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  • 1.
    Aliakbaryhosseinabadi, Susan
    et al.
    Oticon A S, Denmark; Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Keidser, Gitte
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon A S, Denmark.
    May, Tobias
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Dau, Torsten
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Wendt, Dorothea
    Oticon A S, Denmark; Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Rotger-Griful, Sergi
    Oticon A S, Denmark.
    The Effects of Noise and Simulated Conductive Hearing Loss on Physiological Response Measures During Interactive Conversations2023In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 66, no 10, p. 4009-4024Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to study the effects of background noise and hearing attenuation associated with earplugs on three physiological measures, assumed to be markers of effort investment and arousal, during interactive communication. Method: Twelve pairs of older people (average age of 63.2 years) with ageadjusted normal hearing took part in a face-to-face communication to solve a Diapix task. Communication was held in different levels of babble noise (0, 60, and 70 dBA) and with two levels of hearing attenuation (0 and 25 dB) in quiet. The physiological measures obtained included pupil size, heart rate variability, and skin conductance. In addition, subjective ratings of perceived communication success, frustration, and effort were obtained. Results: Ratings of perceived success, frustration, and effort confirmed that communication was more difficult in noise and with approximately 25-dB hearing attenuation and suggested that the implemented levels of noise and hearing attenuation resulted in comparable communication difficulties. Background noise at 70 dBA and hearing attenuation both led to an initial increase in pupil size (associated with effort), but only the effect of the background noise was sustained throughout the conversation. The 25-dB hearing attenuation led to a significant decrease of the high-frequency power of heart rate variability and a significant increase of skin conductance level, measured as the average z value of the electrodermal activity amplitude. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that several physiological measures appear to be viable indicators of changing communication conditions, with pupillometry and cardiovascular as well as electrodermal measures potentially being markers of communication difficulty.

  • 2.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Elwér, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Arithmetic in the signing brain: Differences and similarities in arithmetic processing between deaf signers and hearing non-signers2023In: Journal of Neuroscience Research, ISSN 0360-4012, E-ISSN 1097-4547, Vol. 101, no 1, p. 172-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deaf signers and hearing non-signers have previously been shown to recruit partially different brain regions during simple arithmetic. In light of the triple code model, the differences were interpreted as relating to stronger recruitment of the verbal system of numerical processing, that is, left angular and inferior frontal gyrus, in hearing non-signers, and of the quantity system of numerical processing, that is, right horizontal intraparietal sulcus, for deaf signers. The main aim of the present study was to better understand similarities and differences in the neural correlates supporting arithmetic in deaf compared to hearing individuals. Twenty-nine adult deaf signers and 29 hearing non-signers were enrolled in an functional magnetic resonance imaging study of simple and difficult subtraction and multiplication. Brain imaging data were analyzed using whole-brain analysis, region of interest analysis, and functional connectivity analysis. Although the groups were matched on age, gender, and nonverbal intelligence, the deaf group performed generally poorer than the hearing group in arithmetic. Nevertheless, we found generally similar networks to be involved for both groups, the only exception being the involvement of the left inferior frontal gyrus. This region was activated significantly stronger for the hearing compared to the deaf group but showed stronger functional connectivity with the left superior temporal gyrus in the deaf, compared to the hearing, group. These results lend no support to increased recruitment of the quantity system in deaf signers. Perhaps the reason for performance differences is to be found in other brain regions not included in the original triple code model.

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  • 3.
    Arvola, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Forsblad (Kristiansson), Mattias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division.
    Autonomous Vehicles for Children with Mild Intellectual Disability: Perplexity, Curiosity, Surprise, and Confusion2023In: Proceedings of the European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics 2023: Responsible Technology Community, Culture, and Sustainability / [ed] Alan Dix, Irene Reppa, Carina Westling, Harry Witchel, Stéphane Safin, Gerrit van der Veer, Joseph MacInnes, Harry Witchel, Raymond Bond, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023, p. 1-8, article id 25Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-driving buses will be part of the public transportation system of the future, and they must therefore be accessible to all. The study reported in this paper examines the user experiences of 16 children with mild intellectual disability riding a self-driving bus. The qualitative analysis, performed by iterative affinity diagramming, of interviews, observations, and a co-design session with five of the children, suggests that familiar situations were characterized by contemplation and curiosity, while unfamiliar ones were characterized by surprise or confusion. The temporal structure of past, present, and future situations in the field of attention played a significant role in the children’s experiences. This leads to design considerations for an explainable interior of self-driving buses.

  • 4.
    Batinović, Lucija
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andre, Kalmendal
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    ELD CAMA platform for educational interventions2023Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Community-augmented meta-analysis (CAMA) platforms have begun to set a new standard for promoting FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable, reusable) data sharing. They allow dynamic and interactive meta-analysis of data and ensure reproducibility of results (Tsuji et al., 2014). As the area of disability research and education moves towards open science practices, the newly created CAMA platform sets to facilitate data sharing of meta-analyses and make evidence-based practice accessible to practitioners. Furthermore, we aim to promote high-quality standards in conducting evidence synthesis, which are still not readily implemented in the education research area (Nordström et al., 2022).

    Objectives of the CAMA platform:The Evidence in Learning and Didactics, and Disability research CAMA platform will provide meta-analytic tools to conduct both frequentist (http://194.47.110.50:3838/visualization/), and Bayesian meta-analyses (http://194.47.110.51:3838/) of educational interventions for typically developing and students with intellectual disability. Studies will be subdivided into categories of typically developing students and students with intellectual disability, with further subdivision of educational domains: writing, reading, math, science, and other.

    First objective: Create a platform that facilitates sharing of high-quality meta-analyses. The platform will allow publication bias assessment, effect size aggregation and moderator analysis. One important feature of this CAMA platforms is the ability to do analyses based on risk of bias assessments. Quality assessment and risk of bias estimation will be mandatory for dataset inclusion and it will be possible to conduct analyses on studies with different risks of bias estimation.

    Second objective: Create a platform that is valuable both as a pedagogical and research tool. Apps will allow high flexibility in model building and provide an interface that provides plain and technical explanations/summaries of statistical outputs. The goal is to have the apps become an easy-to-use tool for students and researchers aiming to conduct meta-analyses and serve as a guide on evidence based practices for practitioners.

  • 5.
    Batinović, Lucija
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kalmendal, André
    Department of Psychology, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    ELD CAMA Platform: Facilitating Meta-Analyses and Evidence-Based Practice in Education2023Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing adoption of open science practices in disability research and education highlights the need for tools that facilitate FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable, reusable) data sharing. Community-augmented meta-analysis (CAMA) platforms have emerged as promising solutions, enabling dynamic, interactive meta-analyses while ensuring reproducibility (Tsuji et al., 2014). However, evidence synthesis quality remains a challenge in educational research (Nordström et al., 2022).

    We present the development of a CAMA platform for Evidence in Learning, Didactics, and Disability research, focusing on quantitative methods for conducting frequentist and Bayesian meta-analyses of educational interventions built with R and Shiny. The platform organizes studies into categories for typically developing students and students with intellectual disabilities, subdivided by educational domains: writing, reading, math, science, and others.

    Our objectives are to develop a platform that enables sharing of high-quality meta-analyses, incorporating features such as publication bias assessment, effect size aggregation, and moderator analysis, with mandatory risk of bias assessments for dataset inclusion, and to design a versatile platform suitable as both a pedagogical and research tool. The platform will serve as a guide on evidence-based practices for practitioners and an easy-to-use tool for students and researchers aiming to conduct meta-analyses. During the poster session visitors will get a hands-on experience of the platform. 

  • 6.
    Blomberg, Rina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Perini, Irene
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Johansson Capusan, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Aberrant resting-state connectivity of auditory, ventral attention/salience and default-mode networks in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder2022In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, Vol. 16, article id 972730.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Numerous resting-state studies on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have reported aberrant functional connectivity (FC) between the default-mode network (DMN) and the ventral attention/salience network (VA/SN). This finding has commonly been interpreted as an index of poorer DMN regulation associated with symptoms of mind wandering in ADHD literature. However, a competing perspective suggests that dysfunctional organization of the DMN and VA/SN may additionally index increased sensitivity to the external environment. The goal of the current study was to test this latter perspective in relation to auditory distraction by investigating whether ADHD-adults exhibit aberrant FC between DMN, VA/SN, and auditory networks. Methods Twelve minutes of resting-state fMRI data was collected from two adult groups: ADHD (n = 17) and controls (n = 17); from which the FC between predefined regions comprising the DMN, VA/SN, and auditory networks were analyzed. Results A weaker anticorrelation between the VA/SN and DMN was observed in ADHD. DMN and VA/SN hubs also exhibited aberrant FC with the auditory network in ADHD. Additionally, participants who displayed a stronger anticorrelation between the VA/SN and auditory network at rest, also performed better on a cognitively demanding behavioral task that involved ignoring a distracting auditory stimulus. Conclusion Results are consistent with the hypothesis that auditory distraction in ADHD is linked to aberrant interactions between DMN, VA/SN, and auditory systems. Our findings support models that implicate dysfunctional organization of the DMN and VA/SN in the disorder and encourage more research into sensory interactions with these major networks.

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  • 7.
    Chiossi, Julia S. C.
    et al.
    Oticon AS, Denmark; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Patou, Francois
    Oticon Med, Denmark.
    Ng, Elaine Hoi Ning
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Faulkner, Kathleen F.
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Lyxell, Bjoern
    Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Phonological discrimination and contrast detection in pupillometry2023In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 14, article id 1232262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionThe perception of phonemes is guided by both low-level acoustic cues and high-level linguistic context. However, differentiating between these two types of processing can be challenging. In this study, we explore the utility of pupillometry as a tool to investigate both low- and high-level processing of phonological stimuli, with a particular focus on its ability to capture novelty detection and cognitive processing during speech perception.MethodsPupillometric traces were recorded from a sample of 22 Danish-speaking adults, with self-reported normal hearing, while performing two phonological-contrast perception tasks: a nonword discrimination task, which included minimal-pair combinations specific to the Danish language, and a nonword detection task involving the detection of phonologically modified words within sentences. The study explored the perception of contrasts in both unprocessed speech and degraded speech input, processed with a vocoder.ResultsNo difference in peak pupil dilation was observed when the contrast occurred between two isolated nonwords in the nonword discrimination task. For unprocessed speech, higher peak pupil dilations were measured when phonologically modified words were detected within a sentence compared to sentences without the nonwords. For vocoded speech, higher peak pupil dilation was observed for sentence stimuli, but not for the isolated nonwords, although performance decreased similarly for both tasks.ConclusionOur findings demonstrate the complexity of pupil dynamics in the presence of acoustic and phonological manipulation. Pupil responses seemed to reflect higher-level cognitive and lexical processing related to phonological perception rather than low-level perception of acoustic cues. However, the incorporation of multiple talkers in the stimuli, coupled with the relatively low task complexity, may have affected the pupil dilation.

  • 8.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Samuelsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Elwér, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Randomiserade kontrollerade studier av interventionsprogram för elever med tidiga läs- och matematiksvårigheter2023In: Resultatdialog 2023: Kortfattade resultat från forskning finansierad inom utbildningsvetenskap, Vetenskapsrådet , 2023, p. 15-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Forskningens syfte var att utveckla och utvärdera två interventioner för elever med tidiga lässvårigheter eller tidiga mattesvårigheter. Resultaten visade att bägge interventionerna hade en medelstor till stor effekt på förbättring för interventionsgrupperna direkt efter interventionerna. Ett år efter interventionerna hade de flesta av de positiva effekterna minskat till ungefär hälften.

  • 9.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Imms, Christine
    Apex Australia Chair Neurodev & Disabil, Australia; Univ Melbourne, Australia.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Malardalen Univ, Sweden; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    King, Gillian
    Bloorview Res Inst, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Lyngback, Liz Adams
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden; FUB Swedish Natl Assoc People Intellectual Disabil, Sweden.
    Andersson, Anna Karin
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Arnell, Susann
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Ctr Res & Dev Reg Gavleborg, Sweden; Univ Pretoria, South Africa.
    Augustine, Lilly
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Brooks, Rob
    Univ Bradford, England.
    Eldh, Maria
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Norrköping.
    Engde, Lisa
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Habiliteringen.
    Engkvist, Helena
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Berglund, Ingalill Gimbler
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Green, Dido
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Brunel Univ London, England.
    Huus, Karina
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Charlotte
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Lygnegard, Frida
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Sjodin, Linda
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Jonkoping Habilitat Ctr, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Norwegian Univ Nat Sci & Technol, Norway.
    A Systematic Review of Longitudinal Trajectories of Mental Health Problems in Children with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities2023In: Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities, ISSN 1056-263X, E-ISSN 1573-3580Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To review the longitudinal trajectories - and the factors influencing their development - of mental health problems in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities. Systematic review methods were employed. Searches of six databases used keywords and MeSH terms related to children with neurodevelopmental disabilities, mental health problems, and longitudinal research. After the removal of duplicates, reviewers independently screened records for inclusion, extracted data (outcomes and influencing factors), and evaluated the risk of bias. Findings were tabulated and synthesized using graphs and a narrative. Searches identified 94,662 unique records, from which 49 publications were included. The median publication year was 2015. Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were the most commonly included population in retrieved studies. In almost 50% of studies, trajectories of mental health problems changed by < 10% between the first and last time point. Despite multiple studies reporting longitudinal trajectories of mental health problems, greater conceptual clarity and consideration of the measures included in research is needed, along with the inclusion of a more diverse range of populations of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities.

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  • 10.
    Ekberg, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Andin, Josefine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Effects of mild-to-moderate sensorineuralhearing loss and signal amplification on vocalemotion recognition in middle-aged–olderindividuals2022In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 17, no 1, article id e0261354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown deficits in vocal emotion recognition in sub-populations of individuals with hearing loss, making this a high priority research topic. However, previousresearch has only examined vocal emotion recognition using verbal material, in which emotions are expressed through emotional prosody. There is evidence that older individualswith hearing loss suffer from deficits in general prosody recognition, not specific to emotionalprosody. No study has examined the recognition of non-verbal vocalization, which constitutes another important source for the vocal communication of emotions. It might be thecase that individuals with hearing loss have specific difficulties in recognizing emotionsexpressed through prosody in speech, but not non-verbal vocalizations. We aim to examinewhether vocal emotion recognition difficulties in middle- aged-to older individuals with sensorineural mild-moderate hearing loss are better explained by deficits in vocal emotion recognition specifically, or deficits in prosody recognition generally by including both sentencesand non-verbal expressions. Furthermore a, some of the studies which have concluded thatindividuals with mild-moderate hearing loss have deficits in vocal emotion recognition abilityhave also found that the use of hearing aids does not improve recognition accuracy in thisgroup. We aim to examine the effects of linear amplification and audibility on the recognitionof different emotions expressed both verbally and non-verbally. Besides examining accuracy for different emotions we will also look at patterns of confusion (which specific emotionsare mistaken for other specific emotion and at which rates) during both amplified and nonamplified listening, and we will analyze all material acoustically and relate the acoustic content to performance. Together these analyses will provide clues to effects of amplification onthe perception of different emotions. For these purposes, a total of 70 middle-aged-olderindividuals, half with mild-moderate hearing loss and half with normal hearing will perform acomputerized forced-choice vocal emotion recognition task with and without amplification

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  • 11.
    Ekberg, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stavrinos, Georgios
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andin, Josefine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Acoustic Features Distinguishing Emotions in Swedish Speech.2023In: Journal of Voice, ISSN 0892-1997, E-ISSN 1873-4588, article id S0892-1997(23)00103-0Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few studies have examined which acoustic features of speech can be used to distinguish between different emotions, and how combinations of acoustic parameters contribute to identification of emotions. The aim of the present study was to investigate which acoustic parameters in Swedish speech are most important for differentiation between, and identification of, the emotions anger, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise in Swedish sentences. One-way ANOVAs were used to compare acoustic parameters between the emotions and both simple and multiple logistic regression models were used to examine the contribution of different acoustic parameters to differentiation between emotions. Results showed differences between emotions for several acoustic parameters in Swedish speech: surprise was the most distinct emotion, with significant differences compared to the other emotions across a range of acoustic parameters, while anger and happiness did not differ from each other on any parameter. The logistic regression models showed that fear was the best-predicted emotion while happiness was most difficult to predict. Frequency- and spectral-balance-related parameters were best at predicting fear. Amplitude- and temporal-related parameters were most important for surprise, while a combination of frequency-, amplitude- and spectral balance-related parameters are important for sadness. Assuming that there are similarities between acoustic models and how listeners infer emotions in speech, results suggest that individuals with hearing loss, who lack abilities of frequency detection, may compared to normal hearing individuals have difficulties in identifying fear in Swedish speech. Since happiness and fear relied primarily on amplitude- and spectral-balance-related parameters, detection of them are probably facilitated more by hearing aid use.

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  • 12.
    Ellis, Rachel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Sensory Organs and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Combined effects of age and hearing impairment on utterances and requests for clarification in spontaneous conversation and a referential communication task2024In: International journal of language and communication disorders, ISSN 1368-2822, E-ISSN 1460-6984, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 293-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe impact of hearing impairment is typically studied in terms of its effects on speech perception, yet this fails to account for the interactive nature of communication. Recently, there has been a move towards studying the effects of age-related hearing impairment on interaction, often using referential communication tasks; however, little is known about how interaction in these tasks compares to everyday communication. AimsTo investigate utterances and requests for clarification used in one-to-one conversations between older adults with hearing impairment and younger adults without hearing impairment, and between two younger adults without hearing impairment. Methods & ProceduresA total of 42 participants were recruited to the study and split into 21 pairs, 10 with two younger adults without hearing impairment and 11 with one younger adult without hearing impairment and one older participant with age-related hearing impairment (hard of hearing). Results from three tasks-spontaneous conversation and two trials of a referential communication task-were compared. A total of 5 min of interaction in each of the three tasks was transcribed, and the frequency of requests for clarification, mean length of utterance and total utterances were calculated for individual participants and pairs. Outcomes & ResultsWhen engaging in spontaneous conversation, participants made fewer requests for clarification than in the referential communication, regardless of hearing status/age (p & LE; 0.012). Participants who were hard of hearing made significantly more requests for clarification than their partners without hearing impairment in only the second trial of the referential communication task (U = 25, p = 0.019). Mean length of utterance was longer in spontaneous conversation than in the referential communication task in the pairs without hearing impairment (p & LE; 0.021), but not in the pairs including a person who was hard of hearing. However, participants who were hard of hearing used significantly longer utterances than their partners without hearing impairment in the spontaneous conversation (U = 8, p < 0.001) but not in the referential communication tasks. Conclusions & ImplicationsThe findings suggest that patterns of interaction observed in referential communication tasks differ to those observed in spontaneous conversation. The results also suggest that fatigue may be an important consideration when planning studies of interaction that use multiple conditions of a communication task, particularly when participants are older or hard of hearing. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDSWhat is already known on this subjectAge-related hearing impairment is known to affect communication; however, the majority of studies have focused on its impact on speech perception in controlled conditions. This indicates little about the impact on everyday, interactive, communication. What this study adds to the existing knowledgeWe investigated utterance length and requests for clarification in one-to-one conversations between pairs consisting of one older adult who is hard of hearing and one younger adult without hearing impairment, or two younger adults without hearing impairment. Results from three tasks (two trials of a referential communication task and spontaneous conversation) were compared. The findings demonstrated a significant effect of task type on requests for clarification in both groups. Furthermore, in spontaneous conversation, older adults who were hard of hearing used significantly longer utterances than their partners without hearing impairment. This pattern was not observed in the referential communication task. What are the potential or actual clinical implications of this work?These findings have important implications for generalizing results from controlled communication tasks to more everyday conversation. Specifically, they suggest that the previously observed strategy of monopolizing conversation, possibly as an attempt to control it, may be more frequently used by older adults who are hard of hearing in natural conversation than in a more contrived communication task.

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  • 13.
    Forsblad, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindblad, Philip
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Arvola, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Solís-Marcos, Ignacio
    VTI, The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Department of Informatics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    How Children With Mild Intellectual Disability Experience Self-driving Buses: In Support of Agency2023In: Transaction on Transport Sciences, ISSN 1802-971X, E-ISSN 1802-9876, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 21-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging technology for public transportation is often not fully aligned with an inclusive design strategy. Many people with intellectual disability experience their needs and desires not being fully considered. Responding to this problem, the purpose of this study is to investigate how children with mild intellectual disability experience self-driving buses. On each bus, a person called "safety driver" monitors the ride and takes control if a problematic situation arises. The purpose is also to investigate what roles support persons and safety drivers play. In addition, the research aims to propose improvements in how the design of these self-driving buses can better motivate children with intellectual disability to use them in support of their agency. To address this, we arranged and studied seven rides on self-driving buses, for 16 children diagnosed to have mild intellectual disability, and their support persons. Interviews with the children were held after the rides, and both the rides and interviews were video recorded. The analysis was in part inductive but also employed a theory based on motivation: self-determination theory. For several children, the bus worked as a vehicle for a social sightseeing tour of the local environment, and the current design did not hinder such an experience. Overall, many of the children had a positive experience, but there is room for improvement regarding the design of the buses. Some children expressed curiosity and a few frustrations with how the bus behaved in traffic. For instance, it was difficult for the children to understand why the bus braked for things that were hard for them to perceive. From observation, it appears that the accompanying support person and safety driver played an important role in making children safe and shaping the social environment on the bus. The support persons were also essential for some children to ride the bus at all. The safety driver provided the children with information about how the bus worked. Both the safety driver and the support person had a positive impact on the children's experience. To meet the children's needs and skills, and to improve their motivation for riding the buses again, the buses need to decelerate less abruptly, have easier and consistently designed seatbelts, and communicate what they do, see, and signal more clearly. We argue that further studies at this level of detail are crucial to ensure that new technologies are indeed designed for everyone.

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  • 14.
    Genelyte, Indre
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change.
    Torgé, Cristina Joy
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Social Work.
    Homman, Lina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division.
    Resilient Workers and Resilient Markets: Lessons from the Work Life Courses of Older Workers2023Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Gosling, Justine
    et al.
    WHO, Denmark; Univ Lucerne, Switzerland.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. WHO, Denmark.
    Mishra, Satish
    WHO, Denmark.
    2023: The game changing year for rehabilitation in the WHO European Region?2023In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 45, no 20, p. 3407-3408Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 16.
    Gosling, Justine
    et al.
    Univ Lucerne, Switzerland.
    Maritz, Roxanne
    Univ Lucerne, Switzerland.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sabariego, Carla
    Univ Lucerne, Switzerland; Swiss Parapleg Res, Switzerland; Univ Lucerne, Switzerland.
    Lessons learned from health system rehabilitation preparedness and response for disasters in LMICs: a scoping review2024In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionDisasters such as earthquakes, conflict, or landslides result in traumatic injuries creating surges in rehabilitation and assistive technology needs, exacerbating pre-existing unmet needs. Disasters frequently occur in countries where existing rehabilitation services are underdeveloped, hindering response to rehabilitation demand surge events.AimsThe primary aim of this scoping review is therefore to synthesize the evidence on rehabilitation and assistive technology preparedness and response of health systems in LMICs to the demand associated with disasters and conflict situations. A secondary aim was to summarize related recommendations identified in the gathered literature.MethodologyA scoping review was conducted using the Arksey and O'Malley framework to guide the methodological development. The results are reported in accordance with PRISMA-ScR. Four bibliographic databases were used: CINHAL, Cochrane, Pubmed, Scopus and. Key international organisations were also contacted. The search period was from 2010-2022. Eligible publications were categorized for analysis under the six World Health Organization health systems buildings blocks.ResultsThe findings of this scoping review suggest that rehabilitation is poorly integrated into health systems disaster preparedness and response in LMICs. Of the 27 studies included in the scoping review, 14 focused on service delivery, 6 on health workforce, 4 on health information systems and 3 on the leadership and governance building block. No study focused on financing nor assistive technology. This review found the most frequently referenced recommendations for actions that should be taken to develop rehabilitation services in disasters to be: the provision early and multi-professional rehabilitation, including the provision of assistive technology and psychological support, integrated community services; disaster response specific training for rehabilitation professionals; advocacy efforts to create awareness of the importance of rehabilitation in disasters; and the integration of rehabilitation into disaster preparedness and response plans.ConclusionFindings of this scoping review suggest that rehabilitation is poorly integrated into health systems disaster preparedness and response in LMIC's, largely due to low awareness of rehabilitation, undeveloped rehabilitation health systems and a lack of rehabilitation professionals, and disaster specific training for them. The paucity of available evidence hinders advocacy efforts for rehabilitation in disaster settings and limits the sharing of experiences and lessons learnt to improve rehabilitation preparedness and response. Advocacy efforts need to be expanded.

  • 17.
    Gothilander, Jennifer
    et al.
    Malardalen Univ, Sweden.
    Ullenhag, Anna
    Malardalen Univ, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Axelsson, Anna Karin
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Reliability of FUNDES-Child-SE-measuring participation and independence of children and youths with disabilities2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 1248-1256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThere is a need for an instrument to measure participation and independence in children with disabilities. FUNDES-Child-SE has its origin in the participation questionnaire Child and Adolescent Scale of Participation.AimsTest the psychometric properties of internal consistency and test-retest reliability.Material and methodsThis cross-sectional study included caregivers of 163 children with disability aged 6-18 years, 59 of whom were also included in the test-retest study. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate the proportions of valid ratings. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were tested through Cronbachs alpha and the intra-class correlation coefficient.ResultsThe amount of not relevant/not applicable ratings was substantial but varied between items and subdomains. Internal consistency was acceptable (0.8-0.95), and the test-retest was marginal to excellent (0.73-0.95).ConclusionsThe reliability together with the content validity support the use of the FUNDES-Child-SE to measure participation and independence in children with disabilities. However, results should be interpreted with caution due to the small sample size and possible selection bias. Modifications to reduce the not relevant/not applicable responses should be investigated together with the instruments responsiveness.SignificanceFUNDES-Child-SE can be used to facilitate a discussion of participation and independence and to plan interventions in a habilitation setting.

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  • 18.
    Groh, Aline
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division.
    Delaktighet i beslutsfattandet för människor med intellektuell funktionsnedsättning: En kvalitativ intervjustudie i föreningar2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Full delaktighet i föreningar och i beslutsfattande processer för alla människor på alla nivåer anses vara eftersträvansvärt av internationella konventioner. Forskning visar dock att människor med intellektuell funktionsnedsättning upplever många inskränkningar i delaktigheten inklusive i delaktigheten i beslutsfattande processer. Det finns väldigt lite forskning som undersöker gemensamt beslutsfattande hos personer med intellektuell funktionsnedsättning. Syftet med den här studien är att bidra med fördjupad kunskap kring hur personer med intellektuell funktionsnedsättning upplever delaktigheten i beslutsfattande processer för att för att kunna förstå främjande faktorer. Kontexten för studien är intresseföreningar som har medlemmar och styrelseledamöter med intellektuell funktionsnedsättning, då föreningar tillhandahåller en bred mångfald av möjligheter för delaktighet i beslutsfattandet. Studien utgår ifrån följande frågeställningar utifrån ett biopsykosocialt perspektiv: Hur beskriver personer med intellektuell funktionsnedsättning den upplevda delaktigheten i beslutsfattande processer i en förening? Vilka faktorer för kognitiv tillgänglighet beskrivs som betydelsefulla för personer med IF? Studien utgår dessutom ifrån kritisk realism som vetenskapsteoretisk ansats. Metoden som används är kvalitativa intervjuer som analyseras med en innehållsanalys. Resultat som framkommer är att delaktigheten i beslutsfattande i de undersökta kontexterna upplevs ofta bra men att delaktighetsinskränkningar förekommer. Det finns ett flertal faktorer för kognitiv tillgänglighet som är betydelsefulla. 

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    Delaktighet i beslutsfattandet för människor med intellektuell funktionsnedsättning_En kvalitativ intervjustudie i föreningar
  • 19.
    Homman, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division.
    A structural equation mediation model captures the predictions amongst the parameters of the ease of language understanding model2023In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 14, article id 1015227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to assess the validity of the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model through a statistical assessment of the relationships among its main parameters: processing speed, phonology, working memory (WM), and dB Speech Noise Ratio (SNR) for a given Speech Recognition Threshold (SRT) in a sample of hearing aid users from the n200 database.

    Methods: Hearing aid users were assessed on several hearing and cognitive tests. Latent Structural Equation Models (SEMs) were applied to investigate the relationship between the main parameters of the ELU model while controlling for age and PTA. Several competing models were assessed.

    Results: Analyses indicated that a mediating SEM was the best fit for the data. The results showed that (i) phonology independently predicted speech recognition threshold in both easy and adverse listening conditions and (ii) WM was not predictive of dB SNR for a given SRT in the easier listening conditions (iii) processing speed was predictive of dB SNR for a given SRT mediated via WM in the more adverse conditions.

    Conclusion: The results were in line with the predictions of the ELU model: (i) phonology contributed to dB SNR for a given SRT in all listening conditions, (ii) WM is only invoked when listening conditions are adverse, (iii) better WM capacity aids the understanding of what has been said in adverse listening conditions, and finally (iv) the results highlight the importance and optimization of processing speed in conditions when listening conditions are adverse and WM is activated.

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  • 20.
    Hoogeveen, Suzanne
    et al.
    Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Sarafoglou, Alexandra
    Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Aczel, Balazs
    Eotvos Lorand Univ, Inst Psychol, Budapest, Hungary..
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division.
    Homman, Lina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division.
    A many-analysts approach to the relation between religiosity and well-being2023In: Religion, Brain & Behavior, ISSN 2153-599X, E-ISSN 2153-5981, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 237-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relation between religiosity and well-being is one of the most researched topics in the psychology of religion, yet the directionality and robustness of the effect remains debated. Here, we adopted a many-analysts approach to assess the robustness of this relation based on a new cross-cultural dataset (N = 10, 535 participants from 24 countries). We recruited 120 analysis teams to investigate (1) whether religious people self-report higher well-being, and (2) whether the relation between religiosity and self-reported well-being depends on perceived cultural norms of religion (i.e., whether it is considered normal and desirable to be religious in a given country). In a two-stage procedure, the teams first created an analysis plan and then executed their planned analysis on the data. For the first research question, all but 3 teams reported positive effect sizes with credible/confidence intervals excluding zero (median reported beta = 0.120). For the second research question, this was the case for 65% of the teams (median reported beta = 0.039). While most teams applied (multilevel) linear regression models, there was considerable variability in the choice of items used to construct the independent variables, the dependent variable, and the included covariates.

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  • 21.
    Högstedt, Erika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Community Care Department, The Municipality of Norrköping, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Igelström, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience.
    Korhonen, Laura
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Barnafrid.
    Käcker, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Department of Medicine and Optometry, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    ‘It’s like it is designed to keep me stressed’ — Working sustainably with ADHD or autism2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, no 8, p. 1280-1291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Adults with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) face multiple challenges in obtaining and maintaining employment.

    Aims

    To identify and describe how adults with ADHD or ASD experienced their ability to work and what factors affected their ability to find a sustainable work situation over time.

    Methods

    Individual in-depth interviews were performed with 20 purposively sampled participants with ADHD/ASD. Data were analysed inductively using reflexive thematic analysis.ResultsThree themes were identified, describing (1) one’s own cognitive abilities and challenges, (2) enablement by flexibility and acceptance in the work environment, and (3) accumulated stress that makes the work situation unsustainable over time.

    Conclusions

    Over time, a lack of continuity and predictability of support measures caused great stress and exhaustion, with severe consequences for working life and in life in general. Adaptations needed to be individually tailored and include nonoccupational factors.

    Significance

    The study shows that adults with ADHD/ASD need long-term interventions that flexibly adapt to individual needs, as they vary over time. The findings suggest that occupational therapists and other health care providers, employers, employment services and other involved agencies should pay a greater deal of attention to stability and predictability over time.

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  • 22.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Anna Karin
    Division of Physiotherapy, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden; CHILD, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    CHILD, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; Division of Psychology, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Self-rating via video communication in children with disability – a feasibility study2023In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Different barriers may hinder children with developmental disabilities (DD) from having a voice in research and clinical interventions concerning fundamentally subjective phenomena, such as participation. It is not well-investigated if video communication tools have the potential to reduce these barriers. Aim: This study investigated the feasibility of administering a self-rating instrument measuring participation, Picture My Participation (PmP), via a video communication tool (Zoom), to children with DD. Materials and methods: PmP was administered to 17 children with DD (mean age 13 years). The pictorial representations of activities and response options in PmP were displayed in a shared PowerPoint presentation, enabling nonverbal responses with the annotate function in Zoom. Child and interviewer perceptions of the interview were measured through questionnaires developed for the purpose. Results: All the children completed the interview. Most PmP questions were answered, and no adverse events were registered. Technical issues could generally be solved. No special training or expensive equipment was needed for the interviews. Conclusion: Interviewer-guided self-ratings of participation and related constructs through video communication may be  a feasible procedure to use with children with DD from age 11. Significance: Offering video communication may increase children’s chances to contribute subjective experiences in research and clinical practice.

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  • 23.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Anna Karin
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Gothilander, Jennifer
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; Department of Mental Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Structural validity and internal consistency of the Strengths and Stressors in Parenting (SSF) Questionnaire in parents of children with developmental disabilities.2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 486-494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study investigated the structural validity and internal consistency of the Strengths and Stressors (SSF) questionnaire. The SSF is used in Swedish habilitation services to measure the positive and negative consequences that the fostering of a child with a developmental disability can have on family functioning in six domains: parent's feelings and attitudes, social life, family finances, relationship to the other parent, siblings, and professional support. The proposed six-factor model was tested with confirmatory factor analysis with data collected from 291 parents of children with developmental disabilities. The six-factor model had an acceptable fit according to most fit indices, but two items were non-significant. Overall, the internal consistency was acceptable or good. The SSF, with the proposed six-factor solution, can be a useful tool when assessing parental perspectives on the impacts of having a child with a developmental disability in clinical settings and research.

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  • 24.
    Khatin-Zadeh, Omid
    et al.
    Univ Elect Sci & Technol China, Peoples R China.
    Banaruee, Hassan
    Univ Bonn, Germany.
    Reali, Florencia
    Univ Los Andes, Colombia.
    Tirado, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ruiz-Fernandez, Susana
    FOM Univ Appl Sci, Germany.
    Yamada, Yuki
    Kyushu Univ, Japan.
    Wang, Ruiming
    South China Normal Univ, Peoples R China.
    Nicolas, Robin
    Univ Antilles, France.
    Khwaileh, Tariq
    Qatar Univ, Qatar.
    Szychowska, Malina
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Vestlund, Johanna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Correa, Juan C.
    CESA Business Sch, Colombia.
    Farsani, Danyal
    Univ Finis Terrae, Chile.
    Butcher, Natalie
    Teesside Univ, England.
    Som, Bidisha
    Indian Inst Technol Guwahati, India.
    Volkonskii, Ivan
    Russian Presidential Acad Natl Econ & Publ Adm, Russia.
    Plevoets, Koen
    Univ Ghent, Belgium; Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Marmolejo-Ramos, Fernando
    Univ South Australia Online, Australia.
    Metaphors of time across cultures2023In: JOURNAL OF CULTURAL COGNITIVE SCIENCE, ISSN 2520-100XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    TIME is a highly abstract concept and prevalent in languages worldwide. Cross-cultural and cross-linguistic research suggests that TIME is embodied dissimilarly in different languages. Still the literature has not received sufficient attention in examining the differences. This study aimed to identify and compare how TIME is metaphorically represented and embodied worldwide. We investigated 14 languages; Arabic, Assamese, Chinese, English, Finnish, French, German, Japanese, Kikuyu, Persian, Polish, Russian, Spanish, and Swedish, which represent nine language families. The metaphors were categorized conceptually as TIME IS AN ORGANISM, TIME IS MOTION, TIME IS SPACE, and TIME IS A VALUABLE COMMODITY. We employed a two-part paper-based task. The first part consisted of generation of metaphor items and the second part consisted of a valence rating task. The key variables considered were metaphor category and language family while controlling for demographic variables such as gender, age and handedness. Data from 513 participants were collected. Results showed a significant association between language categories and the valences of time metaphors. The data of this study suggest that within the languages of a certain category, there might be some similarity between the valences of words that are used to realize a given conceptual metaphor.

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  • 25.
    Käcker, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nycklar till kommunikaton2022In: Förhållningssätt och möten: arbetsmetoder i social omsorg / [ed] Thomas Strandberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, 2, Vol. Sidorna 273-298, p. 273-298Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kapitlet handlar om hur kommunikation med några personer som har svåra förvärvade hjärnskador och som inte kommunicerar verbalt går till. Avsaknad av tal, afasi, återfinns hos personer med svåra hjärnskador, oavsett om hjärnskadan är en följd av sjukdom eller skada. Inledningsvis beskrivs förekomst av hjärnskada. Därefter tas begreppet kommunikation upp. Tonvikten läggs på dialogen och samspelet mellan personerna. Kognitiva förmågor som minne och språk kommer att behandlas kortfattat. Huvuddelen av kapitlet består av fyra personbeskrivningar Berit, Ann, Bertil och Karin. Varje personbeskrivning avslutas med en analys av vad som underlättar respektive hindrar kommunikationen. Även om beskrivningarna handlar om personer med förvärvad hjärnskada går resultaten att generalisera till andra grupper, till exempel personer med flerfunktionsnedsättning (intellektuell funktionsnedsättning och omfattande motorisk funktionsnedsättning) och personer med demens. Syftet med kapitlet är dels att ge läsaren en orientering om hur viktig kommunikationen är i det dagliga omsorgsarbetet, dels att beskriva metoder för hur kommunikationen kan gå till när den ena av parterna inte kan tala.

  • 26.
    Levén, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bergström, Monica
    Linköping University.
    Do hearing influence the relation between subjective and more objective measures of prospective memory or memory for intentions in adults with intellectual disability?2022In: 6th International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, 2022, , p. 1Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Prospective memory (PM) or memory for intentions is difficult for people with intellectualdisability (ID). PM has been studied in young people with Down syndrome (Godfrey &Lee, 2020) but less is known about PM in adults with unknown or other causes of ID.Storing the content of the intention and retrieval at the appropriate event load onretrospective memory and executive functions. No difference have been found betweensubjective and more objective measures of PM in the ID population (Levén m.fl., 2011).Subjective experience of perceptual impairments, e.g., hard of hearing, will be investigatedas age-related hearing loss occurs early in the ID group and hearing can benefit PM. Themore objective measure of PM is based on the procedure used in the Betula project onmemory function and ageing in Sweden. As PM task the participant get the instruction toremind the researcher about a paper to sign when the tests are finished. In case this isforgotten the participant is asked if there was something else they should do. If no responsewas given the cue; Were you not supposed to remind me of something? was provided.Subjects were not told that this was a memory test. The SDQ instrument (Goodman, 1997)will give a general description of the individual, inhibition will be rated with the VIMIinstrument, digit span rates working memory capacity, and the subjective experience ofretrospective and prospective memory is rated with PRMQ (Rönnlund m.fl., 2011). 

  • 27.
    Lindström-Sandahl, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Elwér, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Effects of a phonics intervention in a randomized controlled study in Swedish second-grade students at risk of reading difficulties2023In: Dyslexia, ISSN 1076-9242, E-ISSN 1099-0909, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 290-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching phoneme awareness to children at risk for early reading difficulties has been recognized as successful in several studies. In this randomized controlled trial (RCT)-study, we add to this research by optimizing core procedural as well as teaching components in a phonics-directed intervention and extend the RCT reading intervention research into a semi-transparent language context. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a novel Swedish intensive phonics program. This randomized controlled pre-test and post-test intervention study targeted second-grade students with early reading difficulties. Students were identified by a repeated screening procedure and allocated to intervention (n = 34) and control (n = 34) conditions. A 9-week intensive phonics-based program was administrated one-to-one, by special education teachers in Swedish mainstream elementary schools. Results show an improvement in the intervention group, compared with the controls on all outcome measures. Findings indicate that the supplementary phonics program, delivered with high intensity, can significantly increase word reading skills and reading comprehension in second-grade students with early reading difficulties.

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  • 28.
    Marsh, John
    et al.
    Human Factors Laboratory, School of Psychology and Computer Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK; Engineering Psychology, Humans and Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Vachon, Francois
    École de Psychologie, Université Laval, Québec, Canada.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Marsja, Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division.
    Röer, Jan
    Department of Psychology and Psychotherapy, Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, Germany.
    Richardson, Beth
    Human Factors Laboratory, School of Psychology and Computer Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK.
    K. Ljungberg, Jessica
    Engineering Psychology, Humans and Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Irrelevant changing-state vibrotactile stimuli disrupt verbal serial recall: implications for theories of interference in short-term memory2023In: Journal of Cognitive Psychology, ISSN 2044-5911, E-ISSN 2044-592XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What causes interference in short-term memory? We report the novel finding that immediate memory for visually-presented verbal items is sensitive to disruption from task-irrelevant vibrotactile stimuli. Specifically, short-term memory for a visual sequence is disrupted by a concurrently presented sequence of vibrations, but only when the vibrotactile sequence entails change (when the sequence “jumps” between the two hands). The impact on visual-verbal serial recall was similar in magnitude to that for auditory stimuli (Experiment 1). Performance of the missing item task, requiring recall of item-identity rather than item-order, was unaffected by changing-state vibrotactile stimuli (Experiment 2), as with changing-state auditory stimuli. Moreover, the predictability of the changing-state sequence did not modulate the magnitude of the effect, arguing against an attention-capture conceptualisation (Experiment 3). Results support the view that interference in short-term memory is produced by conflict between incompatible, amodal serial-ordering processes (interference-by-process) rather than interference between similar representational codes (interference-by-content).

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  • 29.
    Marsja, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division.
    Holmer, Emil
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Interplay between working memory and speech recognition declines over time2024Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Age-related changes in auditory and cognitive functions are well-documented, with increased hearing thresholds (e.g., Wiley et al., 2008) and reduced working memory capacity (WMC; e.g., Wingfield et al., 1988) among older adults. Moreover, aging has been linked to poorer speech recognition in noise (e.g., Marsja et al., 2022), highlighting the multifaceted impact of age on auditory and cognitive domains. Our study examined the dynamic relationship between auditory and cognitive changes over time to shed light on the direction of influence between the two. To this aim, we employed change score modeling.

    Methods: We analyzed data from 111 normally hearing individuals from the n200 study (https://2024.speech-in-noise.eu/proxy.php?id=81). At Time 1 (T1), their mean age was 61.2 years (SD = 8.00), and at Time 2 (T2), their mean age was 67.0 years (SD = 8.06). We used Latent Change Score modeling to explore the changes in WMC and speech recognition in noise. To measure speech recognition in noise, we used signal-to-noise ratios from the Hearing in Noise Test during speech-shaped noise. The reading span test was used as a measure for WMC.

    Results and Conclusion: Preliminary results showed a decline in WMC, signified by the negative relationship between Reading Span at T1 and changes in Reading Span at T2. This negative relationship indicates that individuals with higher initial WMC experienced subsequent declines in their cognitive abilities. Furthermore, our analysis revealed a negative relationship between changes in speech recognition in noise at T2 and Reading Span at T1. This relationship suggests that individuals with higher initial WMC experienced less decline in their speech recognition in noise over time. Further research with additional time points may be needed to fully elucidate the complex relationship between cognitive and auditory changes over time.

  • 30.
    Mcintyre, Sarah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hauser, Steven C.
    Univ Virginia, VA 22903 USA.
    Kusztor, Anikó
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Böhme, Rebecca
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Moungou, Athanasia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Isager, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Homman, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Novembre, Giovanni
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nagi, Saad
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Israr, Ali
    Facebook, WA USA.
    Lumpkin, Ellen A.
    Columbia Univ, NY 10027 USA.
    Abnousi, Freddy
    Facebook, WA USA.
    Gerling, Gregory J.
    Univ Virginia, VA 22903 USA.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    The Language of Social Touch Is Intuitive and Quantifiable2022In: Psychological Science, ISSN 0956-7976, E-ISSN 1467-9280, Vol. 33, no 9, p. 1477-1494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Touch is a powerful communication tool, but we have a limited understanding of the role played by particular physical features of interpersonal touch communication. In this study, adults living in Sweden performed a task in which messages (attention, love, happiness, calming, sadness, and gratitude) were conveyed by a sender touching the forearm of a receiver, who interpreted the messages. Two experiments (N = 32, N = 20) showed that within close relationships, receivers could identify the intuitive touch expressions of the senders, and we characterized the physical features of the touches associated with successful communication. Facial expressions measured with electromyography varied by message but were uncorrelated with communication performance. We developed standardized touch expressions and quantified the physical features with 3D hand tracking. In two further experiments (N = 20, N = 16), these standardized expressions were conveyed by trained senders and were readily understood by strangers unacquainted with the senders. Thus, the possibility emerges of a standardized, intuitively understood language of social touch.

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  • 31.
    Messer, David
    et al.
    Open Univ, England; City Univ London, England.
    Henry, Lucy A.
    City Univ London, England.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Perfect Match! A Review and Tutorial on Issues Related to Matching Groups in Investigations of Children with Neurodevelopmental Conditions2023In: Brain Sciences, ISSN 2076-3425, E-ISSN 2076-3425, Vol. 13, no 10, article id 1377Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research concerned with children and young people who have neurodevelopmental disabilities (ND) in relation to early language acquisition usually involves comparisons with matched group(s) of typically developing individuals. In these studies, several important and complex issues need to be addressed. Three major issues are related to: (1) the choice of a variables on which to carry out group matching; (2) recruiting children into the study; and (3) the statistical analysis of the data. To assist future research on this topic, we discuss each of these three issues and provide recommendations about what we believe to be the best course of action. To provide a comprehensive review of the methodological issues, we draw on research beyond the topic of early language acquisition. Our overall aim is to contribute to research that considers questions about delay or differences in development patterns of development and about identifying potentially causal variables.

  • 32.
    Messer, David
    et al.
    Open Univ, England; City Univ London, England.
    Kearvell-White, Jennifer
    Open Univ, England.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division.
    Faulkner, Dorothy
    Open Univ, England.
    Henry, Lucy
    City Univ London, England.
    Ibbotson, Paul
    Open Univ, England.
    The structure of executive functioning in 11 to 14 year olds with and without special educational needs2022In: British Journal of Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0261-510X, E-ISSN 2044-835X, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 453-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure and development of executive functioning (EF) have been intensively studied in typically developing populations, with little attention given to those with Special Educational Needs (SEN). This study addresses this by comparing the EF structure of 132 adolescents (11-14 years-old) with SEN and 138 adolescents not requiring additional support (Non-SEN peers). Participants completed verbal and non-verbal assessments of key components of EF: inhibition, working memory and switching. Confirmatory Factor Analysis on each group tested one-, two- and three-factor models of EF. In both groups, there was statistical support for the fit of one- and two-factor models with no model being clearly better than the others; there was little support for three-factor models. Parsimony suggests that the one-factor model best represents the structure of EF. In light of our results, the implications for the nature of EF in early adolescence in both SEN and Non-SEN groups are discussed.

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  • 33.
    Micula, Andreea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ksiazek, Patrycja
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands; Eriksholm Res Ctr, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Reena Murmu
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Wendt, Dorothea
    Eriksholm Res Ctr, Denmark; Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Fiedler, Lorenz
    Eriksholm Res Ctr, Denmark.
    Ng, Elaine Hoi Ning
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    A Glimpse of Memory Through the Eyes: Pupillary Responses Measured During Encoding Reflect the Likelihood of Subsequent Memory Recall in an Auditory Free Recall Test2022In: Trends in Hearing, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 26, article id 23312165221130581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the current study was to investigate whether task-evoked pupillary responses measured during encoding, individual working memory capacity and noise reduction in hearing aids were associated with the likelihood of subsequently recalling an item in an auditory free recall test combined with pupillometry. Participants with mild to moderately severe symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss (n = 21) were included. The Sentence-final Word Identification and Recall (SWIR) test was administered in a background noise composed of sixteen talkers with noise reduction in hearing aids activated and deactivated. The task-evoked peak pupil dilation (PPD) was measured. The Reading Span (RS) test was used as a measure of individual working memory capacity. Larger PPD at a single trial level was significantly associated with higher likelihood of subsequently recalling a word, presumably reflecting the intensity of attention devoted during encoding. There was no clear evidence of a significant relationship between working memory capacity and subsequent memory recall, which may be attributed to the SWIR test and RS test being administered in different modalities, as well as differences in task characteristics. Noise reduction did not have a significant effect on subsequent memory recall. This may be due to the background noise not having a detrimental effect on attentional processing at the favorable signal-to-noise ratio levels at which the test was conducted.

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  • 34.
    Mishra, Satish
    et al.
    WHO, Denmark.
    Gosling, Justine
    WHO, Denmark; Univ Lucerne, Switzerland.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. WHO, Denmark.
    Zapata, Tomas
    WHO, Denmark.
    Muscat, Natasha Azzopardi
    WHO, Denmark.
    The need for rehabilitation services in the WHO European Region is substantial and growing2023In: The Lancet Regional Health: Europe, E-ISSN 2666-7762, Vol. 24, article id 100550Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 35.
    Moradi, Shahram
    et al.
    Univ South Eastern Norway, Norway.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Perceptual Doping: A Hypothesis on How Early Audiovisual Speech Stimulation Enhances Subsequent Auditory Speech Processing2023In: Brain Sciences, ISSN 2076-3425, E-ISSN 2076-3425, Vol. 13, no 4, article id 601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Face-to-face communication is one of the most common means of communication in daily life. We benefit from both auditory and visual speech signals that lead to better language understanding. People prefer face-to-face communication when access to auditory speech cues is limited because of background noise in the surrounding environment or in the case of hearing impairment. We demonstrated that an early, short period of exposure to audiovisual speech stimuli facilitates subsequent auditory processing of speech stimuli for correct identification, but early auditory exposure does not. We called this effect "perceptual doping" as an early audiovisual speech stimulation dopes or recalibrates auditory phonological and lexical maps in the mental lexicon in a way that results in better processing of auditory speech signals for correct identification. This short opinion paper provides an overview of perceptual doping and how it differs from similar auditory perceptual aftereffects following exposure to audiovisual speech materials, its underlying cognitive mechanism, and its potential usefulness in the aural rehabilitation of people with hearing difficulties.

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  • 36.
    Nilsonne, Gustav
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Sweden.
    Dahlgren, Peter
    Eklund, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, The Division of Statistics and Machine Learning.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division.
    Carlsson, Rickard
    Linnéuniversitetet, Sweden.
    Innes-Ker, Åse
    Lunds universitet, Sweden.
    Nordström, Thomas
    Linnéuniversitetet, Sweden.
    Willén, Rebecca
    Linnéuniversitetet, Sweden.
    "Sluta betala för att få publicera forskning"2023In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Nilsson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Words Don’t Come Easy: Decoding and Reading Comprehension Difficulties in Adolescents with Intellectual Disability2022Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) have difficulties with decoding and reading comprehension. However, studies focussing on why these difficulties occur are very sparse, and the existing literature has found conflicting results. This thesis investigated the development of reading abilities and the concurrent cognitive, linguistic, and environmental predictors of decoding and reading comprehension in Swedish adolescents with ID of unknown aetiology. In addition, this thesis evaluated the applicability of one of the most commonly used theoretical frameworks of reading comprehension: the Simple View of Reading (SVR). The results showed that the development of reading abilities in adolescents with ID is in line with the model of developmental delay. This means that the development of reading abilities is not qualitatively different from typical reading development, but the rate is slower. Further, it means that the pattern of concurrent predictors is similar to the pattern found in a younger typically developing population. In Swedish adolescents with ID decoding is predicted by phonological awareness and rapid automatized naming (RAN), and reading comprehension is predicted by decoding, vocabulary, and phonological executive-loaded working memory (ELWM). This thesis also found that the developmental trajectory of decoding plateaus at a mental age of 8:9 years, while it is expected in typically developing children that decoding ability continues to increase until early adolescence. The explanation for this early plateau could be either cognitive or educational, but most likely a combination of both. Lastly, the results from this thesis also suggest that the SVR is not sufficient for explaining reading comprehension in adolescents with ID. Instead, a combination of the SVR and the Lexical Quality Hypothesis (LQH) is suggested as a successful way of explaining the variance in reading comprehension. Taken together, the results from this thesis implies that reading instruction and interventions originally developed for typically developing children is likely to be effective for individuals with ID.  

    List of papers
    1. Decoding Abilities in Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities: The Contribution of Cognition, Language, and Home Literacy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decoding Abilities in Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities: The Contribution of Cognition, Language, and Home Literacy
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    2021 (English)In: Journal of Cognition, E-ISSN 2514-4820, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Decoding abilities in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) are substantially lower than for typical readers. The underlying mechanisms of their poor reading remain uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate the concurrent predictors of decoding ability in 136 adolescents with non-specific ID, and to evaluate the results in relation to previous findings on typical readers. The study included a broad range of cognitive and language measures as predictors of decoding ability. A LASSO regression analysis identified phonological awareness and rapid automatized naming (RAN) as the most important predictors. The predictors explained 57.73% of the variance in decoding abilities. These variables are similar to the ones found in earlier research on typically developing children, hence supporting our hypothesis of a delayed rather than a different reading profile. These results lend some support to the use of interventions and reading instructions, originally developed for typically developing children, for children and adolescents with non-specific ID.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Ubiquity Press, 2021
    National Category
    Pedagogy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-179895 (URN)10.5334/joc.191 (DOI)
    Note

    Funded by: Swedish Research Council (2016-04217)

    Available from: 2021-10-05 Created: 2021-10-05 Last updated: 2022-11-15Bibliographically approved
    2. Investigating Reading Comprehension in Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities: Evaluating the Simple View of Reading
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating Reading Comprehension in Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities: Evaluating the Simple View of Reading
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    2021 (English)In: Journal of Cognition, E-ISSN 2514-4820, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Reading comprehension difficulties are common in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID), but the influences of underlying abilities related to reading comprehension in this group have rarely been investigated. One aim of this study was to investigate the Simple View of Reading as a theoretical framework to describe cognitive and linguistic abilities predicting individual differences in reading comprehension in adolescents with non-specific ID. A second aim was to investigate whether predictors of listening comprehension and reading comprehension suggest that individuals with ID have a delayed pattern of development (copying early grade variance in reading comprehension) or a different pattern of development involving a new or an unusual pattern of cognitive and linguistic predictors. A sample of 136 adolescents with non-specific ID was assessed on reading comprehension, decoding, linguistic, and cognitive measures. The hypotheses were evaluated using structural equation models. The results showed that the Simple View of Reading was not applicable in explaining reading comprehension in this group, however, the concurrent predictors of comprehension (vocabulary and phonological executive-loaded working memory) followed a delayed profile.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Ubiquity Press Ltd., 2021
    Keywords
    reading comprehension, intellectual disability, simple view of reading, vocabulary, delay, difference, structural equation modelling
    National Category
    Pedagogy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-179206 (URN)10.5334/joc.188 (DOI)2-s2.0-85115953309 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2021-09-13 Created: 2021-09-13 Last updated: 2022-11-15Bibliographically approved
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  • 38.
    Nordström, Thomas
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Kalmendal, André
    Department of Psychology, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Batinovic, Lucija
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Risk of bias and open science practices in systematic reviews of educational effectiveness: A meta‐review2023In: Review of Education, E-ISSN 2049-6613, Vol. 11, no 3, article id e3443Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to produce the most reliable syntheses of the effectiveness of educational interventions, systematic reviews need to adhere to rigorous methodological standards. This meta-review investigated risk of bias occurring while conducting a systematic review and the presence of open science practices like data sharing and reproducibility of the review procedure, in recently published reviews in education. We included all systematic reviews of educational interventions, instructions and methods for all K-12 student populations in any school form with experimental or quasi-experimental designs (an active manipulation of the intervention) with comparisons and where the outcome variables were academic performance of any kind. We searched the database Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) through the years 2019-2021. In parallel we hand-searched four major educational review journals for systematic reviews: Educational Research Review (Elsevier), Educational Review (Taylor & Francis), Review of Education (Wiley), and Review of Educational Research (AERA). Systematic reviews were assessed with the risk of bias tool ROBIS and whether the studies had pre-registered protocols, shared primary research data, and whether a third party could reproduce search strings and details of where exactly primary research data were extracted. A total of 88 studies that matched our PICOS were included in this review; of these, 10 educational systematic reviews were judged as low risk of bias (approximately 11%) . The rest were classified as high risk of bias during a shortened ROBIS assessment or assessed as high risk or unclear risk of bias following a full ROBIS assessment. Of the 10 low risk of bias reviews, 6 had detailed their search sufficiently enough for a third party to reproduce, 3 reviews shared the data from primary studies, however none had specified how and from where exactly data from primary studies were extracted. The study shows that at least a small part of systematic reviews in education has a low risk of bias, but most systematic reviews in our set of studies have high risk of bias in their methodological procedure. There are still improvements in this field to be expected as even the low risk of bias reviews are not consistent regarding pre-registered protocols, data sharing, reproducibility of primary research data and reproducible search strings.Rationale for this studyRigorous systematic review is the method to use to evaluate and provide synthesis of methods and interventions in educational research.Why the new findings matterAlarmingly few systematic reviews were judged with low risk of bias and few reviews utilise recent open science practices. This might undermine the reliability of study findings.Implications for journals and review researchersThis meta-review highlights the need for review researchers and journals to better adopt best practices in systematic reviews. We therefore urge for better dissemination and awareness of systematic reviews standards and for more transparency in the review process, which may lead to more reliable synthesis of what works best in education. In the long run this is a necessary change and way forward to provide evidence-based practices in the classroom.Context and implications

  • 39.
    Palmqvist, Lisa
    et al.
    Institutionen för pedagogik och specialpedagogik, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Reichenberg, Monica
    Institutionen för pedagogik och specialpedagogik, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Samuelsson, Jenny
    Institutionen för neurovetenskap och fysiologi, sektionen för hälsa och rehabilitering, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Holmer, Emil
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lundälv, Mats
    Thunberg, Gunilla
    Institutionen för filosofi, lingvistik och vetenskapsteori, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kan en app-baserad läsintervention öka elevers läsförmåga och lärares self-efficacy?2023In: Läs- och Skrivsvårigheter & DyslexiArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Pardiñas, Antonio F.
    et al.
    MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Smart, Sophie E.
    MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom;Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Willcocks, Isabella R.
    MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Holmans, Peter A.
    MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Dennison, Charlotte A.
    MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Lynham, Amy J.
    MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Legge, Sophie E.
    MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Baune, Bernhard T.
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Münster, Münster, Germany;Department of Psychiatry, Melbourne Medical School, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia;The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    Bigdeli, Tim B.
    Department of Psychiatry and the Behavioral Sciences, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn;Institute for Genomic Health, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn;Department of Psychiatry, Veterans Affairs New York Harbor Healthcare System, Brooklyn.
    Cairns, Murray J.
    School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia;Centre for Brain and Mental Health Research, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia;Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, Australia.
    Corvin, Aiden
    Neuropsychiatric Genetics Research Group, Department of Psychiatry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Fanous, Ayman H.
    Department of Psychiatry and the Behavioral Sciences, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn;Institute for Genomic Health, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn.
    Frank, Josef
    Department of Genetic Epidemiology in Psychiatry, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany.
    Kelly, Brian
    School of Medicine & Public Health, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia.
    McQuillin, Andrew
    Molecular Psychiatry Laboratory, Division of Psychiatry, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Melle, Ingrid
    Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway;Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Mortensen, Preben B.
    National Centre for Register-based Research, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark;The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Mowry, Bryan J.
    Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia;Queensland Centre for Mental Health Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Pato, Carlos N.
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn;Department of Psychiatry and Zilkha Neurogenetics Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles;Institute for Genomic Health, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn.
    Periyasamy, Sathish
    Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia;Queensland Centre for Mental Health Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Rietschel, Marcella
    Department of Genetic Epidemiology in Psychiatry, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany.
    Rujescu, Dan
    University Clinic and Outpatient Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany;Division of General Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Simonsen, Carmen
    Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway;Early Intervention in Psychosis Advisory Unit for South-East Norway, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    St Clair, David
    Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom.
    Tooney, Paul
    School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia;Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, Australia.
    Wu, Jing Qin
    Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Australia.
    Andreassen, Ole A.
    Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway;Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Kowalec, Kaarina
    College of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada;Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sullivan, Patrick F.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden;Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New York;Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
    Murray, Robin M.
    Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Owen, Michael J.
    MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    MacCabe, James H.
    Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom.
    O’Donovan, Michael C.
    MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Walter, James, T.
    MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Homman, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Centre For Public Health, Institute Of Clinical Sciences, Queens University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom.
    The Schizophrenia Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC), (Contributor)
    Interaction Testing and Polygenic Risk Scoring to Estimate the Association of Common Genetic Variants With Treatment Resistance in Schizophrenia2022In: JAMA psychiatry, ISSN 2168-6238, E-ISSN 2168-622X, Vol. 79, no 3, p. 260-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance  About 20% to 30% of people with schizophrenia have psychotic symptoms that do not respond adequately to first-line antipsychotic treatment. This clinical presentation, chronic and highly disabling, is known as treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS). The causes of treatment resistance and their relationships with causes underlying schizophrenia are largely unknown. Adequately powered genetic studies of TRS are scarce because of the difficulty in collecting data from well-characterized TRS cohorts.

    Objective  To examine the genetic architecture of TRS through the reassessment of genetic data from schizophrenia studies and its validation in carefully ascertained clinical samples.

    Design, Setting, and Participants  Two case-control genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of schizophrenia were performed in which the case samples were defined as individuals with TRS (n = 10 501) and individuals with non-TRS (n = 20 325). The differences in effect sizes for allelic associations were then determined between both studies, the reasoning being such differences reflect treatment resistance instead of schizophrenia. Genotype data were retrieved from the CLOZUK and Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) schizophrenia studies. The output was validated using polygenic risk score (PRS) profiling of 2 independent schizophrenia cohorts with TRS and non-TRS: a prevalence sample with 817 individuals (Cardiff Cognition in Schizophrenia [CardiffCOGS]) and an incidence sample with 563 individuals (Genetics Workstream of the Schizophrenia Treatment Resistance and Therapeutic Advances [STRATA-G]).

    Main Outcomes and Measures  GWAS of treatment resistance in schizophrenia. The results of the GWAS were compared with complex polygenic traits through a genetic correlation approach and were used for PRS analysis on the independent validation cohorts using the same TRS definition.

    Results  The study included a total of 85 490 participants (48 635 [56.9%] male) in its GWAS stage and 1380 participants (859 [62.2%] male) in its PRS validation stage. Treatment resistance in schizophrenia emerged as a polygenic trait with detectable heritability (1% to 4%), and several traits related to intelligence and cognition were found to be genetically correlated with it (genetic correlation, 0.41-0.69). PRS analysis in the CardiffCOGS prevalence sample showed a positive association between TRS and a history of taking clozapine (r2 = 2.03%; P = .001), which was replicated in the STRATA-G incidence sample (r2 = 1.09%; P = .04).

    Conclusions and Relevance  In this GWAS, common genetic variants were differentially associated with TRS, and these associations may have been obscured through the amalgamation of large GWAS samples in previous studies of broadly defined schizophrenia. Findings of this study suggest the validity of meta-analytic approaches for studies on patient outcomes, including treatment resistance.

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  • 41.
    Pestoff, Rebecka
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    McAllister, Marion
    Cardiff Univ, Wales.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    Translation, cross-cultural adaptation, and preliminary validation of a patient-reported outcome measure for genetic counseling outcomes in Sweden2024In: Journal of Genetic Counseling, ISSN 1059-7700, E-ISSN 1573-3599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetic counseling is key for understanding the consequences of hereditary and genetic diseases and, therefore, crucial for patients, their families, and healthcare providers. Genetic counseling facilitates individuals' comprehension, decision-making, and adaptation to hereditary diseases. This study focuses on the Swedish adaptation of the Genetic Counseling Outcome Scale-24 (GCOS-24), an internationally validated, patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) for quantifying patient empowerment in genetic counseling. This study aimed to translate and cross-culturally adapt the GCOS-24 to measure patient-reported outcome from genetic counseling in Sweden. The adaptation process was meticulously conducted, adhering to international guidelines, with cross-cultural adaptation, translation, and back translation, to ensure semantic, conceptual, and idiomatic equivalence with the original English version. Face validity and understandability was assured using qualitative cognitive interviews conducted with patient representatives, and by a committee of experts in the field. The psychometric properties of the Swedish version of GCOS-24 (GCOS-24swe) were evaluated using a robust sample of 374 patients. These individuals received genetic counseling by telephone or video, necessitated by the constraints of the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants responded to GCOS-24swe both before and after genetic counseling. The GCOS-24swe demonstrated face validity, good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.86), significant responsiveness (Cohen's d = 0.65, p < 0.001), and good construct validity. The study's findings underscore the GCOS-24swe's potential as an effective instrument in both clinical practice and research within Sweden. It offers a valuable means for assessing patient empowerment, a key goal of genetic counseling. Additional psychometric assessment of test-retest reliability and interpretability would further enhance the utility of GCOS-24swe.

  • 42.
    Pestoff, Rebecka
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Neher, Margit
    Department of Rehabilitation, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics. Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Övr Regionledningskontoret.
    Rapid Implementation of Telegenetic Counseling in the COVID-19 and Swedish Healthcare Context: A Feasibility Study2022In: Frontiers in Health Services, E-ISSN 2813-0146, Vol. 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    This study reports the process and preliminary findings of rapid implementation oftelegenetic counseling in the context of Swedish healthcare and COVID-19 pandemic,from both a patient and a provider perspective. Fourty-nine patients and 6 healthcareprofessionals were included in this feasibility study of telegenetic counseling in aregional Department of Clinical Genetics in Sweden. Telegenetic counseling is heredefined as providing genetic counseling to patients by video (n =30) or telephone (n= 19) appointments. Four specific feasibility aspects were considered: acceptability,demand, implementation, and preliminary efficacy. Several measures were used includingthe Genetic Counseling Outcome Scale 24 (collected pre- and post-counseling); theTelehealth Usability Questionnaire; a short study specific evaluation and Visiba Careevaluations, all collected post-counseling. The measures were analyzed with descriptivestatistics and the preliminary results show a high level of acceptance and demand, fromboth patients and providers. Results also indicate successful initial implementation in theregional Department of Clinical Genetics and preliminary efficacy, as shown by significantclinically important improvement in patients’ empowerment levels.

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  • 43.
    Ratanjee-Vanmali, Husmita
    et al.
    University of Pretoria (UP), Hearing Research Clinic, South Africa.
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    International Journal of Audiology, South Africa.
    Laplante-Levesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Digital Proficiency and Teleaudiology: Key Implications in Hearing Care2020In: The Hearing Journal®, ISSN 0745-7472, Vol. 73, no 9, p. 18-20Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Ratanjee-Vanmali, Husmita
    et al.
    University of Pretoria (UP), Hearing Research Clinic, South Africa.
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    International Journal of Audiology, South Africa.
    Laplante-Levesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Implementing a Hybrid Model of Online and In-person Audiology Care2020In: The Hearing Journal®, ISSN 0745-7472, Vol. 73, no 8, p. 16-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Ratanjee-Vanmali, Husmita
    et al.
    University of Pretoria (UP), South Africa; Hearing Research Clinic, South Africa.
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    University of Pretoria (UP), South Africa.
    Laplante-Levesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Optimizing Audiology Websites to Increase Patient Reach2020In: The Hearing Journal®, ISSN 0745-7472, Vol. 73, no 7, p. 31-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Reichenberg, Monica
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thunberg, Gunilla
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Holmer, Emil
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Palmqvist, Lisa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Jenny
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundälv, Mats
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Mühlenbock, Katarina
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Will an app-based reading intervention change how teachers rate their teaching self-efficacy beliefs?: A test of social cognitive theory in Swedish special educational settings2023In: Frontiers in Education, E-ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 8, article id 1184719Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Educational researchers have challenged Bandura’s prediction that self-efficacy beliefs tend to be established early in learning and that once set, self-efficacy beliefs persist unless a critical event causes them to be reevaluated. However, the results have been mixed in previous research, including being positive, negative, and unchanged. In response, we evaluated how 75 teachers (i.e., special educators) rate their teaching self-efficacy beliefs in motivating student reading and adapting reading instruction at two time points. All teachers taught students with an intellectual disability, communication difficulties, and poor reading skills. The teachers participated in a workshop to learn teaching reading strategies with apps under various conditions (comprehension strategies, phonemic strategies, or both comprehension and phonemic strategies). We analyzed teacher self-efficacy beliefs at two time points with a 12-week span (pre-and postintervention). First, we developed measures of teacher self-efficacy through confirmatory factor analyses. Next, we analyzed the data with multiple imputation and mixed linear regression with difference-in-differences (DiD). The results indicated no statistically significant treatment effect on teachers’ rating of their teaching self-efficacy beliefs. We conclude that our results agree with Bandura’s original prediction and thus, his social cognitive theory.

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  • 47.
    Ritoša, Andrea
    et al.
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    Department of Psychology, Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Granlund, Mats
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Profiles of State and Trait Engagement of Preschool Children2023In: Early Education and Development, ISSN 1040-9289, E-ISSN 1556-6935Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research Findings: This study examined the engagement of 494 preschool children in Sweden (M = 53.44 months, SD = 10.64) using both teacher questionnaires to measure global engagement (trait) and observations to measure momentary engagement (state). Using a person-oriented approach with cluster analysis, we identified five distinct profiles of global and momentary engagement, with four of them showing discrepancies between global and observed engagement levels. We found that age, hyperactivity, and second language learner (SLL) status were related to a specific engagement profile. Specifically, children high in hyperactivity tended to be in clusters with higher momentary engagement than global engagement, whereas second language learners were overrepresented in clusters with lower momentary engagement. Practice or Policy: The findings suggest that global and observed measures of engagement capture different aspects of children’s engagement and should not be used interchangeably. Children with low engagement ratings on both measures of engagement are more likely to have an extreme score on the global engagement measure, indicating that difficulties they experience will be more noticeable in their global engagement. On the other hand, displays of high levels of momentary engagement could signal children’s inherent potential, prompting tailored encouragement and support within Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) settings and promoting their overall engagement levels.

  • 48.
    Rudner, Mary
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Holmer, Emil
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division.
    Ease of Language Undestanding in deaf and hard of hearing children: Sign language and reading2022In: Tendencias actuales en la investigación en lenguaje escrito y sordera / [ed] Ana Belén, Domínguez Gutiérrez-Mariana Valmaseda & Carmela Velasco Alonso, Salamanca: Ediciones Universidad de Salamanca , 2022, 1, p. 87-101Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is an empirical study, preceded by a corresponding review of the state of the art, to demonstrate that, as suggested by the notion of multimodal language processing in the ELU model, an intervention basedon training the connection between sign language and reading can be a very useful method to improve word reading among children who are def or hard of hearing who know sign language.

  • 49.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Holmer, Emil
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Ease of Language Understanding Model2022In: The Cambridge Handbook of Working Memory and Language, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2022, p. 197-218Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To conceptualize the communicative role of working memory (WM), the Ease-of-Language Understanding (ELU) model was proposed (e.g., Rönnberg, 2003; Rönnberg et al., 2008, 2013, 2019, 2020). The model states that ease of language understanding is determined by the speed and accuracy with which the signal is matched to existing multimodal language representations. When matching is fast and complete, language understanding is effortless; this process may be facilitated by predictions based on the contents of WM. However, when the contents of the language signal mismatches with existing representations, WM is triggered to access knowledge in semantic long-term memory (SLTM) and personal experience from episodic long-term memory (ELTM) – promoting inference-making and postdictions in WM. The interplay between WM and LTM is fundamental to language understanding; its efficiency becomes apparent in adverse conditions and its breakdown may explain cognitive decline and dementia. Empirical support, limitations, and future studies will be discussed.

  • 50.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sharma, Anu
    Univ Colorado, CO 80309 USA.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research Division. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Campbell, Tom A.
    Tampere Univ, Finland.
    Sorqvist, Patrik
    Univ Gavle, Sweden.
    Editorial: Cognitive hearing science: Investigating the relationship between selective attention and brain activity2022In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, Vol. 16, article id 1098340Article in journal (Other academic)
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