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  • 1.
    Bergek, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Creative Accumulation: Integrating New and Established Technologies in Periods of Discontinuous Change2011In: Knowledge Integration and Innovation: Critical challenges facing international technology-based firms / [ed] Berggren, C., Bergek, A., Bengtsson, L., Hobday, M., Söderlund, J., Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2011, p. 246-273Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology-based firms continue to compete primarily on innovation, and are continuously required to present new solutions to an exacting market. As technological complexity and specialization intensifies, firms increasingly need to integrate and co-ordinate knowledge by means of project groups, diversified organizations, inter-organizational partnerships, and strategic alliances. Innovation processes have progressively become interdisciplinary, collaborative, inter-organizational, and international, and a firm's ability to synthesize knowledge across disciplines, organizations, and geographical locations has a major influence on its viability and success.This book demonstrates how knowledge integration is crucial in facilitating innovation within modern firms. It provides original, detailed empirical studies of prerequisites, mechanisms, and outcomes of knowledge integration processes on several organizational levels, from key individuals, projects, and internal organizations, to collaboration between firms. It stresses the need to understand knowledge integration as a multi-level phenomenon, which requires a broad repertoire of organizational and technical means. It further clarifies the need for strong internal capabilities for exploiting external knowledge, reveals how costs of knowledge integration affect outcomes and strategic decisions, and discusses the managerial implications of fostering knowledge integration, providing practical guidance and support for managers of knowledge integration in

  • 2.
    Bergek, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hobday, Michael
    CENTRIM (Centre for Research in Innovation Management), University of Brighton.
    Technological discontinuities and the challenge for incumbent firms: Destruction, disruption or creative accumulation?2013In: Research Policy, ISSN 0048-7333, E-ISSN 1873-7625, Vol. 42, no 6-7, p. 1210-1224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The creative destruction of existing industries as a consequence of discontinuous technological change is a central theme in the literature on industrial innovation and technological development. Established competence-based and market-based explanations of this phenomenon argue that incumbents are seriously challenged only by ‘competence-destroying’ or ‘disruptive’ innovations, which make their existing knowledge base or business models obsolete and leave them vulnerable to attacks from new entrants. This paper challenges these arguments. With detailed empirical analyses of the automotive and gas turbine industries, we demonstrate that these explanations overestimate the ability of new entrants to destroy and disrupt established industries and underestimate the capacity of incumbents to perceive the potential of new technologies and integrate them with existing capabilities. Moreover, we show how intense competition in the wake of technological discontinuities, driven entirely by incumbents, may instead result in late industry shakeouts. We develop and extend the notion of ‘creative accumulation’ as a way of conceptualizing the innovating capacity of the incumbents that appear to master such turbulence. Specifically, we argue that creative accumulation requires firms to handle a triple challenge of simultaneously (a) fine-tuning and evolving existing technologies at a rapid pace, (b) acquiring and developing new technologies and resources and (c) integrating novel and existing knowledge into superior products and solutions.

  • 3.
    Berggren, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bergek, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hobday, Mike
    University of Brighton.
    Creative accumulation and disruptive innovation: contrasting cases of technology-induced industrial change2012In: , 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Berggren, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Coordinated policies for electrification of heavy vehicles: a technological innovation systems analysis.2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Less than 10 years ago, Volvo Cars was known for spacious family cars with high levels of safety but fuel consumption well above the EU average. When in 2007, customers started to demand more efficient cars, the company had little to offer and few projects in the pipeline, whereas competitors rapidly launched less-emitting models. Without waiting for formal executive decisions, a team of experienced engineers took the initiative and organized a broad reengineering campaign labeled “DRIVe” (“Drive towards zero”). The basic idea was to build on existing models and platforms and in a very focused process introduce modifications and fuel-saving modules and so launch a low emitting model within less than 12 months. Incentives on various national markets, for example Belgium or the Netherlands were important factors to convince the market organization and get internal acceptance. In 2008, production started of the first DRIVe versions of Volvo’s compact cars with emissions at 119 gram CO2/km, a reduction by 10+ grams. Six months later more advanced versions with start/stop functionality reduced emissions to 104 g/km. DRIVe versions of the larger models followed, and in 2010, production started of a new version of the large V70 DRIVe with fuel consumption reduced to 0.45 l/100 km and emissions to 119 g CO2/km, a 25% improvement. Later in 2010, improved versions S40 and V50 reported emissions at 99 g/km. The flow of rapid reengineering projects continued and in 2014, the team could present the compact V40 model with a new powerful engine, boasting emissions as low as 85gra/km – without the help of any hybrid systems. An important driver of this flow constantly improved models has been the purchasing incentives in the Netherlands which are tightened annually, 88 gram/km in 2013, 85gram/km in 2014, 82gram/km in 2015, etc. Compliance with these levels is critical for success in the Dutch company car segment and has been very effective in setting a target for the DRIVe projects in recent years, and has contributed to Volvo Cars repositioning from fuel consumption well above the EU average to the lowest fuel consumer within its segment. In total, the DRIVe program has delivered 25 improved models from 2008 to 2014. In this paper we analyze its success factors, management particularities and lessons and limitations for other development projects.

  • 5.
    Berggren, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kan man skapa utan att förstöra?: nyskapande vidareutveckling som förenar2015In: Kunskapsintegration och innovation i en internationaliserande ekonomi: slutrapport från ett forskningsprogram / [ed] Hans Andersson, Christian Berggren, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2015, p. 19-31Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Berggren, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Reducing automotive emissions-The potentials of combustion engine technologies and the power of policy2012In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 41, p. 636-643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reducing transport emissions, in particular vehicular emissions, is a key element for mitigating the risks of climate change. In much of the academic and public discourse the focus has been on alternative vehicle technologies and fuels (e.g. electric cars, fuel cells and hydrogen), whereas vehicles based on internal combustion engines have been perceived as close to their development limits. This paper offers a different perspective by demonstrating the accelerated improvement processes taking place in established combustion technologies as a result of a new competition between manufacturers and technologies, encouraged both by more stringent EU legislation and new CAFE levels in the US. The short-term perspective is complemented by an analysis of future improvement potentials in internal combustion technologies, which may be realized if efficient regulation is in place. Based on a comparison of four different regulatory approaches, the paper identifies the need for a long-term technology-neutral framework with stepwise increasing stringencies, arguing that this will encourage continual innovation and diffusion in the most effective way.

  • 7.
    Berggren, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sushandoyo, Dedy
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hybrids, diesel or both? The forgotten technological competition for sustainable solutions in the global automotive industry2009In: International Journal of Automotive Technology and Management, ISSN 1470-9511, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 148-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rising fuel prices and tightening regulations to curb greenhouse gases and other emissions have changed the parameters of competition in the global automotive industry, introducing new uncertainties, increased variation and technological turbulence. Many studies focus on the potential performance of alternative technologies, from fuel cells to battery electric cars. This paper starts from the other end: the competition unfolding in the real marketplace between todays most important fuel-saving technologies: the new gasoline hybrid electric vehicle versus the old but continuously evolving diesel power train. In the paper, these technological options are related to the evolution of the European and US markets and the innovation and sourcing strategies of Japanese and European manufacturers. A central finding is that the advent of the hybrid power train has intensified technological competition within the industry, but that it stands no real chance of replacing the evolving diesel in the foreseeable future. However, the competitiveness of technological trajectories must be distinguished from the fate of the firms engaged in these technologies. The paper ends with a discussion of the key factors influencing the outcome of this technology contest between the leading Japanese and European manufacturers.

  • 8.
    Berggren, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sushandoyo, Dedy
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hybrids versus diesel: The forgotten technological competition for sustainable solutions in the global automotive industry2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Berggren, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sushandoyo, Dedy
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Managing radical innovation withinestablished structures – a case study of heavy hybrid-electric vehicle development.2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Berggren, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sushandoyo, Dedy
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    New forms of vehicle maker supplier interdependence? The case of electric machine development for heavy hybrid vehicles2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Berggren, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sushandoyo, Dedy
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Transition pathways revisited: Established firms as multi-level actors in the heavy vehicle industry2015In: Research Policy, ISSN 0048-7333, E-ISSN 1873-7625, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 1017-1028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multi-level perspective on sustainability transitions positions established firms (incumbents) as defenders of existing technologies at the "regime level." By contrast, it positions new entrants at the niche level, as promoters of new technologies. This paper challenges the positioning of firms as actors on either regime or niche levels. Based on a comparative analysis of technology strategies in the heavy vehicle industry, the paper shows that established firms are active at both levels, developing several technology alternatives simultaneously. This means that incumbents technology strategies determine important parts of the required niche regime interactions. The paper also shows how incumbents may pursue contrasting technology strategies. While some adopt a dualistic approach, keeping regime and niche level activities technologically and commercially separate, others develop integrated strategies where niche activities are leveraged to impact upon the regime level. The cases studied illustrate how the success of such integrated strategies depends on the emergence of bridging policies. Bridging policies are relevant both for linking early niche markets to broader regime-level markets, and for supporting further technological advancements of niche markets. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 12.
    Berggren, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sushandoyo, Dedy
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship .
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship .
    Producer-user interactions in the development of discontinuous environmental innovations: The cases of the development processes of heavy hybrid vehicles2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Borghei, Behbood
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    An empirical investigation of technological innovations in the heavy vehicles industry: Observations from 64th IAA International Motor Show, Hannover, Germany2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Motor Show in Hannover, Germany – IAA Nutzfahrzeuge – is considered as one of the major exhibitions in the commercial vehicle industry and a central meeting point for European automotive manufacturers as well as their suppliers and other affiliated firms and industries to demonstrate their latest achievements in producing innovative products and advanced technologies as well as exchanging information and updating status with regards to the position of other companies and their products/technologies in the mobility, logistics and transport solutions related to commercial vehicles.

  • 14.
    Borghei, Behbood
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    "Dancing Giants": Evolution of the European Heavy Duty Vehicles sector in light of institutionalization of EU emissions standards2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Borghei, Behbood
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Institutionalisation of environmental innovation: joint development of standards, technologies and actor networks in the European heavy duty vehicles sector2016In: International Journal of Automotive Technology and Management, ISSN 1470-9511, E-ISSN 1741-5012, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 341-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emission standard requirements for toxic air pollution (NOx/PMs) from heavy duty vehicles (HDVs) have been sharply reduced over the past few decades. This paper seeks to explain how such significant reduction has taken place in the European HDV sector. Based on the sectoral systems of innovation framework, this paper sheds light on the commercial vehicles sector, one that is often overlooked in existing literature. The analysis suggests that extensive periods of network formation, coordination and negotiation in the early stages of regulatory process enabled consensus, which in turn made it possible to obtain acceptance for technology-forcing requirements at the industry level. This facilitated enactment and implementation of further stringent emissions standards in later phases. It also explains why OEMs did not resist stringent environmental measures in this sector.

  • 16.
    Borghei, Behbood
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Institutionalization of Environmental Innovation: Co-evolutionary development of standards, technologies and actor networksin the European heavy vehicles sector2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a coevolutionary account on the development of Euro emissions standards and enhanced environmental innovation in the European heavy-duty vehicles sector. The aim is to understand the complexities and challenges of environmental regulation and the dynamics of environmental innovation at the European level, and draw lessons for policy makers. The analysis points at the need for reciprocal interactions to build consensus, consistency and continuity in regulatory frameworks, and a widening in the scope of knowledge and technologies to meet increasingly stringent requirements. Contributions are three folded: 1) providing a systemic perspective based on sectoral systems of innovation framework 2) shedding light on the commercial vehicles sector that is often overlooked in the management and innovation literature 3) elaborating on the European institutional context and its unique features of environmental regulation.

  • 17.
    Borghei, Behbood
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Institutionalization of Environmental Innovation: Understanding co-evolutionary processes of European emission standards and technological innovation in the European heavy vehicles sector2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With growing global trades and commercial logistics, the environmental impact from transportation has become one of the most challenging issues for the policy makers. Meanwhile, the heavy vehicle sector holds a considerable share of transportation of goods and delivering basic needs of civilians in the modern life. While the automotive industry as a whole is the largest private actor by the share of R&D investment in Europe, the heavy vehicle sector (including buses, trucks, construction and commercial vehicles) corresponds to the largest share of economic activities in this region. Today, commercial road logistics is responsible for the majority of transportation which accounts for 75% of the total volume and 90% of the total value of goods transported within Europe (IRU, 2008).

  • 18.
    Borghei, Behbood
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bauner, David
    Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Institutionalisation of Environmental Innovation: Emission standards and R&D Management in the heavy vehicle industry2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to understand the institutionalization process of environmental innovation by identifying different actors, their roles and interactions within the institutional environment they are embedded in as well as implications on innovation and technological development of the firms in the heavy vehicle industry within Europe. The distinction between this study and the conventional firm-level theories on innovation is its inclusive approach that comprises not only firms and their innovation and technology development strategies but also a wider perspective on interactions among actors, the institutional settings for environmental innovation as well as industry dynamics into account. The outcome is thus a more comprehensive perspective of the activities and competencies needed for successful environmental innovation process that could be useful for the firms as well as policy makers in the future regulation of greenhouse gas emissions.

  • 19.
    Borghei, Benny Behbood
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Niche aggregation through cumulative learning: A study of multiple electric bus projects2018In: Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, E-ISSN 2210-4232, Vol. 28, p. 108-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper seeks to answer the question of how learning processes support niche aggregation. It brings together literature on strategic niche management and theoretical concepts derived from literature on project management and learning in project-based firms to analyze the ongoing standardization efforts for fast-charged electric bus systems in Europe. The analysis suggests that niche aggregation is a cyclical process that depends on two learning processes: knowledge sharing and knowledge accumulation. Whereas knowledge sharing is an interactive process that involves several organizations, knowledge accumulation is an internal organizational learning process that enables firms to move beyond local niche projects and engage in external networks. These learning processes are mutually reinforcing and jointly support niche aggregation.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-04-20 10:15
  • 20.
    Borghei, Benny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Niche experiments with alternative powertrain technologies:: The case of electric city-buses in Europe2016In: International Journal of Automotive Technology and Management, ISSN 1470-9511, E-ISSN 1741-5012, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 274-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using sociotechnical transitions literature, this paper analyses the early market introduction of electric city-buses in Europe. It identifies the role of bus manufacturers and their corresponding choices of alternative powertrain and charging technologies. Study results contrast the traditional dichotomy of incumbents versus niche actors and questions perceived role of incumbents as a homogenous group of actors. The paper proposes an alternative to the typical perception of industry incumbents as the guardians of the current sociotechnical regime, suggesting that a strong position in the established regime may actually facilitate introduction of radical technological solutions. The paper invites transition scholars to make more detailed analyses of actors’ constellations and it further suggests that policy makers need to pay attention to the diversity of individual actors’ strategies.

  • 21.
    Carlsson, Uno
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mårtensson, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sunnerhagen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svensson, Magdalena
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tibell, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    To design a novel protein: A CDIO experience in Molecular Biotechnology at Linköping University2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Hillman, Karl
    et al.
    University of Gavle.
    Nilsson, Mans
    Stockholm Environmental Institute.
    Rickne, Annika
    University of Gothenburg.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fostering sustainable technologies: a framework for analysing the governance of innovation systems2011In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 403-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development and diffusion of technological innovations need governing in order to contribute to societal goals related to sustainability. Yet, there are few systematic studies mapping out what types of governance are deployed and how they influence the development and diffusion of sustainable technological innovations. This paper develops a framework for analysing the role of governance in innovation systems aimed towards sustainability. The framework is based on the literatures on governance, technological innovation systems and socio-technical transitions. We foresee empirical studies based on the framework that may serve as a needed input into governance processes.

  • 23.
    Hillman, Karl
    et al.
    Högskolan Gävle.
    Nilsson, Måns
    SEI.
    Rickne, Annika
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Framework for analysing the governance of sustainable technological innovations2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Johansson, G.
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, PO Box 1026, SE-551 11 Jönköping, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship .
    Organising for environmental considerations in complex product development projects: implications from introducing a "Green" sub-project2006In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 14, no 15-16, p. 1368-1376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents findings from a case study of a product development project in which environmental performance requirements were introduced. Focus is set on how the project was organised in order to ensure that the environmental performance requirements were considered. A specific "Green" sub-project was included in the project organisation. The analysis shows that such a sub-project can: (1) serve as a means to put environmental considerations on the agenda, (2) introduce a risk for confusion regarding who is responsible for fulfilling the environmental performance requirements, (3) act as an arena for communication about the environmental performance requirements, (4) serve as a platform for environmental champions to be active, and (5) serve as a means for environmental specialists to become part of established contact networks in the product development organisation. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 25.
    Johansson, Glenn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eco-innovations: a novel phenomenon?1998In: Journal of Sustainable Product Design, ISSN 1367-6679, E-ISSN 1573-1588, no 7, p. 7-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has generally been accepted that in order to reach sustainability, significant changes will have to take place. Eco-innovations ie. new products and processes providing customer value, while using less resources and resulting in reduced environmental impacts, are therefore of great importance. On the basis of selected parts of the existing innovation theory, this article explores the eco-innovation phenomenon. The theory is used to analyse two examples of ecoinnovation; the struggle between steel and aluminium to the application of light weight car bodies, and the development of lawn mowers with improved environmental performance. The analysis shows that innovation theory is useful for creating a better understanding of the concept and development of eco-innovations. It is therefore concluded that the innovation theory should be part of the frame of reference when analysing and managing eco-innovations.

  • 26.
    Johansson, Glenn
    et al.
    Ingenjörshögskolan i Jönköping.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Ingenjörshögskolan i Jönköping.
    Lakemond Ebbers, Nicolette
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    Case Studies on Interface Dimensions in Industrial Innovation Processes2006In: EuroMOT,2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 27.
    Lakemond Ebbers, Nicolette
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    Creating value through integrated product-service solutions: Integrating service and product development2005In: IMP,2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Lakemond Ebbers, Nicolette
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Ingenjörshögskolan i Jönköping.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Ingenjörshögskolan i Jönköping.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    From product development to production - on the complexity of geographical and organizational dispersion2006In: R and D Management Conference,2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship .
    Johansson, Glenn
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship .
    A model for managing interfaces between technology development, product development and production2007In: RD Management Conference,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship .
    Johansson, Glenn
    Tekniska högskolan i Jönköping.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship .
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Tekniska Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Interfaces between technology development, product development and production: Critical factors and a conceptual model2007In: International Journal of Technology Intelligence and Planning, ISSN 1740-2832, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 317-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interfaces between technology development, product development, and production must be managed in order to avoid misfits between technology and product concepts and ensure the fit of the product design and the production process. In this paper, critical challenges related to these interfaces are studied based on in-depth case studies of ten product development projects at five manufacturing firms, two workshops and a questionnaire. Our findings indicate that factors related to synchronisation and transfer management are most critical. A tentative model is formulated as an instrument to reduce risk and uncertainty related to the interfaces.

  • 31.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Industriell produktion.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Industriell produktion.
    Assessing interface challenges in product development projects2013In: Research technology management, ISSN 0895-6308, E-ISSN 1930-0166, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 40-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development projects are exposed to a number of challenges, and the significance of different challenges differs among projects. To prepare for these challenges, project managers may benefit from assessing them at an early stage of the project. This paper presents a method that can be used to assess product development challenges in terms of technological and market uncertainty, product and production complexity, and geographical and organizational dispersion. Project managers can use the results from such assessments to justify preventive action, negotiate resources and specifications, and devise processes that fit the specific characteristics of individual development projects.

  • 32.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    From Product Development to Production: On the Complexity of Geographical adn Organizational Dispersion2012In: Journal of Applied Economics and Business Research, ISSN 1927-033X, E-ISSN 1927-033X, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 125-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The establishment of low cost production facilities in emerging economies in Asia and Eastern-Europe has resulted in an increased organizational and geographical separation of product development and production processes. This paper elaborates on the complexity of the product development to production interface in dispersed environments and describes two different logics underlying the coordination of the product development to production transition in relation to interface complexity. The paper is based on two case studies of in total three different projects. It is argued that product/process related factors as well as organizational/geographical related factors are important in determining interface complexity. Further, a high degree of interface complexity calls for a predominant knowledge integration logic complemented with some measures of standardization in the product development to production interface. A low degree of interface complexity may be managed by a predominant task partitioning logic complemented with some integration measures.

  • 33.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Commercializing cleaner new technologies: the case of microturbine generators2003In: Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, ISSN 0953-7325, E-ISSN 1465-3990, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 349-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a study of the emerging microturbine industry, this paper argues that recent trends towards preventive and product-oriented industrial environmental management are problematic from the technology suppliers’ perspective. This is especially evident in the suppliers’ initial efforts to define markets and applications during early stages of commercialization. The distinction between product innovation driven by explicit or perceived user needs and innovation in environmental technology driven by regulatory demands has become blurred. This means that suppliers have had to interact simultaneously with both users and regulators in order to articulate the demand and acceptance for the new technology.

  • 34.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Eco-design and product innovation: managing incremental and radical change for environmental compliance2000Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is about firms determined to gain competitive advantages from environmental demands, about the efforts of engineers employed with the challenge of fulfilling environmental performance targets and about the management and organisation of product development. It is about incremental change, built on established technological knowledge, as well as about radical technological change. In the title, the nation of "environmental compliance" has a dual meaning. It implies that industrial organisations have to comply with ecological constraints, but also that they have to comply more generally with contextual factors such as competition, technology, customer preferences and market characteristics. However to avoid confusion, "environment" will henceforth be used to describe the ecological aspects, which is the traditional meaning of this term in environmental management and eco-design literature.

  • 35.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Managerial challenges in environmental innovation: case studies in the electrical equipment and automotive sectors2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation is a compilation of five papers that analyse and discuss the managerial challenge of environmental innovation. Environmental innovation seeks to integrate environmental features into products and thus bring new products with better environmental performance to the market. The dissertation reports on three case studies within the electrical equipment and automotive sectors. The first case refers to development of an innovative new gasoline-electric hybrid power train; the second case refers to the development of a new industrial gas turbine, comprising advanced new burner technology; and the third case describes the introduction of new technology for small-scale distributed electricity generation. On the basis of concepts and theoretical models derived from literature on innovation management, the dissertation offers two alternative ways to conceptualise environmental innovation. Firstly, environmental innovation is conceptualised as product development. This is useful to analyse the inner dynamics of R&D organisations and it hightlights the need to adapt organisations and managerial practices to the specific requirements of the development task. Secondly, environmental innovation is conceptualised as the introduction of new technology. Here, two alternative perspectives are discussed. The incumbents' perspective illustrates that environmental innovation may be perceived as a potential threat for existing manufacturers within the established industry and it is used to discuss their strategic responses. The entrants' perspective shows how the definition of early markets and applications is complicated for suppliers who are engaged in environmental innovation. The dissertation argues that environmental innovation is characterised by extensive complexity both in terms of technological complexity and complexity in shaping of demands on technological progress. It concludes that is is important for managers to create an ability to deal with complexity. Based on empirical findings, three possible approaches are outlined: simplification, interaction and experimentation.

    List of papers
    1. Environmental innovation in auto development: managing technological uncertainty within strict time limits
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental innovation in auto development: managing technological uncertainty within strict time limits
    2001 (English)In: International Journal of Vehicle Design, ISSN 0143-3369, E-ISSN 1741-5314, Vol. 26, no 2-3, p. 101-115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing industry is facing increasingly stringent demands on environmental compliance and the auto industry is particularly exposed to pressure from public and authorities in this area. The purpose of this article is to provide an empirical analysis on how the application of new technologies in order to comply with environmental demands may change the product development process within the auto industry. Experiences from the development of Toyota Prius, the worlds first mass-produced car based on a hybrid power train, are presented and analysed. The analysis shows that technological uncertainty made it necessary to move beyond the prevailing lean product development approach. The article concludes by suggesting a strategy consisting of three fundamental elements in order to control technological uncertainty in innovative and time-focused product development projects up-front testing, intense horizontal communication, and clear and challenging objectives.

    Keywords
    hybrid vehicles, product development, innovation management, technological uncertainty, environmental innovation
    National Category
    Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-43012 (URN)10.1504/IJVD.2001.001932 (DOI)70699 (Local ID)70699 (Archive number)70699 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    2. Planned or experience-based processes for eco-design innovation: exploring product development driven by environmental performance targets
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Planned or experience-based processes for eco-design innovation: exploring product development driven by environmental performance targets
    2001 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Technology and Management, ISSN 1466-2132, E-ISSN 1741-511X, Vol. 1, no 1/2, p. 164-178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Eco-design research suggests that environmental considerations should be integrated with product development with no or only minor changes to existing development processes. These processes are expected to be systematic, predictable and thoroughly planned. This paper explores if this assumption is still valid when requirements on environmental performance call for more innovative product development. An analytic model is derived from innovation management literature and used to analyse the development of a new industrial gas turbine, a project for which challenging emission level targets meant that new combustion technology had to be applied. The main conclusion is that the application of new technology is followed by changes of the development process, meaning that development becomes guided by real-time experiences rather than by formal plans.

    Keywords
    eco-design, innovation management; product development, technology development, industrial gas turbine, development process, green design
    National Category
    Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-35221 (URN)10.1504/IJETM.2001.000746 (DOI)25788 (Local ID)25788 (Archive number)25788 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2018-03-23
    3. Architectural or modular innovation? Managing discontinuous product development in response to challenging environmental performance targets
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Architectural or modular innovation? Managing discontinuous product development in response to challenging environmental performance targets
    2003 (English)In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 1-26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    By adopting challenging targets on environmental performance, pro-active industrial firms may push themselves towards discontinuous product innovation. Such innovation can be understood as being either architectural, i.e. arranging components in new ways, or modular, i.e. introducing new technologies in specific components or subsystems. We argue that these two dimensions of discontinuous change call for some specific managerial responses. Architectural innovation challenges the whole engineering organisation, making it necessary to focus development efforts on technological interfaces, whereas modular innovation has a more isolated effect, making specialisation and co-ordination over organisational boundaries particularly important. Altogether, our analysis highlights the importance of adapting the project organisation to the development task and addressing part-whole relationships when managing innovation in established products and systems, something that becomes increasingly important in the strive towards sustainable development.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Imperial collage press, 2003
    Keywords
    product development, discontinuous innovation, environmental performance, organisation
    National Category
    Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-66058 (URN)10.1142/S1363919603000714 (DOI)
    Available from: 2011-03-02 Created: 2011-03-02 Last updated: 2017-12-11
    4. Sticking to your knitting or changing business model? Discontinuities and capabilities in electrical power generation equipment manufacturing
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sticking to your knitting or changing business model? Discontinuities and capabilities in electrical power generation equipment manufacturing
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We study distributed electricity generation as a potential technological discontinuity, and the response strategies pursued by incumbent electrical manufacturers in the face of this threat. A discontinuity grid is developed, where we position various technological response strategies. The empirical study shows that the major firms are undertaking different response strategies. We discuss this heterogeneity as a consequence of divergent capability endowments and the uncertainty prevailing. We also suggest technology acquisition to be easier than technology exploitation for incumbent firms.

    National Category
    Humanities
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89681 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-03-01 Created: 2013-03-01 Last updated: 2018-06-08
    5. Commercializing cleaner new technologies: the case of microturbine generators
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Commercializing cleaner new technologies: the case of microturbine generators
    2003 (English)In: Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, ISSN 0953-7325, E-ISSN 1465-3990, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 349-362Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a study of the emerging microturbine industry, this paper argues that recent trends towards preventive and product-oriented industrial environmental management are problematic from the technology suppliers’ perspective. This is especially evident in the suppliers’ initial efforts to define markets and applications during early stages of commercialization. The distinction between product innovation driven by explicit or perceived user needs and innovation in environmental technology driven by regulatory demands has become blurred. This means that suppliers have had to interact simultaneously with both users and regulators in order to articulate the demand and acceptance for the new technology.

    National Category
    Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-46493 (URN)10.1080/09537320310001601522 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13
  • 36.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ensuring protection and competitiveness: Characteristics of market formation for biogas2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and research question

    Presenting possible solutions to environmental problems such as air quality, greenhouse gases, nutrient recirculation, organic waste and wastewater management, biogas is highly relevant for sustainability transitions. Besides biogas producers, the production and use of biogas engages actors from several sectors, including energy and gas distribution, waste management and wastewater treatment, agriculture, vehicles and transport.

    The formation of markets for biogas depends on policy interventions at different levels, from the local municipality via the national government to the EU commission. By contrast to other European countries, which tend to subsidize biogas production, the Swedish government has the intention to stimulate demand and to favor the use of purified biogas (biomethane) as a vehicle fuel. While biomethane currently has a strong position as an alternative to fossil fuels in certain niches (notably public transport buses), the Swedish biogas sector faces challenges to reach beyond these narrow market segments.

    Adopting a market constructivist perspective, this paper will analyze the formation of markets for biogas in Sweden. The following research question will guide the analysis: What characterizes market formation in this case and based on that, what is possible to learn about market formation in relation to sustainability transitions? 

    Theory

    Marketing scholars increasingly consider market formation as on-going processes, which a multitude of actors influence through their strategies, activities and capabilities. To understand market formation it is therefore necessary to analyze activities among a wider array of actors than merely producers and their (potential) customers.

    Following a constructivist perspective, the offer is a core element in market formation. The offer describes the meanings and qualifications that actors impose on the object that is for sale. These meanings and qualifications constitute boundaries between actors and goods. Different actors engage to define the object, as well as its meanings, qualifications and potential value. Without a clear view of what is being exchanged, market formation will be difficult. Market formation also includes institutions that set boundaries and rules for the market. These are neither static, nor pre-conceived; instead, they are shaped and acted upon. Actors influence institutions through dynamic and interactive processes. 

    Method

    The paper combines quantitative and qualitative sources of data to study the Swedish biogas sector. The paper presents detailed data on production and use of biogas in Sweden 2010-2017. This quantitative data is complemented by qualitative data from interviews with representatives from key actors as well as secondary data from industry reports and other written sources. 

    Findings

    The multitude of actors involved complicates market formation for biogas. Different meanings and qualifications are attributed to the offer. Whereas it is possible to perceive biogas as a relatively simple product – a fuel – it is also possible to perceive it as a complex system that may help solving various societal and environmental problems. Different perceptions of the offer have different implications for market formation. Depicting biogas as a complex system implies that the offer will comprise a number of different qualifications. The realization of such a complex system depends on the bonding of various actors. Once established, the bonds will protect biogas from competition. By contrast, depicting biogas as a fuel means that the value of biogas will be assessed in relation to fuel prices. Qualification will thus depend on cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other fuels.

    Our analysis suggests that although the contrasting perceptions of biogas cause tensions between the actors involved, the different qualifications complement each other in the market formation process. Various environmental and societal benefits makes it possible for actors argue for institutional reforms to help biogas become cost competitive, and increased competitiveness makes it attractive to establish new biogas systems.

  • 37.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    From niches to local and global market formation: The qualification of the Swedish biogas sector2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents a case study of market formation for biogas in Sweden and analyses the case with concepts derived from literature on socio-technical transitions and business-to-business marketing. Based on the case study analysis, the paper outlines two different models that describe market formation processes for renewable energy technologies: a local model and a global model. Different perspectives on the market offer, different actors involved, and different institutional dynamics characterize these models. The models do not necessarily describe different stages in the market formation process. Rather, they describe different patterns by which the market for renewable energy alternatives may grow. 

  • 38.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Industrial ecology and the boundaries of the manufacturing firm2019In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decisions on organizational boundaries are critical aspects of manufacturing firms’ business strategies. This article brings together concepts and findings from industrial ecology and business strategy in order to understand how manufacturing firms engage in initiatives to facilitate recycling of process wastes. Based on a distinction between waste recovery and use of the recovered resources, the article introduces a typology of four different strategies: Closed, Outsourcing, Diversification, and Open. Each strategy has a unique set of organizational boundaries and is associated with different motives and benefits for the manufacturing firm. The typology of strategies provides a conceptual contribution to assist industrial managers in strategic decision-making, and to support further studies on organizational boundaries in industrial ecology research.

  • 39.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Competing innovationsystems and the need for redeployment in sustainability transitions2018In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 126, p. 217-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to sustainability transitions theories, innovation policies should create protective spaces (‘niches’) for promising new technologies. Moreover they should support a cumulative process of market formation and growth. Based on results from comparative case studies of two competing technological innovation systems for heavy transport (biogas and electrification), this paper argues that these recommendations are contradictory when technology alternatives with different degrees of maturity compete for the same niche. Should innovation policies open up the niche for the promising but immature alternative, or should they continue to support the technology that already has attained a niche position? If this contradiction remains unsolved, there is a risk for conflicts that block the progress of both alternatives. The paper suggests that there is a need for differentiated policies to resolve the contraction. In order to facilitate further development of both systems, the paper suggests that niche nurturing for immature systems needs to be combined with redeployment into new market segments for more mature systems. 

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-09-24 12:47
  • 40.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Elektrifierade tunga fordon i stadstrafik.: Kapitel i ”Teknologiska innovationssystem inom energiområdet”, Energimyndighetens rapportserie 2014:232015In: Teknologiska innovationssystem inom energiområdet: en praktisk vägledning till identifiering av systemsvagheter som motiverar särskilda politiska åtaganden / [ed] Sverige. Statens energimyndighet, Stockholm: Energimyndigheten , 2015, p. 156-192Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Elektromobilitet är ett vittfamnande begrepp. Det kan täcka in ett stort antal fordonstyper och tillverkare, en diversifierad tjänstesektor, liksom nya principer för stads- och trafikplanering. Denna rapport är avgränsad till elektrifiering av tunga fordon: bussar och lastbilar. Den inkluderar därmed inte elektrifiering av personbilar (eller elcyklar/elskotrar). Elektrifierade personbilar betra ktas istället som ett angränsande och ibland delvis överlappande system, som framför allt kan användas för jämförelser. Elbilar är förvisso ett dynamiskt område men drivs nästan helt av ett antal stora batteri- och biltillverkare utanför Sverige: både nyaföretag som Tesla Motors och  volymtillverkare som GM, Nissan-Renault och BMW. Svenskbaserade biltillverkare deltar med viss framgång – försäljningen av Volvo Cars laddbara premiumhybrid som utvecklades tillsammans med Vattenfallhar överträffat förväntningarna – men svenska företag har små möjligheter att påverka den övergripande teknik- och marknadsutvecklingen. Genom den internationella teknikutvecklingen har kostnaderna för elektrifierade personbilar kraftigt sänkts under senare år, och det finns nu ett stort antal serietillverkade modeller på marknaden. Räckvidd och laddtider är nackdelar för de flesta elbilar, men förbättras kontinuerligt. Standarder har etablerats för  infrastruktur, t.ex. snabbladdare, och även här sänks kostnaden fortlöpande.

  • 41.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Entering an era of ferment: radical vs incrementalist strategies in automotive power train development2011In: Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, ISSN 0953-7325, E-ISSN 1465-3990, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 313-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Incremental improvement of a deeply embedded technology system has been a hallmark of the automotive industry for a very long time. Efforts to develop alternatives have repeatedly failed. This paper analyses how Toyota started to challenge this pattern in the late 1990s, by the architectural innovation embodied in Prius, the first mass-produced hybrid-electric car. This is followed by an account of how key competitors reacted by accelerating their incremental innovation efforts, in an era when concerns over fuel prices and greenhouse gas emissions increased demand for environmentally sound vehicles. The paper builds on records of patenting and performance of actually marketed models to analyse the unfolding technology competition. It also considers the most probable technologies on the market in a 10–12 year timeframe, and further explains how different technoogy strategies put competing firms in different positions in an era of ferment.

  • 42.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Environmental innovation in auto development: managing technological uncertainty within strict time limits2001In: International Journal of Vehicle Design, ISSN 0143-3369, E-ISSN 1741-5314, Vol. 26, no 2-3, p. 101-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing industry is facing increasingly stringent demands on environmental compliance and the auto industry is particularly exposed to pressure from public and authorities in this area. The purpose of this article is to provide an empirical analysis on how the application of new technologies in order to comply with environmental demands may change the product development process within the auto industry. Experiences from the development of Toyota Prius, the worlds first mass-produced car based on a hybrid power train, are presented and analysed. The analysis shows that technological uncertainty made it necessary to move beyond the prevailing lean product development approach. The article concludes by suggesting a strategy consisting of three fundamental elements in order to control technological uncertainty in innovative and time-focused product development projects up-front testing, intense horizontal communication, and clear and challenging objectives.

  • 43.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hybrid-electric buses: a first stepp towards electrified heavy vehicles?2014In: Systems perspectives on electromobility / [ed] Björn Sandén och Pontus Wahlgren, Göteborg: Chalmers University of Technology , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship .
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship .
    Innovation in Sustainable Vehicles - Managing the New Technology Based Competition within the Auto Industry2007In: RADMA Conference,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knowledge integration as a key competence: contrasting technology and sourcing strategies for the development of hybrid-electric vehicles2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Stödköp hybrider nu, regeringen2009Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sushandoyo, Dedy
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Entering an Era of Ferment: Technology and Product Strategies for Hybrid Electric Vehicle Development2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship .
    Johansson, G.
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Managing internal technology transfer in complex product development2008In: European Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1460-1060, E-ISSN 1758-7115, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 349-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this article is to illustrate how the characteristics of complex product systems pose specific managerial challenges onto the transfer of new technology from technology development to product development. Design/methodology/approach - The research relies on comparative case studies involving three cases of internal technology transfer processes in the development of electrical equipment and telecommunication systems. Findings - The research findings suggest that managerial decisions on internal technology transfer should be guided by a contingency framework rather than general procedures and tools. Research limitations/implications - Since the research is restricted to a limited number of case studies, additional studies are required to validate the findings. Practical implications - The study results indicate that in cases of complex product development, there is a need for a more integrated view on technology and product development, than what is commonly described in the literature. Originality/value - This article complements previous studies of the management of internal technology transfer processes, which primarily have addressed mass producing industries. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 49.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Planned or experience-based processes for eco-design innovation: exploring product development driven by environmental performance targets2001In: International Journal of Environmental Technology and Management, ISSN 1466-2132, E-ISSN 1741-511X, Vol. 1, no 1/2, p. 164-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eco-design research suggests that environmental considerations should be integrated with product development with no or only minor changes to existing development processes. These processes are expected to be systematic, predictable and thoroughly planned. This paper explores if this assumption is still valid when requirements on environmental performance call for more innovative product development. An analytic model is derived from innovation management literature and used to analyse the development of a new industrial gas turbine, a project for which challenging emission level targets meant that new combustion technology had to be applied. The main conclusion is that the application of new technology is followed by changes of the development process, meaning that development becomes guided by real-time experiences rather than by formal plans.

  • 50.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    Johansson, Glenn
    Ingenjörshögskolan i Jönköping.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Lakemond Ebbers, Nicolette
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    Bridging the boundaries between technology development, product development and production2006In: International Product Development Management Conference,2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 79
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