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  • 1.
    Ali, Zaheer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mukwaya, Anthonny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Biesemeier, Antje
    Univ Tubingen, Germany.
    Ntzouni, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ramskold, Daniel
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Giatrellis, Sarantis
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Mammadzada, Parviz
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Cao, Renhai
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lennikov, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Missouri, MO 65211 USA.
    Marass, Michele
    Max Planck Inst Lung and Heart Res, Germany.
    Gerri, Claudia
    Max Planck Inst Lung and Heart Res, Germany.
    Hildesjö, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Taylor, Michael
    Univ Wisconsin, WI 53706 USA.
    Deng, Qiaolin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Peebo, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping. Bayer AB, Sweden.
    del Peso, Luis
    Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain; Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas Alberto Sols, CSIC-UAM Madrid, Spain.
    Kvanta, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Rickard
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Schraermeyer, Ulrich
    Univ Tubingen, Germany.
    Andre, Helder
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Steffensen, John F.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kele, Julianna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Univ Autonoma Madrid, Spain; UAM, Spain.
    Intussusceptive Vascular Remodeling Precedes Pathological Neovascularization2019In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 1402-1418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective—

    Pathological neovascularization is crucial for progression and morbidity of serious diseases such as cancer, diabetic retinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration. While mechanisms of ongoing pathological neovascularization have been extensively studied, the initiating pathological vascular remodeling (PVR) events, which precede neovascularization remains poorly understood. Here, we identify novel molecular and cellular mechanisms of preneovascular PVR, by using the adult choriocapillaris as a model.

    Approach and Results—

    Using hypoxia or forced overexpression of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) in the subretinal space to induce PVR in zebrafish and rats respectively, and by analyzing choriocapillaris membranes adjacent to choroidal neovascular lesions from age-related macular degeneration patients, we show that the choriocapillaris undergo robust induction of vascular intussusception and permeability at preneovascular stages of PVR. This PVR response included endothelial cell proliferation, formation of endothelial luminal processes, extensive vesiculation and thickening of the endothelium, degradation of collagen fibers, and splitting of existing extravascular columns. RNA-sequencing established a role for endothelial tight junction disruption, cytoskeletal remodeling, vesicle- and cilium biogenesis in this process. Mechanistically, using genetic gain- and loss-of-function zebrafish models and analysis of primary human choriocapillaris endothelial cells, we determined that HIF (hypoxia-induced factor)-1α-VEGF-A-VEGFR2 signaling was important for hypoxia-induced PVR.

    Conclusions—

    Our findings reveal that PVR involving intussusception and splitting of extravascular columns, endothelial proliferation, vesiculation, fenestration, and thickening is induced before neovascularization, suggesting that identifying and targeting these processes may prevent development of advanced neovascular disease in the future.

    Visual Overview—

    An online visual overview is available for this article.

  • 2.
    Harada, Fumiya
    et al.
    Health Science University of Hokkaido, Japan; Taipei Medical University, Taiwan.
    Morikawa, Tetsuro
    Health Science University of Hokkaido, Japan.
    Lennikov, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Far Eastern Federal University, Russia.
    Mukwaya, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schaupper, Mira
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Uehara, Osamu
    Health Science University of Hokkaido, Japan.
    Takai, Rie
    Health Science University of Hokkaido, Japan.
    Yoshida, Koki
    Health Science University of Hokkaido, Japan.
    Sato, Jun
    Health Science University of Hokkaido, Japan.
    Horie, Yukihiro
    Hokkaido University, Japan.
    Sakaguchi, Hiroyuki
    FUJIFILM Corp, Japan.
    Wu, Ching-Zong
    Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taiwan; Lotung Poh Ai Hospital, Taiwan.
    Abiko, Yoshihiro
    Health Science University of Hokkaido, Japan.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Kitaichi, Nobuyoshi
    Hokkaido University, Japan; Health Science University of Hokkaido Hospital, Japan.
    Protective Effects of Oral Astaxanthin Nanopowder against Ultraviolet-Induced Photokeratitis in Mice2017In: Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, ISSN 1942-0900, E-ISSN 1942-0994, article id 1956104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. Astaxanthin (AST) has a strong antioxidant cellular membrane chaperone protective effect. Recently, a water-soluble nanosized AST (nano-AST) form was produced, which is expected to improve the efficacy of oral intake effects. The purpose of this study was to examine whether oral nano-AST has therapeutic effects on UV-induced photokeratitis in mice. Methods. C57BL/6 mice were administered twice with either nano-AST, AST oil, lutein, or bilberry extracts 3 hours before and shortly before UV irradiation (dose: 400 mJ/cm2). The corneas were collected 24 hours after irradiation and stained with Hamp;E and TUNEL. NF-kappa B, dihydroethidium (DHE), COX-2, p-I kappa B-alpha, TNF alpha, and CD45 expression were evaluated through immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and qPCR. Results. Corneal epithelium was significantly thicker in mice orally administered with nano-AST than in the others (p amp;lt; 0.01), with significantly less NF-kappa B nucleus translocation (p amp;lt; 0.001), and significantly fewer TUNEL cells (p amp;lt; 0.01). Weaker DHE signals were detected in the nano-AST group (p amp;lt; 0.05) relative to the others. Furthermore, reduced inflammation and decreased cell death in corneal tissue were observed in the nano-AST group, as indicated by a reduction in the expression of COX-2, p-I kappa B-alpha, TNFa, and CD45. Conclusions. Oral administration of nano-AST demonstrated a protective effect on UV-induced photokeratitis via antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic activity.

  • 3.
    Lennikov, Anton
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Laboratory of Biomedical Cell Technologies, School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok, Russia.
    Mirabelli, Pierfrancesco
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Mukwaya, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schaupper, Mira
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thangavelu, Muthukumar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lachota, Mieszko
    Department of Immunology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.
    Ali, Zaheer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Selective IKK2 inhibitor IMD0354 disrupts NF-kappa B signaling to suppress corneal inflammation and angiogenesis2018In: Angiogenesis, ISSN 0969-6970, E-ISSN 1573-7209, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 267-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corneal neovascularization is a sight-threatening condition caused by angiogenesis in the normally avascular cornea. Neovascularization of the cornea is often associated with an inflammatory response, thus targeting VEGF-A alone yields only a limited efficacy. The NF-kappa B signaling pathway plays important roles in inflammation and angiogenesis. Here, we study consequences of the inhibition of NF-kappa B activation through selective blockade of the IKK complex I kappa B kinase beta (IKK2) using the compound IMD0354, focusing on the effects of inflammation and pathological angiogenesis in the cornea. In vitro, IMD0354 treatment diminished HUVEC migration and tube formation without an increase in cell death and arrested rat aortic ring sprouting. In HUVEC, the IMD0354 treatment caused a dose-dependent reduction in VEGF-A expression, suppressed TNF alpha-stimulated expression of chemokines CCL2 and CXCL5, and diminished actin filament fibers and cell filopodia formation. In developing zebrafish embryos, IMD0354 treatment reduced expression of Vegf-a and disrupted retinal angiogenesis. In inflammation-induced angiogenesis in the rat cornea, systemic selective IKK2 inhibition decreased inflammatory cell invasion, suppressed CCL2, CXCL5, Cxcr2, and TNF-alpha expression and exhibited anti-angiogenic effects such as reduced limbal vessel dilation, reduced VEGF-A expression and reduced angiogenic sprouting, without noticeable toxic effect. In summary, targeting NF-kappa B by selective IKK2 inhibition dampened the inflammatory and angiogenic responses in vivo by modulating the endothelial cell expression profile and motility, thus indicating an important role of NF-kappa B signaling in the development of pathologic corneal neovascularization.

  • 4.
    Mirabelli, Pierfrancesco
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Mukwaya, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lennikov, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Xeroudaki, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Peebo, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Schaupper, Mira
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Genome-wide expression differences in anti-Vegf and dexamethasone treatment of inflammatory angiogenesis in the rat cornea2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 7616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Angiogenesis as a pathological process in the eye can lead to blindness. In the cornea, suppression of angiogenesis by anti-VEGF treatment is only partially effective while steroids, although effective in treating inflammation and angiogenesis, have broad activity leading to undesirable side effects. In this study, genome-wide expression was investigated in a suture-induced corneal neovascularization model in rats, to investigate factors differentially targeted by dexamethasone and anti-Vegf. Topical treatment with either rat-specific anti-Vegf, dexamethasone, or normal goat IgG (sham) was given to sutured corneas for 48 hours, after which in vivo imaging, tissue processing for RNA microarray, and immunofluorescence were performed. Dexamethasone suppressed limbal vasodilation (P amp;lt; 0.01) and genes in PI3K-Akt, focal adhesion, and chemokine signaling pathways more effectively than anti-Vegf. The most differentially expressed genes were confirmed by immunofluorescence, qRTPCR and Western blot. Strong suppression of Reg3g and the inflammatory chemokines Ccl2 and Cxcl5 and activation of classical complement pathway factors C1r, C1s, C2, and C3 occurred with dexamethasone treatment, effects absent with anti-Vegf treatment. The genome-wide results obtained in this study provide numerous potential targets for specific blockade of inflammation and angiogenesis in the cornea not addressed by anti-Vegf treatment, as possible alternatives to broad-acting immunosuppressive therapy.

  • 5.
    Mukwaya, Anthonny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mirabelli, Pierfrancesco
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lennikov, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Missouri, MO USA.
    Thangavelu, Muthukumar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Chonbuk Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Peebo, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping. Sorlandet Hosp Arendal, Norway.
    Repeat Corneal Neovascularization is Characterized by More Aggressive Inflammation and Vessel Invasion Than in the Initial Phase2019In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 60, no 8, p. 2990-3001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Treatment of corneal neovascularization can lead to vessel regression and recovery of corneal transparency. Here, we examined the response of the cornea to a repeated stimulus after initial vessel regression comparing the second wave of neovascularization with the first.

    Methods: Corneal neovascularization was induced by surgical suture placement in the rat cornea for 7 days, followed by suture removal and a 30-day regression period. Corneas were then re-sutured and examined for an additional 4 days. Longitudinal slit-lamp imaging, in vivo confocal microscopy, and microarray analysis of global gene expression was conducted to assess the inflammatory and neovascularization response. Inhibitory effect of topical dexamethasone for repeat neovascularization was assessed.

    Results: After initial robust neovascularization, 30 days of regression resulted in the recovery of corneal transparency; however, a population of barely functional persistent vessels remained at the microscopic level. Upon re-stimulation, inflammatory cell invasion, persistent vessel dilation, vascular invasion, and gene expression of VegfaIl1βIl6Ccl2Ccl3, and Cxcl2 all doubled relative to initial neovascularization. Repeat neovascularization occurred twice as rapidly as initially, with activation of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species, matrix metalloproteinase, and leukocyte extravasation signaling pathways, and suppression of anti-inflammatory LXR/RXR signaling. While inhibiting initial neovascularization, a similar treatment course of dexamethasone did not suppress repeat neovascularization.

    Conclusions: Persistent vessels remaining after the initial resolution of neovascularization can rapidly reactivate to facilitate more aggressive inflammation and repeat neovascularization, highlighting the importance of achieving and confirming complete vessel regression after an initial episode of corneal neovascularization.

  • 6.
    Mukwaya, Anthony
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lennikov, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Xeroudaki, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Mirabelli, Pierfrancesco
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lachota, Mieszko
    Department of Immunology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Peebo, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Time-dependent LXR/RXR pathway modulation characterizes capillary remodeling in inflammatory corneal neovascularization2018In: Angiogenesis, ISSN 0969-6970, E-ISSN 1573-7209, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 395-413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammation in the normally immune-privileged cornea can initiate a pathologic angiogenic response causing vision-threatening corneal neovascularization. Inflammatory pathways, however, are numerous, complex and are activated in a time-dependent manner. Effective resolution of inflammation and associated angiogenesis in the cornea requires knowledge of these pathways and their time dependence, which has, to date, remained largely unexplored. Here, using a model of endogenous resolution of inflammation-induced corneal angiogenesis, we investigate the time dependence of inflammatory genes in effecting capillary regression and the return of corneal transparency. Endogenous capillary regression was characterized by a progressive thinning and remodeling of angiogenic capillaries and inflammatory cell retreat in vivo in the rat cornea. By whole-genome longitudinal microarray analysis, early suppression of VEGF ligand-receptor signaling and inflammatory pathways preceded an unexpected later-phase preferential activation of LXR/RXR, PPAR alpha/RXR alpha and STAT3 canonical pathways, with a concurrent attenuation of LPS/IL-1 inhibition of RXR function and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathways. Potent downstream inflammatory cytokines such as Cxcl5, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and Ccl2 were concomitantly downregulated during the remodeling phase. Upstream regulators of the inflammatory pathways included Socs3, Sparc and ApoE. A complex and coordinated time-dependent interplay between pro- and anti-inflammatory signaling pathways highlights a potential anti-inflammatory role of LXR/RXR, PPAR alpha/RXR alpha and STAT3 signaling pathways in resolving inflammatory corneal angiogenesis.

  • 7.
    Mukwaya, Anthony
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindvall, Jessica M.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Xeroudaki, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Peebo, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Ali, Zaheer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lennikov, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    A microarray whole-genome gene expression dataset in a rat model of inflammatory corneal angiogenesis2016In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 3, article id UNSP 160103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In angiogenesis with concurrent inflammation, many pathways are activated, some linked to VEGF and others largely VEGF-independent. Pathways involving inflammatory mediators, chemokines, and micro-RNAs may play important roles in maintaining a pro-angiogenic environment or mediating angiogenic regression. Here, we describe a gene expression dataset to facilitate exploration of pro-angiogenic, pro-inflammatory, and remodelling/normalization-associated genes during both an active capillary sprouting phase, and in the restoration of an avascular phenotype. The dataset was generated by microarray analysis of the whole transcriptome in a rat model of suture-induced inflammatory corneal neovascularisation. Regions of active capillary sprout growth or regression in the cornea were harvested and total RNA extracted from four biological replicates per group. High quality RNA was obtained for gene expression analysis using microarrays. Fold change of selected genes was validated by qPCR, and protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. We provide a gene expression dataset that may be re-used to investigate corneal neovascularisation, and may also have implications in other contexts of inflammation-mediated angiogenesis.

  • 8.
    Mukwaya, Anthony
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mirabelli, Pierfrancesco
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lennikov, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Xeroudaki, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Schaupper, Mira
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Peebo, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Genome-wide expression datasets of anti-VEGF and dexamethasone treatment of angiogenesis in the rat cornea2017In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 4, article id 170111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Therapeutics against pathologic new blood vessel growth, particularly those targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are of enormous clinical interest. In the eye, where anti-VEGF agents are in widespread clinical use for treating retinal and corneal blindness, only partial or transient efficacy and resistance to anti-VEGF agents are among the major drawbacks. Conversely, corticosteroids have long been used in ophthalmology for their potency in suppressing inflammation and angiogenesis, but their broad biological activity can give rise to side effects such as glaucoma and cataract. To aid in the search for more targeted and effective anti-angiogenic therapies in the eye, we present here a dataset comparing gene expression changes in dexamethasone versus anti-Vegfa treatment of inflammation leading to angiogenesis in the rat cornea. Global gene expression analysis with GeneChip Rat 230 2.0 microarrays was conducted and the metadata submitted to Expression Omnibus repository. Here, we present a high-quality validated dataset enabling genome-wide comparison of genes differentially targeted by dexamethasone and anti-Vegf treatments, to identify potential alternative therapeutic targets for evaluation.

  • 9.
    Mukwaya, Anthony
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Peebo, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Xeroudaki, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Ali, Zaheer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lennikov, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Factors regulating capillary remodeling in a reversible model of inflammatory corneal angiogenesis2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, p. 1-15, article id 32137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Newly formed microcapillary networks arising in adult organisms by angiogenic and inflammatory stimuli contribute to pathologies such as corneal and retinal blindness, tumor growth, and metastasis. Therapeutic inhibition of pathologic angiogenesis has focused on targeting the VEGF pathway, while comparatively little attention has been given to remodeling of the new microcapillaries into a stabilized, functional, and persistent vascular network. Here, we used a novel reversible model of inflammatory angiogenesis in the rat cornea to investigate endogenous factors rapidly invoked to remodel, normalize and regress microcapillaries as part of the natural response to regain corneal avascularity. Rapid reversal of an inflammatory angiogenic stimulus suppressed granulocytic activity, enhanced recruitment of remodelling macrophages, induced capillary intussusception, and enriched pathways and processes involving immune cells, chemokines, morphogenesis, axonal guidance, and cell motility, adhesion, and cytoskeletal functions. Whole transcriptome gene expression analysis revealed suppression of numerous inflammatory and angiogenic factors and enhancement of endogenous inhibitors. Many of the identified genes function independently of VEGF and represent potentially new targets for molecular control of the critical process of microvascular remodeling and regression in the cornea.

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