liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Arsenovic, Jasenko
    et al.
    Karlstad University, CTF, Service Research Center, Sweden.
    De Keyser, Arne
    EDHEC Business School, Department of Marketing, France.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, CTF, Service Research Center, Sweden; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, CTF, Service Research Center, Sweden; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Gruber, Thorsten
    Loughborough University, Centre for Service Management (CSM), United Kingdom.
    Justice (is not the same) for all: The role of relationship activity for post-recovery outcomes2021In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 134, p. 342-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the widespread adoption of the justice framework in service recovery literature, research findings vary as to what dimension - distributive, interactional, procedural - is most important. This paper contributes to this debate by considering how an easily accessible variable like relationship activity (i.e., the frequency of visiting and purchasing from a company) moderates the impact of the justice dimensions on post-recovery customer outcomes. Findings show that distributive justice is the only dimension impacting word-of-mouth (WOM) and repurchase behavior for low- and medium-relationship-activity customer segments. For a high-relationship- activity segment, all justice dimensions have a positive and balanced impact on WOM and/or repurchase behavior. This research demonstrates the potential of a segmented approach for recovery, while also providing managers with valuable insights into how they can use readily available information to adapt their service re- covery efforts.

  • 2.
    Arsenovic, Jasenko
    et al.
    SDA Bocconi, Milan, Italy.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Service Research Centre, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; 4 5 SDA Bocconi, Milan, Italy Service Research Centre, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden Inland Norway University of Applied Science, Elverum, Norway.
    Otterbring, Tobias
    Department of Management, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway; Institute of Retail Economics, Regeringsgatan 60, 103 29 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Service Research Centre, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; 4 5 SDA Bocconi, Milan, Italy Service Research Centre, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Inland Norway University of Applied Science, Elverum, Norway.
    Money for Nothing: The Impact of Compensation on Customers’ Bad-Mouthing in Service Recovery Encounters2022In: Marketing letters, ISSN 0923-0645, E-ISSN 1573-059X, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 69-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As one of the retailer’s most potent recovery tactics to offset disgruntled customers, firms invest heavily in compensation to increase customer satisfaction and improve loyalty. How- ever, the effectiveness of this tactic remains unclear. This study examines whether firm-offered compensation affects customers’ emotional responses and bad-mouthing behavior (i.e., tell- ing others about a particular problem). Importantly, the study investigates whether the level of collaboration during the recovery encounter moderates the link between compensation and customers’ emotional responses, and whether collaborative efforts influence the effectiveness of compensation. The findings indicate that collaboration during the recovery encounter is nec- essary if compensation is to mitigate negative emotional responses, with downstream effects on bad-mouthing behavior. In confirming the importance of collaboration during recovery encounters, the findings have critical managerial and financial implications.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Arsenovic, Jasenko
    et al.
    Centrum för Tjänsteforskning (CTF), Service Research Center, Karlstad University, 651 88 Karlstad, Sweden;.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Centrum för Tjänsteforskning (CTF), Service Research Center, Karlstad University, 651 88 Karlstad, Sweden;;Department of Marketing, Inland Norway University of Applied Science, 2411 Elverum, Norway;.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Centrum för Tjänsteforskning (CTF), Service Research Center, Karlstad University, 651 88 Karlstad, Sweden;;Department of Marketing, Inland Norway University of Applied Science, 2411 Elverum, Norway.
    Moving Toward Collaborative Service Recovery: A Multiactor Orientation2019In: Service Science, ISSN 2164-3962, E-ISSN 2164-3970, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 201-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service recovery research has traditionally beenfirm-centric, focusing primarilyon the time and effort expended byfirms in addressing service failures. The subsequentshift to a customer-centric orientation addressed the customer’s role in recovery situations,and the recent dyadic orientation has explored the effectiveness of their joint efforts.However, earlier conceptualizations failed to take adequate account of the complexity ofservice recovery encounters in which multiple actors collaborate and integrate resources.This study explores how multiactor collaborations influence the customer’s experience ofservice recovery by adopting a multiactor orientation and by applying service-dominantlogic. After reviewing the customer experience literature, a collaborative recovery expe-rience framework is developed that emphasizes the joint efforts of multiple actors andcustomers to achieve a favorable recovery experience. In a contextualization, the usefulnessof the new framework to explain customer experiences in collaborative service processes isshown. Finally, further research avenues are proposed.

  • 4.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Inland Norway University.
    Sörhammar, David
    Stockholm University.
    Sklyar, Alexey
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Digital servitization: How data-driven services drive transformation2022In: Proceedings of the 55th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The infusion of data-driven services in manufacturing provides new opportunities for long-term competitive advantage; however, it also poses new challenges and entails tradeoffs among strategic options. Digital servitization changes intra-firm processes and customer relationships as well as overall ecosystem dynamics. Drawing on an extensive study of ABB Marine & Ports, a market-leading systems integrator, the concept of digital servitization is examined by analyzing its key characteristics, including opportunities and challenges for manufacturers. The resource integration patterns that connect actors and the dual role of technology in both increasing resource integration complexity and in facilitating the coordination of complexity are discussed. Advancing digital servitization requires fostering service-centricity and executing strategic change initiatives for both the internal organization and the broader ecosystem. Firms must undertake three interlinked changes: (1) digital, (2) organizational, and (3) ecosystem transformations. In addition to contributing to the service literature, these findings provide actionable insights for managers.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    et al.
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway; CTF – Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Sklyar, Alexey
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sörhammar, David
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Transformational shifts through digital servitization2020In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 89, p. 293-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturers increasingly look to digitalization to drive service growth. However, success is far from guaranteed, and many firms focus too much on technology. Adopting a discovery-oriented, theories-in-use approach, this study examines the strategic organizational shifts that underpin digital servitization. Notwithstanding strong managerial and academic interest, this link between digitalization and servitization is still under-investigated. Depth interviews with senior executives and managers from a global market leader revealed that to achieve digital service-led growth, a firm and its network need to make three interconnected shifts: (1) from planning to discovery, (2) from scarcity to abundance, and (3) from hierarchy to partnership. Organizational identity, dematerialization, and collaboration play a key role in this transformation. For managers, the study identifies a comprehensive set of strategic change initiatives needed to ensure successful digital servitization. Highlights: • Three strategic organizational shifts are needed for digital servitization success. • The key role of organizational identity, dematerialization, and collaboration • Digital servitization requires changes within both the firm and its entire network. • New business models centered around big data are driving competitive advantage. • Agile mindset and ways of working are imperative for digital servitization.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Tóth, Zsófia
    et al.
    Durham University Business School, Durham University.
    Sklyar, Alexey
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Hanken Sch Econ, Finland.
    Sörhammar, David
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    CREDS – Center for Research on Digitalization and Sustainability, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences; CTF – Service Research Center, Karlstad University.
    Wirths, Oliver
    Department of Business Policy and Logistics, University of Cologne.
    Tensions in digital servitization through a paradox lens2022In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 102, p. 438-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two of the most disruptive changes in todays business markets are servitization and digitalization. Their increasing convergence into digital servitization leads to tensions both within and between organizations. The authors investigate such intra-and interorganizational tensions by applying a paradox theory lens. The study draws on 56 depth interviews and multiple site visits from two cases in the aerospace and maritime industries. Linked to the paradoxes of organizing, learning, belonging, and performing, eight tensions emerge from the findings. The intra-organizational tensions include digitally enabled control, digital upkeep, professional identity, and performance priorities. In turn, the interorganizational tensions comprise platform-based coopetition, information superabundance, organizational identity, and data utilization. For practitioners working with digital services, this study suggests an audit of tensions to inform continued formulations of a mitigation strategy.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Open Access file
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf