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  • 1.
    Chibani, Zohra
    et al.
    Univ Sfax, Tunisia.
    Abid, Imen Zone
    Univ Sfax, Tunisia.
    Molbaek, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    Feki, Jamel
    Univ Sfax, Tunisia.
    Hmani-Aifa, Mounira
    Univ Sfax, Tunisia.
    Novel BEST1 gene mutations associated with two different forms of macular dystrophy in Tunisian families2019In: Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology, ISSN 1442-6404, E-ISSN 1442-9071, Vol. 47, no 8, p. 1063-1073Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Epidemiological studies of hereditary eye diseases allowed us to identify two Tunisian families suffering from macular dystrophies: Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) and autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy (ARB). The purpose of the current study was to investigate the clinical characteristics and the underlying genetics of these two forms of macular dystrophy.

    Methods

    Complete ophthalmic examination was performed including optical coherence tomography, electroretinography, electrooculography and autofluoresence imaging in all patients. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood collected from patients and family members.

    Results

    Sanger sequencing of all exons of the BEST1 gene in both families identified two new mutations: a missense mutation c.C91A [p.L31 M] at the N‐terminal transmembrane domain within the ARB family and a nonsense mutation C1550G (p.S517X) in the C‐terminal domain segregating in the BVMD family.

    Conclusions

    Several mutations of the BEST1 gene have been reported which are responsible for numerous ocular pathologies. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time we report mutations in this gene in Tunisian families presenting different forms of macular dystrophy. Our report also expands the list of pathogenic BEST1 genotypes and the associated clinical diagnosis.

  • 2.
    Harnevik, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fjellstedt, Erik
    Department of Nephrology and Transplantation, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Molbæk, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Denneberg, Torsten
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Urology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mutation analysis of SLC7A9 in cystinuria patients in Sweden2003In: Genetic Testing, ISSN 1090-6576, E-ISSN 1557-7473, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 13-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by increased urinary excretion of cystine and dibasic amino acids, which cause recurrent stone formation in affected individuals. Three subtypes of cystinuria have been described (type I, II, and III): type I is caused by mutations in the SLC3A1 gene, whereas non-type I (II and III) has been associated with SLC7A9 mutations. Of the 53 patients reported in our previous work, patients that showed SLC7A9 mutations in single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) screening and/or either lacked or showed heterozygosity for SLC3A1 mutations were included in the present study. The entire coding region and the exon/intron boundaries of the SLC7A9 gene were analyzed by means of both SSCP and DNA sequencing in 16 patients, all but one of which were clinically diagnosed as homozygous cystinurics. Three novel SLC7A9 mutations were identified in the patient group: two missense mutations (P261L and V330M), and one single base-pair deletion (1009 delA). We also detected the previously reported A182T and nine novel polymorphisms in the patients. Mutations V330M and 1009delA occurred on different alleles in one individual, and we suggest that these mutations cause cystinuria in this patient. One patient that was homozygously mutated in the SLC3A1 gene carried the third novel mutation (P261L). We conclude that SLC3A1 is still the major disease gene among Swedish cystinuria patients, with only a minor contribution of SLC7A9 mutations as the genetic basis of cystinuria. The absence of SLC3A1 and SLC7A9 mutations in a substantial proportion of the patients implies that mutations in parts of the genes that were not analyzed may be present, as well as large deletions that escape detection by the methods used. However, our results raise the question of whether other, as yet unknown genes, may also be involved in cystinuria.

  • 3.
    Harnevik, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fjellstedt, Erik
    Department of Internal Medicine, Motala Hospital, Motala, Sweden.
    Molbæk, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tiselius, Hans-Göran
    Department of Urology, University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Denneberg, Torsten
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Urology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Identification of 12 novel mutations in the SLC3A1 gene in Swedish cystinuria patients2001In: Human Mutation, ISSN 1059-7794, E-ISSN 1098-1004, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 516-525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive disorder that affects luminal transport of cystine and dibasic amino acids in the kidneys and the small intestine. Three subtypes of cystinuria can be defined biochemically, and the classical form (type I) has been associated with mutations in the amino acid transporter gene SLC3A1. The mutations detected in SLC3A1 tend to be population specific and have not been previously investigated in Sweden. We have screened the entire coding sequence and the intron/exon boundaries of the SLC3A1 gene in 53 cystinuria patients by means of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and DNA sequencing. We identified 12 novel mutations (a 2 bp deletion, one splice site mutation, and 10 missense mutations) and detected another three mutations that were previously reported. Five polymorphisms were also identified, four of which were formerly described. The most frequent mutation in this study was the previously reported M467T and it was also detected in the normal population with an allelic frequency of 0.5%. Thirty-seven patients were homozygous for mutations in the SLC3A1 gene and another seven were heterozygous which implies that other genes may be involved in cystinuria. Future investigation of the non-type I cystinuria gene SLC7A9 may complement our results but recent studies also suggest the presence of other potential disease genes.

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