liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Gunnarsson, N.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Hoglund, M.
    University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stenke, L.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sandin, F.
    Regional Cancer Centre, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bjorkholm, M.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Dreimane, Arta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Lambe, M.
    Regional Cancer Centre, Uppsala, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Markevarn, B.
    University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Olsson-Stromberg, U.
    University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wadenvik, H.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Richter, J.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Sjalander, A.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    No increased prevalence of malignancies among first-degree relatives of 800 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia: a population-based study in Sweden2017In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 1825-1827Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 2.
    Gunnarsson, N.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Höglund, M.
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Stenke, L.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wallberg-Jonsson, S.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Sandin, F.
    Regional Cancer Centre, Sweden.
    Björkholm, M.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Dreimane, Arta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Lambe, M.
    Regional Cancer Centre, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Markevarn, B.
    University of Umeå Hospital, Sweden.
    Olsson-Stromberg, U.
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Wadenvik, H.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Richter, J.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Sjalander, A.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Increased prevalence of prior malignancies and autoimmune diseases in patients diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia2016In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 1562-1567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We recently reported an increased incidence of second malignancies in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). To elucidate whether this increase may be linked, not to TKI but rather to a hereditary or acquired susceptibility to develop cancer, we estimated the prevalence of malignancies, autoimmune disease (AD) and chronic inflammatory disease (CID) in CML patients prior to their CML diagnosis. Nationwide population-based registers were used to identify patients diagnosed with CML in Sweden 2002-2012 and to estimate the prevalence of other malignancies, AD and CID prior to their CML diagnosis. For each patient with CML, five matched controls were selected from the general population. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR). Nine hundred and eighty-four CML patients were assessed, representing more than 45 000 person-years of follow-up. Compared with matched controls, the prevalence of prior malignancies and AD was elevated in CML patients: OR 1.47 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20-1.82) and 1.55 (95% CI 1.21-1.98), respectively. No associations were detected between CML and previous CID. An increased prevalence of other malignancies and AD prior to the diagnosis of CML suggest that a hereditary or acquired predisposition to cancer and/or autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of CML.

  • 3.
    Gunnarsson, Niklas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Stenke, Leif
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hoglund, Martin
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden; University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Sandin, Fredrik
    Regional Cancer Centre, Sweden.
    Bjorkholm, Magnus
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Dreimane, Arta
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lambe, Mats
    Regional Cancer Centre, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Markevarn, Berit
    Umeå University Hospital, Sweden.
    Olsson-Stromberg, Ulla
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden; University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Richter, Johan
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Wadenvik, Hans
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Wallvik, Jonas
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Sjalander, Anders
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Second malignancies following treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia in the tyrosine kinase inhibitor era2015In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 169, no 5, p. 683-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given that tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have dramatically improved the survival of patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), we were interested in examining the possible risk of long-term adverse events, such as the emergence of other neoplasms. Therefore, we studied the development of second malignancies in 868 patients diagnosed with CML between 2002 and 2011 using the Swedish CML register, cross-linked to the Swedish Cancer register. With a median follow-up of 37 (range 0-99)years, 65 (75%) patients developed 75 second malignancies (non-haematological), 52 of which were of the invasive type. Compared to expected rates in the background population, the risk of second malignancies was higher in the CML cohort, with a standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of 152 (95% CI 113-199). The SIR before and after the second year following diagnosis of CML was 158 and 147, respectively. Among specific cancer types, gastrointestinal and nose and throat cancer were significantly increased. Founded on a population-based material, our results indicate that CML patients treated in the TKI era are at an increased risk of developing a second malignancy, with indications that this risk may more likely be linked to CML itself rather than to the TKI treatment.

  • 4.
    Hjorth-Hansen, H.
    et al.
    St Olavs Hospital, Norway; Norwegian University of Science and Technology NTNU, Norway.
    Stentoft, J.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Richter, J.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Koskenvesa, P.
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hoeglund, M.
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Dreimane, Arta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Porkka, K.
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gedde-Dahl, T.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Gjertsen, B. T.
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Gruber, F. X.
    University Hospital North Norway, Norway.
    Stenke, L.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Eriksson, K. M.
    Sunderbysjukhuset, Sweden.
    Markevarn, B.
    Umeå University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lubking, A.
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki University Hospital, Sweden.
    Vestergaard, H.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Udby, L.
    Roskilde Hospital, Denmark.
    Bjerrum, O. W.
    University of Copenhagen Hospital, Denmark.
    Persson, I.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Mustjoki, S.
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki University Hospital, Sweden; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Olsson-Stromberg, U.
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Safety and efficacy of the combination of pegylated interferon-alpha 2b and dasatinib in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients2016In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 30, no 9, p. 1853-1860Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dasatinib (DAS) and interferon-a have antileukemic and immunostimulatory effects and induce deep responses in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We assigned 40 newly diagnosed chronic-phase CML patients to receive DAS 100 mg o.d. followed by addition of pegylated interferon-alpha 2b (PegIFN) after 3 months (M3). The starting dose of PegIFN was 15 mu g/week and it increased to 25 mu g/week at M6 until M15. The combination was well tolerated with manageable toxicity. Of the patients, 84% remained on PegIFN at M12 and 91% (DAS) and 73% (PegIFN) of assigned dose was given. Only one patient had a pleural effusion during first year, and three more during the second year. After introduction of PegIFN we observed a steep increase in response rates. Major molecular response was achieved in 10%, 57%, 84% and 89% of patients at M3, M6, M12 and M18, respectively. At M12, MR4 was achieved by 46% and MR4.5 by 27% of patients. No patients progressed to advanced phase. In conclusion, the combination treatment appeared safe with very promising efficacy. A randomized comparison of DAS +/- PegIFN is warranted.

  • 5.
    Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik
    et al.
    St Olavs Hospital, Norway; Norwegian University of Science and Technology NTNU, Norway.
    Stenke, Leif
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Söderlund, Stina
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Dreimane, Arta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ehrencrona, Hans
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gedde-Dahl, Tobias
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Tore Gjertsen, Bjorn
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Hoglund, Martin
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Koskenvesa, Perttu
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Lotfi, Kourosh
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Majeed, Waleed
    Stavanger University Hospital, Norway.
    Markevarn, Berit
    Umeå University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ohm, Lotta
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Olsson-Stromberg, Ulla
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Remes, Kari
    Turku University, Finland.
    Suominen, Merja
    Kanta Hame Central Hospital, Finland.
    Simonsson, Bengt
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Porkka, Kimmo
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Mustjoki, Satu
    University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Richter, Johan
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Dasatinib induces fast and deep responses in newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukaemia patients in chronic phase: clinical results from a randomised phase-2 study (NordCML006)2015In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 94, no 3, p. 243-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We randomised 46 newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (median age 56) to receive dasatinib 100mg QD or imatinib 400mg QD and report outcome as an intention-to-treat analysis with 36months follow-up. Early cytogenetic and molecular responses were superior in the dasatinib group, with a tendency that imatinib patients caught up with time. For instance, MR3.0 was reached at 3months in 36% vs. 8% (P=0.02), at 12months in 81% vs. 46% (P=0.02) and at 18months in 73% vs. 65% (n.s.) of the patients in the two groups. In contrast, MR4.5 was consistently superior in the dasatinib group at all time points from 6months onwards, reaching 61% vs. 21% (Pless than0.05) at 36months. Sixty-four vs. 71% of the patients in the dasatinib and imatinib arms, respectively, remained on assigned drug. Dasatinib dose was frequently reduced, but with maintained excellent effect. One imatinib patient progressed to blastic phase, but no CML-related deaths occurred. In conclusion, our data compare favourably with those of the dasatinib registration study, DASISION. The fast and deep molecular responses induced by dasatinib compared with imatinib may be exploited to increase the proportion of patients who can achieve a treatment-free remission after treatment discontinuation.

  • 6.
    Hoglund, Martin
    et al.
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Sandin, Fredrik
    Regional Cancer Centre, Sweden .
    Hellstrom, Karin
    Regional Cancer Centre, Sweden .
    Bjoreman, Mats
    University Hospital, Sweden .
    Bjorkholm, Magnus
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Brune, Mats
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Dreimane, Arta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekblom, Marja
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Lehmann, Soren
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Ljungman, Per
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Malm, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Markevarn, Berit
    Umeå University Hospital, Sweden .
    Myhr-Eriksson, Kristina
    Sunderby Luleå Hospital, Sweden .
    Ohm, Lotta
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Olsson-Stromberg, Ulla
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Sjalander, Anders
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Wadenvik, Hans
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Simonsson, Bengt
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Stenke, Leif
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Richter, Johan
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Tyrosine kinase inhibitor usage, treatment outcome, and prognostic scores in CML: report from the population-based Swedish CML registry2013In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 122, no 7, p. 1284-1292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical management guidelines on malignant disorders are generally based on data from clinical trials with selected patient cohorts. In Sweden, more than 95% of all patients diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) are reported to the national CML registry, providing unique possibilities to compile population-based information. This report is based on registry data from 2002 to 2010, when a total of 779 patients (425 men, 354 women; median age, 60 years) were diagnosed with CML (93% chronic, 5% accelerated, and 2% blastic phase) corresponding to an annual incidence of 0.9/100 000. In 2002, approximately half of the patients received a tyrosine kinase inhibitor as initial therapy, a proportion that increased to 94% for younger (andlt;70 years) and 79% for older (andgt;80 years) patients during 2007-2009. With a median follow-up of 61 months, the relative survival at 5 years was close to 1.0 for patients younger than 60 years and 0.9 for those aged 60 to 80 years, but only 0.6 for those older than 80 years. At 12 months, 3% had progressed to accelerated or blastic phase. Sokal, but not European Treatment and Outcome Study, high-risk scores were significantly linked to inferior overall and relative survival. Patients living in university vs nonuniversity catchment areas more often received tyrosine kinase inhibitors up front but showed comparable survival.

  • 7.
    Ilander, M.
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Olsson-Stromberg, U.
    Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Schlums, H.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Guilhot, J.
    CHU Poitiers, France.
    Bruck, O.
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Lahteenmaki, H.
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Kasanen, T.
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Koskenvesa, P.
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Soderlund, S.
    Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hoglund, M.
    Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Markevarn, B.
    Umeå University Hospital, Sweden.
    Sjalander, A.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Lotfi, Kourosh
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Dreimane, Arta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lubking, A.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Holm, E.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bjoreman, M.
    University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lehmann, S.
    Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stenke, L.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ohm, L.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gedde-Dahl, T.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Majeed, W.
    Stavanger University Hospital, Norway.
    Ehrencrona, H.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Koskela, S.
    Finnish Red Cross Blood Serv, Finland.
    Saussele, S.
    Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Mahon, F-X
    University of Bordeaux Segalen, France.
    Porkka, K.
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Hjorth-Hansen, H.
    St Olavs University Hospital, Norway.
    Bryceson, Y. T.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Richter, J.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Mustjoki, S.
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki University Hospital, Finland; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Increased proportion of mature NK cells is associated with successful imatinib discontinuation in chronic myeloid leukemia2017In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 1108-1116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies suggest that a proportion of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients in deep molecular remission can discontinue the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment without disease relapse. In this multi-center, prospective clinical trial (EURO-SKI, NCT01596114) we analyzed the function and phenotype of T and NK cells and their relation to successful TKI cessation. Lymphocyte subclasses were measured from 100 imatinib-treated patients at baseline and 1 month after the discontinuation, and functional characterization of NK and T cells was done from 45 patients. The proportion of NK cells was associated with the molecular relapse-free survival as patients with higher than median NK-cell percentage at the time of drug discontinuation had better probability to stay in remission. Similar association was not found with T or B cells or their subsets. In non-relapsing patients the NK-cell phenotype was mature, whereas patients with more naive CD56(bright) NK cells had decreased relapse-free survival. In addition, the TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma cytokine secretion by NK cells correlated with the successful drug discontinuation. Our results highlight the role of NK cells in sustaining remission and strengthen the status of CML as an immunogenic tumor warranting novel clinical trials with immunomodulating agents.

  • 8.
    Landberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Dreimane, Arta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Rissler, Marianne
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Billstrom, Rolf
    Central Hospital Skovde, Sweden.
    Agerstam, Helena
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Primary cells in BCR/FGFR1-positive 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome are sensitive to dovitinib, ponatinib, and dasatinib2017In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 99, no 5, p. 442-448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesTranslocations involving the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene are associated with the 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome (EMS), a rare neoplasm that following a usually short chronic phase progresses into acute myeloid or lymphoid leukemia. The treatment commonly involves chemotherapy and, if possible, allogeneic stem cell transplantation which is the only therapeutic option for long-term survival. Given the aggressive course of EMS, we here evaluated tyrosine kinase inhibitors as treatment options to delay disease progression. MethodsWe described a new case of EMS and used chromosome analyses, PCR, and sequencing to investigate the underlying genetic aberrations. The sensitivity to several tyrosine kinase inhibitors was tested in vitro on the EMS cell line KG1 and on primary cells from the newly diagnosed EMS patient. ResultsA translocation involving chromosomes 8 and 22 was detected, and a BCR/FGFR1 fusion gene was confirmed and characterized by sequencing. KG1 cells and primary EMS cells displayed distinct sensitivity to dovitinib, ponatinib, and dasatinib as compared to normal bone marrow control cells. ConclusionsThese results suggest that treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be beneficial for patients with EMS during the search for a suitable stem cell donor and for those not eligible for transplantation.

  • 9.
    Richter, Johan
    et al.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Soderlund, Stina
    University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lubking, Anna
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Dreimane, Arta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lotfi, Kourosh
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Markevarm, Berit
    University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sjalander, Anders
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Saussele, Susanne
    Univ Med Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany.
    Olsson-Stromberg, Ulla
    University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stenke, Leif
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Letter: Musculoskeletal Pain in Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia After Discontinuation of Imatinib: A Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Withdrawal Syndrome? in JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, vol 32, issue 25, pp 2821-28232014In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 32, no 25, p. 2821-2823Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 10.
    Söderlund, Stina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Dahlen, Torsten
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sandin, Fredrik
    Regional Cancer Centre Uppsala Örebro, Sweden.
    Olsson-Stromberg, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Creignou, Maria
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Dreimane, Arta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lubking, Anna
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Markevarn, Berit
    Umeå University Hospital, Sweden.
    Sjalander, Anders
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Wadenvik, Hans
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stenke, Leif
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Richter, Johan
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hoglund, Martin
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Advanced phase chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) in the tyrosine kinase inhibitor era - a report from the Swedish CML register2017In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 57-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The primary goal in management of chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is to prevent disease progression to accelerated phase (AP) or blast crisis (BC). We have evaluated progression rates in a decentralised healthcare setting and characterised patients progressing to AP/BC on TKI treatment. Methods: Using data from the Swedish CML register, we identified CP-CML patients diagnosed 2007-2011 who progressed to AP/BC within 2 yrs from diagnosis (n = 18) as well as patients diagnosed in advanced phase during 2007-2012 (n = 36) from a total of 544 newly diagnosed CML cases. We evaluated baseline characteristics, progression rates, outcome and adherence to guidelines for monitoring and treatment. Results: The cumulative progression rate at 2 yrs was 4.3%. All 18 progression cases had been treated with imatinib, and six progressed within 6 months. High-risk EUTOS score was associated to a higher risk of progression. Insufficient cytogenetic and/or molecular monitoring was found in 33%. Median survival after transformation during TKI treatment was 1.4 yrs. In those presenting with BC and AP, median survival was 1.6 yrs and not reached, respectively. Conclusion: In this population-based setting, progression rates appear comparable to that reported from clinical trials, with similar dismal patient outcome. Improved adherence to CML guidelines may minimise the risk of disease progression.

  • 11.
    Tynngård, Nahreen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Boknäs, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Trinks, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Dreimane, Arta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Storage-induced change in platelet transfusion response evaluated by serial transfusions from one donor to one patient2019In: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 723-728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    Storage of platelet concentrates (PCs) results in storage lesions with possible detrimental effects on platelet recovery after transfusion, which might affect their ability to prevent or arrest bleeding. The aim of this study was to compare the quality of PCs stored for 1 to 3 or 5 to 7 days by assessing the corrected count increment (CCI) after transfusion. To isolate the effects of storage time, we studied serial transfusions of PCs obtained from one donor and one donation, and transfused to one single recipient after storage for 1 to 3 days and 5 to 7 days.

    STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS

    Platelets were obtained from one donor by apheresis, divided into two units (>240 × 109platelets/unit) and stored for 1 to 3 and 5 to 7 days, respectively, before transfusion. The PCs were transfused on normal indications to patients undergoing treatment at the hematology ward. Platelet count was measured before and after transfusion.

    RESULTS

    Thirty patients concluded the study according to the protocol. The mean storage time was 2.4 ± 0.7 and 5.7 ± 0.8 days for platelets transfused on Days 1 to 3 and 5 to 7, respectively. Storage for 5 to 7 days decreased the 1‐hour transfusion response as compared to platelets stored 1 to 3 days, from a CCI of 17 ± 7 to 13 ± 5. Despite this decrease, 86% of the 5 to 7 days stored PCs resulted in a CCI above the cutoff value for a successful transfusion of 7.5, which was not significantly different to PCs stored for 1 to 3 days.

    CONCLUSION

    Storage of PCs for 5 to 7 days only slightly altered the transfusion response.

1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf