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  • 1.
    Arvidsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Vesterberg, Viktor
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    En ojämlik skolplikt?: Problematisering av skolfrånvaro i en decentraliserad skola2020In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 7-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All children in Sweden have the right to attend school from the year they reach the age of six. But are all children obliged to be there? Sweden have had compulsory schooling since the end of the 19th century. This means that there is an obligation to be in the school and attend its activities. A changed governance of the school during the last decades of the 20th century, from centralized to decentralized, opened up for the possibility of local school practices to define how the compulsory schooling should be interpreted and applied. In this article we scrutinize whether this has opened for potential inequalities regarding compulsory schooling in Sweden. In doing this we analyze law and policy documents that in different ways prescribe how deviations from school duties, so-called school absence, should be handled and by whom. The purpose of the article is to elucidate the effects of state-formulated guidelines regarding the management of school absence in Swedish compulsory school. Inspired by Carol Lee Bacchis’ WPR (What´s the Problem Represented to be) analysis, we interrogate how departures from compulsory schooling are portrayed as a problem and what meaning are ascribed to compulsory schooling - not least from an equality perspective.

  • 2.
    Bodén, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Stenliden, Linnéa
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Emerging Visual Literacy through Enactments by Visual Analytics and Students2019In: Designs for Learning, ISSN 1654-7608, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 40-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the potential aspects of visual literacy that might appear when visual analytics and students interact in social science secondary classrooms. Interacting with visual technology likely demands new forms of literacy as various dimensions of complexity emerge in such learning activities where reading imposes order and relevance on what is displayed. However, only a few studies have evaluated how these visual processes emerge. Applying a socio-material semiotic approach, this paper examines the interactions between teachers, students and a visual analytics application, clarifying what strengthens or weakens the socio-material relations at work in emerging visual literacy. Methodologically, a design-based research approach is chosen. Notably, it is the early stages of the designed-based research cycle that are applied. Interventions were designed and conducted in five classes in three secondary schools in Sweden (97 students). The visual analytics application introduced was Statistics eXplorer. For each class, two to three lessons were video recorded to capture how the students interacted with the application. The socio-material analyses show that the interactions between the visual analytics and the students were both strengthened and weakened by different social as well as material forces. The actions were directed by visual properties such as movement, highlighting, and color, properties that often resulted in quick vision or locked vision. This paper argues that there needs to be a close didactic alignment and deeper knowledge of how visual interfaces attract students’ attention and how students’ visual literacy emerges in that relationship.

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    Emerging Visual Literacy through Enactments by Visual Analytics and Students
  • 3.
    Bodén, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Stenliden, Linnéa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science.
    Emerging Visual Literacy through Enactments by Visual Analytics and Students2018In: 6th international Designs for Learning conference: Design & Learning-Centric Analysis (23–25th May 2018), Bergen, Norway / [ed] Guribye, F., Åkerfeldt, A., Bergdal, N., Cerratto-Pargam, T., Selander, S. & Wasson, B., Bergen, 2018, Vol. 1, p. 23-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to explore how visual literacy emerges when visual analytics and students enact in social science secondary classrooms. Interacting with visual technology likely demands new forms of literacy as various dimensions of complexity emerge in such learning activities, where reading become a way to impose order and relevance on what is displayed. However, there is a lack of research how these visual processes emerge. By applying a socio-material semiotic approach, the interactions between teachers, students and a visual analytics application are followed. The paper clarifies what might strengthen or weaken the socio-material relations at work in emerging visual literacy. This design-based study was conducted in five classes in three secondary schools in Sweden, with 97 students. The visual analytics application introduced was Statistics eXplorer. Each class were followed two to three lessons by a video recording program that captured both the students and the actions at the computer screen. The socio-material analyses show that the enactments between the visual analytics and the students were both strengthened and weakened by different social as well as material forces. The actions were directed by visual properties as movement, highlighting and color. Connecting to the students these often produced a quick vision or a "locked" vision. The paper argues for close didactic alignment and deeper knowledge of how the visual interface attracts human (students’) attention and how students’ visual literacy ablilites may emerge in that relation.

  • 4.
    Brusman, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Turunen, Päivi
    Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Socialt arbete, Högskolan i Gävle.
    Socialt hållbar samhällsplanering2018In: Samhällsarbete: Aktörer, arenor och perspektiv / [ed] Stefan Sjöberg, Päivi Turunen, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 117-138Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Bylund, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Andraspråk och andra språk i familjer2018In: Svenska som andraspråk i förskolan / [ed] Polly Björk-Willén, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2018, Vol. sidorna 123-141, p. 123-141Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Danielsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Institutionen för svenska språket, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora, Linnéuniversitetet.
    Berg, Astrid
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    "Molekylerna rör på sig snabare och snabare så balongen blir jättestor": lågstadieelever förklarar observationer av luft genom digitala animationer2019In: Att utveckla forskningsbaserad undervisning : analyser, utmaningar och exempel: analyser, utmaningar och exempel / [ed] Ylva Ståhle, Mimmi Waermö, Viveca Lindberg, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2019, Vol. Sidorna 177-217, p. 175-215Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Göransson, Andreas C.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Orraryd, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Fiedler, Daniela
    IPN - Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education. Germany.
    Tibell, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Conceptual Characterization of Threshold Concepts in Student Explanations of Evolution by Natural Selection and Effects of Item Context2020In: CBE - Life Sciences Education, ISSN 1931-7913, E-ISSN 1931-7913, Vol. 19, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evolutionary theory explains a wide range of biological phenomena. Proper understanding of evolutionary mechanisms such as natural selection is therefore an essential goal for biology education. Unfortunately, natural selection has time and again proven difficult to teach and learn, and students’ resulting understanding is often characterized by misconceptions. Previous research has often focused on the importance of certain key concepts such as variation, differential survival, and change in population. However, so-called threshold concepts (randomness, probability, spatial scale, and temporal scales) have also been suggested to be important for understanding of natural selection, but there is currently limited knowledge about how students use these concepts. We sought to address this lack of knowledge by collecting responses to three different natural selection items from 247 university students from Sweden and Germany. Content analysis (deductive and inductive coding) and subsequent statistical analysis of their responses showed that they overall use some spatial scale indicators, such as individuals and populations, but less often randomness or probability in their explanations. However, frequencies of use of threshold concepts were affected by the item context (e.g., the biological taxa and trait gain or loss). The results suggest that the impact of threshold concepts, especially randomness and probability, on natural selection understanding should be further explored.

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    fulltext
  • 8.
    Martín Bylund, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Stenliden, Linnéa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science.
    Closer to far away: transcending the spatial in transnational families’ online video calling2020In: Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, ISSN 0143-4632, E-ISSN 1747-7557, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies how transnational children and their distantly locatedbut emotionally close family members recreate their relationship usingapplications for online video calling. The focus is on the interaction ofbodies and language, and if/how proximity of any kind is enabled. Acritical posthumanist applied linguistics is embraced and communicationis viewed as a bodily coordination ocurring in real time. This includes amaterial and dynamic view of language in constant transformation.Video captures are produced with three transnational, multilingualfamilies in China and their adult relatives residing abroad (Europe).Moment analysis informs the processing of data. The analysis includesmultipart semiotic assemblages of critical/creative moments and appliesthe Deleuzian concept of sense. The results suggest, the multi-localanalogue/digital situation in online calling transcends conventionallyimagined spatial ‘boundaries’. Furthermore, a bodily, multisensoryproximity emerge as simultaneously critical to and created by thistranscending spatiality. Multi-local communicative practices shed lighton the multiple, material and semiotic components of the humansenses, and how a rational understanding of proximity might be twisted.Proximity constantly emerges ‘in new copies’ transcending the far awayand close.

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    fulltext
  • 9.
    Puskás, Tünde
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Språkpolicy på samhällsnivå och i praktiken2018In: Svenska som andraspråk i förskolan / [ed] Polly Björk-Willén, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2018, Vol. sidorna 142-155, p. 142-155Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Stenliden, Linnéa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science.
    Att läsa multimodala digitala texter – förhållningssätt och strategier2016In: Skolverket, Läslyftet för gymnasiet Modul: Att läsa, analysera och kritiskt granska. Del 4: Kritisk granskning och analys av multimodala texter, Vol. Modul: Analysera och kritiskt granska, no Del 7: Att läsa digitala texter – förhållningssätt och strategier, p. 1-14Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna artikel ger en orientering om skillnader mellan läsning av traditionella texter och digitala texter. Den problematiserar också elevers läsförståelse kopplat till webbtexters uppbyggnad och struktur. Syftet med artikeln är att läraren ska få förståelse för de specifika förmågor och färdigheter som krävs av eleverna för att skapa mening vid digitalt läsande. Artikeln har också digital informationshantering som fokus, det vill säga hur digitaliserad information söks, hur den kan förstås och hur informationen kritiskt kan granskas. Tanken är att lärare, med hjälp av denna text, ska kunna utveckla redskap som bidrar till förståelse, organisation och hantering av lärsituationer där de digitala redskapen ofta oförutsett påverkar vad som händer i klassrummet. Det handlar därför om att skapa en medvetenhet om det digitala läsandet där det samtidigt finns ett kritiskt granskande förhållningssätt till de digitala redskapen och källorna

  • 11.
    Stenliden, Linnéa
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Geovisual Analytics in School: Challenges for the Didactic Design of the Classroom2018In: International Journal of Information and Education Technology, ISSN 2010-3689, no 3, p. 178-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to determine the distribution of problem spaces in learning activities, when geovisual analytics is introduced into social science education. We know that various dimensions of complexity emerge in learning activities including this kind of technology. This paper clarifies the features of the problem spaces in such activities. The study was conducted in three middle schools in Sweden, in four social science classes with students aged 10 to 13 years. The specific geovisual analytics platform used was Statistics eXplorer. The learning activities were followed for two to four weeks at each school using video observations. Drawing on actor–network theory, we conducted material discursive analyses of the learning activities. The geovisual analytics generally support student understandings, but the didactic design of the classroom was not completely supportive. Six central aspects were found in the distribution of problem spaces within the learning activities. Novel approaches to pedagogy and teaching employing geovisual analytics could benefit students’ knowledge building as they work with visualized data.

  • 12.
    Stenliden, Linnéa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Bylund, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Reimers, Eva
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Post-humanist Qualitative Data Production in Classroom Studies: A Research Machine put to Work.2018In: Reconceptualizing Educational Research Methodology (RERM), ISSN 1892-042X, E-ISSN 1892-042X, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 22-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a methodological inquiry that explores ways of performing classroom studies, where posthuman theory and data production are plugged in to each other from the very outset of this effort. Posthuman theory insists on research practices that demand attention to materialities, research practices that seek to detach the investigations from human concerns and positionality, research practices that consider how data and researcher(s) are entangled producing each other and by that try to operationalize the ‘unself’ of the researcher(s). Hence, a research machine was constructed and put to work in one Physics classroom in an upper secondary school. Five researchers focused on various multiparty interactions, whilst attempting to background the interpersonal interactions. Subsequently, the research machine was plugged into different concepts and turned into workshops where changes in configurations became significant for emergences in the classroom. In this process the concept affraction emerged as an effort to map how material-semiotic processes become observable in classrooms. The work of the research machine points to possible ways of avoiding commonly privileged perspectives in classroom observations. This attempt to deconstruct boundaries between human and non-human and the human as a bounded non-porous subject may affect possibilities to produce research that aids what otherwise might be shadowed actions in classrooms.

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  • 13.
    Stenliden, Linnéa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nissen, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    How to outline didactic designs that combine visual analytics, knowledge visualization, assignments and assessments for K 12 students2017In: 11th International Technology, Education and Development Conference: Valencia, Spain 6-8 March, 2017, Valencia: IATED , 2017, p. 3793-3802Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study how a specific Visual Analytics (VA), the Statistics eXplorer, and tools for Knowledge Visualization (KV) in school settings can be combined in a learning process. The goals are to explain how VA together with KV shape learning in social science classes in K 12 schools and to develop guidelines for didactic designs as well as a visual analytics framework for educational purposes.There is a huge divergence between the large amount of information that is produced and the capacity of humans to make sense of it. VA deals with designing and applying tools that support insights in unexplored data sets, where interactions with screens are directed through eye attention. KV on the other hand deals with expression and organisation of such insights and utilizing the knowledge thus created. Together, these could support learning. Recent research, however, point out that current methods for learning processes often only supports basic visual analysis but not the entire process of the analysis. This means that methods that include the process of making visual discoveries (VA) combined with methods that support the process to express them (KV) are lacking. We know it is easy for both students and teachers to use a VA. It is easy for teachers to learn how to maneuver a VA to produce visualizations for educational use. Despite this, the full potential of the VA has been found difficult to reach.In this world of massively mediated information and communication, current educational models therefore might fail. It looks as teachers’ lack of experience of how to arrange a didactic design of the classroom, when it comes to combining suitable tools that can facilitate analytical reasoning (VA) with a process that support students to construct meaning from visual information (KV), hampers the development of a suitable learning processes. Hence, the aim of this paper is to explore a “set up” of a cooperation in between teachers and researchers in order to support the creation of such combinations of VA and KV in educational settings where didactic designs can be tried out.In order to explore this a teacher-researcher team has been formed by four researchers together with 15 social science teachers. The researchers have provided theory and earlier research findings in relation to the topic. The teachers have provided their classroom experiences, their well-tried methods and didactic skills. The team members have together shared their views and knowledge through in depth discussions in order to develop lesson plans that take into consideration not only to modify a VA to be used in the lessons but also to develop task for the students that make them benefit from the strengths of the visualization.In this paper, the didactic designs that the teachers intend to implement are presented as well as preliminary findings from an analyses of these lessons plans. The analyses show that teachers are aware of the importance of not only concentrate on how to use the powerful VA, but also carefully think through how students can demonstrate their growing knowledge. However this is a more challenging task than to introduce the VA for students and teachers.In the next phase of the project the implementation of the lesson plans will be followed in case-studies. The field of VA and KV can be supported by findings reported in this paper in efforts to construct useful tools for these kinds of analyze processes and different ways of knowledge formation.

  • 14.
    Svenningsson, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science.
    The Mitcham Score: quantifying students’ descriptions of technology2019In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A central issue when measuring students’ attitudes toward an object is the children’s understanding of that object, in this case, technology. Studies have shown that schoolchildren often describe technology narrowly as different kinds of technological objects; more specifically, modern electrical objects. This may mean that we have been measuring students’ attitudes toward modern technological objects for more than 30 years. This study intends to research what other aspects students potentially describe, when describing technology, and how the descriptions can be implemented in attitudes toward technology research. To visualize and analyze different aspects of technology, Carl Mitcham’s philosophical framework of the manifestations of technology is used. The deductive method used for analysis quantifies students’ descriptions of technology, for use in attitude, and other quantitative, studies. In this study, descriptions of technology and technology education from 164 students (aged 12–15) are analyzed, classified and quantified within Mitcham’s typology (technology as Object–Activities–Knowledge–Volition). The student descriptions are compared to the typology and students score a point for every one of the four aspects of technology they describe. The sum of aspects in the description is named The Mitcham Score. The results of this study show that students can describe technology in a broad way using all four aspects of Mitcham’s typology. In line with previous studies, the most common way is to describe technology as objects and activities using the objects. Technological knowledge has not been in focus in previous studies of student descriptions. In this study, 44.5% of the students mention technological knowledge in their descriptions of technology. Measurement using the Mitcham Score provides a method to study both students’ concepts of technology and the factors that might affect this. The Mitcham Score is potentially one more factor to use in analyzing students’ attitudinal profiles. The method is sufficiently reliable and enables a broad understanding of students’ attitudes.

  • 15.
    Wallner, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Det rutiga klassrummet: serier, multimodalitet och litteracitet2020Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Serien är en bred populärkulturell fiktion som de allra flesta kommer i kontakt med och knyter olika upplevelser till. En del kastar sig över Katten Gustaf och Nemi i dagstidningarna, andra är trogna prenumeranter på Kalle Anka eller Fantomen och några samlar de absoluta Batman-favoriterna på bästa plats i bokhyllan. Överallt i samhället möter vi serier – och ändå finner vi dem nästan ingenstans i skolans läroplaner.

    Att arbeta med serier är en multimodal praktik, en praktik som innefattar flera sinnen, där kombinationen av de olika modaliteterna är avgörande för tolkningen – om det ena förändras eller tas bort så förändras förståelsen av det andra. Som fiktion ligger serien kanske närmast till hands för svenskläraren, men även andra ämnen kan med fördel fångas i rutnätsform. Det kan gälla allt ifrån klimatförändringar och teknikens utveckling till värdegrundsfrågor om makt, genus och utanförskap. 

    Den här boken ger grundläggande kunskap om serier utifrån ett skolperspektiv. Författaren redogör för forskning som gjorts om serier i skolan och beskriver hur lärare kan använda serieläsning i sin undervisning, men också hur de kan låta elever skapa egna serier för att lära och förstå.

    Boken vänder sig till såväl lärarstuderande som verksamma lärare i grundskolans alla ämnen.

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