is sufficient to promote several behaviors that model critical aspects of AUD. We further identified the PL-basolateral amygdala (BLA) projection as a key brain circuit within which Syt1 knock-down promotes compulsive-like alcohol intake. In another study, we showed that Prdm2 knock-down in the PL increases the expression of fear memory, a central feature of anxiety disorders. Knock-down after memory formation (consolidation) did not increase the fear expression, indicating that Prdm2 regulates fear memory consolidation. We further showed that knock-down of Prdm2 in the PL-BLA projection was sufficient to promote the increased fear expression. Transcriptome analysis specifically in neurons projecting from the PL to the BLA showed a marked up-regulation of genes involved in synaptogenesis, suggesting that Prdm2 downregulation leads to excessive fear by strengthening fear memory consolidation in the PL-BLA circuit. 

    In a third study, we used a model of social defeat- and witness stress to investigate mechanisms of co-occurring escalated alcohol intake and increased anxiety-like behavior ("comorbidity"). We recapitulated the broad range of individual stress responses observed in human populations. With gene expression analysis, we identified a marked upregulation of Avp in the amygdala of rats with "co-morbid" characteristics, and this upregulation correlated with the magnitude of the comorbidity. 

    Together, our findings highlight the contribution of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating the behavioral consequences of alcohol-dependence, and identify specific downstream target genes whose expression is influenced by alcohol-induced epigenetic reprogramming to mediate long-term behavioral consequences. Our work also identifies amygdala Avp as a possible neurobiological substrate of individual susceptibility for stress-induced alcohol- and anxiety-related behaviors.

    Delarbeid
    1. Downregulation of Synaptotagmin 1 in the Prelimbic Cortex Drives Alcohol-Associated Behaviors in Rats
    Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Downregulation of Synaptotagmin 1 in the Prelimbic Cortex Drives Alcohol-Associated Behaviors in Rats
    Vise andre…
    2021 (engelsk)Inngår i: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 89, nr 4, s. 398-406Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Alcohol addiction is characterized by persistent neuroadaptations in brain structures involved in motivation, emotion, and decision making, including the medial prefrontal cortex, the nucleus accumbens, and the amygdala. We previously reported that induction of alcohol dependence was associated with long-term changes in the expression of genes involved in neurotransmitter release. Specifically, Syt1, which plays a key role in neurotransmitter release and neuronal functions, was downregulated. Here, we therefore examined the role of Syt1 in alcohol-associated behaviors in rats. METHODS: We evaluated the effect of Syt1 downregulation using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) containing a short hairpin RNA against Syt1. Cre-dependent Syt1 was also used in combination with an rAAV2 retro-Cre virus to assess circuit-specific effects of Syt1 knockdown (KD). RESULTS: Alcohol-induced downregulation of Syt1 is specific to the prelimbic cortex (PL), and KD of Syt1 in the PL resulted in escalated alcohol consumption, increased motivation to consume alcohol, and increased alcohol drinking despite negative consequences ("compulsivity"). Syt1 KD in the PL altered the excitation/inhibition balance in the basolateral amygdala, while the nucleus accumbens core was unaffected. Accordingly, a projection-specific Syt1 KD in the PL-basolateral amygdala projection was sufficient to increase compulsive alcohol drinking, while a KD of Syt1 restricted to PL-nucleus accumbens core projecting neurons had no effect on tested alcohol-related behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: Together, these data suggest that dysregulation of Syt1 is an important mechanism in long-term neuroadaptations observed after a history of alcohol dependence, and that Syt1 regulates alcohol-related behaviors in part by affecting a PL-basolateral amygdala brain circuit.

    sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
    Elsevier Science INC, 2021
    HSV kategori
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-173626 (URN)10.1016/j.biopsych.2020.08.027 (DOI)000610845900015 ()33160605 (PubMedID)
    Merknad

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research CouncilEuropean Commission [201307434, 2018-028149]; Region Ostergotland; Stiftelsen Psykiatriska Forskningsfonden; Wallenberg FoundationEuropean Commission

    Tilgjengelig fra: 2021-02-26 Laget: 2021-02-26 Sist oppdatert: 2021-12-29
    2. Stress-induced escalation of alcohol self-administration, anxiety-like behavior, and elevated amygdala Avp expression in a susceptible subpopulation of rats
    Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Stress-induced escalation of alcohol self-administration, anxiety-like behavior, and elevated amygdala Avp expression in a susceptible subpopulation of rats
    Vise andre…
    2021 (engelsk)Inngår i: Addiction Biology, ISSN 1355-6215, E-ISSN 1369-1600, Vol. 26, nr 5, artikkel-id e13009Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Comorbidity between alcohol use and anxiety disorders is associated with more severe symptoms and poorer treatment outcomes than either of the conditions alone. There is a well-known link between stress and the development of these disorders, with post-traumatic stress disorder as a prototypic example. Post-traumatic stress disorder can arise as a consequence of experiencing traumatic events firsthand and also after witnessing them. Here, we used a model of social defeat and witness stress in rats, to study shared mechanisms of stress-induced anxiety-like behavior and escalated alcohol self-administration. Similar to what is observed clinically, we found considerable individual differences in susceptibility and resilience to the stress. Both among defeated and witness rats, we found a subpopulation in which exposure was followed by emergence of increased anxiety-like behavior and escalation of alcohol self-administration. We then profiled gene expression in tissue from the amygdala, a key brain region in the regulation of stress, alcohol use, and anxiety disorders. When comparing "comorbid" and resilient socially defeated rats, we identified a strong upregulation of vasopressin and oxytocin, and this correlated positively with the magnitude of the alcohol self-administration and anxiety-like behavior. A similar trend was observed in comorbid witness rats. Together, our findings provide novel insights into molecular mechanisms underpinning the comorbidity of escalated alcohol self-administration and anxiety-like behavior.

    sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
    Wiley, 2021
    Emneord
    alcohol use disorder; anxiety disorders; comorbidity; social defeat stress; vasopressin; witness stress
    HSV kategori
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-173908 (URN)10.1111/adb.13009 (DOI)000616404100001 ()33565224 (PubMedID)
    Merknad

    Funding Agencies|Wallenberg FoundationEuropean Commission [KAW 2018.0322]; Region Ostergotland; Stiftelsen psykiatriska forskningsfonden; Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research CouncilEuropean Commission [2013-07434]

    Tilgjengelig fra: 2021-03-09 Laget: 2021-03-09 Sist oppdatert: 2022-03-18
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    presentationsbild
  • 25.
    Barchiesi, Riccardo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Chanthongdee, Kanat
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Mahidol Univ, Thailand.
    Domi, Esi
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Gobbo, Francesco
    Univ Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Coppola, Andrea
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Asratian, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Toivainen, Sanne
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Holm, Lovisa
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Augier, Gaëlle
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Xu, Li
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Univ Elect Sci & Technol China, Peoples R China.
    Augier, Eric
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Barbier, Estelle
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Stress-induced escalation of alcohol self-administration, anxiety-like behavior, and elevated amygdala Avp expression in a susceptible subpopulation of rats2021Inngår i: Addiction Biology, ISSN 1355-6215, E-ISSN 1369-1600, Vol. 26, nr 5, artikkel-id e13009Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Comorbidity between alcohol use and anxiety disorders is associated with more severe symptoms and poorer treatment outcomes than either of the conditions alone. There is a well-known link between stress and the development of these disorders, with post-traumatic stress disorder as a prototypic example. Post-traumatic stress disorder can arise as a consequence of experiencing traumatic events firsthand and also after witnessing them. Here, we used a model of social defeat and witness stress in rats, to study shared mechanisms of stress-induced anxiety-like behavior and escalated alcohol self-administration. Similar to what is observed clinically, we found considerable individual differences in susceptibility and resilience to the stress. Both among defeated and witness rats, we found a subpopulation in which exposure was followed by emergence of increased anxiety-like behavior and escalation of alcohol self-administration. We then profiled gene expression in tissue from the amygdala, a key brain region in the regulation of stress, alcohol use, and anxiety disorders. When comparing "comorbid" and resilient socially defeated rats, we identified a strong upregulation of vasopressin and oxytocin, and this correlated positively with the magnitude of the alcohol self-administration and anxiety-like behavior. A similar trend was observed in comorbid witness rats. Together, our findings provide novel insights into molecular mechanisms underpinning the comorbidity of escalated alcohol self-administration and anxiety-like behavior.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 26.
    Barchiesi, Riccardo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Chanthongdee, Kanat
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Mahidol Univ, Thailand.
    Petrella, Michele
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Xu, Li
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Söderholm, Simon
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för molekylär medicin och virologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Domi, Esi
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Augier, Gaëlle
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Coppola, Andrea
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Wiskerke, Joost
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Szczot, Ilona
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Domi, Ana
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Adermark, Louise
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Augier, Eric
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Cantù, Claudio
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för molekylär medicin och virologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Barbier, Estelle
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    An epigenetic mechanism for over-consolidation of fear memories2022Inngår i: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578, Vol. 27, nr 12, s. 4893-4904Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Excessive fear is a hallmark of anxiety disorders, a major cause of disease burden worldwide. Substantial evidence supports a role of prefrontal cortex-amygdala circuits in the regulation of fear and anxiety, but the molecular mechanisms that regulate their activity remain poorly understood. Here, we show that downregulation of the histone methyltransferase PRDM2 in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex enhances fear expression by modulating fear memory consolidation. We further show that Prdm2 knock-down (KD) in neurons that project from the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex to the basolateral amygdala (dmPFC-BLA) promotes increased fear expression. Prdm2 KD in the dmPFC-BLA circuit also resulted in increased expression of genes involved in synaptogenesis, suggesting that Prdm2 KD modulates consolidation of conditioned fear by modifying synaptic strength at dmPFC-BLA projection targets. Consistent with an enhanced synaptic efficacy, we found that dmPFC Prdm2 KD increased glutamatergic release probability in the BLA and increased the activity of BLA neurons in response to fear-associated cues. Together, our findings provide a new molecular mechanism for excessive fear responses, wherein PRDM2 modulates the dmPFC -BLA circuit through specific transcriptomic changes.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 27.
    Belov, Vladimir
    et al.
    Georg August Univ, Germany.
    Erwin-Grabner, Tracy
    Georg August Univ, Germany.
    Aghajani, Moji
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands; Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Aleman, Andre
    Univ Groningen, Netherlands.
    Amod, Alyssa R.
    Univ Cape Town, South Africa.
    Basgoze, Zeynep
    Univ Minnesota, MN 55417 USA.
    Benedetti, Francesco
    IRCCS San Raffaele Sci Inst, Italy.
    Besteher, Bianca
    Jena Univ Hosp, Germany.
    Bülow, Robin
    Univ Med Greifswald, Germany.
    Ching, Christopher R. K.
    Univ Southern Calif, CA USA.
    Connolly, Colm G.
    Florida State Univ, FL 32306 USA.
    Cullen, Kathryn
    Univ Minnesota, MN 55417 USA.
    Davey, Christopher G.
    Univ Melbourne, Australia.
    Dima, Danai
    City Univ London, England; Kings Coll London, England.
    Dols, Annemiek
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Evans, Jennifer W.
    NIMH, MD 20892 USA.
    Fu, Cynthia H. Y.
    Univ East London, England; Kings Coll London, England.
    Gonul, Ali Saffet
    Ege Univ, Turkiye.
    Gotlib, Ian H.
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Grabe, Hans J.
    Univ Med Greifswald, Germany.
    Groenewold, Nynke
    Univ Cape Town, South Africa.
    Hamilton, Paul
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV.
    Harrison, Ben J.
    Univ Melbourne, Australia.
    Ho, Tiffany C.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Mwangi, Benson
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Jaworska, Natalia
    McGill Univ, Canada.
    Jahanshad, Neda
    Univ Southern Calif, CA USA.
    Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie
    Univ Minnesota, MN USA.
    Koopowitz, Sheri-Michelle
    Univ Cape Town, South Africa.
    Lancaster, Thomas
    Cardiff Univ, Wales.
    Li, Meng
    Jena Univ Hosp, Germany.
    Linden, David E. J.
    Cardiff Univ, Wales; Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    MacMaster, Frank P.
    Univ Calgary, Canada.
    Mehler, David M. A.
    Cardiff Univ, Wales; Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Germany.
    Melloni, Elisa
    IRCCS San Raffaele Sci Inst, Italy.
    Mueller, Bryon A.
    Univ Minnesota, MN 55417 USA.
    Ojha, Amar
    Univ Pittsburgh, PA USA.
    Oudega, Mardien L.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Poletti, Sara
    IRCCS San Raffaele Sci Inst, Italy.
    Pomarol-Clotet, Edith
    FIDMAG Germanes Hosp Res Fdn, Spain.
    Portella, Maria J.
    Inst Recerca LHosp Santa Creu I St Pau, Spain.
    Pozzi, Elena
    Univ Melbourne, Australia; Orygen, Australia.
    Reneman, Liesbeth
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Sacchet, Matthew D.
    Harvard Med Sch, MA USA.
    Saemann, Philipp G.
    Max Planck Inst Psychiat, Germany.
    Schrantee, Anouk
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Sim, Kang
    West Reg Inst Mental Hlth, Singapore; Natl Univ Singapore, Singapore; Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Soares, Jair C.
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Stein, Dan J.
    Univ Cape Town, South Africa.
    Thomopoulos, Sophia I.
    Univ Southern Calif, CA USA.
    Uyar-Demir, Aslihan
    Ege Univ, Turkiye.
    van der Wee, Nic J. A.
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    van der Werff, Steven J. A.
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Voelzke, Henry
    Univ Med Greifswald, Germany.
    Whittle, Sarah
    Univ Melbourne, Australia; Melbourne Hlth, Australia.
    Wittfeld, Katharina
    German Ctr Neurodegenerat Dis DZNE, Germany.
    Wright, Margaret J.
    Univ Queensland, Australia.
    Wu, Mon-Ju
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Yang, Tony T.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Zarate, Carlos
    NIMH, MD 20892 USA.
    Veltman, Dick J.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Schmaal, Lianne
    Univ Melbourne, Australia.
    Thompson, Paul M.
    Univ Southern Calif, CA USA.
    Goya-Maldonado, Roberto
    Georg August Univ, Germany.
    Multi-site benchmark classification of major depressive disorder using machine learning on cortical and subcortical measures2024Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 14, nr 1, artikkel-id 1084Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Machine learning (ML) techniques have gained popularity in the neuroimaging field due to their potential for classifying neuropsychiatric disorders. However, the diagnostic predictive power of the existing algorithms has been limited by small sample sizes, lack of representativeness, data leakage, and/or overfitting. Here, we overcome these limitations with the largest multi-site sample size to date (N = 5365) to provide a generalizable ML classification benchmark of major depressive disorder (MDD) using shallow linear and non-linear models. Leveraging brain measures from standardized ENIGMA analysis pipelines in FreeSurfer, we were able to classify MDD versus healthy controls (HC) with a balanced accuracy of around 62%. But after harmonizing the data, e.g., using ComBat, the balanced accuracy dropped to approximately 52%. Accuracy results close to random chance levels were also observed in stratified groups according to age of onset, antidepressant use, number of episodes and sex. Future studies incorporating higher dimensional brain imaging/phenotype features, and/or using more advanced machine and deep learning methods may yield more encouraging prospects.

  • 28.
    Berg, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Lindegaard, Tomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Flygare, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Sjöbrink, Julia
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Hagvall, Linn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Palmebäck, Sofia
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Klemetz, Helena
    Psykologpartners, Private practice, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Medicinska och geriatriska akutkliniken. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Internet-based CBT for adolescents with low self-esteem: a pilot randomized controlled trial2022Inngår i: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 51, nr 5, s. 388-407Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Low self-esteem is a common problem among adolescents and is related to psychiatric problems such as depression and anxiety. However, effective and available interventions primarily targeting low self-esteem are scarce, in particular for youths. To address this gap, the aim of this pilot study was to evaluate a novel internet-based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (ICBT) program for low self-esteem in adolescents using a randomized controlled design. Fifty-two participants (15-19 years) were recruited and randomly allocated to seven weeks of therapist-supported ICBT (n=26) or to a waitlist control condition (n=26). The primary outcome was the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES). Secondary outcomes measured domain-specific aspects of self-esteem, self-compassion, quality of life, depression and anxiety. The treatment group showed significantly higher levels of self-rated self-esteem compared to the control group at post-treatment, with a large between-group effect-size (RSES, d = 1.18). Further, the treatment had significant positive impact on secondary measures of self-esteem, self-compassion, quality of life, depression and anxiety. The results of this pilot-RCT suggest that ICBT can be effective for treating low self-esteem in adolescents, decrease depression and anxiety levels, and increasing quality of life. Replication of the results in larger samples is needed.    

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  • 29.
    Berg, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rozental, Alexander
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; UCL, England.
    de Brun Mangs, Josefine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Näsman, Maja
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Strömberg, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Viberg, Linn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Wallner, Erik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Åhman, Hanna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Silfvernagel, Kristin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Zetterqvist, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Barn- och ungdomspsykiatriska kliniken Linköping.
    Topooco, Naira
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Ctr M2Hlth, CA USA.
    Johansson Capusan, Andrea
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. UCL, England.
    The Role of Learning Support and Chat-Sessions in Guided Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents With Anxiety: A Factorial Design Study2020Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 11, artikkel-id 503Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Increased awareness of anxiety in adolescents emphasises the need for effective interventions. Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) could be a resource-effective and evidence-based treatment option, but little is known about how to optimize ICBT or which factors boost outcomes. Recently, the role of knowledge in psychotherapy has received increased focus. Further, chat-sessions are of interest when trying to optimize ICBT for youths. This study aimed to evaluate the role of learning support and chat-sessions during ICBT for adolescent anxiety, using a factorial design. Method A total of 120 adolescents were randomised to one of four treatment groups, in a 2x2 design with two factors: with or without learning support and/or chat-sessions. Results Anxiety and depressive symptoms were reduced (Beck Anxiety Inventory- BAI; Cohensd=0.72; Beck Depression Inventory- BDI;d=0.97). There was a main effect of learning support on BAI (d=0.38), and learning support increased knowledge gain (d =0.42). There were no main effects or interactions related to the chat-sessions. Treatment effects were maintained at 6-months, but the added effect of learning support had by then vanished. Conclusion ICBT can be an effective alternative when treating adolescents with anxiety. Learning support could be of importance to enhance short-term treatment effects, and should be investigated further.

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  • 30.
    Bergamino, Maurizio
    et al.
    Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, OK, USA.
    Farmer, Madison
    Roosevelt University, Department of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Yeh, Hung-Wen
    Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, OK, USA.
    Paul, Elisabeth
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Statistical differences in the white matter tracts in subjects with depression by using different skeletonized voxel-wise analysis approaches and DTI fitting procedures2017Inngår i: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240, Vol. 1669, s. 131-140Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most significant contributors to the global burden of illness. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a procedure that has been used in several studies to characterize abnormalities in white matter (WM) microstructural integrity in MDD. These studies, however, have provided divergent findings, potentially due to the large variety of methodological alternatives available in conducting DTI research. In order to determine the importance of different approaches to coregistration of DTI-derived metrics to a standard space, we compared results from two different skeletonized voxel-wise analysis approaches: the standard TBBS pipeline and the Advanced Normalization Tools (ANTs) approach incorporating a symmetric image normalization (SyN) algorithm and a group-wise template (ANTs TBSS). We also assessed effects of applying twelve different fitting procedures for the diffusion tensor. For our dataset, lower fractional anisotropy (FA) and axial diffusivity (AD) in depressed subjects compared with healthy controls were found for both methods and for all fitting procedures. No group differences were found for radial and mean diffusivity indices. Importantly, for the AD metric, the normalization methods and fitting procedures showed reliable differences, both in the volume and in the number of significant between-groups difference clusters detected. Additionally, a significant voxel-based correlation, in the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, between AD and self-reported stress was found only for one of the normalization procedure (ANTs TBSS). In conclusion, the sensitivity to detect group-level effects on DTI metrics might depend on the DTI normalization and/or tensor fitting procedures used.

  • 31.
    Bergman, David
    et al.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hagström, Hannes
    Division of Hepatology, Department of Upper GI Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson Capusan, Andrea
    Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Mårild, Karl
    Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Fredrik
    School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sundquist, Kristina
    Center for Primary Health Care Research, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Pediatrics, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden; Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK; Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA.
    Incidence of ICD-Based Diagnoses of Alcohol-Related Disorders and Diseases from Swedish Nationwide Registers and Suggestions for Coding2020Inngår i: Clinical Epidemiology, ISSN 1179-1349, E-ISSN 1179-1349, Vol. 12, s. 1433-1442Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To improve consistency between register studies in Sweden and ensure valid comparisons of possible changes in alcohol-related disorders and diseases (ARDDs) over time, we propose a definition of ARDDs. Based on this definition, we examined Sweden's incidence rates of ARDDs from 1970 to 2018 in non-primary healthcare settings (inpatient and outpatient).

    Methods: Swedish Society of Epidemiology members were invited to give feedback on the International Classification of Disease (ICD) codes with a potential link to alcohol use. We then calculated age-standardised and age-specific incidence of ARDDs over time according to the National Patient Register, and the lifetime prevalence of ARDDs diagnosed in adults alive in Sweden on Dec 31, 2018.

    Results: Sweden's estimated incidence of ARDDs increased substantially after introducing the new ICD-9 codes in 1987. In the past 10 years (2009-2018), the incidence of ARDDs has been stable (males: 110/100,000 person-years, females: 49/100,000 person-years). Requiring at least two ICD records for diagnosed ARDDs led to a somewhat lower incidence of ARDDs (males: 71 per 100,000 person-years, females: 29 per 100,000 person-years). In Sweden, the lifetime prevalence of diagnosed ARDDs in adults on Dec 31, 2018, was 1.9% (95% CI=1.9-1.9).

    Conclusion: In this nationwide study, we found an incidence of ARDDs of 50-100/100,000 person-years. In 2018, 1 in 52 adults in Sweden had been diagnosed with ARDDs in the National Patient Register.

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  • 32.
    Bergström, Anna
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Anestesi- och intensivvårdskliniken VIN.
    Lipcsey, Miklos
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Yang, Bei
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Engblom, David
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Chew, Michelle
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för klinisk kemi och farmakologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, ANOPIVA US.
    Elander, Louise
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för klinisk kemi och farmakologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Anestesi- och intensivvårdskliniken VIN. Nykopings Lasarett, Sweden.
    Acetaminophen Attenuates Pulmonary Vascular Resistance and Pulmonary Arterial Pressure and Inhibits Cardiovascular Collapse in a Porcine Model of Endotoxemia2023Inngår i: Shock, ISSN 1073-2322, E-ISSN 1540-0514, Vol. 59, nr 3, s. 442-448Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is often used in critically ill patients with fever and pain; however, little is known about the effects of acetaminophen on cardiovascular function during systemic inflammation. Here, we investigated the effect of acetaminophen on changes in the systemic and pulmonary circulation induced by endotoxin (0.5 mu g/kg per hour) in anesthetized pigs. Endotoxin infusion led to a rapid increase in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance index. Acetaminophen delayed and attenuated this increase. Furthermore, acetaminophen reduced tachycardia and decreased stroke volume, accompanied by systemic inflammation, without affecting inflammatory parameters such as white blood cell count and TNF-alpha in blood. As a proof of concept, we injected a high dose of endotoxin (100 mu g), which induced rapid cardiovascular collapse in pigs. Pigs treated with acetaminophen survived with no obvious hemodynamic instability during the 50-min observation period. In conclusion, acetaminophen attenuates the effects of endotoxin on pulmonary circulation in anesthetized pigs. This may play a role in severe systemic inflammation.

  • 33.
    Berndtsson, Catarina
    et al.
    Göteborgs Stadsmission.
    Sjölandet, Cecilia
    Stiftelsen Allmänna barnhuset.
    Korhonen, Laura
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Barn- och ungdomspsykiatriska kliniken Linköping.
    Eriksson, Maria
    Marie Cederschiöld högskola.
    Frisk, Maria
    Rädda Barnen.
    Barn ska aldrig behöva flytta tillbaka till en våldsam förälder2022Inngår i: Göteborgs-Posten, ISSN 1103-9345Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 34.
    Best, Laura M.
    et al.
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Williams, Belinda
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Le Foll, Bernard
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Mansouri, Esmaeil
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Bazinet, Richard P.
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Lin, Lin
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    De Luca, Vincenzo
    Univ Toronto, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Lagzdins, Dina
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Rusjan, Pablo
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Tyndale, Rachel F.
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Wilson, Alan A.
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Hendershot, Christian S.
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Houle, Sylvain
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Tong, Junchao
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Kish, Stephen J.
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Boileau, Isabelle
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Lower brain fatty acid amide hydrolase in treatment-seeking patients with alcohol use disorder: a positron emission tomography study with [C-11]CURB2020Inngår i: Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0893-133X, E-ISSN 1740-634X, Vol. 45, nr 8, s. 1289-1296Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The endocannabinoid enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), has been proposed as a therapeutic target for alcohol use disorder (AUD) and co-morbid psychiatric illnesses. Investigating this target in the living human brain and its relationship to clinical outcome is a critical step of informed drug development. Our objective was to establish whether brain FAAH levels are low in individuals with AUD and related to drinking behavior. In this pilot study, treatment-seeking patients with AUD completed two PET scans with the FAAH radiotracer [C-11]CURB after 3-7 days (n = 14) and 2-4 weeks (n = 9) of monitored abstinence. Healthy controls (n = 25) completed one scan. FAAH genetic polymorphism (rs324420) and blood concentrations of anandamide and other N-acylethanolamines metabolized by FAAH were determined and AUD symptoms assessed. In AUD, brain FAAH levels were globally lower than controls during early abstinence (F(1,36) = 5.447; p = 0.025)) and FAAH substrates (anandamide, oleoylethanolamide, and N-docosahexaenoylethanolamide) were significantly elevated (30-67%). No significant differences in FAAH or FAAH substrates were noted after 2-4 weeks abstinence. FAAH levels negatively correlated with drinks per week (r = -0.57, p = 0.032) and plasma concentrations of the three FAAH substrates (r > 0.57; p < 0.04)). Our findings suggest that early abstinence from alcohol in AUD is associated with transiently low brain FAAH levels, which are inversely related to heavier alcohol use and elevated plasma levels of FAAH substrates. Whether low FAAH is an adaptive beneficial response to chronic alcohol is unknown. Therapeutic strategies focusing on FAAH inhibition should consider the possibility that low FAAH during early abstinence may be related to drinking.

  • 35.
    Binder, Luisa B.
    et al.
    Univ Laval, Canada; Univ Laval, Canada; Univ Laval, Canada.
    Batista Da Rosa, Priscila
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    de Sousa, Barbara M.
    Univ Aveiro, Portugal.
    Chagas, Luana S.
    Fluminense Fed Univ, Brazil.
    Dubljevic, Olga
    Inst Biol Res, Serbia.
    Martineau, Fanny Sandrine
    Univ Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Mottarlini, Francesca
    Univ Milan, Italy.
    Castany Quintana, Silvia
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Morton, Lorena
    Otto von Guericke Univ, Germany.
    Krstanovic, Fran
    Univ Rijeka, Croatia.
    Tassinari, Isadora D.
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Choconta, Jeiny L.
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Pereira-Santos, Ana Raquel
    Univ Coimbra, Portugal.
    Weinhard, Laetitia
    Grossman Sch Med, NY USA.
    Pallegar, Praveen N.
    Dept Neurol, MN USA.
    Vahsen, Bjorn F.
    Univ Oxford, England; Univ Oxford, England.
    Lepiarz-Raba, Izabela
    Nencki Inst Expt Biol PAS, Poland.
    Compagnion, Anne-Claire
    Univ Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Lorente-Picon, Marina
    Univ Autonoma Barcelona UAB, Spain.
    Neuro-immune interactions in health and disease: Insights from FENS-Hertie 2022 Winter School2024Inngår i: European Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0953-816X, E-ISSN 1460-9568Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    In a great partnership, the Federation of European Neuroscience Societies (FENS) and the Hertie Foundation organized the FENS-Hertie 2022 Winter School on 'Neuro-immune interactions in health and disease'. The school selected 27 PhD students and 13 postdoctoral fellows from 20 countries and involved 14 faculty members experts in the field. The Winter School focused on a rising field of research, the interactions between the nervous and both innate and adaptive immune systems under pathological and physiological conditions. A fine-tuned neuro-immune crosstalk is fundamental for healthy development, while disrupted neuro-immune communication might play a role in neurodegeneration, neuroinflammation and aging. However, much is yet to be understood about the underlying mechanisms of these neuro-immune interactions in the healthy brain and under pathological scenarios. In addition to new findings in this emerging field, novel methodologies and animal models were presented to foment research on neuro-immunology. The FENS-Hertie 2022 Winter School provided an insightful knowledge exchange between students and faculty focusing on the latest discoveries in the biology of neuro-immune interactions while fostering great academic and professional opportunities for early-career neuroscientists from around the world.

  • 36.
    Biskou, Olga
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för kirurgi, ortopedi och onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Meira de Faria, Felipe
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Centrum för kirurgi, ortopedi och cancervård, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Tinnerfelt Winberg, Martin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för kirurgi, ortopedi och onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Haapaniemi, Staffan
    Region Östergötland, Centrum för kirurgi, ortopedi och cancervård, Kirurgiska kliniken ViN. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för kirurgi, ortopedi och onkologi.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för kirurgi, ortopedi och onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Centrum för kirurgi, ortopedi och cancervård, Kirurgiska kliniken US.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för kirurgi, ortopedi och onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Centrum för kirurgi, ortopedi och cancervård, Kirurgiska kliniken US.
    Keita, Åsa
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för kirurgi, ortopedi och onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Increased Numbers of Enteric Glial Cells in the Peyers Patches and Enhanced Intestinal Permeability by Glial Cell Mediators in Patients with Ileal Crohns Disease2022Inngår i: Cells, E-ISSN 2073-4409, Vol. 11, nr 3, artikkel-id 335Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Enteric glial cells (EGC) are known to regulate gastrointestinal functions; however, their role in Crohns disease (CD) is elusive. Microscopic erosions over the ileal Peyers patches are early signs of CD. The aim of this work was to assess the localization of EGC in the follicle and interfollicular region of the Peyers patches and in the lamina propria and study the effects of EGC mediators on barrier function in CD patients and non-inflammatory bowel disease (non-IBD) controls. EGC markers, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and S100 calcium-binding protein β (S100β) were quantified by immunofluorescence and Western blotting. Both markers showed significantly more EGC in the Peyers patches and lamina propria of CD patients compared to the non-IBD controls. In CD patients there were significantly more EGC in Peyers patches compared to lamina propria, while the opposite pattern was seen in controls. Barrier function studies using Ussing chambers showed increased paracellular permeability by EGC mediators in CD patients, whereas permeability decreased by the mediators in controls. We show the accumulation of EGC in Peyers patches of CD patients. Moreover, EGC mediators induced barrier dysfunction in CD patients. Thus, EGC might have harmful impacts on ongoing inflammation and contribute to the pathophysiology of the disease.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 37.
    Blanken, M. A. J. T.
    et al.
    Vrije Univ, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Oudega, M. L.
    GGZ InGeest Specialized Mental Hlth Care, Netherlands; Vrije Univ, Netherlands; Vrije Univ, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Hoogendoorn, A. W.
    GGZ InGeest Specialized Mental Hlth Care, Netherlands; Vrije Univ, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Sonnenberg, C. S.
    Vrije Univ, Netherlands; GGZ Parnassia NH, Netherlands.
    Rhebergen, D.
    Vrije Univ, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Netherlands; GGZ Cent, Netherlands.
    Klumpers, U. M. H.
    Vrije Univ, Netherlands; Vrije Univ, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Van Diermen, L.
    Psychiat Ctr Bethanie, Belgium; Univ Antwerp, Belgium; Univ Psychiat Ctr UPC Duffel, Belgium.
    Birkenhager, T.
    Univ Antwerp, Belgium; Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Schrijvers, D.
    Univ Antwerp, Belgium; Univ Psychiat Ctr UPC Duffel, Belgium.
    Redlich, R.
    Univ Halle, Germany; Univ Munster, Germany.
    Dannlowski, U.
    Univ Munster, Germany.
    Heindel, W.
    Univ Munster, Germany.
    Coenjaerts, M.
    Univ Hosp Bonn, Germany.
    Nordanskog, Pia
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Oltedal, L.
    Haukeland Hosp, Norway; Univ Bergen, Norway.
    Kessler, U.
    Univ Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Frid, L. M.
    Univ Bergen, Norway.
    Takamiya, A.
    Keio Univ, Japan; Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Kishimoto, T.
    Keio Univ, Japan.
    Jorgensen, M. B.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Jorgensen, A.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bolwig, T.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Emsell, L.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Sienaert, P.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Bouckaert, F.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Abbott, C. C.
    Univ New Mexico, NM 87131 USA.
    Peran, P.
    Univ Toulouse, France.
    Arbus, C.
    Univ Toulouse, France.
    Yrondi, A.
    Univ Toulouse, France.
    Kiebs, M.
    Univ Bonn, Germany; Univ Hosp Oldenburg, Germany.
    Philipsen, A.
    Univ Bonn, Germany.
    van Waarde, J. A.
    Rijnstate Arnhem, Netherlands.
    Prinsen, E.
    Rijnstate Arnhem, Netherlands.
    van Verseveld, M.
    Rijnstate Arnhem, Netherlands.
    Van Wingen, G.
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands; Amsterdam Neurosci, Netherlands.
    ten Doesschate, F.
    Rijnstate Arnhem, Netherlands; Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Camprodon, J. A.
    Harvard Med Sch, MA USA.
    Kritzer, M.
    Harvard Med Sch, MA USA.
    Barbour, T.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, MA 02114 USA.
    Argyelan, M.
    Feinstein Inst Med Res, NY USA.
    Cardoner, N.
    Hosp Santa Creu & Sant Pau, Spain; Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Spain; Carlos III Hlth Inst, Spain.
    Urretavizcaya, M.
    Carlos III Hlth Inst, Spain; Bellvitge Univ Hosp, Spain; Univ Barcelona, Spain.
    Soriano-Mas, C.
    Carlos III Hlth Inst, Spain; Bellvitge Univ Hosp, Spain; Univ Barcelona, Spain.
    Narr, K. L.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Espinoza, R. T.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Prudic, J.
    Columbia Univ, NY 10027 USA.
    Rowny, S.
    Columbia Univ, NY 10027 USA.
    van Eijndhoven, Ph.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Tendolkar, I.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Dols, A.
    Vrije Univ, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Netherlands; Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Sex-specifics of ECT outcome2023Inngår i: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 326, s. 243-248Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective treatment for patients with severe major depressive disorder (MDD). Given the known sex differences in MDD, improved knowledge may provide more sex-specific recommendations in clinical guidelines and improve outcome. In the present study we examine sex differences in ECT outcome and its predictors. Methods: Clinical data from 20 independent sites participating in the Global ECT-MRI Research Collaboration (GEMRIC) were obtained for analysis, totaling 500 patients with MDD (58.6 % women) with a mean age of 54.8 years. Severity of depression before and after ECT was assessed with validated depression scales. Remission was defined as a HAM-D score of 7 points or below after ECT. Variables associated with remission were selected based on literature (i.e. depression severity at baseline, age, duration of index episode, and presence of psychotic symptoms). Results: Remission rates of ECT were independent of sex, 48.0 % in women and 45.7 % in men (X2(1) = 0.2, p = 0.70). In the logistic regression analyses, a shorter index duration was identified as a sex-specific predictor for ECT outcome in women (X2(1) = 7.05, p = 0.01). The corresponding predictive margins did show overlapping confidence intervals for men and women. Conclusion: The evidence provided by our study suggests that ECT as a biological treatment for MDD is equally effective in women and men. A shorter duration of index episode was an additional sex-specific predictor for remission in women. Future research should establish whether the confidence intervals for the corresponding predictive margins are overlapping, as we find, or not.

  • 38.
    Blomberg, Rina
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för funktionsnedsättning och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för funktionsnedsättning och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för funktionsnedsättning och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Perini, Irene
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för funktionsnedsättning och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV.
    Johansson Capusan, Andrea
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Aberrant resting-state connectivity of auditory, ventral attention/salience and default-mode networks in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder2022Inngår i: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, Vol. 16, artikkel-id 972730.Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Numerous resting-state studies on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have reported aberrant functional connectivity (FC) between the default-mode network (DMN) and the ventral attention/salience network (VA/SN). This finding has commonly been interpreted as an index of poorer DMN regulation associated with symptoms of mind wandering in ADHD literature. However, a competing perspective suggests that dysfunctional organization of the DMN and VA/SN may additionally index increased sensitivity to the external environment. The goal of the current study was to test this latter perspective in relation to auditory distraction by investigating whether ADHD-adults exhibit aberrant FC between DMN, VA/SN, and auditory networks. Methods Twelve minutes of resting-state fMRI data was collected from two adult groups: ADHD (n = 17) and controls (n = 17); from which the FC between predefined regions comprising the DMN, VA/SN, and auditory networks were analyzed. Results A weaker anticorrelation between the VA/SN and DMN was observed in ADHD. DMN and VA/SN hubs also exhibited aberrant FC with the auditory network in ADHD. Additionally, participants who displayed a stronger anticorrelation between the VA/SN and auditory network at rest, also performed better on a cognitively demanding behavioral task that involved ignoring a distracting auditory stimulus. Conclusion Results are consistent with the hypothesis that auditory distraction in ADHD is linked to aberrant interactions between DMN, VA/SN, and auditory systems. Our findings support models that implicate dysfunctional organization of the DMN and VA/SN in the disorder and encourage more research into sensory interactions with these major networks.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 39.
    Boettcher, Mareike
    et al.
    Univ Lubeck, Germany.
    Mueller-Fielitz, Helge
    Univ Lubeck, Germany; DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Germany.
    Sundaram, Sivaraj M.
    Univ Lubeck, Germany.
    Gallet, Sarah
    Jean Pierre Aubert Res Ctr, France; Univ Lille, France.
    Neve, Vanessa
    Univ Lubeck, Germany.
    Shionoya, Kiseko
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för neurobiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Zager, Adriano
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för neurobiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Quan, Ning
    Florida Atlantic Univ, FL 33458 USA.
    Liu, Xiaoyu
    Florida Atlantic Univ, FL 33458 USA.
    Schmidt-Ullrich, Ruth
    Max Delbruck Ctr MDC Mol Med, Germany.
    Haenold, Ronny
    FLI, Germany; Friedrich Schiller Univ Jena, Germany.
    Wenzel, Jan
    Univ Lubeck, Germany; DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Germany.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för neurobiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Engblom, David
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Prevot, Vincent
    Jean Pierre Aubert Res Ctr, France; Univ Lille, France.
    Schwaninger, Markus
    Univ Lubeck, Germany; DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Germany.
    NF-kappa B signaling in tanycytes mediates inflammation-induced anorexia2020Inngår i: Molecular Metabolism, ISSN 2212-8778, Vol. 39, artikkel-id 101022Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Infections, cancer, and systemic inflammation elicit anorexia. Despite the medical significance of this phenomenon, the question of how peripheral inflammatory mediators affect the central regulation of food intake is incompletely understood. Therefore, we have investigated the sickness behavior induced by the prototypical inflammatory mediator IL-1 beta. Methods: IL-1 beta was injected intravenously. To interfere with IL-1 beta signaling, we deleted the essential modulator of NF-kappa B signaling (Nemo) in astrocytes and tanycytes. Results: Systemic IL-1 beta increased the activity of the transcription factor NF-kB in tanycytes of the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH). By activating NF-kappa B signaling, IL-1 beta induced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) and stimulated the release of the anorexigenic prostaglandin E-2 (PGE(2)) from tanycytes. When we deleted Nemo in astrocytes and tanycytes, the IL-1 beta-induced anorexia was alleviated whereas the fever response and lethargy response were unchanged. Similar results were obtained after the selective deletion of Nemo exclusively in tanycytes. Conclusions: Tanycytes form the brain barrier that mediates the anorexic effect of systemic inflammation in the hypothalamus. (C) 2020 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier GmbH. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 40.
    Bolic Baric, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Skuthalla, Sofie
    Habilitat Serv, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Malin
    Region Östergötland, Barn- och kvinnocentrum, Kvinnokliniken ViN.
    Gustafsson, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Barn- och ungdomspsykiatriska kliniken Linköping.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    The effectiveness of weighted blankets on sleep and everyday activities: A retrospective follow-up study of children and adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and/or autism spectrum disorder2023Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 30, nr 8, s. 1357-1367Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are often accompanied by sleep problems influencing social, emotional and cognitive functioning in everyday activities. Aim The aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of a weighted blanket has a positive impact on sleep and everyday activities in individuals with ADHD and/or ASD. Material and methods The study included 85 individuals diagnosed with ADHD and/or ASD, 48 children aged <= 17 (57%) and 37 adults >= 18 years (44%), who were prescribed with a weighted blanket. The participants responded via a telephone interview. Results Findings demonstrated that a weighted blanket improved abilities related to falling asleep, sleeping the whole night, and relaxing during the day. Using a weighted blanket improved morning/evening daily routine, including preparing/going to sleep and waking up in the morning. Conclusions Weighted blankets showed positive impact on falling asleep, sleeping the whole night, and relaxing during the day, and they were used frequently by children and adults with ADHD and/or ASD. Findings indicate that a weighted blanket improved morning/evening routine, however this research area needs further investigation using both subjective and objective parameters.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 41.
    Boström, Anita
    et al.
    Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper, Karlstads universitet, Sverige.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avd. för naturvetenskap och biomedicin, Sverige.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Medicinska och geriatriska akutkliniken. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Institutionen för omvårdnad, Umeå universitet, Sverige.
    Simmons, Johanna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Medicinska och geriatriska akutkliniken.
    Siverskog, Anna
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete, Sverige.
    Åkerlund, Nina
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avd. för socialt arbete, Sverige.
    Förekomsten av våld i nära relationer bland äldre personer2022Inngår i: Äldre personers utsatthet för våld i nära relationer: Interprofessionella perspektiv / [ed] Lena Östlund, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB , 2022, s. 31-64Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 42.
    Botvinik-Nezer, Rotem
    et al.
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel; Tel Aviv Univ, Israel; Dartmouth Coll, NH 03755 USA.
    Holzmeister, Felix
    Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Camerer, Colin F.
    CALTECH, CA 91125 USA.
    Dreber, Anna
    Stockholm Sch Econ, Sweden; Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Huber, Juergen
    Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Johannesson, Magnus
    Stockholm Sch Econ, Sweden.
    Kirchler, Michael
    Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Iwanir, Roni
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel; Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Mumford, Jeanette A.
    Univ Wisconsin, WI USA.
    Adcock, R. Alison
    Duke Univ, NC USA; Duke Univ, NC USA; Univ Ghent, Belgium; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Avesani, Paolo
    Fdn Bruno Kessler, Italy; Univ Trento, Italy; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Baczkowski, Blazej M.
    Max Planck Inst Human Cognit and Brain Sci, Germany.
    Bajracharya, Aahana
    Washington Univ, MO 63110 USA.
    Bakst, Leah
    Boston Univ, MA 02215 USA; Boston Univ, MA 02215 USA.
    Ball, Sheryl
    Virginia Tech, VA USA; Virginia Tech, VA USA.
    Barilari, Marco
    UCLouvain, Belgium.
    Bault, Nadege
    Univ Plymouth, England.
    Beaton, Derek
    Baycrest Hlth Sci Ctr, Canada.
    Beitner, Julia
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands; Goethe Univ, Germany.
    Benoit, Roland G.
    Max Planck Inst Human Cognit and Brain Sci, Germany.
    Berkers, Ruud M. W. J.
    Max Planck Inst Human Cognit and Brain Sci, Germany.
    Bhanji, Jamil P.
    Rutgers State Univ, NJ USA.
    Biswal, Bharat B.
    New Jersey Inst Technol, NJ 07102 USA; Univ Elect Sci and Technol China, Peoples R China.
    Bobadilla-Suarez, Sebastian
    New Jersey Inst Technol, NJ 07102 USA.
    Bortolini, Tiago
    D’Or Institute for Research and Education (IDOR), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Bottenhorn, Katherine L.
    Florida Int Univ, FL 33199 USA.
    Bowring, Alexander
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Braem, Senne
    Univ Ghent, Belgium; Vrije Univ Brussel, Belgium.
    Brooks, Hayley R.
    Univ Denver, CO 80208 USA.
    Brudner, Emily G.
    Rutgers State Univ, NJ USA.
    Calderon, Cristian B.
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Camilleri, Julia A.
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany; Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Castrellon, Jaime J.
    Duke Univ, NC USA; Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Cecchetti, Luca
    Univ Nebraska, NE 68588 USA.
    Cieslik, Edna C.
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany; Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Cole, Zachary J.
    Univ Nebraska, NE 68588 USA.
    Collignon, Olivier
    Univ Trento, Italy; UCLouvain, Belgium.
    Cox, Robert W.
    NIMH, MD 20892 USA.
    Cunningham, William A.
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Czoschke, Stefan
    Goethe Univ, Germany.
    Dadi, Kamalaker
    Imperial Coll London, England; Univ Oxford, England.
    Davis, Charles P.
    Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA.
    Luca, Alberto De
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Delgado, Mauricio R.
    New Jersey Inst Technol, NJ 07102 USA.
    Demetriou, Lysia
    Imperial Coll London, England; Univ Oxford, England.
    Dennison, Jeffrey B.
    Temple Univ, PA 19122 USA.
    Di, Xin
    New Jersey Inst Technol, NJ 07102 USA; Univ Elect Sci and Technol China, Peoples R China.
    Dickie, Erin W.
    Ctr Addict and Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Dobryakova, Ekaterina
    Kessler Fdn, NJ USA.
    Donnat, Claire L.
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Dukart, Juergen
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany; Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Duncan, Niall W.
    Taipei Med Univ, Taiwan; TMU ShuangHo Hosp, Taiwan.
    Durnez, Joke
    Stanford Univ, CA USA; Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Eed, Amr
    CSIC UMH, Spain.
    Eickhoff, Simon B.
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany; Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Erhart, Andrew
    Univ Denver, CO 80208 USA.
    Fontanesi, Laura
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Fricke, G. Matthew
    Univ New Mexico, NM 87131 USA.
    Fu, Shiguang
    Zhejiang Univ Technol, Peoples R China; Zhejiang Univ Technol, Peoples R China.
    Galvan, Adriana
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Gau, Remi
    UCLouvain, Belgium.
    Genon, Sarah
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany; Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Glatard, Tristan
    Concordia Univ, Canada.
    Glerean, Enrico
    Aalto Univ, Finland.
    Goeman, Jelle J.
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Golowin, Sergej A. E.
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Gonzalez-Garcia, Carlos
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J.
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Grady, Cheryl L.
    Baycrest Hlth Sci Ctr, Canada.
    Green, Mikella A.
    Duke Univ, NC USA; Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Guassi Moreira, Joao F.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Guest, Olivia
    Res Ctr Interact Media Smart Syst and Emerging Tech, Cyprus.
    Hakimi, Shabnam
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Hancock, Roeland
    Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA.
    Handjaras, Giacomo
    IMT Sch Adv Studies Lucca, Italy.
    Harry, Bronson B.
    Western Sydney Univ, Australia.
    Hawco, Colin
    Ctr Addict and Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Herholz, Peer
    McGill Univ, Canada.
    Herman, Gabrielle
    Ctr Addict and Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Heunis, Stephan
    Eindhoven Univ Technol, Netherlands; Epilepsy Ctr Kempenhaeghe, Netherlands.
    Hoffstaedter, Felix
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany; Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Hogeveen, Jeremy
    Univ New Mexico, NM 87131 USA; Univ New Mexico, NM 87131 USA.
    Holmes, Susan
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Hu, Chuan-Peng
    LIR, Germany.
    Huettel, Scott A.
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Hughes, Matthew E.
    Swinburne Univ Technol, Australia.
    Iacovella, Vittorio
    Univ Trento, Italy.
    Iordan, Alexandru D.
    Univ Michigan, MI USA.
    Isager, Peder M.
    Eindhoven Univ Technol, Netherlands.
    Isik, Ayse I.
    Max Planck Inst Empir Aesthet, Germany.
    Jahn, Andrew
    Univ Michigan, MI 48109 USA.
    Johnson, Matthew R.
    Univ Nebraska, NE 68588 USA; Univ Nebraska, NE USA.
    Johnstone, Tom
    Swinburne Univ Technol, Australia.
    Joseph, Michael J. E.
    Ctr Addict and Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Juliano, Anthony C.
    Kessler Fdn, NJ USA.
    Kable, Joseph W.
    Univ Penn, PA 19104 USA; Univ Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Kassinopoulos, Michalis
    McGill Univ, Canada.
    Koba, Cemal
    IMT Sch Adv Studies Lucca, Italy.
    Kong, Xiang-Zhen
    Max Planck Inst Psycholinguist, Netherlands.
    Koscik, Timothy R.
    Univ Iowa, IA 52242 USA.
    Kucukboyaci, Nuri Erkut
    Univ Nebraska, NE USA; Rutgers New Jersey Med Sch, NJ USA.
    Kuhl, Brice A.
    Univ Oregon, OR 97403 USA.
    Kupek, Sebastian
    Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Laird, Angela R.
    Florida Int Univ, FL 33199 USA.
    Lamm, Claus
    Univ Vienna, Austria; Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Langner, Robert
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany; Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Lauharatanahirun, Nina
    US CCDC Army Res Lab, MD USA; Univ Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Lee, Hongmi
    US CCDC Army Res Lab, MD USA.
    Lee, Sangil
    Univ Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Leemans, Alexander
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Leo, Andrea
    IMT Sch Adv Studies Lucca, Italy.
    Lesage, Elise
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Li, Flora
    Fralin Biomed Res Inst, VA USA; Nanjing Audit Univ, Peoples R China.
    Li, Monica Y. C.
    Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Haskins Labs Inc, CT USA.
    Lim, Phui Cheng
    Univ Nebraska, NE 68588 USA; Univ Nebraska, NE USA.
    Lintz, Evan N.
    Univ Nebraska, NE 68588 USA.
    Liphardt, Schuyler W.
    Univ New Mexico, NM 87131 USA.
    Losecaat Vermeer, Annabel B.
    Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Love, Bradley C.
    Alan Turing Inst, England.
    Mack, Michael L.
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Malpica, Norberto
    Univ Rey Juan Carlos, Spain.
    Marins, Theo
    UCL, England; DOr Inst Res and Educ IDOR, Brazil.
    Maumet, Camille
    Univ Rennes, France.
    McDonald, Kelsey
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    McGuire, Joseph T.
    Boston Univ, MA 02215 USA; Boston Univ, MA 02215 USA.
    Melero, Helena
    Univ Rey Juan Carlos, Spain; CES Cardenal Cisneros, Spain; Northeastern Univ, MA 02115 USA.
    Mendez Leal, Adriana S.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Meyer, Benjamin
    LIR, Germany; Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Germany.
    Meyer, Kristin N.
    Univ N Carolina, NC 27515 USA.
    Mihai, Glad
    Max Planck Inst Human Cognit and Brain Sci, Germany; Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Mitsis, Georgios D.
    McGill Univ, Canada.
    Moll, Jorge
    UCL, England; DOr Inst Res and Educ IDOR, Brazil; Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Nielson, Dylan M.
    NIMH, MD 20892 USA.
    Nilsonne, Gustav
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Notter, Michael P.
    Univ Hosp Ctr, Switzerland; Univ Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Olivetti, Emanuele
    Fdn Bruno Kessler, Italy; Univ Trento, Italy.
    Onicas, Adrian I.
    IMT Sch Adv Studies Lucca, Italy.
    Papale, Paolo
    IMT Sch Adv Studies Lucca, Italy; Netherlands Inst Neurosci, Netherlands.
    Patil, Kaustubh R.
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany; Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Peelle, Jonathan E.
    Washington Univ, MO 63110 USA.
    Perez, Alexandre
    McGill Univ, Canada.
    Pischedda, Doris
    Charite, Germany; Charite, Germany; Charite, Germany; Free Univ Berlin, Germany; Humboldt Univ, Germany; Berlin Inst Hlth, Germany; Tech Univ Berlin, Germany; Humboldt Univ, Germany; NeuroMI Milan Ctr Neurosci, Italy.
    Poline, Jean-Baptiste
    McGill Univ, Canada; Univ Calif Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Prystauka, Yanina
    Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA.
    Ray, Shruti
    New Jersey Inst Technol, NJ 07102 USA.
    Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A.
    Univ Michigan, MI USA.
    Reynolds, Richard C.
    NIMH, MD 20892 USA.
    Ricciardi, Emiliano
    IMT Sch Adv Studies Lucca, Italy.
    Rieck, Jenny R.
    Baycrest Hlth Sci Ctr, Canada.
    Rodriguez-Thompson, Anais M.
    Univ N Carolina, NC 27515 USA.
    Romyn, Anthony
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Salo, Taylor
    Florida Int Univ, FL 33199 USA.
    Samanez-Larkin, Gregory R.
    Duke Univ, NC USA; Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Sanz-Morales, Emilio
    Univ Rey Juan Carlos, Spain.
    Schlichting, Margaret L.
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Schultz, Douglas H.
    Dartmouth Coll, NH 03755 USA; Univ Nebraska, NE 68588 USA.
    Shen, Qiang
    Zhejiang Univ Technol, Peoples R China; Zhejiang Univ Technol, Peoples R China.
    Sheridan, Margaret A.
    Alan Turing Inst, England.
    Silvers, Jennifer A.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Skagerlund, Kenny
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Smith, Alec
    Virginia Tech, VA USA; Virginia Tech, VA USA.
    Smith, David V.
    Temple Univ, PA 19122 USA.
    Sokol-Hessner, Peter
    Univ Denver, CO 80208 USA.
    Steinkamp, Simon R.
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany.
    Tashjian, Sarah M.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Thirion, Bertrand
    Univ Paris Saclay, France.
    Thorp, John N.
    Columbia Univ, NY 10027 USA.
    Tinghög, Gustav
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Nationalekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för samhälle och hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Tisdall, Loreen
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA; Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Tompson, Steven H.
    US CCDC Army Res Lab, MD USA.
    Toro-Serey, Claudio
    Boston Univ, MA 02215 USA; Boston Univ, MA 02215 USA.
    Torre Tresols, Juan Jesus
    Univ Paris Saclay, France.
    Tozzi, Leonardo
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Truong, Vuong
    Taipei Med Univ, Taiwan; TMU ShuangHo Hosp, Taiwan.
    Turella, Luca
    Univ Trento, Italy.
    van t Veer, Anna E.
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Verguts, Tom
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Vettel, Jean M.
    US Combat Capabil Dev Command Army Res Lab, MD USA; Univ Calif Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA; Univ Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Vijayarajah, Sagana
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Vo, Khoi
    Duke Univ, NC USA; Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Wall, Matthew B.
    Invicro, England; Imperial Coll London, England; UCL, England.
    Weeda, Wouter D.
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Weis, Susanne
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany; Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Germany.
    White, David J.
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Wisniewski, David
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Xifra-Porxas, Alba
    McGill Univ, Canada.
    Yearling, Emily A.
    Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA.
    Yoon, Sangsuk
    Univ Dayton, OH 45469 USA.
    Yuan, Rui
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Yuen, Kenneth S. L.
    Duke Univ, NC USA; LIR, Germany; Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Germany.
    Zhang, Lei
    Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Zhang, Xu
    Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA.
    Zosky, Joshua E.
    Univ Nebraska, NE 68588 USA; Univ Nebraska, NE USA.
    Nichols, Thomas E.
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Poldrack, Russell A.
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Schonberg, Tom
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel; Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Variability in the analysis of a single neuroimaging dataset by many teams2020Inngår i: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 582, s. 84-88Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Data analysis workflows in many scientific domains have become increasingly complex and flexible. Here we assess the effect of this flexibility on the results of functional magnetic resonance imaging by asking 70 independent teams to analyse the same dataset, testing the same 9 ex-ante hypotheses(1). The flexibility of analytical approaches is exemplified by the fact that no two teams chose identical workflows to analyse the data. This flexibility resulted in sizeable variation in the results of hypothesis tests, even for teams whose statistical maps were highly correlated at intermediate stages of the analysis pipeline. Variation in reported results was related to several aspects of analysis methodology. Notably, a meta-analytical approach that aggregated information across teams yielded a significant consensus in activated regions. Furthermore, prediction markets of researchers in the field revealed an overestimation of the likelihood of significant findings, even by researchers with direct knowledge of the dataset(2-5). Our findings show that analytical flexibility can have substantial effects on scientific conclusions, and identify factors that may be related to variability in the analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging. The results emphasize the importance of validating and sharing complex analysis workflows, and demonstrate the need for performing and reporting multiple analyses of the same data. Potential approaches that could be used to mitigate issues related to analytical variability are discussed. The results obtained by seventy different teams analysing the same functional magnetic resonance imaging dataset show substantial variation, highlighting the influence of analytical choices and the importance of sharing workflows publicly and performing multiple analyses.

  • 43.
    Brito, Haissa Oliveira
    et al.
    Univ Fed Parana, Brazil.
    Radulski, Debora
    Univ Fed Parana, Brazil.
    Wilhelms, Daniel
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för läkemedelsforskning. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken i Linköping.
    Stojakovic, Andrea
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Oliveira Brito, Luciane Maria
    Univ Fed Maranhao, Brazil.
    Gil da Costa, Rui Miguel
    Univ Fed Maranhao, Brazil.
    Trindade, Edvaldo
    Univ Fed Parana, Brazil.
    Engblom, David
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Cavichiolo Franco, Celia Regina
    Univ Fed Parana, Brazil.
    Zampronio, Aleksander Roberto
    Univ Fed Parana, Brazil.
    Immune-mediated febrile response in female rats: Role of central hypothalamic mediators2020Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, nr 1, artikkel-id 4073Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces fever through cytokines like receptor-activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), triggering mediators like prostaglandins (PG), endothelin-1 (ET-1), corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF), substance P (SP) and endogenous opioids. LPS-induced fever is reduced in females compared with males except in ovariectomized (OVX) females which show increased fever mediated by PG. The present study aimed to identify the mediators involved in fever in intact and OVX female rats. Fever was induced with LPS (50 mu g/kg) intraperitoneally or CRF (2.5 mu g), ET-1 (1 pg), morphine (10 mu g) and SP (500 ng) intracerebroventricularly in sham-operated and OVX rats. The role of RANKL was evaluated with osteoprotegerin (OPG, 1 mu g, intracerebroventricularly). Expression of RANK, CRFI/II, ETB, mu-opioid (MOR) and NK1 receptors was evaluated by confocal microscopy. Besides LPS, only morphine induced fever in OVX rats while all mediators induced fever in sham-operated animals. OPG abolished LPS-induced fever in OVX but not sham-operated animals. Overall, fever involves similar central mediators in cycling females and males but only morphine induced fever in OVX females. Importantly, RANK/RANKL participates in LPS-induced fever in OVX females, as in males but not in cycling females.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 44.
    Bunketorp Kall, Lina
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp Molndal, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Friden, Jan
    Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp Molndal, Sweden; Swiss Parapleg Ctr, Switzerland.
    Björnsdotter Åberg, Malin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Regional estimates of cortical thickness in brain areas involved in control of surgically restored limb movement in patients with tetraplegia2020Inngår i: Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine (JSCM), ISSN 1079-0268, E-ISSN 2045-7723, Vol. 43, nr 4, s. 462-469Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Context/Objective:Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes atrophy of brain regions linked to motor function. We aimed to estimate cortical thickness in brain regions that control surgically restored limb movement in individuals with tetraplegia. Design:Cross-sectional study. Setting:Sahlgrenska University hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. Participants:Six individuals with tetraplegia who had undergone surgical restoration of grip function by surgical transfer of one elbow flexor (brachioradialis), to the paralyzed thumb flexor (flexor pollicis longus). All subjects were males, with a SCI at the C6 or C7 level, and a mean age of 40 years (range = 31-48). The average number of years elapsed since the SCI was 13 (range = 6-26). Outcome measures:We used structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to estimate the thickness of selected motor cortices and compared these measurements to those of six matched control subjects. The pinch grip control area was defined in a previous functional MRI study. Results:Compared to controls, the cortical thickness in the functionally defined pinch grip control area was not significantly reduced (P = 0.591), and thickness showed a non-significant but positive correlation with years since surgery in the individuals with tetraplegia. In contrast, the anatomically defined primary motor cortex as a whole exhibited substantial atrophy (P = 0.013), with a weak negative correlation with years since surgery. Conclusion:Individuals with tetraplegia do not seem to have reduced cortical thickness in brain regions involved in control of surgically restored limb movement. However, the studied sample is very small and further studies with larger samples are required to establish these findings.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 45.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Hoffmann, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för samhälle och hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Comment on Hauser et al.: Medical use of opioids in Europe - Methodological concerns about data from the International Narcotics Control Board2022Inngår i: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 26, nr 4, s. 937-938Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 46.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Hoffmann, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för samhälle och hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Opioid availability statistics from the International Narcotics Control Board do not reflect the medical use of opioids: comparison with sales data from Scandinavia2021Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 21, nr 4, s. 696-706Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Opioid analgesics are essential in clinical practice, but their excessive use is associated with addiction risk. Increases in opioid prescription rates have fuelled an epidemic of opioid addiction in the USA, making statistics on medical opioid use a critical warning signal. A dramatic 150% increase in Swedish opioid access 2001-2013 was recently reported based on data from the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB; Berterame et al. 2016) in conflict with other studies of opioid use in the Nordic countries. This article aims to analyse to what degree published INCB statistics on opioids in Scandinavia (Denmark, Norway and Sweden) reflect actual medical use and study the methodological reasons for putative discrepancies. Methods: Data on aggregated total national sales of opioids for the whole population, including hospitals, were collected from the Swedish e-Health Authority. Total sales data for Denmark and drugs dispensed at pharmacies in Norway are publicly available through the relevant authorities websites. Results: INCB opioid statistics during the period 2001-2013 were markedly inconsistent with sales data from Scandinavia, calling the reliability of INCB data into question. INCB-data were flawed by (a) over-representing the volume of fentanyl, (b) under-reporting of codeine, and (c) by not including tramadol. Conclusions: Opioid availability, as expressed by INCB statistics, does not reflect medical opioid use. It is crucial to underline that INCB statistics are based on the manual compilation of national production, import and export data from manufacturers and drug companies. This is not the same amount that is prescribed and consumed within the health care system. Moreover, there are methodological problems in the INCB reports, in particular concerning fentanyl, codeine and tramadol. We suggest that INCB should carefully review the quality of their data on medical opioids.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 47.
    Böhme, Rebecca
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV.
    Frost-Karlsson, Morgan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Neurofysiologiska kliniken US. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV.
    Johansson Capusan, Andrea
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Sharpened self-other distinction in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder2020Inngår i: NeuroImage: Clinical, E-ISSN 2213-1582, Vol. 27, artikkel-id 102317Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Differentiation between self-produced tactile stimuli and touch by others is necessary for social interactions and for a coherent concept of “self”. In attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder (ADHD), tactile hypersensitivity and social cognition problems are part of the symptomatology, but pathophysiological mechanisms are largely unknown. Differentiation of self- and non-self- generated sensations might be key to understand and develop novel strategies for managing hypersensitivity. Here, we compared the neural signatures of affective self- and other-touch between adults with ADHD and neurotypical controls (NC).

    Methods

    Twenty-eight adult ADHD participants and 30 age- and gender-matched NC performed a self-other-touch-task during functional magnetic resonance imaging: they stroked their own arm, an object, or were stroked by the experimenter. In addition, tactile detection thresholds and rubber hand illusion (RHI) were measured.

    Results

    ADHD participants had more autistic traits than NC and reported to engage less in interpersonal touch. They also reported to be more sensitive to tactile stimuli. Compared to NC, ADHD participants showed enhanced responses to both the self- and other-touch conditions: stronger deactivation during self-touch in the anterior and posterior insula, and increased activation during other-touch in primary somatosensory cortex. ADHD participants had intact tactile detection thresholds, but were less susceptible to the RHI.

    Conclusions

    Unaltered detection thresholds suggest that peripheral processing is intact, and that hypersensitivity might be driven by central mechanisms. This has clinical implications for managing somatosensory hypersensitivity in ADHD. The more pronounced differentiation between self- and other-touch might indicate a clearer self-other-distinction. This is of interest regarding body ownership perception in both NC and ADHD, and possibly other psychiatric conditions with altered self-experiences, like schizophrenia. A sharper boundary of the own body might relate to deficits in social cognition and tactile hypersensitivity.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 48.
    Böhme, Rebecca
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Neurofysiologiska kliniken US.
    Differentiating self-touch from social touch2022Inngår i: CURRENT OPINION IN BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, ISSN 2352-1546, Vol. 43, s. 27-33Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Humans need to be able to differentiate between signals they produce themselves and signals that arise from non-self-causes. It has long been discussed that the brain uses a copy of the motor command, an efference copy, to predict the sensory outcomes of ones own action - and to attenuate these. While studies in humans suggest that cerebellum and supplementary motor area play crucial roles in the attenuation, a study in mice suggests a global suppression during self-touch. However, the sensory percepts of self-touch are not fully cancelled out. Humans touch themselves frequently suggesting a behavioral relevance of self-touch, as to refocus attention, to calm oneself down during stress, to itch or for self-enjoyment. We discuss studies on sensory attenuation as well as the behavioral relevance of self-touch and open questions for future research.

  • 49.
    Böhme, Rebecca
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV.
    Veenstra, Helene
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Neurofysiologiska kliniken US. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV.
    Nagi, Saad
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Neurofysiologiska kliniken US.
    Anhedonia to Gentle Touch in Fibromyalgia: Normal Sensory Processing but Abnormal Evaluation2020Inngår i: Brain Sciences, ISSN 2076-3425, E-ISSN 2076-3425, Vol. 10, nr 5, artikkel-id 306Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Social touch is important for interpersonal interaction. Gentle touch and slow brushing are typically perceived as pleasant, the degree of pleasantness is linked to the activity of the C-tactile (CT) fibers, a class of unmyelinated nerves in the skin. The inability to experience pleasure in general is called anhedonia, a common phenomenon in the chronic pain condition fibromyalgia. Here, we studied the perception and cortical processing of gentle touch in a well-characterized cohort of fibromyalgia. Patients and controls participated in functional brain imaging while receiving tactile stimuli (brushing) on the forearm. They were asked to provide ratings of pleasantness of the tactile stimulus and ongoing pain. We found high distress, pain catastrophizing, and insomnia, and a low perceived state of health in fibromyalgia. Further, patients rated both slow (CT-optimal) and fast (CT-suboptimal) brushing as less pleasant than healthy participants. While there was no difference in brain activity during touch, patients showed deactivation in the right posterior insula (contralateral to the stimulated arm) during pleasantness rating and activation during pain rating. The opposite pattern was observed in healthy participants. Voxel-based morphometry analysis revealed reduced grey matter density in patients, in the bilateral hippocampus and anterior insula. Our results suggest anhedonia to gentle touch in fibromyalgia with intact early-stage sensory processing but dysfunctional evaluative processing. These findings contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying anhedonia in fibromyalgia.

  • 50.
    Casado Bedmar, Maria Teresa
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för kirurgi, ortopedi och onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Meira de Faria, Felipe
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Biskou, Olga
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för kirurgi, ortopedi och onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Lindqvist, Carl Mårten
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Ranasinghe, Purnika Damindi
    Queens Univ Belfast, North Ireland.
    Bednarska, Olga
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Centrum för kirurgi, ortopedi och cancervård, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Peterson, Christer
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Diagnost Dev, Sweden.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för inflammation och infektion. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Centrum för kirurgi, ortopedi och cancervård, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Carlson, Marie
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Keita, Åsa
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för kirurgi, ortopedi och onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Elevated F-EDN correlates with mucosal eosinophil degranulation in patients with IBS - A possible association with microbiota?2022Inngår i: Journal of Leukocyte Biology, ISSN 0741-5400, E-ISSN 1938-3673, Vol. 111, nr 3, s. 655-665Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Eosinophils have been linked to functional dyspepsia; however, less is known about their role in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This study tested the hypothesis of alterations in levels of fecal eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (F-EDN) and eosinophil density and degranulation within the colonic mucosa of IBS patients compared with healthy controls (HC). Colonic biopsies were collected from 37 IBS patients and 20 HC and analyzed for eosinophil numbers and local degranulation of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) by histologic procedures. Fecal samples were collected for F-EDN and microbiota analysis. Differentiated 15HL-60 cells were used in vitro to investigate the direct effect of live bacteria on eosinophil activation measured by a colorimetric assay with o-phenylenediamine (OPD) substrate. We observed a higher number of eosinophils and increased extracellular ECP in the mucosa of IBS patients compared with HC. Moreover, F-EDN levels in IBS samples were elevated compared with HC and positively correlated to extracellular ECP. Metagenomic analysis showed significant correlations between bacterial composition and eosinophil measurements in both HC and IBS patients. In vitro experiments revealed an increased degranulation of 15HL-60 after stimulation with Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella enterica, and Yersinia enterocolitica. To conclude, we could demonstrate alterations related to eosinophils in IBS, and, for the first time, a positive correlation between F-EDN levels and degranulated eosinophils in the colonic mucosa of IBS patients. Together our results suggest that eosinophils play a role in the pathophysiology of IBS and the mechanisms might be linked to an altered microbiota.

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