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  • 1.
    Ahlstrand, I.
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center. School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Pain and activity limitations in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared to 10 years ago: the Swedish TIRA project2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 259-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To study differences regarding pain and activity limitations during the 3 years following diagnosis in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared with their counterparts who were diagnosed 10 years earlier. Method: This study was based on patients recruited to the Early Intervention in RA (TIRA) project. In the first cohort (TIRA-1) 320 patients were included in time for diagnosis during 1996-1998 and 463 patients were included in the second cohort (TIRA-2) during 2006-2009. Disease activity, pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS), bodily pain (BP) in the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), activity limitations (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ), and medication were reported at inclusion and at follow-up after 1, 2, and 3 years. Results: Disease activity, pain, and activity limitations were pronounced at inclusion across both genders and in both cohorts, with some improvement observed during the first year after diagnosis. Disease activity did not differ between cohorts at inclusion but was significantly lower at the follow-ups in the TIRA-2 cohort, in which the patients were prescribed traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and biological agents more frequently. In TIRA-2, patients reported significantly lower pain and activity limitations at all follow-ups, with men reporting lower pain than women. Women reported significantly higher activity limitations at all time points in TIRA-2. Conclusions: Pain and activity limitations were still pronounced in the contemporary treated early RA cohort compared with their counterparts diagnosed 10 years earlier and both of these factors need to be addressed in clinical settings.

  • 2.
    Alonso, Juan-Manuel
    et al.
    Int Assoc Athlet Federat, Med & Antidoping Commiss, Monaco, Monaco; Qatar Orthoped & Sports Med Hosp, Sports Med Dept, Aspetar, Doha, Qatar.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Ronsen, Ola
    Int Assoc Athlet Federat, Med & Antidoping Commiss, Monaco, Monaco; Aker Solut, Lysaker, Norway.
    Kajenienne, Alma
    Int Assoc Athlet Federat, Med & Antidoping Commiss, Monaco, Monaco; Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Inst Sport, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Spreco, Armin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Edouard, Pascal
    Univ Hosp St Etienne, Fac Med, Sports Med Unity, Dept Clin & Exercise Physiol, St Etienne, France; Univ Lyon, Exercise Physiol Lab, LPE EA 4338, St Etienne, France; French Athlet Federat, Med Commiss, Paris, France.
    Preparticipation injury complaint is a risk factor for injury: a prospective study of the Moscow 2013 IAAF Championships.2015In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 49, no 17, p. 1118-U45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the health status of athletes before the start of an international athletics championship and to determine whether preparticipation risk factors predicted in-championship injuries.

    METHODS: At the beginning of the 2013 International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) World Championships, all registered athletes (n=1784) were invited to complete a preparticipation health questionnaire (PHQ) on health status during the month preceding the championships. New injuries that occurred at the championships were prospectively recorded.

    RESULTS: The PHQ was completed by 698 (39%) athletes; 204 (29.2%) reported an injury complaint during the month before the championships. The most common mode of onset of preparticipation injury complaints was gradual (43.6%). Forty-nine athletes in the study reported at least one injury during the championships. Athletes who reported a preparticipation injury complaint were at twofold increased risk for an in-championship injury (OR=2.09; 95% CI 1.16 to 3.77); p=0.014). Those who reported a preparticipation gradual-onset injury complaint were at an almost fourfold increased risk for an in-championship time-loss injury (OR=3.92; 95% CI 1.69 to 9.08); p=0.001). Importantly, the preparticipation injury complaint severity score was associated with the risk of sustaining an in-championship injury (OR=1.14; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.22); p=0.001).

    SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS: About one-third of the athletes participating in the study reported an injury complaint during the month before the championships, which represented a risk factor for sustaining an injury during the championship. This study emphasises the importance of the PHQ as a screening tool to identify athletes at risk of injuries before international championships.

  • 3.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Deaf signers are less reliant than hearing non-signers on fact retrieval from verbal long term memory during arithmetic processing: fMRI evidence2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Greater reliance on magnitude manipulation during mental arithmetic in deaf signers compared to hearing non-signers: fMRI evidence2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence suggests that the lag reported in mathematics for deaf signers derives from difficulties related to verbal processing of numbers, whereas magnitude processing seems unaffected by deafness. Neuroimaging evidence from hearing individuals suggests that verbal processing of numbers engages primarily left angular gyrus (lAG), whereas magnitude processing engages primarily the horizontal portion of the right intraparietal sulcus (rHIP). In a ROI analysis of brain imaging data from 16 adult deaf signers and 16 adult hearing non-signers, who did not differ on sex, age or education, we examined if activity in lAG and rHIP changed as a result of task (multiplication vs subtraction) and group (deaf signers and hearing non-signers). We found a significant main effect of brain region (F(1,30) = 117.00, p < .001, η_p^2 = .80) and an interaction effect between region and group (F(1,30) = 20.70, p < .001, η_p^2 = .41). Further analyses showed that there were no significant differences in average activation between groups in lAG (F(1,30) = 0.16, p = .70). However, in rHIP deaf signers showed significantly greater average activation compared to non-signers (F(1,30) = 15.20, p < .001, η_p^2 = .34). There were no significant differences in activation between subtraction and multiplication (F(1,30) = 0.66, p = .42) and no behavioural differences between groups (F(1,30) = 1.70, p = .20). These results suggest that when engaging in arithmetic tasks deaf signers successfully make use of qualitatively difference processes, compared to hearing non-signers, with stronger emphasis on brain regions relating to magnitude manipulation.

  • 5.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Deaf signers and hearing non-signers recruit similar networks for arithmetic and phonological tasks2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Profoundly deaf individuals sometimes have difficulty with arithmetic and phonological tasks. In the present study we investigate if these differences can be attributed to differences in recruitment of neurobiological networks. Seventeen hearing non-signers (HN) and sixteen deaf signers (DS) matched on age, gender and non-verbal intelligence took part in an fMRI study. In the scanner three digit/letter pairs were visually presented and the participants performed six different blocked tasks tapping processing of digit and letter order, multiplication, subtraction and phonological ability. Data were analysed using two 2x2x2 ANOVAs; process (arithmetic, language) x level (high, low) x group (DS, HN). A main effect of process revealed language networks in the left inferior frontal gryus, supramarginal gyrus, fusiform gyrus and insula. Arithmetic networks included left middle orbital gyrus and superior medial gyrus. A main effect of level revealed low level processing (digit/letter order) in the right middle occipital gyrus and the right precuneus and high level processing (subtraction/multiplication/phonological ability) in left inferior frontal gyrus. There was no main effect of group but a significant task x group interaction in the right temporal pole which in DS (but not HN) was activated more for arithmetic than language processing (pfwe = .022) when multiplication was included in the analysis. This region is implicated in conceptual representation. These results suggest that both arithmetic and language are processed similarly by DS and HN with possible between-group differences in the use of conceptual representation in arithmetic and language tasks.

  • 6.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fransson, Peter
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Deaf signers use magnitude manipulatioin strategies for mulitplication: fMRI evidence2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence suggests that the lag reported in mathematics for deaf signers derives from difficulties related to the verbal system of number processing as described in the triple code model. For hearing individuals the verbal system has been shown to be recruited for both arithmetic and language tasks. In the present study we investigate for the first time neuronal representations of arithmetic in deaf signers. We examine if the neural network supporting arithmetic and language, including the horizontal portion of the intraparietal sulcus (HIPS), the superior parietal lobule (SPL) bilaterally, the left angular gyrus (AG), pars opercularis (POPE) and pars triangularis (PTRI) of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), is differently recruited for deaf and hearing individuals. Imaging data were collected from 16 deaf signers and 16 well-matched hearing nonsigners, using the same stimulus material for all tasks, but with different cues. During multiplication, deaf signers recruited rHIPS more than hearing non-signers, suggesting greater involvement of magnitude manipulation processes related to the quantity system, whereas there was no evidence that the verbal system was recruited. Further, there was no support for the notion of a common representation of phonology for sign and speech as previously suggested.

  • 7.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Multiplication engages phonological networks in Broca's area differently for deaf signers and hearing non-signers2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In hearing individuals, multiplication relies mainly on the phonological loop while subtraction relies on the visuo-spatial sketchpad (VSSP; Lee & Kang, 2002). Little is known about arithmetic neural networks in deaf signers (DS). Since DS often perform worse than hearing non-signers (NH) on arithmetic in general and multiplication in particular (Traxler, 2000), we hypothesized that there are strategic differences between how groups recruit the phonological loop in multiplication, but not in subtraction, leading to differential activation of phonological processing areas in left inferior frontal gyrus (Broca’s area). We investigated this using a blocked fMRI-design in which nine DS and 17 HN matched on age, gender, education and non-verbal intelligence (Raven & Raven, 1998) were tested on tasks of multiplication, subtraction and phonology (rhyme). The contrasts rhyme versus multiplication and rhyme versus subtraction were examined across groups within the region of interest defined by a probability map of Broca’s area (Amunts, 1999). We observed a significant interaction between task (multiplication and rhyme) and group (F = 12.64, p = .034, FWE-corrected), where the HN showed higher activation for rhyme than for multiplication (T = 4.55, p = .001, FWE-corrected) whereas there were no differences in activations between tasks for DS. For subtraction versus rhyme no interaction with group was found. These results suggest that there are differences between DS and HN in the phonology dependent neural networks in Broca’s area used during multiplication, which may be part of the explanation for poorer performance in DS.

  • 8.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Wetterö, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöwall, Christoffer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Quality of life and acquired organ damage are intimately related to activity limitations in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus2015In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 16, no 188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune multi-organ disease, characterized by episodes of disease flares and remissions over time, which may restrain affected patients ability to perform daily activities. The purpose of the present study was to characterize variation in activity limitations among well-defined SLE patients, and to describe disease phenotypes, acquired organ damage and their relations to activity limitation and self-reported health, respectively. Methods: The disease phenotypes were organized into 4 different clinical groups and logistic regression analyses were used to identify how an elevated health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) score was related to disease variables such as phenotypes, disease activity and damage accrual. Correlation and multiple linear regression analyses were used to examine the association between each group of variables - background variables, disease variables and self-reported measurements - and the degree of elevated HAQ. Results: We found a higher proportion of activity limitation in patients with skin and joint involvement compared to others. The presence of activity limitation, as detected by the HAQ instrument, was significantly associated with quality of life (EuroQol-5D) and accrual of organ damage using the Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics/ACR damage index. Conclusions: The findings highlight the differing requirements of the multi-professional rehabilitation interventions for the various SLE phenotypes in order to optimize the clinical care of the patients.

  • 9.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Focus on Chronic Disease through Different Lenses of Expertise: Towards Implementation of Patient-Focused Decision Support Preventing Disability: The Example of Early Rheumatoid Arthritis2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease. Treatment strategies emphasize early multi-professional interventions to reduce disease activity and to prevent disability, but there is a lack of knowledge on how optimal treatment can be provided to each individual patient.

    Aim: To elucidate how clinical manifestations of early RA are associated to disease and disability outcomes, to strive for greater potential to establish prognosis in early RA, and to facilitate implementation of decision support through analyses of the decision-making environment in chronic care.

    Methods: Multivariate statistics and mathematical modelling, as well as field observations and focus group interviews.

    Results: Decision support: A prognostic tree that predicted patients with a poor prognosis (moderate or high levels of DAS-28) at one year after diagnosis had a performance of 25% sensitivity, 90% specificity and a positive predictive value of 76%. Implementation of a decision support application at a rheumatology unit should include taking into account incentive structures, workflow and awareness, as well as informal communication structures. Prognosis: A considerable part of the variance in disease activity at one year after diagnosis could be explained by disease progression during the first three months after diagnosis. Using different types of knowledge – different expertise – prior to standardized data mining methods was found to be a promising when mining (clinical) data for new patterns that elicit new knowledge. Disease and disability: Women report more fatigue than men in early RA, although the difference is not consistently significant. Fatigue in early RA is closely and rather consistently related to disease activity, pain and activity limitation, as well as to mental health and sleep disturbance.

    Conclusion: A decision tree was designed to identify patients at risk of poor prognosis at one year after the diagnosis of RA. When constructing prediction rules for good or poor prognosis, including more measures of disease and disability progressions showed promise. Using different types of knowledge – different lenses of expertise – prior to standardized data mining methods was also a promising method when mining (clinical) data for new patterns that elicit new knowledge.

    List of papers
    1. Prognostic components and predictive modelling of prognosis in early RA
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prognostic components and predictive modelling of prognosis in early RA
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: There is a need for tools that are easy to use in clinical practice supporting decision making upon treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Aim: The aim was to identify components of prognosticators in early RA and to identify individual patients with a poor prognosis as early as possible.

    Methods: Two cohorts from the Swedish TIRA project including 320+408 patients with recent onset RA were included in the study. Disease activity was measured by C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and the 28-joint count disease activity score (DAS-28), and by the physicians’ global assessment of disease activity (PGA). Disability was assessed as activity limitation by the Swedish version of the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and impairment was reported by pain on a visual analogue scale of 0–100 mm. Serological markers were rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-CCP. RF was measured at the time for diagnosis, and anti-CCP at the time of diagnosis or at one or some of the follow-ups. If at least one anti-CCP test was positive, the patient was judged to be anti-CCP-positive. Assuming different clinical practice in the different cohorts, two different treatment strategies were assumed based on clinical practice in real-world settings. Principal Component Analysis and Multiple Linear Regression Analysis were used to identify prognosticators. Prediction rules were identified by data-driven approach, controlling for different treatment strategies.

    Results: Progression of disease and disability measures and inflammation measures the first three months after inclusion predicted a considerable part of DAS-28 at the 1-year follow-up. Serological markers had a larger explanatory power for men than for women. Anti-CCP was a significant predictor for men, but not for women. Two versions of rules, one for women and one for men, predicting good or poor prognosis at one year after inclusion were produced by using measures of disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire), DAS-28, relative change in DAS-28 during first three months, sex, and test of anti-CCP. The rules demanded high prognostic specificity but the prognostic sensitivity was moderate.

    Conclusion: A considerable part of DAS-28 at one year after inclusion could be explained by the first 3 months’ progression of disease, disability and inflammation. Anti-CCP was predictive for men but not for women, and needs further investigation. A decision tree predicting poor prognosis among individual early RA-patients showed high specificity and moderate sensitivity on a validationcohort. The medical informatics approach used, controlling for different treatment strategies, yields promising results and further studies will control for more specific differences in treatment strategies, e.g. different DMARDs initiated.

    National Category
    Social Work
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-18104 (URN)
    Available from: 2009-05-06 Created: 2009-05-06 Last updated: 2018-04-07Bibliographically approved
    2. A simple method for heuristic modeling of expert knowledge in chronic disease: identification of prognostic subgroups in rheumatology
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A simple method for heuristic modeling of expert knowledge in chronic disease: identification of prognostic subgroups in rheumatology
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: eHealth Beyond the Horizon – Get IT There, IOS Press, 2008, Vol. 136, p. 157-162Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identification of prognostic subgroups is of key clinical interest at the early stages of chronic disease. The aim of this study is to examine whether representation of physicians' expert knowledge in a simple heuristic model can improve data mining methods in prognostic assessments of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Five rheumatology consultants' experiences of clinical data patterns among RA patients, as distinguished from healthy reference populations, were formally represented in a simple heuristic model. The model was used in K-mean-clustering to determine prognostic subgroups. Cross-sectional validation using physician's global assessment scores indicated that the simple heuristic model performed better than crude data made in identification of prognostic subgroups of RA patients. A simple heuristic model of experts' knowledge was found useful for semi-automatic data mining in the chronic disease setting. Further studies using categorical baseline data and prospective outcome variables are warranted and will be examined in the Swedish TIRA-program.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    IOS Press, 2008
    Series
    Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630, E-ISSN 1879-8365 ; Vol. 136
    Keywords
    Knowledge engineering, Clinical Decision Support Systems, Semiautomated Data Mining, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Mathematical models in medicine
    National Category
    Social Work
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-18106 (URN)000274308700026 ()18487724 (PubMedID)978-1-58603-864-9 (ISBN)978-1-60750-333-0 (ISBN)
    Conference
    21st International Congress of the European-Federation-for-Medical-Informatic (MIE2008), Gothenburg, Sweden, MAY 25-28, 2008
    Available from: 2009-05-06 Created: 2009-05-06 Last updated: 2018-04-07Bibliographically approved
    3. Factors related to fatigue in women and men with early rheumatoid arthritis: The Swedish TIRA study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors related to fatigue in women and men with early rheumatoid arthritis: The Swedish TIRA study
    2009 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 41, no 11, p. 904-912Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study whether there are differences between women and men, with regard to the reported level of fatigue, and to explore the strength of the relations between fatigue and disease activity, pain, sleep disturbance, mental health, and activity limitation in early rheumatoid arthritis, and also to explore the consistency of such findings.

    Design: Analyses and comparisons of cross-sectional data.

    Subjects. 276 patients, 191 women and 85 men, with early rheumatoid arthritis were included.

    Method: Patients were examined with respect to 28-joint count disease activity score, and disability variables reflecting pain, sleep disturbance, fatigue, mental health, and activity limitation, at follow-ups at one, two and three years after diagnosis.

    Results: Women reported somewhat more fatigue than men. Fatigue was closely and rather consistently related to disease activity, pain and activity limitation, and also to mental health and sleep disturbance.

    Conclusion: Although this study does not permit conclusions about causal directions, statistical relationships may be related to clinical conceptions about causation: When disease activity can be significantly reduced by pharmacological treatment, this may have a positive effect on fatigue. Specific treatment with respect to the mentioned disability aspects that are related to fatigue is also a clinically reasonable strategy.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Uppsala, Sweden: FOUNDATION REHABILITATION INFORMATION, 2009
    Keywords
    Early rheumatoid arthritis, fatigue, sleep disturbance, sex
    National Category
    Social Work
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-18108 (URN)10.2340/16501977-0444 (DOI)000271102800008 ()19841842 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-05-06 Created: 2009-05-06 Last updated: 2018-04-07Bibliographically approved
    4. Designing a decision support system for existing clinical organizational structures: Considerations from a rheumatology clinic
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing a decision support system for existing clinical organizational structures: Considerations from a rheumatology clinic
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Journal of medical systems, ISSN 0148-5598, E-ISSN 1573-689X, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 325-331Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify the social and organizational requirements for a decision support system (DSS) to be implemented in a clinical rheumatology setting, utilizing data-mining techniques. Field observations and focus group interviews were used for data collection. The decision-making was found to be situated, patient-focused, and long-term in nature. At the same time, the main part of peer-to-peer communication was informal. Patient records were involved in almost every decision. The conclusion is that the main challenges, when introducing a DSS at a rheumatology unit, are adapting the system to informal communication structures and integrating it with patient records. Considering incentive structures, understanding workflow and incorporating awareness are relevant issues when addressing these issues in future studies.

    National Category
    Social Work
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-18111 (URN)10.1007/s10916-005-9000-1 (DOI)17068995 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-05-06 Created: 2009-05-06 Last updated: 2018-04-07Bibliographically approved
  • 10.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Learning during a collaborative final exam2012In: Educational Research and Evaluation, ISSN 1380-3611, E-ISSN 1744-4187, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 321-332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative testing has been suggested to serve as a good learning activity, for example, compared to individual testing. The aim of the present study was to measure learning at different levels of knowledge during a collaborative final exam in a course in basic methods and statistical procedures. Results on pre- and post-tests taken individually (N = 30) before and after the collaborative part of the final exam confirmed learning effects at the uni- and multi-structural levels, as well as on the relational level of Biggs’ structure of the observed learning outcome (SOLO) taxonomy (Biggs & Collins, 1982). Low performers at pre-test raised their test scores more than high performers. No differences could be generalized at the extended level of knowledge. Results also suggest that it might be preferable to collaborate without first deciding on questions individually. The experimental design can be applied when evaluating learning, at different levels of knowledge, during a variety of learning activities.

  • 11.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Learning effects of a final collaborative exam2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Prognostic rule generation controlling for treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Babic, Ankica
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Antonsson, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lönn, Urban
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Ahn, Henrik Casimir
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Clustering as a data mining method in a Web-based system for thoracic surgery2001In: Journal of the Medical Informatics Association. Symposium Supplement, Washington: Hanley&Belfus , 2001, p. 888-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cluster analysis is one way of data mining from large amounts of information. Being able to perform series of analyses, varying clinical criteria and requests, expected results of the clustering might be truly rewarding. Instead of having a few hypotheses prepared and tested, medical experts can be surprised by obtaining a set of hypotheses to further validate and work on.

    Internet technologies enable a substantial flexibility that can be taken advantage of when implementing a Web-based tool. Division of Medical Informatics together with Linkoping Heart Center of the Linkoping University is developing procedures for multivariate clustering within the Web-based AssistMe1 system.

  • 14.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Backe, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Sweden Skövde University, Sweden .
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janson, Staffan
    Karlstad University, Sweden .
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Health and Developmental Care, Centre for Public Health.
    Is "Football for All" Safe for All? Cross-Sectional Study of Disparities as Determinants of 1-Year Injury Prevalence in Youth Football Programs2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Football (soccer) is endorsed as a health-promoting physical activity worldwide. When football programs are introduced as part of general health promotion programs, equal access and limitation of pre-participation disparities with regard to injury risk are important. The aim of this study was to explore if disparity with regard to parents educational level, player body mass index (BMI), and self-reported health are determinants of football injury in community-based football programs, separately or in interaction with age or gender. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethodology/Principal Findings: Four community football clubs with 1230 youth players agreed to participate in the cross-sectional study during the 2006 season. The study constructs (parents educational level, player BMI, and self-reported health) were operationalized into questionnaire items. The 1-year prevalence of football injury was defined as the primary outcome measure. Data were collected via a postal survey and analyzed using a series of hierarchical statistical computations investigating associations with the primary outcome measure and interactions between the study variables. The survey was returned by 827 (67.2%) youth players. The 1-year injury prevalence increased with age. For youths with parents with higher formal education, boys reported more injuries and girls reported fewer injuries than expected; for youths with lower educated parents there was a tendency towards the opposite pattern. Youths reporting injuries had higher standardized BMI compared with youths not reporting injuries. Children not reporting full health were slightly overrepresented among those reporting injuries and underrepresented for those reporting no injury. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Pre-participation disparities in terms of parents educational level, through interaction with gender, BMI, and self-reported general health are associated with increased injury risk in community-based youth football. When introduced as a general health promotion, football associations should adjust community-based youth programs to accommodate children and adolescents with increased pre-participation injury risk.

  • 15.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Have you seen it before? Collaborative memory for adolescents with intellectual disabilities and their assistants.2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Jan
    VTI, Linköping, Sweden.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The applied value of collaborative memory research in aging – Some critical comments2013In: Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, ISSN 2211-3681, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 122-123Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The article by Blumen, Rajaram, and Henkel (2013) raises some very interesting research topics. Using the aging population as the prime example, they also provide general recommendations for future research in the area of collaborative memory; ‘it's time to become more applied’, and we appreciate such a suggestion.

    The article spans many subfields and for obvious reasons, it is not possible to consider every potential issue in this field in one single article. In addition, there are several issues that could be either extended or added. We will in this commentary focus on issues we consider important for the understanding of the current literature, and we will add some from our own research.

  • 17.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Emilsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Jan
    VTI, Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Does retrieval strategy disruption cause general and specific collaborative inhibition?2011In: Memory, ISSN 0965-8211, E-ISSN 1464-0686, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 140-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the experiment on collaborative memory was to investigate if the collaborative inhibition is due to collaborating pair's disruption of each others' retrieval strategies (the retrieval strategy disruption hypothesis, RSD). The participants' (N=36) task was to recall a list of 60 words individually and collaboratively. Retrieval strategies were manipulated by presenting word lists organised either by categories or by country of origin and adoption of retrieval strategies were examined by the adjusted ratio of clustering score. Half of the dyads received word lists organised by the same strategy and half of the dyads received word lists organised by different strategies. The results revealed a main effect of collaboration, i.e., collaborative recalled items were significantly fewer than the sum of the non-redundant individually recalled items. Both conditions (same strategies vs different strategies) suffered to the same extent from collaboration, which did not support the RSD hypothesis. However, focusing on words recalled individually but not collaboratively, dyads with different strategies, as predicted by the RSD, forgot more items during collaboration than did dyads with the same strategy. Additional results suggest that collaborative forgetting is mainly manifested by forgetting of non-overlapping items (as measured by individual recalls).

  • 18.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Overcoming the organization-practice barrier in sports injury prevention: A nonhierarchical organizational model2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 25, no 4, p. e414-e422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The organization of sports at the national level has seldom been included in scientific discussions of sports injury prevention. The aim of this study was to develop a model for organization of sports that supports prevention of overuse injuries. The quality function deployment technique was applied in seminars over a two-season period to develop a national organizational structure for athletics in Sweden that facilitates prevention of overuse injuries. Three central features of the resulting model for organization of sports at the national level are (a) diminishment of the organizational hierarchy: participatory safety policy design is introduced through annual meetings where actors from different sectors of the sporting community discuss training, injury prevention, and sports safety policy; (b) introduction of a safety surveillance system: a ubiquitous system for routine collection of injury and illness data; and (c) an open forum for discussion of safety issues: maintenance of a safety forum for participants from different sectors of the sport. A nonhierarchical model for organization of sports at the national level - facilitated by modern information technology - adapted for the prevention of overuse injuries has been developed. Further research is warranted to evaluate the new organizational model in prospective effectiveness studies.

  • 19.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    ent of Psychology and Centre for Neuroscience Studies, Queen's University, Kingston Ontario, Canada.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Individual differences in working memory capacity modulate frontal cortical activity while listening to speech in noise2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Working Memory Processing for Sign and Speech in Broca's area2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Dahl, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Effects of cognitive load on neurophysiological activity among persons with tinnitus2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Skagerstrand, Åsa
    Örebro University Hospital, Audiological Research Center.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Thunberg, Per
    Örebro University, Department of Medical Physics.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    University of Gävle, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering.
    Lundin, Margareta
    Örebro University Hospital, Audiological Research Center.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    University of Western Ontario, School of Communication Sciences and Disorders.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University Hospital, Audiological Research Center.
    Cognitive training and effects on speech-in noise performance in normal hearing and hearing impaired individuals2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive training might have potential to improve speech understanding under adverse listening conditions. Here, we have examined the effects of a 5-week computer-based cognitive training program on speech-in-noise-performance, in normal hearing (NH) participants and in participants with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss (HI).

    Two groups, matched on gender and age (45-65 years), of 20 participants each (HI and NH respectively) are recruited. Participants perform four test-sessions; inclusion (t0), five weeks (t1), ten weeks (t2) and six months (t3). Training is performed either between t0 and t1, or between t1 and t2 (using a cross-over design), using the computer-based Cogmed training program, approximately 30-40 minutes per day, five days per week, during five weeks. At each session participants are tested in three different ways: (a) cognitive testing (KIPS, SICSPAN, TRT); (b) auditory performance (pure tone-audiometry (air- and bone-conduction) and speech audiometry (HINT, Swedish SPIN-test (SNR +4dB))); (c) cortical activation (MR sessions where participants performed a speech-in-noise task using Hagerman-sentences with steady-state speech-spectrum noise (SSN) and with two competing talkers). MR imaging is performed on a Philips Achieva 1.5 Tesla scanner using a sparse imaging technique in which stimuli are presented during the silent period between successive scans. Participants listen to auditory stimuli under eight different conditions: clear speech, SSN or two competing talkers (each at 90%, 50% and 0% intelligibility), and silent rest. Pre- and post-training, hearing disability is assessed by the Speech-Spatial-Qualities-Questionnaire.

    The study is on-going and behavioral results as well as results from fMRI will be presented.

  • 23.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hass, Ursula
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Designing a decision support system for existing clinical organizational structures: Considerations from a rheumatology clinic2006In: Journal of medical systems, ISSN 0148-5598, E-ISSN 1573-689X, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 325-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify the social and organizational requirements for a decision support system (DSS) to be implemented in a clinical rheumatology setting, utilizing data-mining techniques. Field observations and focus group interviews were used for data collection. The decision-making was found to be situated, patient-focused, and long-term in nature. At the same time, the main part of peer-to-peer communication was informal. Patient records were involved in almost every decision. The conclusion is that the main challenges, when introducing a DSS at a rheumatology unit, are adapting the system to informal communication structures and integrating it with patient records. Considering incentive structures, understanding workflow and incorporating awareness are relevant issues when addressing these issues in future studies.

  • 24.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Prognostic rule generation controlling for treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Factors related to fatigue in women and men with early rheumatoid arthritis (the Swedish TIRA study)2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Hass, Ursula
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A simple method for heuristic modeling of expert knowledge in chronic disease: identification of prognostic subgroups in rheumatology2008In: eHealth Beyond the Horizon – Get IT There, IOS Press, 2008, Vol. 136, p. 157-162Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identification of prognostic subgroups is of key clinical interest at the early stages of chronic disease. The aim of this study is to examine whether representation of physicians' expert knowledge in a simple heuristic model can improve data mining methods in prognostic assessments of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Five rheumatology consultants' experiences of clinical data patterns among RA patients, as distinguished from healthy reference populations, were formally represented in a simple heuristic model. The model was used in K-mean-clustering to determine prognostic subgroups. Cross-sectional validation using physician's global assessment scores indicated that the simple heuristic model performed better than crude data made in identification of prognostic subgroups of RA patients. A simple heuristic model of experts' knowledge was found useful for semi-automatic data mining in the chronic disease setting. Further studies using categorical baseline data and prospective outcome variables are warranted and will be examined in the Swedish TIRA-program.

  • 27.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Prognostic components and predictive modelling of prognosis in early RAManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: There is a need for tools that are easy to use in clinical practice supporting decision making upon treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Aim: The aim was to identify components of prognosticators in early RA and to identify individual patients with a poor prognosis as early as possible.

    Methods: Two cohorts from the Swedish TIRA project including 320+408 patients with recent onset RA were included in the study. Disease activity was measured by C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and the 28-joint count disease activity score (DAS-28), and by the physicians’ global assessment of disease activity (PGA). Disability was assessed as activity limitation by the Swedish version of the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and impairment was reported by pain on a visual analogue scale of 0–100 mm. Serological markers were rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-CCP. RF was measured at the time for diagnosis, and anti-CCP at the time of diagnosis or at one or some of the follow-ups. If at least one anti-CCP test was positive, the patient was judged to be anti-CCP-positive. Assuming different clinical practice in the different cohorts, two different treatment strategies were assumed based on clinical practice in real-world settings. Principal Component Analysis and Multiple Linear Regression Analysis were used to identify prognosticators. Prediction rules were identified by data-driven approach, controlling for different treatment strategies.

    Results: Progression of disease and disability measures and inflammation measures the first three months after inclusion predicted a considerable part of DAS-28 at the 1-year follow-up. Serological markers had a larger explanatory power for men than for women. Anti-CCP was a significant predictor for men, but not for women. Two versions of rules, one for women and one for men, predicting good or poor prognosis at one year after inclusion were produced by using measures of disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire), DAS-28, relative change in DAS-28 during first three months, sex, and test of anti-CCP. The rules demanded high prognostic specificity but the prognostic sensitivity was moderate.

    Conclusion: A considerable part of DAS-28 at one year after inclusion could be explained by the first 3 months’ progression of disease, disability and inflammation. Anti-CCP was predictive for men but not for women, and needs further investigation. A decision tree predicting poor prognosis among individual early RA-patients showed high specificity and moderate sensitivity on a validationcohort. The medical informatics approach used, controlling for different treatment strategies, yields promising results and further studies will control for more specific differences in treatment strategies, e.g. different DMARDs initiated.

  • 28.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zetterqvist, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundh, Lars-Gunnar
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden..
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Functions of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury: Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analyses in a Large Community Sample of Adolescents2015In: Psychological Assessment, ISSN 1040-3590, E-ISSN 1939-134X, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 302-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given that nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is prevalent in adolescents, structured assessment is an essential tool to guide treatment interventions. The Functional Assessment of Self-Mutilation (FASM) is a self-report scale that assesses frequency, methods, and functions of NSSI. FASM was administered to 3,097 Swedish adolescents in a community sample. With the aim of examining the underlying factor structure of the functions of FASM in this sample, the adolescents with NSSI who completed all function items (n = 836) were randomly divided into 2 subsamples for cross-validation purposes. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was followed by a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using the mean and variance adjusted weighted least squares (WLSMV) estimator in the Mplus statistical modeling program. The results of the EFA suggested a 3-factor model (social influence, automatic functions, and nonconformist peer identification), which was supported by a good fit in the CFA. Factors differentiated between social/interpersonal and automatic/intrapersonal functions. Based on learning theory and the specific concepts of negative and positive reinforcement, the nonconformist peer identification factor was then split into 2 factors (peer identification and avoiding demands). The resulting 4-factor model showed an excellent fit. Dividing social functions into separate factors (social influence, peer identification, and avoiding demands) can be helpful in clinical practice, where the assessment of NSSI functions is an important tool with direct implications for treatment.

  • 29.
    Dalal, Koustuv
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Interactions between microfinance programmes and non-economic empowerment of women associated with intimate partner violence in Bangladesh: a cross-sectional study2013In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 12, p. 2941-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aims to examine the associations between microfinance programme membership and intimate partner violence (IPV) in different socioeconomic strata of a nationally representative sample of women in Bangladesh. Methods: The cross-sectional study was based on a nationally representative interview survey of 11 178 ever-married women of reproductive age (15-49 years). A total of 4465 women who answered the IPV-related questions were analysed separately using chi(2) tests and Cramers V as a measure of effect size to identify the differences in proportions of exposure to IPV with regard to microfinance programme membership, and demographic variables and interactions between microfinance programme membership and factors related to non-economic empowerment were considered. Results: Only 39% of women were members of microfinance programmes. The prevalence of a history of IPV was 48% for moderate physical violence, 16% for severe physical violence and 16% for sexual violence. For women with secondary or higher education, and women at the two wealthiest levels of the wealth index, microfinance programme membership increased the exposure to IPV two and three times, respectively. The least educated and poorest groups showed no change in exposure to IPV associated with microfinance programmes. The educated women who were more equal with their spouses in their family relationships by participating in decision-making increased their exposure to IPV by membership in microfinance programmes. Conclusions: Microfinance plans are associated with an increased exposure to IPV among educated and empowered women in Bangladesh. Microfinance firms should consider providing information about the associations between microfinance and IPV to the women belonging to the risk groups.

  • 30.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Jan
    VTI.
    The more you remember the more you decide: Collaborative memory in adolescents with intellectual disability and their assistants2011In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 470-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to investigate collaborative memory in adolescents withintellectual disabilities when collaborating with an assistant, and also the extent to whichdecisiveness is related to individual memory performance.Nineteen students with intellectual disabilities (mean age = 18.5, SD = 0.9) eachcollaborated with a teaching assistant (mean age 40.3, SD = 12.1) familiar from everydaywork in school. Pictures were presented individually. Recognition was performed in twoparts, first individually and thereafter collaboratively. The design involved 2 settings, onenatural (with equal encoding time) and another with equal individual memoryperformance (assistants had shorter encoding time than the students). Results showedcollaborative inhibition in this previously uninvestigated collaboration setting withadolescents with intellectual disabilities and their assistants. The assistants bothperformed higher and decided more than the students with intellectual disabilities inthe natural setting, but not in the equated performance setting. Inhibition was larger in theequated setting. The assistants’ decisiveness was moderately correlated with individualmemory performance. Implications for everyday life are discussed.

  • 31.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Emilsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Jan
    VTI.
    Opposites accord: Effects of individual performance variations on collaborative memory performance2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative memory is traditionally assessed among persons with presumed equal memory capability, which is not always true in ecological settings. We have investigated collaborative memory performances both when a difference in memory performance within the pair is provoked and when it is not. This was manipulated by different encoding times in a within participant design. 20 pairs were presented with a word list for later recall. The word list was firstly recalled individually and afterwards collaboratively for both memory difference conditions. Nominal recall (the sum of the individual nonredundant performances) and collaborative recall was calculated. An interaction between type of recall and difference in memory performance was found, where collaborative recall at same memory performance was especially impaired by net negative effects of collaboration. These results are discussed in relation to item analysis of which words were recalled.

  • 32.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Spreco, Armin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Dept. of Social and Economic Geography, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Holm, Einar
    Dept. of Social and Economic Geography, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Dynamic Multicore Processing for Pandemic Influenza Simulation.2016In: AMIA Annual Symposium Proceedings, American Medical Informatics Association , 2016, Vol. 2016, p. 534-540Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pandemic simulation is a useful tool for analyzing outbreaks and exploring the impact of variations in disease, population, and intervention models. Unfortunately, this type of simulation can be quite time-consuming especially for large models and significant outbreaks, which makes it difficult to run the simulations interactively and to use simulation for decision support during ongoing outbreaks. Improved run-time performance enables new applications of pandemic simulations, and can potentially allow decision makers to explore different scenarios and intervention effects. Parallelization of infection-probability calculations and multicore architectures can take advantage of modern processors to achieve significant run-time performance improvements. However, because of the varying computational load during each simulation run, which originates from the changing number of infectious persons during the outbreak, it is not useful to us the same multicore setup during the simulation run. The best performance can be achieved by dynamically changing the use of the available processor cores to balance the overhead of multithreading with the performance gains of parallelization.

  • 33.
    Fagher, Kristina
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Anna
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Athletics Research Center, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Athletics Research Center, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Lexell, Jan
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Paralympic athletes’ perceptions of their experiences of sports-related injuries, risk factors and preventive possibilities2016In: European Journal of Sport Science, ISSN 1746-1391, E-ISSN 1536-7290, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 1240-1249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our knowledge of sports-related injuries in para-sport is limited and there are no data on how Paralympic athletes themselves perceive an injury. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore Paralympic athletes' perceptions of their experiences of sports-related injuries, risk factors and preventive possibilities. Eighteen Swedish Paralympic athletes with vision impairment, intellectual impairment, spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, myelomeningocele, dysplasia and neuromuscular disorder, representing 10 different para-sports, were interviewed. The qualitative phenomenographic method was used to interpret the data. The analysis revealed nine categories of perceptions of experiences. The athletes perceived that their impairments were involved in the cause and consequential chains associated with a sports-related injury. Other categories that denoted and described these injuries were: sport overuse, risk behaviour, functional limitations, psychological stressors, the normalised pain, health hazards, individual possibilities to prevent sports-related injuries and unequal prerequisites. This qualitative study revealed that Paralympic athletes' perceptions of their experiences of sports-related injuries are complex and multifactorial, and in several ways differ from able-bodied athletes. This needs to be considered in the sports health and safety work within the Paralympic Movement as well as in the design of future injury surveillance systems and preventive programmes

  • 34.
    Fagher, Kristina
    et al.
    Rehabilitation Medicine Research Group, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Lexell, Jan
    Rehabilitation Medicine Research Group, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden; Department of Health Science, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    An eHealth Application of Self-Reported Sports-Related Injuries and Illnesses in Paralympic Sport: Pilot Feasibility and Usability Study2017In: JMIR Human Factors, E-ISSN 2292-9495, Vol. 4, no 4, article id e30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sport participation is associated with a risk of sports-related injuries and illnesses, and Paralympic athletes additional medical issues can be a challenge to health care providers and medical staff. However, few prospective studies have assessed sports-related injuries and illnesses in Paralympic sport (SRIIPS) over time. Advances in mobile phone technology and networking systems offer novel opportunities to develop innovative eHealth applications for collection of athletes self-reports. Using eHealth applications for collection of self-reported SRIIPS is an unexplored area, and before initiation of full-scale research of SRIIPS, the feasibility and usability of such an approach needs to be ascertained.

  • 35.
    Fagher, Kristina
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Athletics Research Center, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Lexell, Jan
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    The sports-related injuries and illnesses in paralympic sport study (SRIIPSS): a study protocol for a prospective longitudinal study2016In: BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 2052-1847, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Paralympic sport provides sporting opportunities for athletes with a disability, with the Paralympic Games as the main event. Participation in sport is, however, associated with a significant risk for sustaining injuries and illnesses. Our knowledge of sports-related injuries and illnesses in Paralympic sport is very limited and there are no large-scale epidemiological cohort studies. The purpose here is to present a protocol for a prospective longitudinal study: The Sports-Related Injuries and Illnesses in Paralympic Sport Study (SRIIPSS).

    METHODS/DESIGN:

    An argument-based method for investigation of design problems was used to structure the study protocol. The primary requirement of the protocol is to allow prospective studies over time and include exposure to both training and competition. To reflect the complexity of Paralympic sport with athletes' pre-existing impairments, use of assistive equipment, pain and other and medical issues, it is required that the data collection system is specifically adapted to Paralympic sport. To allow the collection of data, at the same time as there is limited access to coaches and medical personnel, it is advantageous that data can be collected online directly from the athletes. Based on this a self-report athlete monitoring system will be developed, where the athletes can enter data weekly via their mobile phones or lap-tops. Data will be collected from around 100 Swedish Paralympic athletes for approximately 1 year, which will allow us to i) prospectively estimate the annual incidence of sports-related injuries and illnesses and ii) explore risk factors and mechanisms for sustaining sports-related injuries and illnesses based on athlete exposure and training loads.

    DISCUSSION:

    For effective implementation of injury and illness prevention measures, comprehensive epidemiological knowledge is required. This study will be the first prospective longitudinal self-report study of sports-related injuries and illnesses in Paralympic sport over a longer period of time. The results will eventually contribute to the development of evidence-based preventive measures specifically adapted to Paralympic sport in order to provide safe and healthy sport participation. Thereby, the project will be of relevance for Paralympic athletes at all levels and to the Paralympic Movement.

  • 36.
    Frodlund, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kastbom, Alf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Associations between antinuclear antibody staining patterns and clinical features of systemic lupus erythematosus: analysis of a regional Swedish register2013In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Antinuclear antibody (ANA) analysis by immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy remains a diagnostic hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The clinical relevance of ANA fine-specificities in SLE has been addressed repeatedly, whereas studies on IF-ANA staining patterns in relation to disease manifestations are very scarce. This study was performed to elucidate whether different staining patterns associate with distinct SLE phenotypes.

    Design Observational cohort study.

    Setting One university hospital rheumatology unit in Sweden.

    Participants The study population consisted of 222 cases (89% women; 93% Caucasians), where of 178 met ≥4/11 of the 1982 American College of Rheumatology (ACR-82) criteria. The remaining 20% had an SLE diagnosis based on positive IF-ANA (HEp-2 cells) and ≥2 typical organ manifestations at the time of diagnosis (Fries’ criteria).

    Outcome measures The IF-ANA staining patterns homogenous (H-ANA), speckled (S-ANA), combined homogenous and speckled (HS-ANA), centromeric (C-ANA), nucleolar (N-ANA)±other patterns and other nuclear patterns (oANA) were related to disease manifestations and laboratory measures. Antigen-specificities were also considered regarding double-stranded DNA (Crithidia luciliae) and the following extractable nuclear antigens: Ro/SSA, La/SSB, Smith antigen (Sm), small nuclear RNP (snRNP), Scl-70 and Jo-1 (immunodiffusion and/or line-blot technique).

    Results 54% of the patients with SLE displayed H-ANA, 22% S-ANA, 11% HS-ANA, 9% N-ANA, 1% C-ANA, 2% oANA and 1% were never IF-ANA positive. Staining patterns among patients meeting Fries’ criteria alone did not differ from those fulfilling ACR-82. H-ANA was significantly associated with the 10th criterion according to ACR-82 (‘immunological disorder’). S-ANA was inversely associated with arthritis, ‘immunological disorder’ and signs of organ damage.

    Conclusions H-ANA is the dominant IF-ANA pattern among Swedish patients with SLE, and was found to associate with ‘immunological disorder’ according to ACR-82. The second most common pattern, S-ANA, associated negatively with arthritis and organ damage.

  • 37.
    Hallert, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björk, Mathilda
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Disease activity and disability in women and men with early rheumatoid arthritis: An 8-year follow-up of the Swedish TIRA project2012In: Arthritis Care and Research, ISSN 0893-7524, E-ISSN 1529-0123, Vol. 64, no 8, p. 1101-1107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To compare women and men regarding course of disease activity and disability over 8 years from diagnosis of recent onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PATIENTS AND METHODS: 149 patients were followed for 8 years from RA diagnosis (1996-98) regarding 28-joint count disease activity score (DAS28), pain (visual analogue scale, VAS), grip force, Grip Ability Test (GAT), Signals of Functional Impairment (SOFI hand, upper/lower extremity), walking speed, activity limitation (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ) and prescribed disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). RESULTS: Disease activity pattern over time was similar in women and men, showing improvement during the first year and thereafter a stable situation during 6 years. However, at the 7- and 8-year follow-ups deterioration was seen with a less favourable course in women. HAQ did not differ between sexes at diagnosis, but at all follow-ups women had significantly higher scores than men. Women also had lower grip force and lower walking speed, but higher upper extremity mobility. DMARD prescription was similar for both sexes. Over eight years, disease duration, sex, biologics, grip force, SOFI-hand and pain intensity together explained 43% of the variation in DAS, while grip force, SOFI-lower, GAT and pain intensity could together explain 55% of variations in HAQ. CONCLUSIONS: Disease activity was fairly well managed, but disability gradually deteriorated. Despite similar medication, women had more disability than men. The discrepancy between disease activity and disability indicates unmet needs for multi-professional interventions to prevent progressing disability and patients at risk for disability need to be identified early in the process. © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  • 38.
    Hallert, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Department of Rehabilitation, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Disability in women and men with early rheumatoid arthritis during 8 years after diagnosis 8the Swedish TIRA-study2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Ighe, Anna
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Application of the 2012 systemic lupus international collaborating clinics classification criteria to patients on a Regional Swedish systemic lupus erythematosus register2015In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 17, article id 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    In 2012, the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) network presented a new set of criteria (SLICC-12) to classify systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The present study is the first to evaluate the performance of SLICC-12 in an adult European study population. Thus, SLICC-12 criteria were applied to confirmed SLE cases in our regional SLE register as well as to individuals with a fair suspicion of systemic autoimmune disease who were referred to rheumatology specialists at our unit.     

    Methods

    We included 243 confirmed SLE patients who met the 1982 American College of Rheumatology (ACR-82) classification criteria and/or the Fries ‘diagnostic principle’ (presence  of antinuclear antibodies on at least one occasion plus involvement of at least two defined organ systems) and 55 controls with possible systemic autoimmune disease, including the presence of any SLE-related autoantibody.     

    Results

    SLICC-12 showed a diagnostic sensitivity of 94% (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.90 to 0.96) compared with 90% (95% CI, 0.85 to 0.93) for the updated set of ACR criteria from 1997 (ACR-97), whereas ACR-82 failed to identify every fifth true SLE case. However, the disease specificity of SLICC-12 reached only 74% (95% CI, 0.60 to 0.84) and did not change much when involvement of at least two different organs was required as an indicator of systemic disease. In addition, SLICC-12 misclassified more of the controls compared to ACR-82, ACR-97 and Fries.     

    Conclusions

    Establishing a standard definition of SLE continues to challenge lupus researchers and clinicians. We confirm that SLICC-12 has advantages with regard to diagnostic sensitivity, whereas we found the diagnostic specificity to be surprisingly low. To accomplish increased sensitivity and specificity figures, a combination of criteria sets for clinical SLE studies should be considered.

  • 40.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bergin, D.
    Swedish Athlet Assoc, Sweden.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Nyce, J. M.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish Athlet Assoc, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Injuries in youth track and field are perceived to have multiple-level causes that call for ecological (holistic-developmental) interventions: A national sporting community perceptions and experiences2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 348-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engaging in competitive sports as a youth can have many health benefits, but recent studies also report a high risk for injury. The long-term purpose of this Swedish research program is to develop a framework for safe track and field training for young athletes (aged 12-15years). The aim of this study was to establish what is perceived to contribute and cause injuries in youth track and field by compiling the best available experiential knowledge about the underlying factors and use this knowledge to identify appropriate areas to handle these in practical ways. Nine focus group interviews with in total 74 participants and confirming interviews with five individuals were performed in seven Swedish regions. Qualitative research methods were used for data analysis. Injuries in youth athletes were not considered to be strictly the result of individual factors but rather the result of the interactions between factors at different levels. Three major factors emerged as follows: Insufficient knowledge for athletic development in daily practice; shortsighted communities of practice and sports policies not adjusted to youth; and societal health behaviors. The experiential knowledge in the national sporting community suggests that if effective and sustainable injury prevention processes are to be implemented for youth track and field, an ecological (holistic-developmental) approach to injury prevention is needed. Such an approach allows a longitudinal development-focused strategy for prevention that spans an athletes entire career.

  • 41.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kowalski, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Sverker
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Renström, Per
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Injury patterns in Swedish elite athletics – part 1: annual incidence and injury types2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To estimate the incidence, type and severity of musculoskeletal injuries in youth and adult elite athletics athletes and to explore risk factors for sustaining injuries. Design Prospective cohort study conducted during a 52-week period. Setting Male and female youth and adult athletics athletes ranked in the top 10 in Sweden (n=292). Results 199 (68%) athletes reported an injury during the study season. Ninety-six per cent of the reported injuries were non-traumatic (associated with overuse). Most injuries (51%) were severe, causing a period of absence from normal training exceeding 3 weeks. Log-rank tests revealed risk differences with regard to athlete category (p=0.046), recent previous injury (>3 weeks time-loss; p=0.039) and training load rank index (TLRI; p=0.019). Cox proportional hazards regression analyses showed that athletes in the third (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.54 to 2.78) and fourth TLRI quartiles (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.16 to 2.74) had almost a twofold increased risk of injury compared with their peers in the first quartile and interaction effects between athlete category and previous injury; youth male athletes with a previous serious injury had more than a fourfold increased risk of injury (HR=4.39; 95% CI 2.20 to 8.77) compared with youth females with no previous injury. Conclusions The injury incidence among both youth and adult elite athletics athletes is high. A training load index combing hours and intensity and a history of severe injury the previous year were predictors for injury. Further studies on measures to quantify training content and protocols for safe return to athletics are warranted.

  • 42.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kowalski, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Sverker
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Renström, Per
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Injury patterns in Swedish elite athletics – part 2: risk indicators2012Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine the risk indicators associated with sustaining musculoskeletal injuries in youth and adult elite athletics athletes competing at national and international levels.

    Design: Prospective cohort study conducted during a 52-week period starting in March 2009. A web-based athlete electronic diary was administrated every week by email to athletes for self-reporting of data on training, competition and injuries.

    Setting: Male and female youth and adult athletics athletes ranked in the top 10 in Sweden (n=292).

    Results: One-hundred ninety-nine (68%) athletes reported an injury during the study season. The median time to first injury was 101 days (95% confidence interval (CI) 75–127). Univariate log-rank tests revealed risk differences with regard to athlete category (P=0.046), serious injury (>3 weeks time loss) during the previous season (P=0.039) and training load rank index (TLRI) (P=0.019). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analyses showed that athletes in the third (hazard ratio (HR) 1.79; 95% CI 1.54–2.78) and fourth TLRI quartile (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.16–2.74) had almost a twofold increased risk of injury compared with their peers in the first quartile and interaction effects between athlete category and previous injury; youth male athletes with a previous serious injury had more than a fourfold increased risk of injury (HR=4.39; 95% CI 2.20–8.77) compared with youth females with no previous injury.

    Conclusions: A training load index combing hours and intensity and a history of severe injury the previous year are predictors for injury risk among elite athletic athletes. Future studies on measures to quantify training content and protocols for safe return to athletics are warranted.

  • 43.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Effect of selenium and Q10 on the cardiac biomarker NT-proBNP2013In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 281-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To investigate whether the effect of 48-month usage of coenzyme Q10 and selenium on cardiac function was different for participants with different levels of cardiac wall tension as measured by plasma levels of N-terminal natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) at baseline. Methods. A 48-month randomized double-blind controlled trial in a cohort of community-dwelling elderly (mean age 78 years) was carried out. A total of 443 participants were given coenzyme Q10 combined with selenium, or a placebo. NT-proBNP measured at baseline and 48 months was used to evaluate the cardiac wall tension. Results. After 48 months, supplementation of coenzyme Q10 and selenium had varying impacts depending on the severity of impairment of cardiac function. Analyses of the responses in the different quintiles of baseline NT-proBNP showed that those with active supplementation, and a plasma level of NT-proBNP in the second to fourth quintiles demonstrated significantly reduced NT-proBNP levels (p = 0.022) as well as cardiovascular mortality after 48 months (p = 0.006). Conclusion. Long-term supplementation of coenzyme Q10/selenium reduces NT-proBNP levels and cardiovascular mortality in those with baseline NT-proBNP in the second to fourth quintiles indicating those who gain from supplementation are patients with mild to moderate impaired cardiac function.

  • 44.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Improved health-related quality of life, and more days out of hospital with supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 combined. Results from a double blind, placebo-controlled prospective study2015In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 19, no 9, p. 870-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on health-care usage and health-related quality of life (Hr-QoL) in community-dwelling elderly people has, to our knowledge, not previously been investigated. To investigate the effect of 48 months supplementation with CoQ10 and selenium on community-dwelling elderly as regards: (I) the number of days out of hospital, and (II) the effect on Hr-QoL. A 48-month double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial was carried out. A total of 443 participants were given CoQ10 and organic selenium yeast combined, or a placebo. All admissions to the Department of Internal Medicine or Cardiology were evaluated. Hr-QoL were measured with the Short Form-36 (SF-36), the Cardiac Health Profile (CHP) and one item overall-quality of life (overall-QoL). A total of 206 participants were evaluated after 48 months. No changes were found in the number of days out of hospital or Hr-QoL. A sub-analysis of participants matched for age, gender and baseline cardiac wall tension as measured by NT-proBNP was performed. The mean number of days out of hospital was 1779 for those taking the active substance compared to 1533 for those taking the placebo (p=0.03). Those with active substance declined significantly less in the HR-QoL domains of physical role performance (p=0.001), vitality (p=0.001), physical component score (p=0.001), overall QoL (p=0.001), somatic dimension (p=0.001), conative dimension (p=0.001) and global function (p=0.001). In a match-group analysis selenium and CoQ10 increased the number of days out of hospital and slowed the deterioration in Hr-QoL.

  • 45.
    Kalnina, Liga
    et al.
    State Sports Medical Centre, Latvia; Latvian University, Latvia.
    Sauka, Melita
    State Sports Medical Centre, Latvia.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Selga, Guntars
    State Sports Medical Centre, Latvia; Riga Stradins University, Latvia.
    Ligere, Renate
    Latvian University, Latvia.
    Karklina, Helena
    Latvian University, Latvia.
    Priedite, Ilga S.
    State Sports Medical Centre, Latvia.
    Larins, Viesturs
    Latvian Academic Sports Educ, Latvia.
    Body fat in children and adolescents participating in organized sports: Descriptive epidemiological study of 6048 Latvian athletes2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 615-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pressure among young athletes to meet body composition goals may lead to poor nutrition and affect growth. Aims: To examine the proportion of body fat (%BF), measured by bioimpedance analysis, among Latvian children and adolescents participating in organized sports. Methods: Our study had a nationally representative sample of 6048 young athletes, aged 10-17 years. Their %BF was measured using a multifrequency, 8-pole, bioelectrical impedance leg-to-hand analyzer. Results: About 19.2% (CI 14.4-20.0) of boys and 15.1% (CI 14.0-16.3) of girls had a %BF value below the recommended levels. The %BF in young female athletes participating in aesthetic sports was lower than among their peers participating in other sports. Young male athletes participating in aesthetic sports had lower %BF levels at 10 and 12 years of age, compared with participants in weight-class sports; and lower levels of %BF from age 10-14 years, compared with participants in non-weight-sensitive sports. Conclusions: Almost every fifth child and adolescent participating in organized sports displayed critically low body fat levels. Body fat needs to be assessed regularly in young athletes, to prevent negative consequences on health.

  • 46.
    Keselman, Olga
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Lamb, M.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Mediated communication with minors in asylum-seeking hearings2008In: The Journal of Refugee Studies, ISSN 0951-6328, E-ISSN 1471-6925, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 103-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated caseworkers' information-seeking prompts in interviews with asylum-seeking minors and assesses the accuracy of the translations provided by interpreters. Twenty six Russian-speaking minors were individually interviewed by one of 10 caseworkers assisted by one of 17 interpreters. A quantitative analysis examined the type of questions asked and the accuracy of the corresponding renditions. The actual and translated content of the messages were examined using a qualitative analysis. The study showed that interviewers relied heavily on focused questions, which are more likely to elicit inaccurate information. When open questions were asked, the interviewers tended to ask narrow 'directive' questions rather than broader 'invitations'. The interpreters' renditions of utterances were often inaccurate. Almost half of the misrepresentations altered the content and one third involved changes in the type of question asked. This indicates that both interviewers and translators clearly need special training to ensure that they serve asylum-seeking minors adequately. © The Author [2008]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  • 47.
    Keselman, Olga
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lamb, Michael E.
    Department of Social and Developmental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3 RQ, UK.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Asylum seeking minors in interpreter-mediated interviews: what do theysay and what happens to their responses?2010In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 325-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored how asylum-seeking minors report information when formally interviewed. Twenty-six Russian-speaking minors (M= 16.0 years of age) were individually interviewed by officials assisted by one of eighteen interpreters. A quantitative analysis examined the translated questions asked by the officials, the minors’ responses to them, and the accuracy with which the minors’ responses were rendered. The asylum-seeking minors distinguished themselves as active participants. They appeared eager to disclose relevant information despite being asked many potentially contaminating questions. Most of the children’s responses were accurately rendered but mistranslations can affect the fact–finding process substantially. Both the minors and the officials involved in the asylum-seeking process need to recognise that both the questions asked and the responses given may be influenced by the third parties involved, i.e. the interpreters.

  • 48.
    Lundgren, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kärner Köhler, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy for patients with heart failure and depressive symptoms: A proof of concept study2015In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 98, no 8, p. 935-942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was (1) to describe the development of a guided internet-based CBT (ICBT) program adapted to patients with heart failure (HF) and (2) to evaluate the feasibility of the ICBT program in regard to depressive symptoms, the time used by health care providers to give feedback, and participants perceptions of the ICBT program. Method: A multi-professional team developed the program and seven HF patients with depressive symptoms were recruited to the study. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating-Self-rating scale (MADRS-S) were used to measure depression, and patients were interviewed about their perceptions of the program. Results: Based on research in HF and CBT, a nine-week program was developed. The median depression score decreased from baseline to the end of the study (PHQ-9: 11-8.5; MADRS-S: 25.5-16.5) and none of the depression scores worsened. Feedback from health care providers required approximately 3 h per patient. Facilitating perceptions.(e.g. freedom of time) and demanding perceptions (e.g. part of the program demanded a lot of work) were described by the patients. Conclusion: The program appears feasible and time-efficient. However, the program needs to be evaluated in a larger randomized study.

  • 49.
    Lundgren, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kärner Köhler, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The effect of guided web-based cognitive behavioral therapy on patients with depressive symptoms and heart failure-: A randomized controlled trial.2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aims of this study were to: (I) evaluate the effect of a nine-week guided Internet-based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (ICBT) program on depressive symptoms (DS) in patients with HF; (II) to assess factors associated with the change in DS; and (III) to investigate the effect of the ICBT program on cardiac anxiety and QoL.

    Methods: Fifty participants were included and randomized into two treatment arms: ICBT or an online moderated discussion forum (DF). Data were collected at baseline and at the nine-week follow-up; the Patient Health Questionnaire- nine, (DS); the Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire, (cardiac-related anxiety); the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure questionnaire, (QoL). Intention to treat analysis was used. Between group differences were determined by analysis of covariance.

    Results: In the ICBT-group (n=25), DS improved significantly (P=.02). Also cardiac anxiety in the subscale of fear decreased significantly (P=.04) between baseline and the follow up in the ICBT-group. QoL improved in the ICBT-group by 6 points in the total score and 2.4 points in the physical factor, but this was not significant (P=.09 and P=.12). In the DF-group (n=25) no significant change in the level of DS was found (P=.36). There were no significant differences in the change in DS between the DF- and the ICBT-group (P=.21), nor in cardiac related anxiety (P=.22) or in QoL (total score P=.09, physical factor P=.07). In the ICBT-group, the number of logins to the web-portal correlated significantly with improvement in DS (P=.02), whereas higher age (P=.01) and male sex (P=.048) were associated with less change in DS.

    Conclusions: Guided ICBT adapted for persons with HF and DS can potentially reduce DS, cardiac anxiety and increase QoL, but is not statistically superior to participation in an online DF.

  • 50.
    Lundgren, Johan Gustav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kärner Köhler, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    The Effect of Guided Web-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Patients With Depressive Symptoms and Heart Failure: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.2016In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 18, no 8, p. 1-13, article id e194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Depressive symptoms, and the associated coexistence of symptoms of anxiety and decreased quality of life (QoL), are common in patients with heart failure (HF). However, treatment strategies for depressive symptoms in patients with HF still remain to be established. Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT), as guided self-help CBT programs, has shown good effects in the treatment of depression. Until now, ICBT has not been evaluated in patients with HF with depressive symptoms.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate the effect of a 9-week guided ICBT program on depressive symptoms in patients with HF; (2) investigate the effect of the ICBT program on cardiac anxiety and QoL; and (3) assess factors associated with the change in depressive symptoms.

    METHODS: Fifty participants were randomized into 2 treatment arms: ICBT or a Web-based moderated discussion forum (DF). The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 was used to measure depressive symptoms, the Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire (CAQ) was used to measure cardiac-related anxiety, and the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure questionnaire was used to measure QoL. Data were collected at baseline and at follow-up at the end of the 9-week intervention. Intention-to-treat analysis was used, and missing data were imputed by the Expectation-Maximization method. Between-group differences were determined by analysis of covariance with control for baseline score and regression to the mean.

    RESULTS: No significant difference in depressive symptoms between the ICBT and the DF group at the follow-up was found, [F(1,47)=1.63, P=.21] and Cohen´s d=0.26. Secondary within-group analysis of depressive symptoms showed that such symptoms decreased significantly in the ICBT group from baseline to the follow-up (baseline M=10.8, standard deviation [SD]=5.7 vs follow-up M=8.6, SD=4.6, t(24)=2.6, P=.02, Cohen´s d=0.43), whereas in the DF group, there was no significant change (baseline M=10.6, SD=5.0, vs follow-up M=9.8, SD=4.3, t(24)=0.93, P=.36. Cohen´s d=0.18). With regard to CAQ and QoL no significant differences were found between the groups (CAQ [d(1,47)=0.5, P=.48] and QoL [F(1,47)=2.87, P=.09]). In the ICBT group in the CAQ subscale of fear, a significant within-group decrease was shown (baseline M=1.55 vs follow-up M=1.35, P=.04). In the ICBT group, the number of logins to the Web portal correlated significantly with improvement in depressive symptoms (P=.02), whereas higher age (P=.01) and male sex (P=.048) were associated with less change in depressive symptoms. This study is underpowered because of difficulties in the recruitment of patients.

    CONCLUSIONS: Guided ICBT adapted for persons with HF and depressive symptoms was not statistically superior to participation in a Web-based DF. However, within the ICBT group, a statically significant improvement of depressive symptoms was detected.

    CLINICALTRIAL: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01681771; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01681771 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6ikzbcuLN).

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