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  • 1.
    Allemann, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Poli, Arianna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Designing and evaluating information and communication technology-based interventions? Be aware of the needs of older people2020In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, article id 1474515119897398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 2.
    Andersson, Asa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Vilhelmsson, Mattias
    Reg Hosp Vaxjo, Sweden.
    Fomichov Casaballe, Victoria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Patient involvement in surgical care-Healthcare personnel views and behaviour regarding patient involvement2020In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background All professions in surgical care have a responsibility to include patients in their health care. By Swedish law, all care should be done in dialogue with the patient. The essential part of health care is the meeting between patient and healthcare professional. In the interaction, a decision can be made, and needs can be identified to a safer care. Previous studies on patient participation have focussed on patients perspectives in surgical care, but there is a paucity of studies about the personnels perspective of estimated patient involvement in surgical care. Aim The aim of this study was to identify and describe healthcare personnels view and behaviour regarding patient involvement in surgical care. Method A quantitative study with various professions was conducted. A validated questionnaire was used, remaining questions grouped under following areas: patient involvement, acute phase, hospital time, discharge phase and questions on employment and workplace. Results A total of 140 questionnaires were sent out to a surgical clinic in Sweden, and 102 questionnaires were answered. All professionals stated that clear information is an important part of patient involvement in surgical care. Statistically significant differences existed between the professions in the subscale information. Physicians rated their information higher than the Registered Nurses (p = 0.005) and the practical nurses did (p = 0.001). Hindrances to involving patients were lack of time and other priority tasks. Conclusions Professionals in surgical care graded information to be the most important thing for patient involvement. Participation in important decisions, including the possibility to express personal views and ask questions, is important factors for patient involvement. Barriers against patient involvement are lack of time and prioritisation of other work activities.

  • 3.
    Ax, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology and Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Maria
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordin, Karin
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Exercise: A positive feature on functioning in daily life during cancer treatment – Experiences from the Phys-Can study2020In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Nursing, Vol. 44, article id 101713Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Impaired functioning due to cancer treatment is a challenge for daily life. Exercise during treatment can improve functioning. However, research describing experiences of how exercise affects activities of daily life is limited. We aimed to explore how individuals with cancer receiving curative treatment and participating in an exercise intervention experienced their functioning in daily life.

    Methods

    Twenty-one participants were recruited from Phys-Can, an exercise intervention study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted after the intervention had finished, and data was analysed using thematic analysis.

    Results

    Two main themes evolved: “Striving to maintain a normal life in a new context” and “Struggling with impairments from side effects of cancer treatment”. The supervised group exercise proved popular, and participants reported positive effects on physical and psychological functioning, as well as social and informative support from other participants. Participants struggled with impaired cognitive and physical functioning and exhaustion. They strove to maintain a normal life by adjusting their activities.

    Conclusions

    Perceived physical and psychological benefits from exercise during cancer treatment suggest that exercise should be a part of cancer rehabilitation to facilitate activities and participation in daily life. Striving to maintain a normal life during cancer treatment is vital, and adjustments are needed to maintain activities and participation in daily life. Cancer nurses should motivate patients to engage in physical activity and encourage the introduction of exercise as part of their rehabilitation. They could also support patients in making adjustments to maintain functioning in daily life.

  • 4.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fomichov Casaballe, Victoria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sense of coherence and health-related quality of life in patients with neurotoxicity after cancer chemotherapy: Assessment from a real-time mobile phone-based system2020In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 107-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    In the present study, we aimed to assess sense of coherence (SOC) and health‐related quality of life (HRQOL) during and after adjuvant chemotherapy by mobile phone‐based reporting in patients with colorectal cancer experiencing neurotoxicity.

    Methods

    In this prospective descriptive cohort study, a mobile phone‐based system was used to receive a series of real‐time longitudinal patient‐reported assessments of SOC (13‐item), HRQOL (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy‐General (FACT‐G) 27‐item), and neurotoxicity (OANQ 29‐item) from 43 patients with colorectal cancer after being treated with chemotherapy including oxaliplatin. Measurements were conducted during the whole treatment period (mean 5 cycles) and up to 12 months after completing chemotherapy.

    Results

    In total, 817 questionnaire responses (226 SOC, 221 FACT‐G, 370 OANQ) answered during and after chemotherapy treatment were available for analysis. Even though all patients experienced neurotoxicity during the treatment period, HRQOL was stable over time. Over time, the ratings of physical wellbeing tended to increase, while the subscale of social wellbeing tended to decrease. Overall SOC, including the three components comprehensibility, manageability, and meaningfulness was stable during the entire study period. No internal data was missing due to the mobile phone‐based system.

    Conclusions

    All patients had neurotoxicity during the treatment period that seemed to affect the social wellbeing component of HRQOL, but SOC seemed unaffected. Real‐time patient‐reported assessment using mobile phone technology could be valuable in the clinical setting to provide continuous individualised monitoring to help identify patients who need further evaluation to maintain or improve their psychosocial health.

  • 5.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Wennerholm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Faresjö, Åshild
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Philosophy, History, Arts and Religion.
    [Public health differences between »the twin cities« persist].2019In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 116, article id FI6HArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    A decade ago, major public health differences between two neighboring, equal sized large Swedish cities, Norrköping and Linköping (»the Twin cities«) were revealed. These differences were considerable for cardiovascular mortality and life expectancy. An important finding was that cardiovascular mortality rates for men and women in the city of Norrköping were highest compared to other major Swedish cities. In this follow-up, a decade later, cardiovascular mortality rates are still highest for the Norrköping population in comparison to the largest Swedish cities. There are also still profound and major public health differences between these twin cities. The differences seem to persist over time. These differences could not be explained by differences in health care, but are rather reflecting different social history and socioeconomic and life style differences in these two cities.

  • 6.
    Grundström, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Rauden, Anna
    Cty Council Gavleborg, Sweden.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Cross-cultural adaptation of the Swedish version of Endometriosis Health Profile-302020In: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0144-3615, E-ISSN 1364-6893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Endometriosis Health Profile-30 (EHP-30) is focusing on the effect of endometriosis symptoms upon health-related quality of life. The aim of this study was to pre-test and culturally adapt the Swedish version of EHP-30. Eighteen Swedish-speaking women with laparoscopically verified diagnosis of endometriosis answered the questionnaire and 17 were interviewed regarding their interpretations of the questionnaire. Demographics, distribution of answers, roof-ceiling effects and missing answers were analysed. The interviews were analysed using the qualitative approach proposed by Beaton et al. The Swedish version of EHP-30 was experienced as accessible with 100% data completeness and a roof effect (11%) in one dimension. Some women had difficulties with the instructions and one word should be replaced in order to culturally adapt the questionnaire. In conclusion, the Swedish version of EHP-30 is a useful and well-accepted questionnaire for women with endometriosis in Sweden, but a minor change of wording is recommended.Impact statement What is already known on this subject? Cross-cultural adaptation and psychometric testing are crucial when introducing translated questionnaires. Cross-cultural adaptation is a process that looks at both translational and cultural issues when a questionnaire is being prepared for use in another country than the original. EHP-30 has been translated into Swedish but has not yet been cross-culturally adapted. What do the results of this study add? The Swedish version of EHP-30 was experienced as a useful and well-accepted questionnaire for women with endometriosis, but a minor change of wording is recommended in one question to make the questionnaire convergent with the original version.

  • 7.
    Hendriks, Jeroen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Univ Adelaide, Australia; Royal Adelaide Hosp, Australia.
    Andreae, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Ågren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Eriksson, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hjelm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ski, Chantal F.
    Queens Univ Belfast, North Ireland.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Cardiac disease and stroke: Practical implications for personalised care in cardiac-stroke patients. A state of the art review supported by the Association of Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied ProfessionsIn: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, article id 1474515119895734Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiac and stroke conditions often coexist because of common risk factors. The occurrence of stroke may have significant consequences for patients with cardiac conditions and their caregivers and poses a major burden on their lives. Although both cardiac and stroke conditions are highly prevalent, primary stroke prevention in cardiac patients is crucial to avert disabling limitations or even mortality. In addition, specific interventions may be needed in the rehabilitation and follow-up of these patients. However, healthcare systems are often fragmented and are not integrated enough to provide specifically structured and individualised management for the cardiac-stroke patient. Cardiac rehabilitation or secondary prevention services are crucial from this perspective, although referral and attendance rates are often suboptimal. This state of the art review outlines the significance of primary stroke prevention in cardiac patients, highlights specific challenges that cardiac-stroke patients and their caregivers may experience, examines the availability of and need for structured, personalised care, and describes potential implications for consideration in daily practice.

  • 8.
    Hendriks, Jeroen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Maastricht Univ, Netherlands; Univ Adelaide, Australia; Royal Adelaide Hosp, Australia.
    Tieleman, Robert G.
    Martini Hosp Groningen, Netherlands.
    Vrijhoef, Hubertus J. M.
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Brussel, Belgium; Panaxea Bv, Netherlands.
    Wijtvliet, Petra
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands; Martini Hosp Groningen, Netherlands.
    Gallagher, Celine
    Univ Adelaide, Australia; Royal Adelaide Hosp, Australia.
    Prins, Martin H.
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Sanders, Prashanthan
    Univ Adelaide, Australia; Royal Adelaide Hosp, Australia.
    Crijns, Harry J. G. M.
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Integrated specialized atrial fibrillation clinics reduce all-cause mortality: post hoc analysis of a randomized clinical trial2019In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 21, no 12, p. 1785-1792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims An integrated chronic care programme in terms of a specialized outpatient clinic for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), has demonstrated improved clinical outcomes. The aim of this study is to assess all-cause mortality in patients in whom AF management was delivered through a specialized outpatient clinic offering an integrated chronic care programme. Methods and results Post hoc analysis of a Prospective Randomized Open Blinded Endpoint Clinical trial to assess all-cause mortality in AF patients. The study included 712 patients with newly diagnosed AF, who were referred for AF management to the outpatient service of a University hospital. In the specialized outpatient clinic (AF-Clinic), comprehensive, multidisciplinary, and patient-centred AF care was provided, i.e. nurse-driven, physician supervised AF treatment guided by software based on the latest guidelines. The control group received usual care by a cardiologist in the regular outpatient setting. After a mean follow-up of 22months, all-cause mortality amounted 3.7% (13 patients) in the AF-Clinic arm and 8.1% (29 patients) in usual care [hazard ratio (HR) 0.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.23-0.85; P = 0.014]. This included cardiovascular mortality in 4 AF-Clinic patients (1.1%) and 14 patients (3.9%) in usual care (HR 0.28; 95% CI 0.09-0.85; P = 0.025). Further, 9 patients (2.5%) died in the AF-Clinic arm due to a non-cardiovascular reason and 15 patients (4.2%) in the usual care arm (HR 0.59; 95% CI 0.26-1.34; P = 0.206). Conclusion An integrated specialized AF-Clinic reduces all-cause mortality compared with usual care. These findings provide compelling evidence that an integrated approach should be widely implemented in AF management.

  • 9.
    Hägglund, Ewa
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Hagerman, Inger
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lynga, Patrik
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Theory Testing of Patient Perspectives Using a Mobile Health Technology System in Heart Failure Self-care2019In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 448-453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is an increasing interest in mobile health (mHealth), the use of mobile devices for supporting self-care in persons with heart failure. However, an established theoretical framework to explain, predict, and understand the phenomena of mHealth to support self-care is lacking. Objective: The aim of this study was to deductively test if the situation-specific theory of heart failure self-care could be applied in the context of persons with heart failure using an mHealth system with a tablet computer connected to a weighing scale to support their self-care. We wanted to test whether the 3 phases of the self-care process (ie, self-care maintenance, symptom perception, and self-care management) could be validated in the experiences of persons with heart failure using an mHealth tool. Methods: A qualitative study design was used with semistructured interviews. Data were analyzed deductively using content analysis and coded according to a structured matrix into 1 of the 3 predefined categories: self-care maintenance, symptom perception, or self-care management Results: Seventeen persons with heart failure, with mean age of 75 years, participated. The mHealth system was found to be feasible, influencing adherence and providing support for maintaining self-care as well as influencing both physical and psychological symptom perception. In persons with heart failure, the mHealth tool experience influenced the development and use of skills and fostered independence in self-care management. An interaction with healthcare professionals was sometimes needed in combination with the mHealth tool. Conclusions: The findings confirmed that "the situation-specific theory of heart failure self-care" could be applied in this context.

  • 10.
    Israelsson, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health.
    Health-related quality of life after cardiac arrest2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cardiac arrest is a major health problem worldwide. For many of the afflicted, cardiac arrest is the natural end of life. For others, it is an unexpected event suddenly striking in the middle of life. During the last decades, major efforts in treatment have contributed to more people surviving their cardiac arrest. However, previous research has mainly focused on survival, while the knowledge about health-related quality of life in survivors is sparse. Hence, there is a need for more research in order to extend the knowledge about the living situations among survivors and their spouses. For example, factors associated with health-related quality of life are not sufficiently investigated. Knowledge about such factors is important in order to develop interventions and to be able to improve post cardiac arrest care. In addition, existing research shows incongruent results concerning differences in characteristics and survival between men and women. In order to provide equitable care between sexes, further studies are warranted.

    Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to increase the knowledge of survival and health-related quality of life among people suffering cardiac arrest with focus on sex and other related factors. The specific aims were: to describe in-hospital cardiac arrest events with regard to sex and investigate if sex is associated with survival after controlling for known predictors and interaction effects (study I), to describe health status and psychological distress among in-hospital cardiac arrest survivors in relation to sex (study II), to investigate factors associated with health-related quality of life among cardiac arrest survivors treated with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator in relation to sex, and to compare their health-related quality of life with a general population, (study III) and to investigate if type D personality and perceived control among cardiac arrest survivors and their spouses were associated with their own and their partners’ health-related quality of life (study IV).

    Methods: The general design in all studies (I-IV) was quantitative, cross-sectional and correlational. This thesis is based on four different data collections. Data was systematically collected using national quality registries (I and II) or by sending questionnaires to survivors (III and IV) and their spouses (IV), treated at several different hospitals in Sweden. The sample size varied between 126 and 990 across the studies. The outcomes and explanatory study variables were chosen with respect to Wilson and Cleary’s conceptual model of health-related quality of life. The main outcome variables were survival after resuscitation, survival at hospital discharge, survival at 30 days post cardiac arrest (I), and health-related quality of life measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (II and III) and the EuroQol-5 dimensions (II-IV). In this thesis descriptive and inferential statistics were applied. The main statistics consisted of logistic and linear regression analyses, and structural equation modelling.

    Results: Male sex was associated with a better chance of survival to hospital discharge, but no associations between sex and survival after resuscitation or at 30 days were identified. More men than women received resuscitation attempts when suffering an in-hospital cardiac arrest (study I). Health-related quality of life among most cardiac arrest survivors was good (II-IV), even when compared to a general population (III). However, a significant proportion reported low health status and symptoms of anxiety and depression (II and III). Women reported worse health-related quality of life compared to men, and female sex was associated with poorer health-related quality of life in the multiple regression models (II and III). Several additional factors were identified to be associated with poorer health-related quality of life: being unemployed, having a type D personality, perceiving less control, suffering from more comorbidities and suffering from more ICD-related concerns (III). In addition, older age was associated with poorer (EQ VAS) or better (HADS Anxiety) health-related quality of life, depending of outcome measure (II). Moreover, perceived control and type D personality among the survivors were associated with health-related quality of life among their spouses, but not vice versa.

    Conclusions: Although, sex does not appear to be an important predictor for survival, the difference between men and women regarding the proportion of resuscitation attempts should be further investigated. The majority of survivors and their spouses report good health-related quality of life similar to general populations. However, a substantial proportion suffer from health problems. Since women in general report worse health-related quality of life compared to men a higher proportion of women may be in need of support. Several factors associated with worse health-related quality of life were identified and might be used during follow-up and rehabilitation. For example, identifying type D personality might be important when screening patients at risk for health problems. Perceiving more control could be targeted by health-supportive interventions, for example person-centered care. Healthcare professionals should make efforts to identify survivors at risk of poor health-related quality of life and offer individualized support when needed. Characteristics among survivors were associated with health-related quality of life in their spouses. Including spouses in follow-up care is therefore important. Wilson and Cleary’s conceptual model for health-related quality of life appears to be applicable for choosing outcomes in cardiac arrest research and might be helpful when designing interventions to improve post cardiac arrest care.

    List of papers
    1. Is there a difference in survival between men and women suffering in-hospital cardiac arrest?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is there a difference in survival between men and women suffering in-hospital cardiac arrest?
    2014 (English)In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 510-515Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To describe in-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) events with regard to sex and to investigate if sex is associated with survival. Background: Previous studies exploring differences between sexes are incongruent with regard to clinical outcomes. In order to provide equality and improve care, further investigations into these aspects are warranted. Methods: This registry study included 286 CAs. To investigate if sex was associated with survival, logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: The proportion of CA with a resuscitation attempt compared to CA without resuscitation was higher among men. There were no associations between sex and survival when controlling for previously known predictors and interaction effects. Conclusions: Sex does not appear to be a predictor for survival among patients suffering CA where resuscitation is attempted. The difference regarding proportion of resuscitation attempts requires more attention. It is important to consider possible interaction effects when studying the sex perspective.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    Heart arrest; Hospital; Sex; Survival; Predictor
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112817 (URN)10.1016/j.hrtlng.2014.05.012 (DOI)000344837600007 ()25005828 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|county council of Kalmar

    Available from: 2015-01-08 Created: 2014-12-17 Last updated: 2020-02-17Bibliographically approved
    2. Health status and psychological distress among in-hospital cardiac arrest survivors in relation to gender
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health status and psychological distress among in-hospital cardiac arrest survivors in relation to gender
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 114, p. 27-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe health status and psychological distress among in -hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) survivors in relation to gender. Methods: This national register study consists of data from follow-up registration of IHCA survivors 3-6 months post cardiac arrest (CA) in Sweden. A questionnaire was sent to the survivors, including measurements of health status (EQ-5D-5L) and psychological distress (HADS). Results: Between 2013 and 2015, 594 IHCA survivors were included in the study. The median values for EQ-5D-5L index and EQVAS among survivors were 0.78 (ql-q3 = 0.67-0.86) and 70 (ql -q3 = 50-80) respectively. The values were significantly lower (p amp;lt; 0.001) in women compared to men. In addition, women reported more problems than men in all dimensions of EQ-5D-5L, except self -care. A majority of the respondents reported no problems with anxiety (85.4%) and/or symptoms of depression (87.0%). Women reported significantly more problems with anxiety (p amp;lt; 0.001) and symptoms of depression (p amp;lt; 0.001) compared to men. Gender was significantly associated with poorer health status and more psychological distress. No interaction effects for gender and age were found. Conclusions: Although the majority of survivors reported acceptable health status and no psychological distress, a substantial proportion reported severe problems. Women reported worse health status and more psychological distress compared to men. Therefore, a higher proportion of women may be in need of support. Health care professionals should make efforts to identify health problems among survivors and offer individualised support when needed. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD, 2017
    Keywords
    Anxiety; Depression; Health status; Heart arrest; Hospitals; Gender
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-138921 (URN)10.1016/j.resuscitation.2017.02.006 (DOI)000402487800021 ()28216089 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Heart and Lung Association; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden

    Available from: 2017-06-27 Created: 2017-06-27 Last updated: 2020-02-17
    3. Factors associated with health-related quality of life among cardiac arrest survivors treated with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors associated with health-related quality of life among cardiac arrest survivors treated with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator
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    2018 (English)In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 132, p. 78-84Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore factors associated with health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among cardiac arrest (CA) survivors treated with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) in relation to gender, and to compare their HRQoL with a general population. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 990 adults treated with an ICD after suffering CA. All participants received a questionnaire including demographics, comorbidities and instruments to measure HRQoL (EQ-5D-3L and HADS), ICD-related concerns (ICDC), perceived control (CAS), and type D personally (DS-14). HRQoL (EQ-5D-3L) was compared to a general Swedish population, matched for age and gender. Linear regression analyses were used to explore factors associated with HRQoL. Results: The CA survivors reported better HRQoL in EQ index and less pain/discomfort compared to the general population (p amp;lt; 0.001). In contrast, they reported more problems in mobility and usual activities (p amp;lt; 0.01). Problems with anxiety and depression were reported by 15.5% and 7.4% respectively. The following factors were independently associated with all aspects of worse HRQoL: being unemployed, suffering more comorbidity, perceiving less control, and having a type D personally. Further, being female and suffering ICD-related concerns were independently associated with worse HRQoL in three of the four final regression models. Conclusions: This extensive population-based study showed that most CA survivors living with an ICD rate their HRQoL as acceptable. In addition, their HRQoL is similar to a general population. Women reported worse HRQoL compared to men. Several factors associated with HRQoL were identified, and might be used when screening patients for health problems and when developing health promoting interventions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD, 2018
    Keywords
    Health-related quality of life; Health status; Psychological distress; Cardiac arrest; Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator; Gender
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-152373 (URN)10.1016/j.resuscitation.2018.09.002 (DOI)000446854900019 ()30201535 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Swedish Heart and Lung Association

    Available from: 2018-11-05 Created: 2018-11-05 Last updated: 2020-02-17
    4. Dyadic effects of type D personality and perceived control on health-related quality of life in cardiac arrest survivors and their spouses using the actor-partner interdependence model
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dyadic effects of type D personality and perceived control on health-related quality of life in cardiac arrest survivors and their spouses using the actor-partner interdependence model
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    2019 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, article id UNSP 1474515119890466Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a lack of knowledge about factors associated with health-related quality of life in cardiac arrest survivors and their spouses. In addition, survivors and spouses are likely to affect each others health-related quality of life. Aims: The aim was to investigate if a distressed personality and perceived control among cardiac arrest survivors and their spouses were associated with their own and their partners health-related quality of life. Methods: This dyadic cross-sectional study used the actor-partner interdependence model to analyse associations between a distressed personality (type D personality), perceived control (control attitudes scale), and health-related quality of life (EQ index and EQ visual analogue scale). Results: In total, 126 dyads were included in the study. Type D personality and perceived control in cardiac arrest survivors were associated with their own health-related quality of life. In their spouses, a significant association was found for type D personality but not for perceived control. In addition, type D personality and perceived control in survivors were associated with health-related quality of life in their spouses. Conclusions: Type D personality and perceived control are factors that might be considered during post cardiac arrest, because of the associations with health-related quality of life in survivors and spouses. More research is needed to test psychosocial interventions in the cardiac arrest population in order to improve health-related quality of life.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2019
    Keywords
    Heart arrest; survivor; partner; health; quality of life; dyads
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162500 (URN)10.1177/1474515119890466 (DOI)000498130000001 ()31752502 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Heart and Lung AssociationSwedish Heart-Lung Foundation; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden

    Available from: 2019-12-16 Created: 2019-12-16 Last updated: 2020-02-17
  • 11.
    Liljeroos, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Perkiö Kato, Naoko
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    van der Wal, Martje H. L.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Groningen, Netherlands.
    Brons, Maaike
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Luttik, Marie Louise
    Univ Appl Sci Groningen, Netherlands.
    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.
    Univ Groningen, Netherlands.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Trajectory of self-care behaviour in patients with heart failure: the impact on clinical outcomes and influencing factors2020In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients self-care behaviour is still suboptimal in many heart failure (HF) patients and underlying mechanisms on how to improve self-care need to be studied. Aims: (1) To describe the trajectory of patients self-care behaviour over 1 year, (2) to clarify the relationship between the trajectory of self-care and clinical outcomes, and (3) to identify factors related to changes in self-care behaviour. Methods: In this secondary analysis of the COACH-2 study, 167 HF patients (mean age 73 years) were included. Self-care behaviour was assessed at baseline and after 12 months using the European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour scale. The threshold score of amp;gt; 70 was used to define good self-care behaviour. Results: Of all patients, 21% had persistent poor self-care behaviour, and 27% decreased from good to poor. Self-care improved from poor to good in 10%; 41% had a good self-care during both measurements. Patients who improved self-care had significantly higher perceived control than those with persistently good self-care at baseline. Patients who decreased their self-care had more all-cause hospitalisations (35%) and cardiovascular hospitalisations (26%) than patients with persistently good self-care (2.9%, p amp;lt; 0.05). The prevalence of depression increased at 12 months in both patients having persistent poor self-care (0% to 21%) and decreasing self-care (4.4% to 22%, both p amp;lt; 0.05). Conclusion: Perceived control is a positive factor to improve self-care, and a decrease in self-care is related to worse outcomes. Interventions to reduce psychological distress combined with self-care support could have a beneficial impact on patients decreasing or persistently poor self-care behaviour.

  • 12.
    Samuelsson, John
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Hanberger, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Åkesson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Poor metabolic control in childhood strongly correlates to diabetes-related premature death in persons <30 years of age-A population-based cohort study2020In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/objective

    The importance of metabolic control in childhood regarding excess risk of death in young persons has not been well studied. This registry‐based study aimed to investigate mortality rates and cause of death related to metabolic control in young persons (≤29 years) in Sweden with type 1 diabetes.

    Methods

    All 12 652 subjects registered in the Swedish pediatric diabetes quality register, from 2006 to 2014, were included. Data were merged with the Swedish Cause of Death Register. Standardized mortality rates were calculated using the official Swedish population register.

    Results

    Of 68 deaths identified, 38.2% of the deaths were registered as being due to diabetes whereof the major cause of death was acute complications. Overall standardized mortality ratio was 2.7 (2.1‐3.4, 95% CI). Subjects who died from diabetes had a mean HbA1c of 74 ± 19 mmol/mol (8.9 ± 1.7%) during childhood vs 62 ± 12 mmol/mol (7.8 ± 1.1%) in those still alive (P < .001).

    Conclusions

    In this nationwide cohort of young subjects with type 1 diabetes, there was a high mortality rate compared to the general population. Mean HbA1c in childhood was significantly higher in those who died from diabetes, compared to subjects who were still alive. To decrease mortality in young persons with type 1 diabetes it is essential not only to achieve but also to maintain a good metabolic control during childhood and adolescence.

  • 13.
    Yngman Uhlin, Pia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Operations management Region Östergötland, Research and Development Unit.
    Kjellsdotter, Anna
    Univ Skovde, Sweden.
    Uhlin, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Tallinn Univ Technol, Estonia.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sleep Quality, Fatigue, and Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients on Initial Peritoneal Dialysis and Multiple Modalities after Two Years: A Prospective Study2019In: Nephrology Nursing Journal : Journal of The American Nephrology Nurses Association, ISSN 1526-744X, E-ISSN 2163-5390, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 615-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in sleep quality, fatigue, mental health, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) over a two-year period among patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis treatment at home. We further explored the extent to which sleep quality, fatigue, and mental health predicted health-related quality of life outcomes. This prospective study included 55 patients. Sleep parameters changed over two years, independently of treatment. Sleep variables at baseline, to some extent, predicted sleep quality after two years. Daytime sleepiness can be a long-term problem. Findings indicate improvements in nocturnal sleep over a two-year time period, independently of dialysis treatment. In contrast, fatigue remained unchanged over the same time period Dansplantation seems to generally benefit the outcome of HRQoL. Strategies to improve sleep and HRQoL may include systematic risk factor modification and efforts to optimise symptomatic treatment.

1 - 13 of 13
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