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  • 1.
    Schulman, H.
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Niward, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Abate, E.
    Univ Gondar, Ethiopia; Ethiopian Publ Hlth Inst, Ethiopia.
    Idh, Jonna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Axenram, P.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bornefall, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Forsgren, S.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jakobsson, J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öhrling, C.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kron, M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Diro, E.
    Univ Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Kebede, A. Getachew
    Addis Ababa Univ, Ethiopia.
    Paues, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Bruchfeld, J.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Wejse, C.
    Indepth Network, Guinea Bissau; Aarhus Univ Hosp, Denmark; Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Stendahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schön, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sedimentation rate and suPAR in relation to disease activity and mortality in patients with tuberculosis2019In: The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, ISSN 1027-3719, E-ISSN 1815-7920, Vol. 23, no 11, p. 1155-1161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE : To investigate how levels of the soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) correlate with disease activity and prognosis in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). DESIGN: This was a retrospective analysis of patients with active PTB (n = 500) in Gondar, Ethiopia, for whom the suPAR (n = 301) and ESR (n = 330) were analysed at the start of treatment. Both biomarkers were available for 176 patients. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status, chest X-ray (CXR) findings, classification according to the clinical TBscore and treatment outcome were all recorded. RESULTS : In a multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex and HIV status, surrogate markers of disease activity such as advanced CXR patterns correlated with increased levels of suPAR (adjusted OR [aOR] 8.24, Pamp;lt; 0.001) and of ESR (aOR 1.63, P = 0.030), whereas ESR only correlated significantly with a TBscore amp;gt;6 points. Increased levels of both suPAR and ESR were associated with unsuccessful treatment outcomes (aOR 2.93, P = 0.013; aOR 2.52, P = 0.025). The highest quartile of suPAR (aOR 13.3, P = 0.029) but not ESR levels correlated independently with increased mortality. CONCLUSION: SuPAR and ESR levels correlate with disease activity in PTB; however, the clinical role of these potentially prognostic biomarkers needs to be verified in prospective studies.

  • 2.
    Tran, Dien M.
    et al.
    Vietnam National Children’s Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam,.
    Larsson, Mattias
    Training and Research Academic Collaboration Sweden-Vietnam / Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Olson, Linus
    Training and Research Academic Collaboration Sweden-Vietnam / Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Hoang, Ngoc T.B.
    Vietnam National Children’s Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Le, Ngai K.
    Vietnam National Children’s Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam / Training and Research Academic Collaboration Sweden-Vietnam.
    Khu, Dung T.K.
    Vietnam National Children’s Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam / Training and Research Academic Collaboration Sweden-Vietnam.
    Nguyen, Hung D.
    St Paul Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Vu, Tam V.
    Uong Bi Hospital, Quang Ninh, Vietnam.
    Trinh, Tinh H.
    Binh Dinh General Hospital, Vietnam.
    Le, Thinh Q.
    Children’s Hospital 1, Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam.
    Phan, Phuong T.T.
    Phu San Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Nguyen, Binh G.
    Bach Mai Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Pham, Nhung H.
    Bach Mai Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Mai, Bang H.
    108 Military Central Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Nguyen, Tuan V.
    108 Military Central Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Nguyen, Phuong T.K.
    108 Military Central Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Le, Nhan D.
    Da Nang General Hospital, Vietnam.
    Huynh, Tuan M.
    University Medical Clinic, HCMC, Vietnam.
    Thu, Le T.H.
    Cho Ray Hospital, HCMC, Vietnam.
    Thanh, Tran Chi
    Training and Research Academic Collaboration Sweden-Vietnam.
    Berglund, Björn
    Vietnam National Children’s Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam / St Paul Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Nilsson, Lennart E.
    Vietnam National Children’s Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam / St Paul Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Bornefall, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Song, Le H.
    108 Military Central Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases. Training and Research Academic Collaboration Sweden-Vietnam.
    High prevalence of colonisation with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae among patients admitted to Vietnamese hospitals: Risk factors and burden of disease2019In: Journal of Infection, ISSN 0163-4453, E-ISSN 1532-2742, Vol. 79, no 2, p. 115-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) is an increasing problem worldwide, but particularly problematic in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) due to limitations of resources for surveillance of CRE and infection prevention and control (IPC).

    Methods

    A point prevalence survey (PPS) with screening for colonisation with CRE was conducted on 2233 patients admitted to neonatal, paediatric and adult care at 12 Vietnamese hospitals located in northern, central and southern Vietnam during 2017 and 2018. CRE colonisation was determined by culturing of faecal specimens on selective agar for CRE. Risk factors for CRE colonisation were evaluated. A CRE admission and discharge screening sub-study was conducted among one of the most vulnerable patient groups; infants treated at an 80-bed Neonatal ICU from March throughout June 2017 to assess CRE acquisition, hospital-acquired infection (HAI) and treatment outcome.

    Results

    A total of 1165 (52%) patients were colonised with CRE, most commonly Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=805), Escherichia coli (n=682) and Enterobacter spp. (n=61). Duration of hospital stay, HAI and treatment with a carbapenem were independent risk factors for CRE colonisation. The PPS showed that the prevalence of CRE colonisation increased on average 4.2 % per day and mean CRE colonisation rates increased from 13% on the day of admission to 89% at day 15 of hospital stay. At the NICU CRE colonisation increased from 32% at admission to 87% at discharge, mortality was significantly associated (OR 5•5, P < 0•01) with CRE colonisation and HAI on admission.

    Conclusion

    These data indicate that there is an epidemic spread of CRE in Vietnamese hospitals with rapid transmission to hospitalised patients.

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